liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
3456789 251 - 300 of 425
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 251.
    Singh, Ravindra P.
    et al.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Choi, Jeong -Woo
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University,1 Sinsoo-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742, South Korea.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pandey, Avinash Chand
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Utility and Potential Application of Nanomaterials in Medicine2012In: Biomedical Materials and Diagnostic Devices / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Murugan Ramalingam, Hisashi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 215-260Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The functional materials with the most promising outlook have the ability to precisely adjust the biological phenomenon in a controlled mode. Engineering of advanced bio- materials has found striking applications in used for biomedical and diagnostic device applications, such as cell separation, stem-cell, drug delivery, hyperthermia, automated DNA extraction, gene targeting, resonance imaging, biosensors, tissue engineering and organ regeneration.

  • 252.
    Singh, Ravindra P.
    et al.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Choi, Jeong-Woo
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University,1 Sinsoo-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742, South Korea.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pandey, Avinash C.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Biomimetic Materials toward Application of Nanobiodevices2012In: Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Ajay Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 741-782Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

  • 253.
    Singh, Ravindra P.
    et al.
    University of Allahabad, India.
    Kumar, Kaushal
    University of Allahabad, India.
    Rai, Radheyshyam
    Aveiro University, Portugal.
    Choi, Jeong-Woo
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University,1 Sinsoo-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742, South Korea.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pandey, Avinash C.
    University of Allahabad, India.
    Synthesis, Characterization of Metal-Oxide Nanomaterials for Biosensors2012In: Synthesis, characterization and application of smart materials / [ed] Radheshyam Rai, USA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 225-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart materials, one of the more focused points in materials research, deal primarily with the chemistry, physics and applications of materials in the real world because it induces conformational changes in complex structures and properties which are useful for the control of them. The thrust area of these types of materials are the combination of functional properties like thermal, electric, magnetic, superconducting and optical, which have led to the development of a wide range of new technological devices. These types of materials have been found to be very useful and interesting for various solid state devices. This book examines research developments of smart materials, including processing, properties and applications, which include device materials and environmentally friendly materials.

  • 254.
    Singh, Ravindra Pratap
    et al.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad- 211 002, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Choi, Joeng-Woo
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University,1 Sinsoo-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742, South Korea.
    Pandey, Avinash Chandra
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad- 211 002, India.
    Smart Nanomaterials for Biosensors, Biochips and Molecular Bioelectronics2012In: Smart Nanomaterials for Sensor Application / [ed] Songjun Li; Yi Ge; He Li, USA: Bentham eBooks, 2012, 1, p. 3-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The domain of biology has greatly been benefited by advances in other sciences leading to new levels of sensitivity, precision and resolution in biomolecular detection. The key driving force is the complementary length scale between biological structures that range from the 10's of nanometers (proteins, DNA, viruses) to the micron scale (cells and cellular assemblies) and capabilities of nanosystems to manipulate and control such feature sizes within our environment. Progress and development in biosensor development will inevitably focus upon the technology of the nanomaterials that promise to solve the biocompatibility and biofouling problems. The biosensors are integrated with new technologies in molecular biology, micro-fluidics, and smart nanomaterials, have applications in agricultural production, food processing, and environmental monitoring for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line and/or real-time detection of pesticides, antibiotics, pathogens, toxins, proteins, microbes, plants, animals, foods, soil, air, and water. Thus, biosensors are excellent analytical tools for pollution monitoring, by which implementation of legislative provisions to safeguard our biosphere could be made effectively plausible. The current trends and challenges with smart nanomaterials for various applications have been the focuse in this chapter that pertains to biosensor development, bionanoelectronics, nanotechnology, biotechnology and miniaturization. All these growing areas will have a remarkable influence on the development of new ultra biosensing devices to resolve the severe pollution problems in the future that not only challenge the human health but also affect adversely other various comforts to living entities.

