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  • 251.
    Eikeland Husebø, Sissel
    et al.
    University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nordenström, Elin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordahl Amorøe, Torben
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Hans
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dieckmann, Peter
    Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES), Center for Human Resources, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department for Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department for Quality and Health Technology, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Reflecting on Interprofessional Simulation2019In: Reflecting on Interprofessional Simulation: Materiality, Embodiment, Interaction / [ed] Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Hans Rystedt, Li Felländer-Tsai and Sofia Nyström, Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2019, p. 139-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores and discusses how models of debriefing can support interprofessional learning in simulation-based education activities. The role of video as a tool for feedback and reflection is described and the ways video can be integrated in the learning environment to optimize opportunities for learning.

  • 252.
    Ek, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nystrom, Christine Delisle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Chirita-Emandi, Adela
    Univ Med and Farm Timisoara, Romania; Louis Turcanu Clin Emergency Hosp Children, Romania.
    Tur, Josep A.
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Nordin, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bouzas, Cristina
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Argelich, Emma
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Alfredo Martinez, J.
    Inst Carlos III, Spain; Univ Navarra, Spain; IMDEA Food Precis Nutr, Spain.
    Frost, Gary
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Garcia-Perez, Isabel
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Saez, Marc
    Univ Girona, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Paul, Corina
    Univ Med and Farm Timisoara, Romania; Clin Emergency Cty Hosp Timisoara, Romania.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A randomized controlled trial for overweight and obesity in preschoolers: the More and Less Europe study- an intervention within the STOP project2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundChildhood overweight and obesity is a serious public health issue with an increase being observed in preschool-aged children. Treating childhood obesity is difficult and few countries use standardized treatments. Therefore, there is a need to find effective approaches that are feasible for both health care providers and families. Thus, the overall aim of this study is to assess the acceptance and effectiveness of a parent support program (the More and Less, ML) for the management of overweight and obesity followed by a mobile health (mHealth) program (the MINISTOP application) in a socially diverse population of families.Methods/designA two-arm, parallel design randomized controlled trial in 300 2-to 6-year-old children with overweight and obesity from Romania, Spain and Sweden (n=100 from each). Following baseline assessments children are randomized into the intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention, the ML program, consists of 10-weekly group sessions which focus on evidence-based parenting practices, followed by the previously validated MINISTOP application for 6-months to support healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. The primary outcome is change in body mass index (BMI) z-score after 9-months and secondary outcomes include: waist circumference, eating behavior (Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire), parenting behavior (Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire), physical activity (ActiGraph wGT3x-BT), dietary patterns (based onmetabolic markers from urine and 24h dietary recalls), epigenetic and gut hormones (fasting blood samples), and the overall acceptance of the overweight and obesity management in young children (semi-structured interviews). Outcomes are measured at baseline and after: 10-weeks (only BMI z-score, waist circumference), 9-months (all outcomes), 15- and 21-months (all outcomes except physical activity, dietary patterns, epigenetics and gut hormones) post-baseline.DiscussionThis study will evaluate a parent support program for weight management in young children in three European countries. To boost the effect of the ML program the families will be supported by an app for 6-months. If the program is found to be effective, it has the potential to be implemented into routine care to reduce overweight and obesity in young children and the app could prove to be a viable option for sustained effects of the care provided.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT03800823; 11 Jan 2019.

  • 253.
    Ek, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandborg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Delisle Nystrom, Christine
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Physical Activity and Mobile Phone Apps in the Preschool Age: Perceptions of Teachers and Parents2019In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e12512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity (PA) is already beneficial at the preschool age. In many countries, young children spend most of their days in the preschool setting, making it a common arena for PA interventions. Mobile health tools are becoming increasingly popular to promote PA in different populations; however, little is known about the interest for and how the preschool setting could incorporate such a tool. Objective: This study aimed to examine how teachers and parents perceive PA in preschool-aged children in general and their perceptions of how a mobile phone app could be used to promote PA in the preschool setting. Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 teachers (93%, [14/15] women, mean age 43.5 years, 47%, [7/15] with a university degree and 10 parents [91%, 9/10] women, mean age 38.9 years, all with a university degree) recruited from 2 urban preschools in central Sweden. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis by means of an inductive approach. Results: The analysis revealed 4 themes: (1) children are physically active by nature, (2) the environment as a facilitator or a barrier, (3) prerequisites of the adult world, and (4) an app in the preschool setting-challenges and possibilities. Parents and teachers perceived preschoolers as being spontaneously physically active; however, high-intensity PA was perceived as low. The PA was specifically performed during the day in the preschool. Identified facilitators of PA were access to safe and engaging outdoor environments such as forests, spacious indoor areas, and adult involvement. Adult involvement was considered especially important for children preferring sedentary activities. Identified barriers for PA were restricted indoor and outdoor space, rules for indoor activities, and lack of adult involvement because of time constraints. The teachers perceived that they had limited skills and experiences using apps in general, although they also acknowledged the increasing role of technological tools in the curriculum. Thus, the teachers expressed an interest for an app designed as a support tool for them, especially for situations when PA was limited because of perceived barriers. They suggested the app to include accessible information regarding the health benefits of PA in children linked to a library of activities for different settings and seasons. Parents suggested interactive app features including problem-solving tasks and music and dance, but not video clips as they made children passive. Conclusions: Vigorous PA was perceived as low in preschool-aged children. Future tailoring of interventions in the preschool setting should work around barriers and support facilitators to PA, especially PA of high intensity. In such work, an app could serve as a source of inspiration for PA in different ages, settings, and seasons and thus reduce environmental and structural inequalities in the preschool setting.

  • 254.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Valter, L.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    History matters: childhood weight trajectories as a basis for planning community-based obesity prevention to adolescents2012In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 524-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To use epidemiological data and a standardized economic model to compare projected costs for obesity prevention in late adolescence accrued using a cross-sectional weight classification for selecting adolescents at age 15 years compared with a longitudinal classification. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: All children born in a Swedish county (population 440 000) in 1991 who participated in all regular measurements of height and weight at ages 5, 10 and 15 years (n=4312) were included in the study. The selection strategies were compared by calculating the projected financial load resulting from supply of obesity prevention services from providers at all levels in the health care system. The difference in marginal cost per 1000 children was used as the primary end point for the analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: Using the cross-sectional selection strategy, 3.8% of adolescents at age 15 years were selected for evaluation by a pediatric specialist, and 96.2% were chosen for population-based interventions. In the trajectory-based strategy, 2.4% of the adolescents were selected for intensive pediatric care, 1.4% for individual clinical interventions in primary health care, 14.0% for individual primary obesity prevention using the Internet and 82.1% for population-based interventions. Costs for the cross-sectional selection strategy were projected to USD463 581 per 1000 adolescents and for the trajectory-based strategy were USD 302 016 per 1000 adolescents. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: Using projections from epidemiological data, we found that by basing the selection of adolescents for obesity prevention on weight trajectories, the load on highly specialized pediatric care can be reduced by one-third and total health service costs for obesity management among adolescents reduced by one-third. Before use in policies and prevention program planning, our findings warrant confirmation in prospective cost-benefit studies.

  • 255.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gursky, Elin A.
    Analytic Services Inc., Arlington, VA, USA.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Pre-launch evaluation checklist for online health-promoting communities2014In: Journal of Biomedical Informatics, ISSN 1532-0464, E-ISSN 1532-0480, Vol. 47, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Despite the apparent potential of online health-promoting communities (OHPC), there is limited guidance available for developers on the basic design features that contribute to successful applications. The aim of this study was to develop a checklist for a pre-launch evaluation of OHPCs incorporating the perspectives of both the user and the health services communities.

    METHODS:

    The study was based on an action research design. Constructs previously applied to evaluate information system success were used as the basis for checklist development. The constructs were adapted for the OHPC context and formatively evaluated in a case study project. Evaluation data were collected from participatory observations and analyzed using qualitative methods.

    RESULTS:

    The initial OHPC checklist included the constructs information quality, service quality, and subjective norms. The contextual adaptation of the information quality construct resulted in items for content area, trust, and format; the adaptation of the service quality construct in items for staff competence, prompt service and empathy; and the adaptation of the subject norms construct in items for social facilitation, interconnectivity and communication. The formative evaluation demonstrated the critical need to balance the autonomy of the online community with the professional control of health services quality expressed in the information and service quality constructs.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    A pre-launch OHPC evaluation checklist has been designed for use in practical development of health promotion web resources. Research on instruments for OHPC evaluations is warranted.

  • 256.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hälsofrämjande och lärande arbetsplats: finns organisatoriska förutsättningar?2014In: Lärande i arbetslivet: möjligheter och utmaningar : en vänbok till Per-Erik Ellström / [ed] Henrik Kock, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2014, p. 37-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    i detta kapitel diskuteras vilken betydelse arbetets organisering och arbetsvillkoren har för de anställdas möjligheter att bibehålla och utveckla sin hälsa. Förutsättningarna för en hälsofrämjande arbetsplats är sammanflätade med förutsättningar för ett utvecklingsinriktat lärande på arbetsplatsen. Arbetslivet genomgår omstrukturering och organisatoriska förändringar med syfte att öka effektiviteten. En fråga är under vilka förutsättningar organisatoriska förändringar bidrar till hälsa och utvecklingsinriktat lärande på arbetsplatsen och vilka förutsättningar som hämmar en utvecklingsinriktad och hälsosam arbetsplats.

  • 257.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arbetsgivares kostnader, åtgärder och anpassningar för sjuknärvarande och sjukfrånvarande medarbetare: samband med återgång i arbete och produktion2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien syftade till att undersöka vilka åtgärder arbetsgivare gör för sjukskrivna medarbetare och vilka kostnader arbetsgivare och samhället har i samband med sjuknärvaro och sjukfrånvaro.

    Totalt 3000 sjukskrivna personer i AFA Försäkrings register med diagnoserna psykiska besvär eller besvär i rörelseorganen fick ett informationsbrev och förfrågan om samtycke till att forskarna skulle få skicka en enkät till deras arbetsledare; 393 sjukskrivna gav samtycke. En  webbenkät skickades till dessa arbetsledare. Totalt 198 arbetsledare (50 %) till sjukskrivna personer besvarade enkäten.

    Resultaten visar att arbetsgivare genomför en rad olika åtgärder och anpassningar när en medarbetare blir sjukskriven. Analyserna visade att dessa åtgärder och anpassningar i viss mån beror på vem den sjukskrivne medarbetaren är. Åtgärder och anpassningar var vanligare för sjukskrivna med psykiska diagnoser, för högutbildade och för sjukskrivna i högkvalificerade yrken. Kvinnor fick i högre grad anpassningar och åtgärder såsom ändrade arbetsuppgifter och psykosocialt stöd jämfört med män.