  • 255.
    Sodzel, Dzmitry
    et al.
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Belarus .
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P F
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Viter, Roman
    National Science Center FOTONIKA-LV, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia; Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, Odessa, Ukraine .
    Eriksson, Martin O
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holtz, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janot, Jean-Marc
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Bechelany, Mikhael
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Belma, Sebastien
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Smyntyna, Valentyn
    Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, Odessa, Ukraine .
    Kolesneva, Ekaterina
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus .
    Dubovskaya, Lyudmila
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.
    Volotovski, Igor
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.
    Ubelis, Arnolds
    National Science Center FOTONIKA-LV, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia .
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Control of hydrogen peroxide and glucose via UV and Visible Photoluminescence of ZnO nanoparticles.2015In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 182, no 9-10, p. 1819-1826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an indirect optical method for the determination of glucose via the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that is generated during the glucose oxidase (GOx) catalyzed oxidation of glucose. It is based on the finding that the ultraviolet (~374 nm) and visible (~525 nm) photoluminescence of pristine zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles strongly depends on the concentration of H2O2 in water solution. Photoluminescence is quenched by up to 90 % at a 100 mM level of H2O2. The sensor constructed by immobilizing GOx on ZnO nanoparticles enabled glucose to be continuously monitored in the 10 mM to 130 mM concentration range, and the limit of detection is 10 mM. This enzymatic sensing scheme is supposed to be applicable to monitoring glucose in the food, beverage and fermentation industries. It has a wide scope in that it may be extended to numerous other substrate or enzyme activity assays based on the formation of H2O2, and of assays based on the consumption of H2O2 by peroxidases.

  • 256.
    Svennersten, Karl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institut.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A polymer microactuator chip for studying mechanotransduction in urothelial cells2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Svennersten, Karl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallén Grufman, Katarina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Micromechanical stimulation chips for studying mechanotransduction in micturition2015In: 2015 Transducers - 2015 18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, p. 1672-1675Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a micromechanical stimulation chipthat can apply physiologically relevant mechanical stimulito single cells to study mechanosensitive cells in the urinarytract. The chips comprise arrays of microactuators based onthe electroactive polymer polypyrrole (PPy). PPy offersunique possibilities and is a good candidate to provide suchphysiological mechanical stimulation, since it is driven atlow voltages, is biocompatible, and can be microfabricated.The PPy microactuators can provide mechanical stimulationat different strains and/or strain rates to single cells orclusters of cells, including controls, all integrated on onesingle chip, without the need to pre-prepare the cells. Thechips allow for in situ stimulation during live imagingstudies. The use of these devices will increase experimentalquality and reduce the number of biological samples. Theseunique tools fill an important gap in presently availabletools, since the chips provide array-based stimulationpatterns and are easily integrated in existing cell biologyequipment. These chips will generate a leap forward in ourunderstanding of the mechanisms involved inmechanotransduction in cells that may lead to breakthroughs,for instance in therapies for urinary incontinence.

  • 258.
    Svenningstorp, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Salomonsson, Per
    AB Volvo Technological Development, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of catalytic reactivity on the response of metal-oxide-silicon carbide sensor to exhaust gases1999In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 57, no 1-3, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic metal insulator silicon carbide, MISiC, Schottky diodes are promising devices for on board exhaust diagnosis in cars. These sensors show a direct or indirect sensitivity to gases like H-2, CO, HC (hydrocarbons) and O-2. The catalytic reactivity of the sensor will effect the gas sensing conditions. In some situations knowledge about the reactivity of the catalytic surface may give more information about the exhaust gas composition. For instance, the sensor signal normally moves to a lower voltage in an ambient containing H-2 and HC, however, under certain conditions when exposed to rich gas mixtures, the HC response is opposite the one for H-2. Measurements performed by the MISiC sensors on simulated exhaust gas mixtures, either rich or lean, are shown here. Some fundamental studies of the HC response have been performed. Reaction limitation conditions are suggested as an explanation for the response of HC opposite the one of H-2.

  • 259.
    Taccola, S
    et al.
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy .
    Greco, F
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy .
    Mazzolai, B
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy .
    Mattoli, V
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy .
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thin film free-standing PEDOT:PSS/SU8 bilayer microactuators2013In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 117004-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several smart active materials have been proposed and tested for the development of microactuators. Among these, conjugated polymers are of great interest because miniaturization improves their electrochemical properties, such as increasing the speed and stress output of microactuators, with respect to large-scale actuators. Recently we developed a novel fabrication process to obtain robust free-standing conductive ultra-thin films made of the conjugated polymer poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with the polyanion poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). These conductive free-standing nanofilms, with thicknesses ranging between a few tens to several hundreds of nm, allow the realisation of new all polymer microactuators using facile microfabrication methods. Here, we report a novel processing method for manufacturing all polymer electrochemical microactuators. We fabricated and patterned free-standing PEDOT: PSS/SU8 bilayer microactuators in the form of microfingers of a variety of lengths using adapted microfabrication procedures. By imposing electrochemical oxidation/reduction cycles on the PEDOT: PSS we were able to demonstrate reversible actuation of the microactuators resulting in bending of the microfingers. A number of possible applications can be envisaged for these small, soft actuators, such as microrobotics and cell manipulation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 260.
    Taccola, Silvia
    et al.
    Center For MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Istituto Italiano Di Tecnologia, Pontedera, Italy;.
    Greco, Francesco
    Center For MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Istituto Italiano Di Tecnologia, Pontedera, Italy;.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mattoli, Virgilio
    Center For MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Istituto Italiano Di Tecnologia, Pontedera, Italy;.
    Electrochemical actuation of free‑standing PEDOT: PSS/SU8 bilayer microactuators2012In: EuroEAP 2012 online proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymers are of great interest for micro‑actuators because, compared to large‑scale actuators, miniaturization improves their electrochemical properties by increasing speed, stress output etc. Recently, a novel fabrication process for obtaining robust large area free‑standing ultra-thin films made of the conjugated polymer poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with the polyanion poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been demonstrated. These nanofilms show a thickness ranging between few tenths to several hundredths of nm. This opens up the possibility of using such free‑standing PEDOT:PSS nanofilms to realize new all polymer electrochemical micro‑actuators using facile microfabrication methods. . Here, we report the processing methods and a validation of the micro-actuators’ working principle. Free standing PEDOT:PSS/SU8 bilayer micro‑actuators in the form of micro-fingers have been fabricated and patterned using a combination of standard microfabrication procedures. Reversible actuation of the PEDOT:PSS microactuators caused by electrochemical oxidation/reduction cycles was demonstrated and resulted in bending of the micro-fingers. Small, soft actuators may be useful for a number of applications, including microrobotics, microsurgery, and cell handling

  • 261.
    Tang-Turner, Alice Xiao-Jing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors : Special Issue of Biosensors and Bioelectronics2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Thakur, Shweta
    et al.
    Shoolini University, India.
    Rai, Radheshyam
    Shoolini University, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of Gd and Dy doped (Bi0.95RE0.05)(Fe0.95Mn0.05)O-3 ceramics synthesized by SSR method2014In: Solid State Communications, ISSN 0038-1098, E-ISSN 1879-2766, Vol. 197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multiferruic (Bi0.95RE0.05)(Fe0.95Mn0.05)O-3 (where RE is Gd (BGFM) and Dy (BDFM)) has been synthesized by using the solid state reaction (SSR) technique. Effects of Gd and Dy substitutions on the structure, electrical and ferroelectric properties of (Bi0.95RE0.05)(Fe0.95Mn0.05)O-3 samples have been studied by performing X-ray diffraction, dielectric measurements and magnetic measurements. The crystal structure of the ceramic samples shows a monoclinic phase. Studies of dielectric properties (dielectric constant (epsilon) and tangent loss (tan delta)) both as a function of frequency (10 and 100 kHz) and temperatures (20-300 degrees C) exhibit dielectric anomaly in the range of (225-245 degrees C) suggesting a possible ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition in the compounds. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurement shows a significant change in the magnetic properties of Gd and Dy doped (Bi0.95RE0.05)(Fe0.95Mn0.05)O-3. It is seen that the coercive field (H-C) and remanent magnetization (M-R) increase for Gd.