    Demografiska faktorer visade sig ha mindre betydelse för om den sjukskrivne återgick i arbete eller ej. Multipla logistiska regressionsanalyser visade att åtgärder och anpassningar på arbetsplatsen hade signifikanta samband med en ökad chans för återgång i arbete. Resultaten visade också att för sjukskrivna medarbetare vars arbetsledare hade tagit många kontakter med andra aktörer, som HR-avdelningen, företagshälsan och/eller Försäkringskassan var sannolikheten lägre att den sjukskrivne medarbetaren återgick i arbete. Arbetsledare tog fler kontakter, om den sjukskrivne medarbetaren hade en psykisk diagnos.

    Sjuknärvaro och produktionsförlust före, under och efter sjukskrivningen skattades av arbetsledarna. Sammanlagt beräknades produktionsförlusterna till cirka SEK 100 000 per sjukskrivningsfall. Härutöver lägger arbetsgivare tid på att ta kontakter, genomföra åtgärder och anpassningar och organisera om arbetet. Arbetsledare hade mycket oklar eller saknade helt uppfattning om vad tid, åtgärder och anpassningar kostar, varför detta inte har kunnat analyseras närmare. De beräknade genomsnittliga kostnaderna till följd av produktivitetsförluster är således en underskattning av de faktiska kostnaderna för arbetsgivare.

    Studien visar att arbetsledares kunskap om vad sjuknärvaro och sjukfrånvaro kostar för verksamheten och för samhället är begränsad. En ökad kostnadsmedvetenhet skulle kunna stimulera till att större resurser läggs på att implementera policys för hälsofrämjande åtgärder och att utbilda arbetsledare i att hantera frågor om hälsa och arbetsförmåga på arbetsplatsen.

  • 258.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lunds universitet.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Kunskapsbaserade åtgärder för att främja arbetsförmåga och återgång i arbete2015In: Återgång i arbete: processer, bedömningar, åtgärder / [ed] Kerstin Ekberg, Mona Eklund, Gunnel Hensing, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 219-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lunds universitet.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Perspektiv på arbetsförmåga2015In: Återgång i arbete: processer, bedömningar, åtgärder / [ed] Kerstin Ekberg, Mona Eklund, Gunnel Mensing, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 19-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, MonaInstitutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Arbetsterapi och aktivitetsvetenskap, Lunds universitet.Hensing, GunnelInstitutionen för medicin, Avd för samhällsmedicin och folkhälsa, Sahlgrenska akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Återgång i arbete: processer, bedömningar, åtgärder2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förmågan och möjligheten att arbeta är viktig både för den enskilda 
individen och för samhället. När en person helt eller delvis förlorar sin arbetsförmåga på grund av ohälsa ska olika aktörer i välfärds­samhället möjliggöra återgång i arbete. Sjukskrivnings- och rehabiliteringsprocessen blir i en del fall komplex beroende på variationer i aktörernas perspektiv på arbetsförmåga, de bedömningsmetoder som används och vilka regelverk som är tillämpbara. Kunskapsbaserade åtgärder för att främja återgång i arbete involverar i allmänhet arbetsplatsen som en central 
aktör och arena för åtgärder, medan praktiken ofta är annorlunda. 
Boken belyser förut­sättningar för att implementera kunskapsbaserade utredningar och åtgärder i det svenska samhället, liksom komplexiteten 
i dessa processer.

    Boken vänder sig till personer som arbetar med bedömning av arbetsförmåga och med åtgärder för att främja återgång i arbete. Målgrupper är studerande och professionella som i sin yrkesutövning inom till exempel primärvården, företagshälsovården eller inom privata rehabiliterings­enheter arbetar med sjukskrivningsprocesser och arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Boken riktar sig också till arbetsgivare och arbetsledare som har ansvar för sjukskrivna medarbetares återgång i arbete.

  • 261.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lättare psykisk ohälsa2015In: Återgång i arbete: processer, bedömningar, åtgärder / [ed] Kerstin Ekberg, Mona Eklund, Gunnel Hensing, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Conditions for presenteeism and production in changing organizations2015In: Sustainable development in organizations: studies on innovative practices / [ed] Mattias Elg, Per-Erik Ellström, Magnus Klofsten, Malin Tillmar, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 42-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 263.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pransky, Glenn S.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton, MA, USA; University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA .
    Besen, Elyssa
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton, MA, USA.
    Fassier, Jean-Baptise
    Claude Bernard University Lyon, France.
    Feuerstein, Michael
    Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, Lyon, France.
    Munir, Fehmidah
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Blanck, Peter
    Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
    New Business Structures Creating Organizational Opportunities and Challenges for Work Disability Prevention.2016In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 480-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Flexible work arrangements are growing in order to develop resource-efficient production and because of advanced technologies, new societal values, changing demographics, and globalization. The article aims to illustrate the emerging challenges and opportunities for work disability prevention efforts among workers in alternate work arrangements. Methods The authors participated in a year-long collaboration that ultimately led to an invited 3-day conference, "Improving Research of Employer Practices to Prevent Disability," held October 14-16, 2015, in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. The collaboration included a topical review of the literature, group conference calls to identify key areas and challenges, drafting of initial documents, review of industry publications, and a conference presentation that included feedback from peer researchers and a roundtable discussion with experts having direct employer experience. Results Both worker and employer perspectives were considered, and four common alternate work arrangements were identified: (a) temporary and contingent employment; (b) small workplaces; (c) virtual work/telework; and (d) lone workers. There was sparse available research of return-to-work (RTW) and workplace disability management strategies with regard to alternate work patterns. Limited research findings and a review of the grey literature suggested that regulations and guidelines concerning disabled workers are often ambiguous, leading to unsatisfactory protection. At the workplace level, there was a lack of research evidence on how flexible work arrangements could be handled or leveraged to support RTW and prevent disability. Potential negative consequences of this lack of organizational guidance and information are higher costs for employers and insurers and feelings of job insecurity, lack of social support and integration, or work intensification for disabled workers. Conclusions Future studies of RTW and workplace disability prevention strategies should be designed to reflect the multiple work patterns that currently exist across many working populations, and in particular, flexible work arrangements should be explored in more detail as a possible mechanism for preventing disability. Labor laws and policies need to be developed to fit flexible work arrangements.

  • 264.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early and Late Return to Work After Sick Leave: Predictors in a Cohort of Sick-Listed Individuals with Common Mental Disorders2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 627-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aims to identify individual and workplace factors associated with early return to work (RTW)-defined as within 3 months-and factors associated with later RTW-between 3 and 12 months after being sick-listed-in a cohort of newly sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders. Methods In a prospective cohort study, a cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline measures of patients granted sick leave due to common mental disorders. A total of 533 newly sick-listed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. A baseline questionnaire was sent by post within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 354 (66 %) responded. Those who were unemployed were excluded, resulting in a study population of 319 individuals. Sick leave was recorded for each individual from the Social Insurance Office during 1 year. Analyses were made with multiple Cox regression analyses. Results Early RTW was associated with lower education, better work ability at baseline, positive expectations of treatment and low perceived interactional justice with the supervisor. RTW after 3 months was associated with a need to reduce demands at work, and turnover intentions. Conclusions Early RTW among sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders seems to be associated with the individuals need to secure her/his employment situation, whereas later RTW is associated with variables reflecting dissatisfaction with work conditions. No health measures were associated with RTW. The study highlights the importance of considering not only health and functioning, but also workplace conditions and relations at the workplace in implementing RTW interventions.

  • 265.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictive values for early and late return to work of the Work Ability Index (WAI), the single-item question (WAI-1), and EQ-5D among sick listed in musculoskeletal and mental disorders2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Injury Study Lead Expert, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Preventing injuries in professional football: thinking bigger and working together in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 12, pp 709-+2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 709-710Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 267.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Keeping your top players on the pitch: the key to football medicine at a professional level2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 723-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 268.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Askling, Carl
    Swedish School Sport and Health Science, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mithoefer, Kai
    Harvard University, MA USA .
    Return to play after thigh muscle injury in elite football players: implementation and validation of the Munich muscle injury classification2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 769-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Owing to the complexity and heterogeneity of muscle injuries, a generally accepted classification system is still lacking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims To prospectively implement and validate a novel muscle injury classification and to evaluate its predictive value for return to professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods The recently described Munich muscle injury classification was prospectively evaluated in 31 European professional male football teams during the 2011/2012 season. Thigh muscle injury types were recorded by team medical staff and correlated to individual player exposure and resultant time-loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 393 thigh muscle injuries occurred. The muscle classification system was well received with a 100% response rate. Two-thirds of thigh muscle injuries were classified as structural and were associated with longer lay-off times compared to functional muscle disorders (pandlt;0.001). Significant differences were observed between structural injury subgroups (minor partial, moderate partial and complete injuries) with increasing lay-off time associated with more severe structural injury. Median lay-off time of functional disorders was 5-8 days without significant differences between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the absence time between anterior and posterior thigh injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions The Munich muscle classification demonstrates a positive prognostic validity for return to play after thigh muscle injury in professional male football players. Structural injuries are associated with longer average lay-off times than functional muscle disorders. Subclassification of structural injuries correlates with return to play, while subgrouping of functional disorders shows less prognostic relevance. Functional disorders are often underestimated clinically and require further systematic study.

  • 269.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fewer ligament injuries but no preventive effect on muscle injuries and severe injuries: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 732-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLimited information is available on the variation in injury rates over multiple seasons of professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo analyse time-trends in injury characteristics of male professional football players over 11 consecutive seasons. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 1743 players comprising 27 teams from 10 countries were followed prospectively between 2001 and 2012. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time loss injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 8029 time loss injuries were recorded. The match unavailability due to injury was 14% and constant over the study period. On average, a player sustained two injuries per season, resulting in approximately 50 injuries per team and season. The ligament injury rate decreased during the study period (R-2=0.608, b=-0.040, 95% CI -0.065 to -0.016, p=0.005), whereas the rate of muscle injury (R-2=0.228, b=-0.013, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.005, p=0.138) and severe injury (R-2=0.141, b=0.015, 95% CI -0.013 to 0.043, p=0.255) did not change over the study period. In addition, no changes in injury rates over the 11-year period were found for either training (R-2=0.000, b=0.000, 95% CI -0.035 to 0.034, p=0.988) or match play (R-2=0.282, b=-0.015, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.003, p=0.093). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe injury rate has decreased for ligament injuries over the last 11years, but overall training, match injury rates and the rates of muscle injury and severe injury remain high.