  • 263.
    Tiwari, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Kobayashi, H.
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Turner, APF
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Sequence-specific molecularly-imprinted polymeric electrode for point mutation analysis2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 264.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Advanced Healthcare Materials2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications.Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nano/micro-devices for diagnosis, therapy (theranostics).The leading contributor researchers cover the following topics: 

    • State-of-the-art of biomaterials for human health
    • Micro- and nanoparticles and their application in biosensors
    • The role of immunoassays
    • Stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles
    • Diagnosis and treatment of cancer
    • Advanced materials for biomedical application and drug delivery
    • Nanoparticles for diagnosis and/or treatment of Alzheimers disease
    • Hierarchical modelling of elastic behavior of human dental tissue
    • Biodegradable porous hydrogels
    • Hydrogels in tissue engineering, drug delivery and wound care
    • Modified natural zeolites
    • Supramolecular hydrogels based on cyclodextrin poly(pseudo)rotaxane
    • Polyhydroxyalkanoate-based biomaterials
    • Biomimetic molecularly imprinted polymers

    The book is written for readers from diverse backgrounds across chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering, medical science, pharmacy, biotechnology, and biomedical engineering. It offers a comprehensive view of cutting-edge research on advanced materials for healthcare technology and applications.

  • 265.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    DEVELOPMENT OF AMPEROMETRIC GLUCOSE BIOSENSOR BASED ON NANOWIRE-NANORIBBON JUNCTION ARRAYS OF ZNO2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    DEVELOPMENT OF ENZYMATIC BIOSENSOR BASED ON 2D TUNGSTEN DISULFIDE (WS2)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL ION DOPING ON MORPHOLOGY AND PROPERTIES OF POLYANILINE2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 268.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Frontiers in bio-nanocomposites2011In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 2, no 6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 269.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Intelligent nanomaterials for prospective nanotechnology2012In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanomaterials play very prominent role in physical, chemical and biomedical engineering applications due their high surface energies. Also the electronic configuration of atoms within the materials is very important since this principally detrmines the type of bonding and thus electrical, optical, luminescent, mechanical and magnetic properties. At nanoscale dimensions, materials exhibit entirely different properties as compared to thieir bulk counterpart. Noble metallic nanoparticles/nanostructures exhibit interesting feature of localised surface plasmon resonant; absorption can be tuned from ultraviolet region to infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum and this field has been developed to deliver potential applications in photonics, optoelectronics, optical-data storage, solar cells, filters, sensors not to mention the considerable scope in medical engineering,

  • 270.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Intelligent nanosystems for biomedical devices2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    INTERFACE ENGINEERING ON SWITCHABLE 2D NANOSHEETS FOR SMART AMPEROMETRIC BIOSENSING2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Molecular imprinted polymers offer new prospective in bioanalytics2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Molecular imprinted polymers offer new prospective in bioanalytics2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Molecularly imprinted polymer for DNA sensor technology2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Molecularly imprinted polymer for DNA sensor technology2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 276.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) GENERATION CAPACITY OF TIO2 NANOCRYSTALS2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 277.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Smart Chitosan Matrices for Application to Cholesterol Biosensors2012In: Biotechnology in Biopolymers: Developments, Applications & Challenging Areas / [ed] Atul Tiwari & Ravi B Srivastava, United Kingdom: Smithers Rapra , 2012, p. 193-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This comprehensive book provides up-to-date information on the developments in the field of biopolymers. Close attention has been paid to include all the important aspects that are necessary to understand the field. The book introduces the reader with the progress in the field, followed by outlining its applications in different areas. Different methods and techniques of synthesis and characterization are detailed as individual chapters. Various mode and mechanism of degradation of materials will be discussed. There is a dedicated chapter on industrially available biopolymers and their applications and well as a chapter detailing the ongoing research, current trends and future challenges.

  • 278.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    SMART THERAGNOSIS:MULTI DRUG RESISTANCE CANCER PERSPECTIVE2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    SPION-BASED THERANOSIS OF ARTERIAL THROMBOSIS2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    SPION-BASED THERANOSIS OF ARTERIAL THROMBOSIS2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    State-of-the-art of stimuli-responsive materials2013In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 507-507Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 282.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Stimuli responsive three dimensional conducting electrospun fibrous scaffolds for regenerative medicine2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Supervision of doctoral student by public-private sectors patnership: A special focus on healthcare nanotechnology2013In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 106-107Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The supervision of conducting a doctorate degree in interdisciplinary science and technology such as healthcare nanotechnology, a strategic supervisory role is essential. Supervision of such doctor of philosophy (PhD)students immerses in an internationally leading education, research environment and provide a wide range of scientific and complementary training, executed both inter and intra university-private sectors joint supervisions. The focus of this editorial is to bring the criteria to produce trained, highly competent, enthusiastic and creative PhDs by the public and private sectors partnership. The interdisciplinary PhD supervision approach would make significant contributions to designed, constructed and commercialized new technology including personalized healthcare and medical nanodevices.

  • 284.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    TEMPERATURE-GATED SWITCHABLE BIOELECTROCATALYTIC INTERFACE2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    TEMPLATE-DIRECTED HIERARCHICAL SELF- ASSEMBLY OF GRAPHENE BASED HYBRID STRUCTURE FOR ELECTROCHEMICAL BIOSENSING2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 286.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Demir, Mustafa M.Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey.
    Advanced Sensor and Detection Materials2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of sensors at macroscopic or nanometric scales in solid, liquid, or gas phases, contact or noncontact configurations, has driven the research of sensor & detection materials and technology into high gear. The emphasis on detection techniques requires the use of spin crossover organic, inorganic and composite materials and methods that could be unique for sensors fabrication.  The influence of length, composition and conformation structure of materials on their properties and the possibilities to adjust sensing properties by doping or adding the side-groups are the starting point of multifarious sensing. The role of inter-molecular interactions, polymer and ordered phases formation, as well as the behavior under pressure, magnetic and electric fields are also important facts for processing of ultra-sensing materials. Advanced Sensor and Detection Materials highlights the key features that aid the design of new sensor and detection materials for a multitude of sensor and detection devices. The senior contributors write on the follow topics:

    • Construction of nanostructures
    • The role of the shape in the design of new nanoparticles
    • Advances in sensors’ nanotechnology
    • Molecularly imprinted polymer for enantioselective sensing devices
    • Ferrites for high frequency applications
    • Mesoporous Silica: Making “Sense” of Sensors
    • Porous TiO2-Au/Ag materials
    • Ferroelectronic glass-ceramics
    • NASICON: Synthesis, structure and electrical characterisation
    • Heavy clay products quality
    • Ionic liquids
    • Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers
    • Theoretical investigation of superconducting state parameters
    • Microscopic polarization and thermal conductivity of binary Wurtzite nitrides
    • Experiments techniques and theoretical background to study materials

    The book is written for readers from diverse backgrounds across chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering, medical science, pharmacy, biotechnology, and biomedical engineering. It offers a comprehensive view of cutting-edge research on advanced materials for sensor and detection technology and applications.

  • 287.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Deshpande, Swapneel R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan JSR CREST, Japan .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    RETRACTED: Detection of p53 gene point mutation using sequence-specific molecularly imprinted PoPD electrode2012In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An amperometric sequence-specific molecularly imprinted single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ss-ODN) biosensor was fabricated and characterised in this study. Using ss-ODN as the template and o-phenylenediamine as the functional monomer, the ODN biosensor was fabricated by an electropolymerisation process on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. The template ss-ODN was washed out of the ss-ODN/poly(o-phenylenediamine)(PoPD)/ITO electrode using sterilised basic ethanol-water. The resulting ss-ODN imprinted PoPD/ITO electrode was characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The amperometric responses, i.e., Delta i as a function of the target ss-ODN concentration was studied. The biosensor using ss-ODN imprinted PoPD/ITO as the working electrode showed a linear Delta current response to the target ss-ODN concentration within the range of 0.01-300 fM. The biosensor showed a sensitivity of 0.62 mu A/fM, with a response time of 14s. The present novel molecularly imprinted ss-ODN biosensor could greatly benefit in terms of cost-effectiveness, storage stability, ultra sensitivity and selectivity together with the potential for improved commercial genetic sensors.

  • 288.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    Biomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Stimuli-responsive redox biopolymers2013In: Responsive Materials and Methods: State-of-the-Art Stimuli-Responsive Materials and Their Applications / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari and Hisatoshi Kobayashi, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2013, , p. 464p. 359-376Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 289.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, HisayoshiBiofunctional Materials, Biomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Responsive Materials and Methods: State-of-the-Art Stimuli-Responsive Materials and Their Applications2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of finely-tuned materials that adjust in a predictable manner by specific environment change is the recent arena of materials research. It is a newly emerging supra-disciplinary field with huge commercial potential. Stimuli-responsive materials answer by a considerable change in their properties to small changes in their environment. Responsive materials are becoming increasingly more prevalent as scientists learn about the chemistry and triggers that induce conformational changes in materials structures and devise ways to take advantage of and control them. Responsive Materials and Method offers state-of-the-art of the stimuli-responsive materials and their potential applications.This collection brings together novel methodologies and strategies adopted in the research and development of responsive materials and technology