  • 270.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tornqvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronic Devices. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Upper extremity injuries in male elite football players2013In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1626-1632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the epidemiology of upper extremity injuries in male elite football players and to describe their characteristics, incidence and lay-off times. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBetween 2001 and 2011, 57 male European elite football teams (2,914 players and 6,215 player seasons) were followed prospectively. Time-loss injuries and exposure to training and matches were recorded on individual basis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIn total, 11,750 injuries were recorded, 355 (3 %) of those affected the upper extremities giving an incidence of 0.23 injuries/1,000 h of football. The incidence in match play was almost 7 times higher than in training (0.83 vs. 0.12 injuries/1,000 h, rate ratio 6.7, 95 % confidence interval 5.5-8.3). As much as 32 % of traumatic match injuries occurred as a result of foul play situations. Goalkeepers had a significantly higher incidence of upper extremity injuries compared to outfield players (0.80 vs. 0.16 injuries/1,000 h, rate ratio 5.0, 95 % confidence interval 4.0-6.2). The average absence due to an upper extremity injury was 23 +/- A 34 days. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanUpper extremity injuries are uncommon among male elite football players. Goalkeepers, however, are prone to upper extremity injury, with a five times higher incidence compared to outfield players. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanII.

  • 271.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lee, Justin C.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Healy, Jeremiah C.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    MRI findings and return to play in football: a prospective analysis of 255 hamstring injuries in the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 738-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The present study evaluated whether the MRI parameters of hamstring injuries in male professional football players correlate with time to return to play (RTP). Methods 46 elite European football teams were followed prospectively for hamstring injuries between 2007 and 2014. Club medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss after hamstring injury. MRI parameters were evaluated by two independent radiologists and correlated with the RTP data. Results A total of 255 grade 1 and 2 injuries were evaluated in this study. RTP was longer for grade 2 than grade 1 injuries (24 +/- 13, 95% CI 21 to 26 days vs 18 +/- 15, 95% CI 16 to 20 days; mean difference: 6, 95% CI 2 to 9 days, p=0.004, d=0.39). 84% of injuries affected the biceps femoris (BF) muscle, whereas 12% and 4% affected the semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST), respectively. No difference in lay-off time was found for injuries to the three different muscles (BF 20 +/- 15 days, SM 18 +/- 11 days, ST 23 +/- 14 days; p=0.83). The recurrence rate was higher for BF injuries than for SM and ST injuries combined (18% vs 2%, p=0.009). The size of the oedema weakly correlated with time to RTP (r(2)=6-12%). No correlation was found between location of injury and time to RTP. The majority of the intramuscular injuries affected the MT junction (56% in grade 1 and 2 injuries), but no difference in lay-off time was found between the different types of injuries. Conclusions The radiological grade and size of the oedema correlate with time to RTP for both, grade 1 and 2 injuries. No correlations were found between time to RTP and the location and type of injury.

  • 272.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Davison, Michael
    Isokinetic Medical Group, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, London, UK.
    DHooghe, Michel
    Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), Nyon, Switzerland.
    Pensgaard, Anne Marte
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Communication quality between the medical team and the head coach/manager is associated with injury burden and player availability in elite football clubs2019In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 304-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated medical staff interpretations and descriptions of internal communication quality in elite football teams to determine whether internal communication was correlated with injuries and/or player availability at training and matches.

  • 273.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lagerbäck, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Vouillamoz, Marc
    UEFA, Switzerland.
    Papadimitiou, Niki
    UEFA, Switzerland.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Linköping University. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Is there a correlation between coaches leadership styles and injuries in elite football teams?: A study of 36 elite teams in 17 countries2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Do coaches’ leadership styles affect injury rates and the availability of players in professional football? Certain types of leadership behaviour may cause stress and have a negative impact on players’ health and well-being.

    Aim To investigate the transformational leadership styles of head coaches in elite men’s football and to evaluate the correlation between leadership styles, injury rates and players’ availability.

    Methods Medical staff from 36 elite football clubs in 17 European countries produced 77 reports at four postseason meetings with a view to assessing their perception of the type of leadership exhibited by the head coaches of their respective teams using the Global Transformational Leadership scale. At the same time, they also recorded details of individual players’ exposure to football and time-loss injuries.

    Results There was a negative correlation between the overall level of transformational leadership and the incidence of severe injuries (rho=−0.248; n=77; p=0.030); high levels of transformational leadership were associated with smaller numbers of severe injuries. Global Transformational Leadership only explained 6% of variation in the incidence of severe injuries (r2=0.062). The incidence of severe injuries was lower at clubs where coaches communicated a clear and positive vision, supported staff members and gave players encouragement and recognition. Players’ attendance rates at training were higher in teams where coaches gave encouragement and recognition to staff members, encouraged innovative thinking, fostered trust and cooperation and acted as role models.

    Conclusions There is an association between injury rates and players’ availability and the leadership style of the head coach.

  • 274.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Dijk, Niek C.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Fifth metatarsal fractures among male professional footballers: a potential career-ending disease2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 754-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThere is little information about Metatarsal Five (MT-5) fractures for specific sports. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo study the occurrence, the imaging characteristics, the lay-off times and healing problems of MT-5 fractures among male footballers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSixty-four European elite teams were monitored from 2001 to 2012. x-Rays were collected and classified by the Torg criteria. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOf 13754 injuries, 0.5% (67) proved to be MT-5 fractures. Their incidence was 0.04 injuries/1000h of exposure. A team of 25 players might thus expect an MT-5 fracture every fifth season. Of these fractures, 67% (38) were primary and 33% were refractures. One of the 38 primary fractures was an avulsion of the tuberosity; all the others (97%) located towards the base. In total, 32% of the players with MT-5 fracture were younger than 21years, 40% of the fractures occurred during the preseason and 45% of the players had prodromal symptoms. In total, 54% of the initial x-rays were classified as Torg type II (stress fractures), and 46% were classified as Torg type I (acute type). After surgical treatment the fractures healed faster, compared with conservative treatment (75% vs 33%, pandlt;0.05). There was no significant difference in lay-off days between players that had been operated, and those that had not (80 vs 74days, p=0.67). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe majority of MT-5 fractures are stress fractures, and mainly occur among young players. There are frequent healing problems, which might be explained by the stress nature of the injury. After surgery there are less healing problems, compared with those in conservative treatment.

  • 275.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Medical Comm, Switzerland.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hamstring injuries have increased by 4% annually in mens professional football, since 2001: a 13-year longitudinal analysis of the UEFA Elite Club injury study2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 731-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There are limited data on hamstring injury rates over time in football. Aim To analyse time trends in hamstring injury rates in male professional footballers over 13 consecutive seasons and to distinguish the relative contribution of training and match injuries. Methods 36 clubs from 12 European countries were followed between 2001 and 2014. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. Injuries per 1000 h were compared as a rate ratio (RR) with 95% CI. Injury burden was the number of lay off days per 1000 h. Seasonal trend for injury was analysed using linear regression. Results A total of 1614 hamstring injuries were recorded; 22% of players sustained at least one hamstring injury during a season. The overall hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period was 1.20 injuries per 1000 h; the match injury rate (4.77) being 9 times higher than the training injury rate (0.51; RR 9.4; 95% CI 8.5 to 10.4). The time-trend analysis showed an annual average 2.3% year on year increase in the total hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period (R-2=0.431, b=0.023, 95% CI 0.006 to 0.041, p=0.015). This increase over time was most pronounced for training injuries-these increased by 4.0% per year (R-2=0.450, b=0.040, 95% CI 0.011 to 0.070, p=0.012). The average hamstring injury burden was 19.7 days per 1000 h (annual average increase 4.1%) (R-2=0.437, b=0.041, 95% CI 0.010 to 0.072, p=0.014). Conclusions Training-related hamstring injury rates have increased substantially since 2001 but match-related injury rates have remained stable. The challenge is for clubs to reduce training-related hamstring injury rates without impairing match performance.

  • 276.
    Ekstrom, Kajsa
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Spelmans, Sanna
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ahlstrom, Gerd
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alftberg, Asa
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Behm, Lina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Next of kins perceptions of the meaning of participation in the care of older persons in nursing homes: a phenomenographic study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 400-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Being involved in the care of a loved one is a desire of many next of kin. However, according to several studies of the perceptions of nursing home staff, the involvement of next of kin is not an obvious part of care. To be able to involve next of kin in care at nursing homes, the perceptions of what participation means are an important piece of knowledge. The aim of this study was therefore to describe variations in next of kins perceptions of the meaning of participation in the care of older persons living in nursing homes. Methods Eighteen next of kin of older persons living in ten nursing homes in Sweden were recruited for interviews. The study design was based on a phenomenographic approach, focusing on the qualitatively different ways in which a person perceives, experiences or conceptualises a phenomenon or certain aspect of reality. Results Five categories emerged from analysis of the interviews, representing the next of kins perceptions of the meaning of participation in the care of older persons in nursing homes: be present; communicate; monitor; do practical tasks; and to represent. The next of kin expressed meanings that belonged to more than one category, and the categories were interdependent. Conclusions Our results indicate that there are several meanings of next of kins perceptions of participation at nursing homes. Nursing home staffs knowledge of these perceptions is important to enable next of kin to participate according to their own preferences.

  • 277.
    Ellen, MacEachen
    et al.
    University of Waterloo, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada; Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada.
    Kosny, A.
    University of Toronto, Canada; Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada; Monash University, Australia.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    OHagan, F.
    Trent University, Canada.
    Redgrift, L.
    Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada; Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Sanford, S.
    Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada.
    Carrasco, C.
    Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada.
    Emile, Tompa
    Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada; McMaster University, Canada.
    Mahood, Q.
    Institute Work and Heatlh, Canada.
    Systematic review of qualitative literature on occupational health and safety legislation and regulatory enforcement planning and implementation2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 42, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The ability of occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation and regulatory enforcement to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses is contingent on political, economic, and organizational conditions. This systematic review of qualitative research articles considers how OHS legislation and regulatory enforcement are planned and implemented. Methods A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed, English-language articles published between 1990 and 2013 yielded 11 947 articles. We identified 34 qualitative articles as relevant, 18 of which passed our quality assessment and proceeded to meta-ethnographic synthesis. Results The synthesis yielded four main themes: OHS regulation formation, regulation challenges, inspector organization, and worker representation in OHS. It illuminates how OHS legislation can be based on normative suppositions about worker and employer behavior and shaped by economic and political resources of parties. It also shows how implementation of OHS legislation is affected by "general duty" law, agency coordination, resourcing of inspectorates, and ability of workers to participate in the system. Conclusions The review identifies methodological gaps and promising areas for further research in "grey" zones of legislation implementation.

  • 278.
    Engstrom, Sevek
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Berne, Christian
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Gahnberg, Lars
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Svardsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Can costs of screening for hypertension and diabetes in dental care and follow-up in primary health care be predicted?2013In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 256-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The purpose was to assess the direct costs of screening for high blood pressure and blood glucose in dental care and of follow-up in primary health care and, based on these data, arrive at a prediction function. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy population. All subjects coming for routine check-ups at three dental health clinics were invited to have blood pressure or blood glucose measurements; 1,623 agreed to participate. Subjects screening positive were referred to their primary health care centres for follow-up. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. Information on individual screening time was registered during the screening process, and information on accountable time, costs for the screening staff, overhead costs, and analysis costs for the screening was obtained from the participating dental clinics. The corresponding items in primary care, i.e. consultation time, number of follow-up appointments, accountable time, costs for the follow-up staff, overhead costs, and analysis costs during follow-up were obtained from the primary health care centres. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. The total screening costs per screened subject ranged from (sic)7.4 to (sic)9.2 depending on subgroups, corresponding to 16.7-42.7 staff minutes. The corresponding follow-up costs were (sic)57-(sic)91. The total resource used for screening and follow-up per diagnosis was 563-3,137 staff minutes. There was a strong relationship between resource use and numbers needed to screen (NNS) to find one diagnosis (P andlt; 0.0001, degree of explanation 99%). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Screening and follow-up costs were moderate and appear to be lower for combined screening of blood pressure and blood glucose than for separate screening. There was a strong relationship between resource use and NNS.

  • 279.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do pain characteristics guide selection for multimodal pain rehabilitation?2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported painmeasures are associated with selection for multimodalor multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MMR) andwhether this selection is influenced by sex.Design: Cross-sectional cohort study.Subjects: A total of 1,226 women and 464 men withchronic pain conditions from 2 university hospitals.Methods: Drawing from the Swedish Quality Registryfor Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), data on pain, psychologicalsymptoms, function, health, and activity/participation were collected. Multiple logistic regressionwas used to investigate association of painmeasures with selection for MMR (no/yes) aftermultidisciplinary assessment. Covariates were: age,educational level, anxiety, depression, working status,and several pain measures.Results: High pain intensity in the previous week(odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI)0.86–0.99) and high pain severity (MultidimensionalPain Inventory) (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.74–0.95)were negatively associated with selection for MMR,whereas higher number of pain quadrants was positivelyassociated with selection for MMR. Similarresults were obtained for women, but none of themeasures was predictive for men.Conclusion: This practice-based study showed thathigher scores on self-reported pain were not associatedwith selection for MMR, and in women therewas a negative association for higher pain intensityand pain severity. Thus, other factors than pain determinewhether patients are selected for MMR.

  • 280.
    Ericsson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Resistance exercise improves physical fatigue in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) affects approximately 1-3 % of the general population. Fatigue limits the work ability and social life of patients with FM. A few studies of physical exercise have included measures of fatigue in FM, indicating that exercise can decrease fatigue levels. There is limited knowledge about the effects of resistance exercise on multiple dimensions of fatigue in FM. The present study is a sub-study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial in women with FM. The purpose of the present sub-study was to examine the effects of a person-centered progressive resistance exercise program on multiple dimensions of fatigue in women with FM, and to investigate predictors of the potential change in fatigue. Methods: A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multicenter trial examining the effects of person-centered progressive resistance exercise compared with an active control group. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks. Outcomes were five dimensions of fatigue measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Information about background was collected and the women also completed several health-related questionnaires. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to analyze predictors of change in fatigue in the total population. Results: A higher improvement was found at the post-treatment examination for change in the resistance exercise group, as compared to change in the active control group in the MFI-20 subscale of physical fatigue (resistance group Delta -1.7, SD 4.3, controls Delta 0.0, SD 2.7, p = 0.013), with an effect size of 0.33. Sleep efficiency was the strongest predictor of change in the MFI-20 subscale general fatigue (beta = -0.54, p = 0.031, R-2 = 0.05). Participating in resistance exercise (beta = 1.90, p = 0.010) and working fewer hours per week (beta = 0.84, p = 0.005) were independent significant predictors of change in physical fatigue (R-2 = 0.14). Conclusions: Person-centered progressive resistance exercise improved physical fatigue in women with FM when compared to an active control group.

  • 281.
    Ericsson, Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Can patients contribute to safer care in meetings with healthcare professionals? A cross-sectional survey of patient perceptions and beliefs2019In: BMJ Quality and Safety, ISSN 2044-5415, E-ISSN 2044-5423, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 657-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate patients perceptions of their meetings with healthcare professionals and the extent to which they believe they can influence patient safety in these meetings. Design Cross-sectional survey of patients using a study-specific questionnaire. Data were analysed using both parametric and non-parametric statistics. Setting The study was conducted in primary and secondary care in three county councils in southeast Sweden by means of a survey questionnaire despatched in January 2017. Participants Survey data were collected from 1445 patients, 333 of whom were complainants (patients who had filed a complaint about being harmed in healthcare) and 1112 regular patients (patients recruited from healthcare units). Main outcome measures Patients perceptions of meetings with physicians and nurses, beliefs concerning patients contributions to safer care and whether the patients had suffered harm in healthcare during the past 10 years. Results Most respondents reported that it was easy to ask physicians and nurses questions (84.9% and 86.6%) and to point out if something felt odd in their care (77.7% and 80.7%). In general, complainants agreed to a higher extent compared with regular patients that patients can contribute to safer care (mean 1.92 and 2.13, pamp;lt;0.001). Almost one-third (31.2%) of the respondents (both complainants and regular patients) reported that they had suffered harm in healthcare during the past 10 years. Conclusions Most respondents believed that healthcare professionals can facilitate patient interaction and increase patient safety by encouraging patients to ask questions and take an active part in their care. Further research will need to identify strategies to support such questioning in routine practice and ensure that it achieves its intended goals.

  • 282.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Dept. of Social and Economic Geography, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holm, Einar
    Dept. of Social and Economic Geography, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dynamic Multicore Processing for Pandemic Influenza Simulation.2016In: AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, American Medical Informatics Association , 2016, Vol. 2016, p. 534-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandemic simulation is a useful tool for analyzing outbreaks and exploring the impact of variations in disease, population, and intervention models. Unfortunately, this type of simulation can be quite time-consuming especially for large models and significant outbreaks, which makes it difficult to run the simulations interactively and to use simulation for decision support during ongoing outbreaks. Improved run-time performance enables new applications of pandemic simulations, and can potentially allow decision makers to explore different scenarios and intervention effects. Parallelization of infection-probability calculations and multicore architectures can take advantage of modern processors to achieve significant run-time performance improvements. However, because of the varying computational load during each simulation run, which originates from the changing number of infectious persons during the outbreak, it is not useful to us the same multicore setup during the simulation run. The best performance can be achieved by dynamically changing the use of the available processor cores to balance the overhead of multithreading with the performance gains of parallelization.

  • 283.
    Ernberg, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Lofgren, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjersing, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, K.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Ctr, Sweden.
    Plasma Cytokine Levels in Fibromyalgia and Their Response to 15 Weeks of Progressive Resistance Exercise or Relaxation Therapy2018In: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, article id 3985154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to compare circulating cytokines between FM and healthy controls and to investigate the effect on cytokine levels by 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise or relaxation therapy in FM. Baseline plasma cytokine levels and clinical data were analyzed in 125 women with FM and 130 age-matched healthy women. The FM women were then randomized to progressive resistance exercise (n = 49) or relaxation (n = 43). Baseline IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IP-10, and eotaxin were higher in FM than in healthy controls (P amp;lt; 0.041), whereas IL-beta was lower (P amp;lt; 0.001). There were weak correlations between cytokine levels and clinical variables. After both interventions, IL-1ra had increased (P=0.004), while IL-1 beta had increased in the relaxation group (P = 0.002). Changes of IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17A were weakly correlated with changes of PPT, but there were no significant correlations between changes of cytokine and changes in other clinical variables. The elevated plasma levels of several cytokines supports the hypothesis that chronic systemic inflammation may underlie the pathophysiology of FM even if the relation to clinical variables was weak. However, 15 weeks of resistance exercise, as performed in this study, did not show any anti-inflammatory effect on neither FM symptoms nor clinical and functional variables.

  • 284.
    Ernberg, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Effects of 15 weeks of resistance exercise on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the vastus lateralis muscle of patients with fibromyalgia2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aimed at investigating the effect of a resistance exercise intervention on the interstitial muscle levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in fibromyalgia (FMS) and healthy controls (CON). Methods: Twenty-four female patients with FMS (54 +/- 8 years) and 27 female CON (54 +/- 9 years) were subjected to intramuscular microdialysis of the most painful vastus lateralis muscle before and after 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise twice per week. Baseline dialysates were sampled in the resting muscle 140 min after insertion of the microdialysis catheter. The participants then performed repetitive dynamic contractions (knee extension) for 20 min, followed by 60 min rest. Pain intensity was assessed with a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), and fatigue was assessed with Borgs RPE throughout microdialysis. Dialysates were sampled every 20 min and analyzed with Luminex for interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Results: At both sessions and for both groups the dynamic contractions increased pain (P amp;lt; 0.012) and fatigue (P amp;lt; 0.001). The levels of TNF were lower in the FMS group than the CON group at both sessions (P amp;lt; 0.05), but none of the other cytokines differed between the groups. IL-6 and IL-8 increased after the dynamic contractions in both groups (P amp;lt; 0.010), while TNF increased only in CON (P amp;lt; 0.05) and IL-1 beta did not change. Overall pain intensity was reduced after the 15 weeks of resistance exercise in FMS (P amp;lt; 0.05), but there was no changes in fatigue or cytokine levels. Conclusion: Progressive resistance exercise for 15 weeks did not affect the interstitial levels of IL-1 beta, TNF, IL-6, and IL-8 in the vastus lateralis muscle of FMS patients or CON.

  • 285.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Studies on Spasticity from an Interventional Perspective2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on interventional aspects of spasticity, but has a very holistic approach, grounded in the specialty of Rehabilitation medicine. This means capturing the effects of spasticity, on such a complex biological system as the human being, living in a psychosocial context affecting the situation. When evaluating spasticity there are a number of levels of evidence. The first of course, understanding what we mean with spasticity, where there unfortunately is no consensus. The second level is to study if our treatments affect spasticity in a positive direction. The third is to grasp if a decrease in spasticity improve or normalize patient’s movement patterns. The fourth level investigates if improvement in movement patterns improve patient’s ability to perform activities; and the fifth level, comprising whether this intervention improves life satisfaction. Finally, on a societal level, we wish to investigate whether the improvement in life satisfaction or health related quality of life would motivate society to fund the intervention.

    Paper I on Goal Attainment Scaling pointed out necessary aspects to consider when using this instrument. This relates, among other things, to the need of learning (“the art of”) goal setting and deciding the purpose of the measurements. Research and clinical use puts different demands on the instrument, for the latter time-efficiency and simplicity to use being most important. For research, it is important to be able to register deterioration, and this can be achieved using the 6-step version.

    In paper II, concerning validation of the portable motion system, we showed this system to be valid for short-term measurements and that the use of Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) seems to be a valuable tool for graphically elucidating different movements. The equipment needs further development in handling long-term measurements (which is effectuated), and norms for normal movements in different activities has to be produced. The discriminative value of EVA needs confirmation in coming studies. For the future, there is the intriguing possibility of long-term measurements in patients’ every-day life, thereby getting objective measures on how our patients use their abilities, thus capturing the difference between what you can do and what you actually do.

    The results from paper III demonstrated a large inequality in Sweden regarding the accessibility of BoNT-A treatment for spasticity. We could also show that treatment with BoNT-A is sound from a health-economic perspective, accounting for the uncertainty of data via the sensitivity analysis. For the future, we need to explore if this inequality also exists for other modes of spasticity treatments, e.g. multidisciplinary spasticity treatment and ITB pumps, and in other countries.

    In paper IV evaluating multifocal TES, the results could not confirm efficacy with the treatment according to the protocol of the manufacturer. The results have to be interpreted with care, as low compliance and frequent adverse events made deduction not captured in the RCT study. Further studies are needed in a number of areas, e.g. what is the optimal stimulation frequency, what patients can gain from the treatment and how should adjunct treatment be organized.

    In this thesis, I have had the privilege to explore different methods of evaluating spasticity interventions from a multimodal perspective as a starting point in an effort to understand more of this intriguing phenomenon. Some of the research questions above are already in the “pipeline” for coming studies; others are to be planned by our research group and others.

    List of papers
    1. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR GOAL ATTAINMENT SCALING DURING REHABILITATION FOLLOWING ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR GOAL ATTAINMENT SCALING DURING REHABILITATION FOLLOWING ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY
    2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Goal attainment scaling represents a unique approach to identifying and quantifying individualized, meaningful treatment outcomes, and its use in the rehabilitation medicine setting is increasing. The aim of this paper is to discuss the available literature for goal attainment scaling in patients with acquired brain injury, in terms of its advantages, disadvantages and practical application, including examples of goal setting and scaling.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Foundation for Rehabilitation Information, 2011
    Keywords
    acquired brain injury, goal attainment scaling, rehabilitation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66870 (URN)10.2340/16501977-0664 (DOI)000288105200002 ()
    Available from: 2011-03-22 Created: 2011-03-21 Last updated: 2018-11-22
    2. A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study
    2016 (English)In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Portable motion systems based on inertial motion sensors are promising methods, with the advantage compared to optoelectronic cameras of not being confined to a laboratory setting. A challenge is to develop relevant outcome measures for clinical use. The aim of this study was to characterize elbow and shoulder motion during functional tasks, using portable motion sensors and a modified Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) and evaluate system accuracy with optoelectronic cameras. Ten healthy volunteers and one participant with sequel after stroke performed standardised functional arm tasks. Motion was registered simultaneously with a custom developed motion sensor system, including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and an optoelectronic camera system. The EVA was applied on elbow and shoulder joints, and angular and angular velocity EVA plots was calculated. The EVA showed characteristic patterns for each arm task in the healthy controls and a distinct difference between the affected and unaffected arm in the participant with sequel after stroke. The accuracy of the portable system was high with a systematic error ranging between -1.2 degrees and 2.0 degrees. The error was direction specific due to a drift component along the gravity vector. Portable motion sensor systems have high potential as clinical tools for evaluation of arm function. EVA effectively illustrates joint angle and joint angle velocity patterns that may capture deficiencies in arm function and movement quality. Next step will be to manage system drift by including magnetometers, to further develop clinically relevant outcome variables and apply this for relevant patient groups. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2016
    Keywords
    Upper extremity motion analysis; Portable motion sensors; Exposure Variation Analysis; Validity
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127585 (URN)10.1016/j.math.2015.09.004 (DOI)000373615100033 ()26456185 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-11-22
    3. Regional disparities in botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) therapy for spasticity in Sweden: budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional disparities in botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) therapy for spasticity in Sweden: budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap
    2017 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: As no national treatment guidelines for spasticity have been issued in Sweden, different regional treatment practices may potentially occur. This study examines botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment for spasticity on a regional level in Sweden and presents budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of spasticity in Sweden was estimated from published data. Regional sales data for BoNT-A were acquired from IMS Health. A set proportion of hospital BoNT-A use was assumed to represent treatment of spasticity. Total intervention cost of BoNT-A treatment was gathered from healthcare regional tariffs, while costs associated with spasticity were derived from publications on multiple sclerosis and stroke. Results: Results show that the regional variation in treatment of spasticity with BoNT-A is large, with approximately every fourth patient being treated in Southern healthcare region compared to every tenth in the Stockholm-Gotland or Western healthcare regions. The incremental cost of filling the reported treatment gap was also assessed and was estimated at around 9.4 million EUR. However, for the incremental cost to be offset by savings in spasticity-related costs, only a small proportion of treatment responders (defined as patients transitioning to a lower severity grade of spasticity) was required (12%). Conclusions: The study revealed apparent regional disparities of BoNT-A treatment for spasticity in Sweden. The results further suggest that the incremental cost of eliminating the treatment gap has a high probability of being offset by savings in direct costs, even at a low proportion of the patients reaching clinical improvement.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2017
    Keywords
    botulinum toxins; costs and cost analysis; muscle spasticity; regional variation
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136626 (URN)10.1111/ane.12610 (DOI)000397285600014 ()27220381 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|University of Linkoping

    Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-11-22
    4. Evaluation of a self-administered transcutaneous electrical stimulation concept for the treatment of spasticity: a randomized placebo-controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a self-administered transcutaneous electrical stimulation concept for the treatment of spasticity: a randomized placebo-controlled trial
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1973-9087, E-ISSN 1973-9095, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 507-517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a common consequence of injury to the central nervous system negatively affecting patients everyday activities. Treatment mainly consists of training and different drugs, often with side effects. There is a need for treatment options that can be performed by the patient in their home environment. AIM: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an assistive technology (AT), Mono, a garment with integrated electrodes for multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation intended for self-treatment of spasticity, in study participants with spasticity due to stroke or CP. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with a cross-over design. SETTING: Participants were recruited from two rehabilitation clinics. Treatments were performed in participants homes and all follow-ups were performed in the two rehabilitation clinics. POPULATION: Thirty-one participants were included in the study and 27 completed the study. Four participants discontinued the study. Two declined participation before baseline and two withdrew due to problems handling the garment. METHODS: Participants used the AT with and without electrical stimulation (active/non-active period) for six weeks each. followed by six weeks without treatment. Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), change in mobility, arm-hand ability, spasticity and pain were measured at baseline and after 6, 12 and 18 weeks. RESULTS: Fifteen of the 27 participants fulfilled the treatment protocol in terms of recommended use. Deviations were frequent. No statistically significant differences in outcome were found between the active and the non-active treatment periods. During the active period, an improvement was seen in the 10-meter comfortable gait test, time and steps. An improvement was seen in both the active and non-active periods for the GAS. CONCLUSIONS: Compliance was low, partly due to deviations related to the garment, complicating the interpretation of the results. Further research should focus on identifying the target population and concomitant rehabilitation strategies. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: The evaluated concept of multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) represents an interesting addition to the existing repertoire of treatments to alleviate muscle spasticity. The evaluated concept allows TES to be self-administered by the patient in the home environment. A more elaborate design of training activities directly related to patients own rehabilitation goals is recommended and may increase the value of the evaluated concept.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA, 2018
    Keywords
    Muscle spasticity; Randomized controlled trial; Cerebral palsy; Stroke; Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation
    National Category
    Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151798 (URN)10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04791-8 (DOI)000445298800001 ()29072043 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland; Promobilia Foundation; Inerventions AB (Vinnova)

    Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2018-11-22
  • 286.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sorbo, Ann
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sodra Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Sandsjo, Leif
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a self-administered transcutaneous electrical stimulation concept for the treatment of spasticity: a randomized placebo-controlled trial2018In: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1973-9087, E-ISSN 1973-9095, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 507-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a common consequence of injury to the central nervous system negatively affecting patients everyday activities. Treatment mainly consists of training and different drugs, often with side effects. There is a need for treatment options that can be performed by the patient in their home environment. AIM: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an assistive technology (AT), Mono, a garment with integrated electrodes for multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation intended for self-treatment of spasticity, in study participants with spasticity due to stroke or CP. DESIGN: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with a cross-over design. SETTING: Participants were recruited from two rehabilitation clinics. Treatments were performed in participants homes and all follow-ups were performed in the two rehabilitation clinics. POPULATION: Thirty-one participants were included in the study and 27 completed the study. Four participants discontinued the study. Two declined participation before baseline and two withdrew due to problems handling the garment. METHODS: Participants used the AT with and without electrical stimulation (active/non-active period) for six weeks each. followed by six weeks without treatment. Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), change in mobility, arm-hand ability, spasticity and pain were measured at baseline and after 6, 12 and 18 weeks. RESULTS: Fifteen of the 27 participants fulfilled the treatment protocol in terms of recommended use. Deviations were frequent. No statistically significant differences in outcome were found between the active and the non-active treatment periods. During the active period, an improvement was seen in the 10-meter comfortable gait test, time and steps. An improvement was seen in both the active and non-active periods for the GAS. CONCLUSIONS: Compliance was low, partly due to deviations related to the garment, complicating the interpretation of the results. Further research should focus on identifying the target population and concomitant rehabilitation strategies. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: The evaluated concept of multifocal transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) represents an interesting addition to the existing repertoire of treatments to alleviate muscle spasticity. The evaluated concept allows TES to be self-administered by the patient in the home environment. A more elaborate design of training activities directly related to patients own rehabilitation goals is recommended and may increase the value of the evaluated concept.

  • 287.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Anhammer, M.
    Ipsen, Sweden.
    Forsmark, A.
    Nordic Health Econ AB, Sweden.
    Regional disparities in botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) therapy for spasticity in Sweden: budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: As no national treatment guidelines for spasticity have been issued in Sweden, different regional treatment practices may potentially occur. This study examines botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment for spasticity on a regional level in Sweden and presents budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of spasticity in Sweden was estimated from published data. Regional sales data for BoNT-A were acquired from IMS Health. A set proportion of hospital BoNT-A use was assumed to represent treatment of spasticity. Total intervention cost of BoNT-A treatment was gathered from healthcare regional tariffs, while costs associated with spasticity were derived from publications on multiple sclerosis and stroke. Results: Results show that the regional variation in treatment of spasticity with BoNT-A is large, with approximately every fourth patient being treated in Southern healthcare region compared to every tenth in the Stockholm-Gotland or Western healthcare regions. The incremental cost of filling the reported treatment gap was also assessed and was estimated at around 9.4 million EUR. However, for the incremental cost to be offset by savings in spasticity-related costs, only a small proportion of treatment responders (defined as patients transitioning to a lower severity grade of spasticity) was required (12%). Conclusions: The study revealed apparent regional disparities of BoNT-A treatment for spasticity in Sweden. The results further suggest that the incremental cost of eliminating the treatment gap has a high probability of being offset by savings in direct costs, even at a low proportion of the patients reaching clinical improvement.

  • 288.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Campo, Claudia
    Medtron EMEA Regional Clin Centre, Italy.
    Calabrese, Alessandra
    Medtron Int Trading Sarl, Switzerland.
    EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ORAL BACLOFEN IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SPASTICITY: A RATIONALE FOR INTRATHECAL BACLOFEN2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 193-203Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral baclofen has long been a mainstay in the management of spasticity. This review looks at the clinical evidence for the efficacy and safety of oral baclofen in patients with spasticity of any origin or severity, to determine whether there is a rationale for the use of intrathecal baclofen. Results suggest that oral baclofen may be effective in many patients with spasticity, regardless of the underlying disease or severity, and that it is at least comparable with other antispasmodic agents. However, adverse effects, such as muscle weakness, nausea, somnolence and paraesthesia, are common with oral baclofen, affecting between 25% and 75% of patients, and limiting its usefulness. Intrathecal baclofen may be an effective alternative as the drug is delivered directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, thus bypassing the blood-brain barrier and thereby optimizing the efficacy of baclofen while minimizing drug-related side-effects. Intrathecal baclofen is a viable option in patients who experience intolerable side-effects or who fail to respond to the maximum recommended dose of oral baclofen.

  • 289.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Ohberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Portable motion systems based on inertial motion sensors are promising methods, with the advantage compared to optoelectronic cameras of not being confined to a laboratory setting. A challenge is to develop relevant outcome measures for clinical use. The aim of this study was to characterize elbow and shoulder motion during functional tasks, using portable motion sensors and a modified Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) and evaluate system accuracy with optoelectronic cameras. Ten healthy volunteers and one participant with sequel after stroke performed standardised functional arm tasks. Motion was registered simultaneously with a custom developed motion sensor system, including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and an optoelectronic camera system. The EVA was applied on elbow and shoulder joints, and angular and angular velocity EVA plots was calculated. The EVA showed characteristic patterns for each arm task in the healthy controls and a distinct difference between the affected and unaffected arm in the participant with sequel after stroke. The accuracy of the portable system was high with a systematic error ranging between -1.2 degrees and 2.0 degrees. The error was direction specific due to a drift component along the gravity vector. Portable motion sensor systems have high potential as clinical tools for evaluation of arm function. EVA effectively illustrates joint angle and joint angle velocity patterns that may capture deficiencies in arm function and movement quality. Next step will be to manage system drift by including magnetometers, to further develop clinically relevant outcome variables and apply this for relevant patient groups. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 290.
    Escher, Cecilia
    et al.
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Hans
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Creutzfeldt, Johan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meurling, Lisbet
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordahl Amorøe, Torben
    Simulator Centre West, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Method matters: impact of in-scenario instruction on simulation-based teamwork training2017In: Advances in Simulation, E-ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 2, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The rationale for introducing full-scale patient simulators in training to improve patient safety is to recreate clinical situations in a realistic setting. Although high-fidelity simulators mimic a wide range of human features, simulators differ from the body of a sick patient. The gap between the simulator and the human body implies a need for facilitators to provide information to help participants understand scenarios. The authors aimed at describing different methods that facilitators in our dataset used to provide such extra scenario information and how the different methods to convey information affected how scenarios played out.

    Methods

    A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to examine the variation of methods to deliver extra scenario information to participants. A multistage approach was employed. The authors selected film clips from a shared database of 31 scenarios from three participating simulation centers. A multidisciplinary research team performed a collaborative analysis of representative film clips focusing on the interplay between participants, facilitators, and the physical environment. After that, the entire material was revisited to further examine and elaborate the initial findings.

    Results

    The material displayed four distinct methods for facilitators to convey information to participants in simulation-based teamwork training. The choice of method had impact on the participating teams regarding flow of work, pace, and team communication. Facilitators’ close access to the teams’ activities when present in the simulation suite, either embodied or disembodied in the simulation, facilitated the timing for providing information, which was critical for maintaining the flow of activities in the scenario. The mediation of information by a loudspeaker or an earpiece from the adjacent operator room could be disturbing for team communication.

    Conclusions

    In-scenario instruction is an essential component of simulation-based teamwork training that has been largely overlooked in previous research. The ways in which facilitators convey information about the simulated patient have the potential to shape the simulation activities and thereby serve different learning goals. Although immediate timing to maintain an adequate pace is necessary for professionals to engage in training of medical emergencies, novices may gain from a slower tempo to train complex clinical team tasks systematically.

  • 291.
    E:son Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Risk factors in type 2 diabetes with emphasis on blood pressure, physical activity and serum vitamin D2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic disease with a two-fold increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and has an increasing prevalence worldwide. This thesis is based on a study conducted in primary health care in Östergötland and Jönköping, Sweden. The aim of the thesis was to evaluate new risk markers to identify patients with high risk of developing cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Data from the cohort study CArdiovascular Risk in type 2 DIabetes – a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP) was used. In paper III data were also used from CARDIPP-Revisited where all participants in the CARDIPP study were invited four years after the baseline investigation for a re-investigation. In paper IV data were used from CAREFUL which is a control group of 185 subjects without diabetes. The investigation included a standard medical history including data on diabetes duration and on-going medication. Anthropometric data were recorded and both office and ambulatory blood pressure were measured. The patients filled out a detailed questionnaire and physical activity was measured by using waist-mounted pedometers. Pedometer-determined physical activity was classified in four groups: Group 1: <5000 steps/day (‘sedentary’); Group 2: 5000-7499 steps/day (‘low active’); Group 3: 7500-9999 steps/day (‘somewhat active’); Group 4: and ≥10 000 steps/day (‘active’). Blood samples were drawn for routine analyses and also frozen for later analyses. The investigations at the departments of physiology included echocardiography, measurements of the carotid intima-media thickness, applanation tonometry and measurements of  sagittal abdominal diameter.

    Results

    Paper 1:

    Patients with a non-dipping systolic blood pressure pattern showed higher left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (PWV) compared with patients with ≥10% decline in nocturnal systolic blood pressure. Patients with <10% decline in nocturnal systolic blood pressure had higher BMI and sagittal abdominal diameter, lower GFR and higher albumin:creatinine ratio and also higher levels of NT-proBNP than patients with a dipping pattern of the nocturnal blood pressure.

    Paper 2:

    The number of steps/day were inversely significantly associated with BMI, waist circumference and sagittal abdominal diameter, levels of CRP, levels of interleukin-6 and PWV.

    Paper 3:

    At the 4-year follow-up the change in PWV (ΔPWV) from baseline was calculated. The group with the lowest steps/day had a significantly higher increase in ΔPWV compared with the group with the highest steps/day. The associations between baseline steps/day and ΔPWV remained after further adjustment in a multivariate linear regression statistically significant (p=0.005). 23% of the variation in the study could be explained by our model. Every 1000 extra steps at baseline reduced the change in ΔPWV by 0.103 m/s between baseline and follow-up.

    Paper 4:

    Low vitamin D levels were associated with significantly increased risk for premature mortality in men with type 2 diabetes. High levels of parathyroid hormone were associated with significantly increased risk for premature mortality in women with type 2 diabetes. These relationships were still statistically significant also when two other well-established risk markers for mortality, PWV and carotid intima-media thickness, were added to the analyses.

    Conclusions

    Ambulatory blood pressure recording can by addressing the issue of diurnal blood pressure variation, explore early cardiovascular organ damage and microvascular complications that goes beyond effects of standardised office blood pressure measurements. Pedometer-determined physical activity may serve as a surrogate marker for inflammation and subclinical organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. There is novel support for the durable vascular protective role of a high level of daily physical activity, which is independent of BMI and systolic blood pressure. The use of pedometers is feasible in clinical practice and provides objective information not only about physical activity but also the future risk for subclinical organ damage in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes. Our results indicate that low vitamin D levels in men or high parathyroid hormone levels in women give independent prognostic information of an increased risk for total mortality.

    List of papers
    1. Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage
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    2011 (English)In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24 h. Individuals with ≥10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as <10% nocturnal decrease in SBP. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated and microalbuminuria was measured by albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries.

    Results

    We identified 433 dippers and 230 subjects with a nocturnal non-dipping pattern. Nocturnal SBP dipping was independently of office SBP associated with decreased PWV (p = 0.008), lower ACR (p = 0.001) and NT-proBNP (p = 0.001) and increased GFR (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    We conclude that diurnal BP variation provides further information about early macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage that goes beyond standardized office BP measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2011
    Keywords
    Type 2 diabetes mellitus ambulatory blood pressure arterial stiffness microalbuminuria diurnal blood pressure variation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75571 (URN)10.1016/j.pcd.2011.04.001 (DOI)000304279600004 ()
    Note

    funding agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)||Linkoping University||GE Healthcare||Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation||Swedish Research Council| 12661 |

    Available from: 2012-03-08 Created: 2012-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Pedometer-determined physical activity is linked to low systemic inflammation and low arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedometer-determined physical activity is linked to low systemic inflammation and low arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes
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    2012 (English)In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1119-1125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Diabet. Med. 29, 11191125 (2012) Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to explore the association between pedometer-determined physical activity versus measures of obesity, inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods We analysed data from 224 men and 103 women with Type 2 diabetes, aged 5466 years. Physical activity was measured with waist-mounted pedometers during three consecutive days and the number of steps/day were calculated and classified in four groups: andlt; 5000 steps/day, 50007499 steps/day, 75009999 steps/day and andgt;= 10000 steps/day. Blood samples were analysed for lipids, HbA1c, inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometrics. Aortic pulse wave velocity was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries. Results Mean steps/day was 7683 +/- 3883 (median 7222, interquartile range 486910 343). There were no differences in age, diabetes duration, blood pressure, lipids or glycaemic control between the four groups of pedometer-determined physical activity. Subjects with higher steps/day had lower BMI (28.8 vs. 31.5 kg/m2, P andlt; 0.001), waist circumference (101.7 vs. 108.0 cm, P andlt; 0.001), lower levels of C-reactive protein (1.6 vs. 2.6 mg/l, P = 0.007), lower levels of interleukin-6 (1.9 vs. 3.8 pg ml, P andlt; 0.001) and lower pulse wave velocity (10.2 vs. 11.0 m/s, P = 0.009) compared with less physically active people. Conclusions We conclude that physical activity measured with pedometer was associated not only with less abdominal obesity, but also with decreased systemic low-grade inflammation as well as with low arterial stiffness, in people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    Keywords
    arterial stiffness, exercise, inflammation, obesity, pedometer, Type 2 diabetes
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81816 (URN)10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03621.x (DOI)000307470200021 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoping University||GE Healthcare||Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation||Swedish Research Council|12661|

    Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Pedometer-determined physical activity level and change in arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes over 4 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedometer-determined physical activity level and change in arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes over 4 years
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    2016 (English)In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 992-997Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore prospectively the correlation between the level of pedometer-determined physical activity at the start of the study and the change in pulse wave velocity from baseline to 4 years later in people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 135 men and 53 women with Type 2 diabetes, aged 54–66 years. Physical activity was measured with waist-mounted pedometers on 3 consecutive days and the numbers of steps/day at baseline were classified into four groups: <5000 steps/day, 5000–7499 steps/day, 7500–9999 steps/day and ≥10 000 steps/day. Pulse wave velocity was measured using applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and after 4 years.

    Results The mean (±sd; range) number of steps/day was 8022 (±3765; 956–20 921). The participants with the lowest level of physical activity had a more pronounced increase in the change in pulse wave velocity compared with the participants with the highest. When change in pulse wave velocity was analysed as a continuous variable and adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, BMI, systolic blood pressure, pulse wave velocity at baseline, β-blocker use, statin use, unemployment, smoking and diabetes medication, the number of steps/day at baseline was significantly associated with a less steep increase in change in pulse wave velocity (P=0.005). Every 1000 extra steps at baseline corresponded to a lower increase in change in pulse wave velocity of 0.103 m/s.

    Conclusions We found that a high level of pedometer-determined physical activity was associated with a slower progression of arterial stiffness over 4 years in middle-aged people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2016
    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes General Practice Geriatrics Sport and Fitness Sciences Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125910 (URN)10.1111/dme.12873 (DOI)000379930900018 ()26227869 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Centre for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoping University; GE Healthcare; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation; Swedish Research Council [12661]; King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria Freemason Found

    Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    4. A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes
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    2015 (English)In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low levels of vitamin D have been related to increased mortality and morbidity in several non-diabetic studies. We aimed to prospectively study relationships between serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 (vitamin D) and of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) to total mortality in type 2 diabetes. We also aimed to compare the levels of these potential risk-factors in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: The main study design was prospective and observational. We used baseline data from 472 men and 245 women who participated in the "Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care" study. Patients were 55-66 years old at recruitment, and an age-matched non-diabetic sample of 129 individuals constituted controls for the baseline data. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation-tonometry and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with ultrasound. Patients with diabetes were followed for all-cause mortality using the national Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results: Levels of vitamin D were lower in patients with diabetes than in controls, also after correction for age and obesity, while PTH levels did not differ. Nine women and 24 men died during 6 years of median follow up of the final cohort (n = 698). Vitamin D levels were negatively related to all-cause mortality in men independently of age, PTH, HbA1c, waist circumference, 24-h systolic ambulatory-blood pressure (ABP) and serum-apoB (p = 0.049). This finding was also statistically significant when PWV and IMT were added to the analyses (p = 0.028) and was not affected statistically when medications were also included in the regression-analysis (p = 0.01). In the women with type 2 diabetes, levels of PTH were positively related with all-cause mortality in the corresponding calculations (p = 0.016 without PWV and IMT, p = 0.006 with PWV and IMT, p = 0.045 when also adding medications to the analysis), while levels of vitamin D was without statistical significance (p greater than 0.9). Conclusions: Serum vitamin D in men and serum PTH in women give prognostic information in terms of total-mortality that are independent of regular risk factors in addition to levels of ABP, IMT and PWV.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    Keywords
    Arteriosclerosis; Calcium; Mortality; Parathyroid hormone; Type 2 diabetes; Vitamin D
    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120044 (URN)10.1186/s13098-015-0049-9 (DOI)000356219100001 ()26078787 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Futurum; King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria Freemason Foundation; GE Healthcare; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation; Swedish Research Council [12661]; County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences

    Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-07-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
  • 292.
    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene
    et al.
    Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA; Univ Granada, Spain.
    Mora-Gonzalez, Jose
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Contreras-Rodriguez, Oren
    Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Spain; Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental CIBERSAM, Spain.
    Verdejo-Roman, Juan
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Henriksson, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Granada, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Migueles, Jairo H.
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Ayllon, Maria
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Molina-Garcia, Pablo
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Suo, Chao
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Hillman, Charles H.
    Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA.
    Kramer, Arthur F.
    Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA; Univ Illinois, IL USA.
    Erickson, Kirk I
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Catena, Andres
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    Univ Granada, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fitness, cortical thickness and surface area in overweight/obese children: The mediating role of body composition and relationship with intelligence2019In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 186, p. 771-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cortical thickness and surface area are thought to be genetically unrelated and shaped by independent neurobiological events suggesting that they should be considered separately in morphometric analyses. Although the developmental trajectories of cortical thickness and surface area may differ across brain regions and ages, there is no consensus regarding the relationships of physical fitness with cortical thickness and surface area as well as for its subsequent influence on intelligence. Thus, this study examines: (i) the associations of physical fitness components (i.e., cardiorespiratory fitness, speed-agility and muscular fitness) with overall and regional cortical thickness and surface area; (ii) whether body composition indicators (i.e., body mass index, fat-free mass index and fat mass index) mediate these associations; and (iii) the association of physical fitness and cortical thickness with intelligence in overweight/obese children. A total of 101 overweight/obese children aged 8-11 years were recruited in Granada, Spain. The physical fitness components were assessed following the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery. T1-weighted images were acquired with a 3.0 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Tim Trio system. We used FreeSurfer software version 5.3.0 to assess cortical thickness (mm) and surface area (mm(2)). The main results showed that cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility were related to overall cortical thickness (beta = 0.321 and beta = 0.302, respectively; both P amp;lt; 0.05), and in turn, cortical thickness was associated with higher intelligence (beta = 0.198, P amp;lt; 0.05). Muscular fitness was not related to overall cortical thickness. None of the three physical fitness components were related to surface area (p amp;gt; 0.05). The associations of cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility with overall cortical thickness were mediated by fat mass index (56.86% amp; 62.28%, respectively). In conclusion, cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility, but not muscular fitness, are associated with overall cortical thickness, and in turn, thicker brain cortex is associated with higher intelligence in overweight/obese children. Yet, none of the three physical fitness components were related to surface area. Importantly, adiposity may hinder the benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility on cortical thickness. Understanding individual differences in brain morphology may have important implications for educators and policy makers who aim to determine policies and interventions to maximize academic learning and occupational success later in life.

  • 293.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Viewpoints of working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists on role balance strategies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 366-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational therapists need to be cognizant of evidence-based role balance advice and strategies that women with multigenerational caring responsibilities can implement independently or with minimal assistance, as role balance may not be the primary goal during many encounters with this population. Hence, this study aimed to identify the viewpoints on the most helpful role balance strategies for working sandwich generation women, both from their own perspectives and from the perspective of occupational therapists. This was achieved through a Q methodology study, where 54 statements were based on findings from interviews, sandwich generation literature and occupational therapy literature. In total, 31 working sandwich generation women and 42 occupational therapists completed the Q sort through either online or paper administration. The data were analysed using factor analysis with varimax rotation and were interpreted through collaboration with experts in the field. The findings revealed similarities between working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists, particularly in terms of advocating strategies related to sleep, rest and seeking practical assistance from support networks. Differences were also present, with working sandwich generation women viewpoints tending to emphasize strategies related to coping with a busy lifestyle attending to multiple responsibilities. In contrast, occupational therapy viewpoints prioritized strategies related to the occupational therapy process, such as goal setting, activity focused interventions, monitoring progress and facilitating sustainable outcomes.

  • 294.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Australia, Jönköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia; Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The complexity of role balance: Support for the Model of Juggling Occupations2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 334-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This pilot study aimed to establish the appropriateness of the Model of Juggling Occupations in exploring the complex experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities living in Perth, Australia. Methods: In meeting this aim, an evaluation was conducted of a case study design, where data were collected through a questionnaire, time diary, and interview. Results: Overall role balance varied over time and across participants. Positive indicators of role balance occurred frequently in the questionnaires and time diaries, despite the interviews revealing a predominance of negative evaluations of role balance. Between-role balance was achieved through compatible role overlap, buffering, and renewal. An exploration of within-role balance factors demonstrated that occupational participation, values, interests, personal causation, and habits were related to role balance. Conclusions: This pilot study concluded that the Model of Juggling Occupations is an appropriate conceptual framework to explore the complex and dynamic experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities. It was also confirmed that the case study design, including the questionnaire, time diary, and interview methods, is suitable for researching role balance from this perspective.

  • 295.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Telethon Kids Inst, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

  • 296.
    Fagerlind, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experience of work-related flow: Does high decision latitude enhance benefits gained from job resources?2013In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, ISSN 0001-8791, E-ISSN 1095-9084, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 161-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow is an experience of enjoyment, intrinsic motivation and absorption, which may occur in situations involving high challenges and high skill utilization. This study investigated the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow in relation to the job strain categories of the demand–control model, and to job resources such as social capital and an innovative learning climate. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in nine Swedish organizations (n = 3667, 57% response rate). Binary logistic regression analysis was performed. The results show that active jobs, low-strain jobs, a high degree of social capital and innovative learning climate increased the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow. In jobs with high decision latitude, regardless of demands, there was an increased likelihood to benefit from social capital and an innovative learning climate. The results emphasize the importance of autonomy and skill utilization, to enable the use of additional job resources in order to promote work-related flow and well-being at work.

  • 297.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Live long and prosper: Health-promoting conditions at work2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute with knowledge concerning health-promoting conditions at work, and to investigate how individual, workplace and organisational conditions are interrelated. In the thesis, work-related flow, i.e. an experience of motivation, absorption and work enjoyment, is used as a holistic notion of occupational health. In Paper I, work-related flow is investigated in relation to decision latitude, social capital and an innovative learning climate at work. Paper II investigates whether the use of tools inspired by lean production, such as standardisation and value stream mapping, is positively associated with conditions for innovative learning in organisations. The aim of Paper III is to identify conditions for health and performance in organisation and at work; further, to investigate the association between work-related flow and performance. Paper IV reports on a longitudinal investigation of workrelated flow in relation to lean tool use and conditions at the workplace. The empirical material is based on data from 10 organisations, including 4442 employees. Papers I-III are cross-sectional, whereas Paper IV is longitudinal. Papers II-IV utilise multilevel analyses.

    The results show that decision latitude, social capital and an innovative learning climate are associated with an increase in work-related flow (Papers I, III & IV), and with performance (Paper III). Individuals’ decision latitude enables an increased benefit from the social capital and innovative learning climate at work (Paper I). The effect of tools inspired by lean production on work-related flow (Papers III & IV), and on conditions for innovative learning (Paper II) differs, depending on which tools are used, and on workplace conditions. These tools enable innovative learning mainly where decision latitude is low (Paper II), and it is primarily the lean tool value stream mapping which has the potential to create an arena for innovative learning (Paper II) and work-related flow (Paper IV).

    It is concluded that the individual is embedded in a social work context that has the potential to strengthen the ability to act with motivation, absorption and enjoyment. In order to utilise collective healthpromoting conditions at work, individuals need to have authority to make their own decisions and use their skills. The effect of tools inspired by lean production depends on the specific tools that are used, and on individuals’ decision latitude at work. Their potential to enable innovative learning is most evident for employees who  have few opportunities for autonomous decision-making and skill use in their work. For those with a high degree of decision latitude, the use of lean tools has a smaller effect. Work-related flow may in itself serve as a resource that improves performance and increases engagement in health-promoting work conditions. In order to promote health as well as performance, work needsto be organised so that employees have opportunities to decide over their own work, and utilise their skills, individually and collectively within the workgroup.

    List of papers
    1. Experience of work-related flow: Does high decision latitude enhance benefits gained from job resources?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of work-related flow: Does high decision latitude enhance benefits gained from job resources?
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, ISSN 0001-8791, E-ISSN 1095-9084, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 161-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Flow is an experience of enjoyment, intrinsic motivation and absorption, which may occur in situations involving high challenges and high skill utilization. This study investigated the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow in relation to the job strain categories of the demand–control model, and to job resources such as social capital and an innovative learning climate. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in nine Swedish organizations (n = 3667, 57% response rate). Binary logistic regression analysis was performed. The results show that active jobs, low-strain jobs, a high degree of social capital and innovative learning climate increased the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow. In jobs with high decision latitude, regardless of demands, there was an increased likelihood to benefit from social capital and an innovative learning climate. The results emphasize the importance of autonomy and skill utilization, to enable the use of additional job resources in order to promote work-related flow and well-being at work.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Work-related flow, Job resources, Demand-control model, Employee health, Health promoting organizations, Innovative learning climate
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95813 (URN)10.1016/j.jvb.2013.03.010 (DOI)000320484100005 ()
    Available from: 2013-07-26 Created: 2013-07-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Lean production tools and decision latitude enable conditions for innovative learning in organizations: a multilevel analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean production tools and decision latitude enable conditions for innovative learning in organizations: a multilevel analysis
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 47, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of lean production on conditions for learning is debated. This study aimed to investigate how tools inspired by lean production (standardization, resource reduction, visual monitoring, housekeeping, value flow analysis) were associated with an innovative learning climate and with collective dispersion of ideas in organizations, and whether decision latitude contributed to these associations. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in public, private, production and service organizations (n = 4442). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used. Use of lean tools and decision latitude were positively associated with an innovative learning climate and collective dispersion of ideas. A low degree of decision latitude was a modifier in the association to collective dispersion of ideas. Lean tools can enable shared understanding and collective spreading of ideas, needed for the development of work processes, especially when decision latitude is low. Value flow analysis played a pivotal role in the associations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    psychosocial work conditions, job resources, learning climate
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Learning
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112552 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2014.10.013 (DOI)000347663600033 ()
    Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Associations between organisation of work, work conditions, work-relatedf low and performance: a multilevel analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between organisation of work, work conditions, work-relatedf low and performance: a multilevel analysis
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how organisation of work in terms of sociotechnical characteristics and use of tools inspired by lean production, and psychosocial conditions at the workplace, are associated with work-related flow and performance.

    A questionnaire including questions concerning work organisation, psychosocial work conditions, work-related flow and self-rated performance was sent to employees in ten Swedish organisations; 4442 people (56%) responded. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used in order to investigate organisation of work and work conditions in relation to work-related flow and performance. In addition, the association between work-related flow and performance was investigated.

    Our results show that a high degree of lean tool use in combination with a low degree of sociotechnical characteristics was negatively associated with work-related flow but positively associated with performance. When decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate were included in the model, the association was no longer significant in relation to work-related flow, but remained and was strengthen in relation to performance. Work-related flow had a positive association with performance.

    The conclusion is that work-related flow and work conditions that enable individual and collective skill use are important for increased performance. When lean tools are used to a high degree, good decision latitude, social capital and innovative learning climate buffer negative effects on health, and increase performance.

    Keywords
    Job resources; health; well-being; job design
    National Category
    Learning Work Sciences Other Medical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117062 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2015-04-15Bibliographically approved
    4. The effect of lean tool use and work conditions on employee health: a longitudinal multilevel study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of lean tool use and work conditions on employee health: a longitudinal multilevel study
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although lean production is an increasingly common approach to increase the efficiency of organisations, its effect on employee health is not clear. This longitudinal study investigates the effect of lean tool use and work conditions on work-related flow. Flow is a measure of health that reflects the experience of intrinsic motivation, absorption and work enjoyment.

    Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in seven organisations on two occasions with an interval of two years (n =1722). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used in order to investigate the association between the use of lean tools (i.e. standardisation, value stream mapping, visual monitoring, housekeeping and resource reduction), decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate at baseline, and work-related flow at follow-up.

    Results: In multivariate analyses, adjusted for flow at baseline, use of lean tools was positively associated with work-related flow at follow-up. When the tools were investigated separately, only value stream mapping remained significant after adjustment for work conditions and flow at baseline. Social capital and decision latitude were positively associated with flow at follow-up. Flow at baseline and follow-up were strongly associated.

    Conclusions: The extent to which lean tool use has an effect on employee health depends on which tools are used. Work conditions that support learning, such as decision latitude and social capital, are associated with a longitudinal increase in the experience of work-related flow, and are important for gaining health-promoting benefits from the use of lean tools.

    Keywords
    Work-related flow, job resources, psychosocial work conditions, control, learning
    National Category
    Learning Work Sciences Other Medical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117063 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2015-04-15Bibliographically approved
  • 298.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    The effect of lean tool use and work conditions on employee health: a longitudinal multilevel study2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although lean production is an increasingly common approach to increase the efficiency of organisations, its effect on employee health is not clear. This longitudinal study investigates the effect of lean tool use and work conditions on work-related flow. Flow is a measure of health that reflects the experience of intrinsic motivation, absorption and work enjoyment.

    Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in seven organisations on two occasions with an interval of two years (n =1722). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used in order to investigate the association between the use of lean tools (i.e. standardisation, value stream mapping, visual monitoring, housekeeping and resource reduction), decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate at baseline, and work-related flow at follow-up.

    Results: In multivariate analyses, adjusted for flow at baseline, use of lean tools was positively associated with work-related flow at follow-up. When the tools were investigated separately, only value stream mapping remained significant after adjustment for work conditions and flow at baseline. Social capital and decision latitude were positively associated with flow at follow-up. Flow at baseline and follow-up were strongly associated.

    Conclusions: The extent to which lean tool use has an effect on employee health depends on which tools are used. Work conditions that support learning, such as decision latitude and social capital, are associated with a longitudinal increase in the experience of work-related flow, and are important for gaining health-promoting benefits from the use of lean tools.

  • 299.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Associations between organisation of work, work conditions, work-relatedf low and performance: a multilevel analysis2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how organisation of work in terms of sociotechnical characteristics and use of tools inspired by lean production, and psychosocial conditions at the workplace, are associated with work-related flow and performance.

    A questionnaire including questions concerning work organisation, psychosocial work conditions, work-related flow and self-rated performance was sent to employees in ten Swedish organisations; 4442 people (56%) responded. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used in order to investigate organisation of work and work conditions in relation to work-related flow and performance. In addition, the association between work-related flow and performance was investigated.

    Our results show that a high degree of lean tool use in combination with a low degree of sociotechnical characteristics was negatively associated with work-related flow but positively associated with performance. When decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate were included in the model, the association was no longer significant in relation to work-related flow, but remained and was strengthen in relation to performance. Work-related flow had a positive association with performance.

    The conclusion is that work-related flow and work conditions that enable individual and collective skill use are important for increased performance. When lean tools are used to a high degree, good decision latitude, social capital and innovative learning climate buffer negative effects on health, and increase performance.

  • 300.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Lean production tools and decision latitude enable conditions for innovative learning in organizations: a multilevel analysis2015In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 47, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of lean production on conditions for learning is debated. This study aimed to investigate how tools inspired by lean production (standardization, resource reduction, visual monitoring, housekeeping, value flow analysis) were associated with an innovative learning climate and with collective dispersion of ideas in organizations, and whether decision latitude contributed to these associations. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in public, private, production and service organizations (n = 4442). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used. Use of lean tools and decision latitude were positively associated with an innovative learning climate and collective dispersion of ideas. A low degree of decision latitude was a modifier in the association to collective dispersion of ideas. Lean tools can enable shared understanding and collective spreading of ideas, needed for the development of work processes, especially when decision latitude is low. Value flow analysis played a pivotal role in the associations.

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