    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 290.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mishra, Ajay K.Nanomaterials Research Centre, Department of Chemical Technology, University of Johannesburg, South Africa.Kobayashi, HisatoshiBiofunctional Materials at Biomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, Anthony P.F.Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

    Divided into 4 parts: Inorganic Materials; Organic Materials; Composite Materials; and Biomaterials, the 22 chapters cover the latest research and developments in the processing, properties, and applications of intelligent nanomaterials. Included are molecular device materials, biomimetic materials, hybrid-type functionalized polymers-composite materials, information-and energy-transfer materials, as well as environmentally friendly materials.

  • 291.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra KumarFunctional Nanomaterials Group, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany.Kobayashi, HisatoshiInternational Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent nanomaterials2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overall, this book presents a detailed and comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art development of different nanoscale intelligent materials for advanced applications. Apart from fundamental aspects of fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials, it also covers key advanced principles involved in utilization of functionalities of these nanomaterials in appropriate forms. It is very important to develop and understand the cutting-edge principles of how to utilize nanoscale intelligent features in the desired fashion. These unique nanoscopic properties can either be accessed when the nanomaterials are prepared in the appropriate form, e.g., composites, or in integrated nanodevice form for direct use as electronic sensing devices. In both cases, the nanostructure has to be appropriately prepared, carefully handled, and properly integrated into the desired application in order to efficiently access its intelligent features. These aspects are reviewed in detail in three themed sections with relevant chapters: Nanomaterials, Fabrication and Biomedical Applications; Nanomaterials for Energy, Electronics, and Biosensing; Smart Nanocomposites, Fabrication, and Applications.

    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 292.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra KumarFunctional Nanomaterials, Institute for Materials Science, University of Kiel, Germany.Kobayashi, HisatoshiWPI Research center MANA, National Institute for Material Science, Tsukuba Japan.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition.2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overall, this book presents a detailed and comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art development of different nanoscale intelligent materials for advanced applications. Apart from fundamental aspects of fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials, it also covers key advanced principles involved in utilization of functionalities of these nanomaterials in appropriate forms. It is very important to develop and understand the cutting-edge principles of how to utilize nanoscale intelligent features in the desired fashion. These unique nanoscopic properties can either be accessed when the nanomaterials are prepared in the appropriate form, e.g., composites, or in integrated nanodevice form for direct use as electronic sensing devices. In both cases, the nanostructure has to be appropriately prepared, carefully handled, and properly integrated into the desired application in order to efficiently access its intelligent features. These aspects are reviewed in detail in three themed sections with relevant chapters: Nanomaterials, Fabrication and Biomedical Applications; Nanomaterials for Energy, Electronics, and Biosensing; Smart Nanocomposites, Fabrication, and Applications.

  • 293.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar
    Functional Nanomaterials, Institute for Materials Science, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    WPI Research center MANA, National Institute for Material Science, Tsukuba Japan.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface2016In: Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition. / [ed] Tiwari, A., Mishra, Y.K., Kobayashi, H., Turner, A.P.F., USA: Wiley-Scrivener , 2016, p. xvii-xxChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar
    Functional Nanomaterials Group, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface: Intelligent Nanomaterials2016In: Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Yogendra Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Anthony P. F. Turner, John Wiley & Sons, 2016, p. xvii-xxChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordin, Anis N.Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Advanced Biomaterials and Biodevices2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomaterials are the fastest-growing emerging field of  biodevices. Design and development of biomaterials play a significant role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Recently, a variety of scaffolds/carriers have been evaluated for tissue regeneration, drug delivery, sensing and imaging.  Liposomes and microspheres have been developed for sustained delivery. Several anti-cancer drugs have been successfully formulated using biomaterial. The targeting of drugs to certain physiological sites has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment with improved drug bioavailability and reduction of dosing frequency. Biodevices-based targeting of drugs may improve the therapeutic success by limiting the adverse drug effects and resulting in more patient compliance and attaining a higher adherence level. Advanced biodevices hold merit as a drug carrier with high carrier capacity, feasibility of incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, high stability, as well as the feasibility of variable courses. Biodevices for diagnosis of diseases by improving the sensitivity and selectivity on the biomaterials platform is the most latest R & D focus especially in the field of treatment by the prognosis and detection of disease in the early stage. This groundbreaking book is devoted to all of the emerging areas of biomaterials and biodevices including therapeutic agents, molecular targeting and diagnostic imaging capabilities. The senior contributors write on the following topics:

    • Frontiers for bulk nanostructured metals
    • Stimuli-responsive materials used as medical devices
    • Recent advances with liposomes as drug carriers
    • Fabrication, Properties of nanoshells with controllable surface charge
    • Advanced healthcare materials: Chitosan
    • Anticipating behaviour of advanced material in healthcare
    • Label free biochips
    • Polymer MEMS sensors
    • Assembly of polymers/metal nanoparticles
    • Combination of molecular imprinting and nanotechnology
    • Efficiency of biosensors as new generation of analytical approaches
    • State-of-the-art of biosensors in healthcare
  • 296.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patra, HirakLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Advanced Bioelectronic Materials2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book covers the recent advances in the development of bioelectronics systems and their potential application in future biomedical applications starting from system design to signal processing for physiological monitoring, to in situ biosensing.

    Advanced Bioelectronics Materialshas contributions from distinguished international scholars whose backgrounds mirror the multidisciplinary readership ranging from the biomedical sciences, biosensors and engineering communities with diverse backgrounds, interests and proficiency in academia and industry. The readers will benefit from the widespread coverage of the current literature, state-of-the-art overview of all facets of advanced bioelectronics materials ranging from real time monitoring, in situ diagnostics, in vivo imaging, image-guided therapeutics, biosensors, and translational biomedical devices and personalized monitoring.

    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 297.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patra, Hirak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface2015In: Advanced bioelectronics materials / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Hirak Patra and Anthony Turner, Beverly, MA, USA: Wiley-Scrivener , 2015, p. XV-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ramalingam, MuruganInstitut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Université de Strasbourg (UdS), France.Kobayashi, HisatoshiBiomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, Anthony P. F.Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biomedical materials and diagnostic devices2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "The functional materials with the most promising outlook have the ability to precisely adjust the biological phenomenon in a controlled mode. Engineering of advanced bio- materials has found striking applications in used for biomedical and diagnostic device applications, such as cell separation, stem-cell, drug delivery, hyperthermia, automated DNA extraction, gene targeting, resonance imaging, biosensors, tissue engineering and organ regeneration"--Provided by publisher. 

  • 299.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Hattori, Shinya
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Terada, Dohiko
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Sharma, Ashok K.
    DCR University of Science and Technology, India.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Influence of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-CNT-polyaniline three-dimensional electrospun microfabric scaffolds on cell growth and viability2013In: Biopolymers, ISSN 0006-3525, E-ISSN 1097-0282, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 334-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect on: 1) the bulk surface; and 2) the three-dimensional non-woven microfabric scaffolds of poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline on growth and viability of  mice fibroblast cells L929. The poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline was prepared using coupling chemistry and electrospinning was then used for the fabrication of responsive, nonwoven microfabric scaffolds. The electrospun microfabrics were assembled in regular three-dimensional scaffolds with OD: 400-500 mm; L: 6-20 cm. Mice fibroblast cells L929 were seeded on the both poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline bulk surface as well as non-woven microfabric scaffolds. Excellent cell proliferation and viability was observed on poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline non-woven microfabric matrices in compare to poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline bulk and commercially available Matrigel™ even with a range of cell lines up to 168 h. Temperature dependent cells detachment behaviour was observed on the poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline scaffolds by varying incubation at below lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacylamide). The results suggest that poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline non-woven microfabrics could be used as a smart matrices for applications in tissue engineering.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 300.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shukla, Shailendra K.Department of Menchanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, India.
    Advanced Carbon Materials and Technology2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The expansion of carbon materials is multidisciplinary and is related to physics, chemistry, biology, applied sciences and engineering. The research on carbon materials has mostly focused on aspects of fundamental physics as they unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties applicable for the range of applications.

    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
3456789 251 - 300 of 425
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf