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  • 251.
    Hassling, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Lönn, Urban
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    A web-based patient information system - identification of patients' information needs2003In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 247-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Hassling, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Lönn, Urban
    Thoraxkirurgi, Akademiska sjukhuset Uppsala.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Assessment of patient information needs for a health information system in thoracic surgery and care.2002In: Health Care MMII,2002, 2002, p. 41-41Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Haufe, William
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United states.
    Hooker, Jonathan
    Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Schlein, Alexandra
    Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Szeverenyi, Nikolaus
    Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tunón, Patrik
    Advanced MR Analytics AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Horgan, Santiago
    Surgery, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Jacobsen, Garth
    Surgery, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Schwimmer, Jeffrey B
    University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Reeder, Scott B
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI, United States.
    Sirlin, Claude B.
    Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Feasibility of an automated tissue segmentation technique in a longitudinal weight loss study2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the problems inherent in manual methods, a novel, semi-automated tissue segmentation image analysis technique has been developed. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and describe preliminary observations of applying this technique to quantify and monitor longitudinal changes in abdominal adipose tissue and thigh muscle volume in obese adults during weight loss. Abdominal adipose tissue and thigh muscle volume decreased during weight loss. As a proportion of body weight, adipose tissue volumes decreased during weight loss. By comparison, as a proportion of body weight, thigh muscle volume increased.

  • 254. Hedin, K
    et al.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Liver guide for monitoring of chronic hepatitis C2000In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 340-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The severity of chronic hepatitis C infection in the Individual patient is monitored using blood laboratory findings and liver biopsy. Lf blood test results could be shown to provide sufficient information concerning the disease, the invasive procedure of liver biopsy could perhaps be avoided in some instances. This study assessed the clinical relevance of blood laboratory tests for detecting disease-related changes. in the liver. Histopathological classification was used ta assign class membership of the patients and data mining operations were performed in an elaborate way on 19 different data sets. Disease activity could be detected by a small set of blood tests. Extended sets could identify more severe changes, but failed to distinguish them. The extracted rules are implemented as a part of the knowledge base of a corresponding decision support system aimed at specialists and general practitioners.

  • 255. Hedin, K
    et al.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Take care: Patient oriented information system regarding chronic hepatitis C1999In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 1075-1075Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 256.
    Hedin, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Take care: Guidelines for patients with chronic Hepatitis C1999In: Medical Informatics Europe99,1999, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1999, p. 783-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Hedin, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Take CAre: Patient-orientedinformation system regarding chronic hepatitis C1999In: Medical Informatics Europe99,1999, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1999, p. 1075-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Hedlund, Martin
    et al.
    n/a.
    Granlund, Gösta H.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Consistency Operation for Line and Curve Enhancement1982In: The Computer Society Conference on PR&IP: Anaheim, California, 1982Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Hedlund, Martin
    et al.
    n/a.
    Granlund, Gösta H.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Image Filtering and Relaxation Procedures using Hierarchical Models1981In: Proceedings of the 2nd Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis: Finland, 1981Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 260.
    Hemmendorff, M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kronander, T.
    SECTRA, Teknikringen 2, SE-583 30 Linköping, Sweden.
    Motion compensated digital subtraction angiography1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital subtraction angiography, whether based on traditional X-ray or MR, suers from patient motion artifacts. Until now, the usual remedy is to pixel shift by hand, or in some cases performing a global pixel shift semi-automatically. This is time consuming, and cannot handle rotations or local varying deformations over the image. We have developed a fully automatic algorithm that provides for motion compensation in the presence of large local deformations. Our motion compensation is very accurate for ordinary motions, including large rotations and deformations. It does not matter if the motions are irregular over time. For most images, it takes about a second per image to get adequate accuracy. The method is based on using the phase from lter banks of quadrature lters tuned in dierent directions and frequencies. Unlike traditional methods for optical ow and correlation, our method is more accurate and less susceptible to disturbing changes in the image, e.g. a moving contrast bolus. The implications for common practice are that radiologists' time can be significantly reduced in ordinary peripheral angiographies and that the number of retakes due to large or local motion artifacts will be much reduced.

  • 261.
    Hemmendorff, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Accurate registration and motion estimation based on canonical correlation2001In: Scandinavian conference on image analysis SCIA,2001, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Hemmendorff, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kronander, T.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase-based Multidimensional Volume Registration2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for accurate image registration and motion estimation in multidimensional volumes, such as 3D CT and MR images. The method is based on phase from quadrature filters, which makes it insensitive to variations in luminance and other disturbance in the images. The theory is not restricted to any particular kind of motion model or number of dimensions. Experimental results for affine motions in 3D show high accuracy.

  • 263.
    Hemmendorff, Magnus
    et al.
    n/a.
    Andersson, Mats T.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase-based Image Motion Estimation and Registration: Phoenix, AZ, USA1999In: International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 1999, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conventional gradient methods (optical flow), for motion estimation assume intensity conservation between frames. This assumption is often violated in real applications. The remedy is a novel method that computes constraints on the local motion. These constraint are given on the same form as in conventional methods. Thus, it can directly substitute the gradient method in most applications. Experiments indicate a superior accuracy, even on synthetic images where the intensity conservation assumption is valid. The conventional gradient methods seem obsolete.

  • 264.
    Herberthson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics.
    Brun, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pairs of orientation in the plane2006In: SSBA Symposium on Image Analysis,2006, 2006, p. 97-100Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 265.
    Herberthson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brun, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    P-averages of diffusion tensors2007In: SSBA 2007, Symposium on image analysis,2007, Linköping, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For positive semi-definite tensors like diffusion tensors in the plane it is possible to calculate several different means or p-averages. These are related to p-norms for functions, but produce mappings rather than numbers as means. We compare these means for various values of the real parameter p. One important future application is the filtering and interpolation of tensor fields in Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance

  • 266.
    Herberthson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brun, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Representing Pairs of Orientations in the Plane2007In: Image Analysis: 15th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2007, Aalborg, Denmark, June 10-14, 2007 / [ed] Bjarne Kjær Ersbøll, Kim Steenstrup Pedersen, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 661-670Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present a way of representing pairs of orientations in the plane. This is an extension of the familiar way of representing single orientations in the plane. Using this framework, pairs of lines can be added, scaled and averaged over in a sense which is to be described. In particular, single lines can be incorporated and handled simultaneously.

  • 267.
    Herzog, Almut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, IISLAB - Laboratory for Intelligent Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lind, Leili
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Network solutions for home health care applications2003In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing number of the elderly in industrialised countries is increasing the pressure on respective health care systems. This is one reason for recent trends in the development and expansion of home health care organisations. With Internet access available to everyone and the advent of wireless technologies, advanced telehomecare is a possibility for a large proportion of the population.

    In the near future, one of the authors plans to implement a home health care infrastructure for patients with congestive heart failure and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The system is meant to support regular and ad-hoc measurements of medical parameters in patient homes and transmission of measurement data to the home health care provider.

    In this paper we look at network technologies that connect sensors and input devices in the patient home to a home health care provider. We consider wireless and Internet technologies from functional and security-related perspectives and arrive at a recommendation for our system.

    Security and usability aspects of the proposed network infrastructures are explored with special focus on their impact on the patient home.

  • 268.
    Hojen, A.R.
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark .
    Sundvall, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Goeg, K.R.
    Aalborg University, Denmark .
    Methods and applications for visualization of SNOMED CT concept sets2014In: Applied Clinical Informatics, ISSN 1869-0327, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 127-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inconsistent use of SNOMED CT concepts may reduce comparability of information in health information systems. Terminology implementation should be approached by common strategies for navigating and selecting proper concepts. This study aims to explore ways of illustrating common pathways and ancestors of particular sets of concepts, to support consistent use of SNOMED CT and also assess potential applications for such visualizations. The open source prototype presented is an interactive web-based re-implementation of the terminology visualization tool TermViz that provides an overview of concepts and their hierarchical relations. It provides terminological features such as interactively rearranging graphs, fetching more concept nodes, highlighting least common parents and shared pathways in merged graphs etc. Four teams of three to four people used the prototype to complete a terminology mapping task and then, in focus group interviews, discussed the user experience and potential future tool usage. Potential purposes discussed included SNOMED CT search and training, consistent selection of concepts and content management. The evaluation indicated that the tool may be useful in many contexts especially if integrated with existing systems, and that the graph layout needs further tuning and development.

  • 269.
    Holm, Tua
    et al.
    Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Norr, Anders
    Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nyström, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lessons learned from starting to implement SNOMED CT2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    National eHealth – the strategy for accessible and secure information in health and social care – is a Swedish initiative aiming at improving information management within the healthcare and social services sector. SNOMED CT is one tool in this strategy. To gain experience from SNOMED CT implementation, the National Board of Health and Welfare (host of the National Release Center of SNOMED CT) funded a number of pilot projects during 2013. Our project was one of these, focusing on facilitation of information sharing by using SNOMED CT in two application areas as described below. Furthermore, the project initiated a dialog with the EHR vendor concerning future SNOMED CT implementation.

    One area was transfer of discharge summaries from hospital care at Östergötland County Council to municipal home care. A discharge summary consists of a template with encoded headings, associated free text fields, and instructions about intended content. These headings were mapped to SNOMED CT.

    The other area was transfer of information from the EHR system at hospitals in three counties to the Swedish Stroke Register, a national quality register. The specification of information requested by the register was analyzed. Then, an EHR template was outlined, taking into account the clinical stroke process requirements, quality register requirements, and the information model of the EHR system. The draft template was based on mappings to SNOMED CT to facilitate a mutually agreed template. That means a template common for the three county councils, as well as information transfer to the register, and at the same time reduce the need for double documentation, information searching and other manual routines.

    Lessons learned include that mapping EHR template components and other EHR objects to SNOMED CT concepts holds potential benefits, regardless of whether one’s EHR system can handle mappings. Mapping activities may aid review and management of existing and development of new templates. Furthermore, mappings may be used as a common point of reference when information is shared. Mapping ambiguous template headings to SNOMED CT concepts was found to be time consuming and uncertain and mapping seems to be most useful when EHR contents are structured. These mapping source prerequisites imply that existing documentation practice needs to be revised and that organizations must support end users in that process. The project also concluded that mappings would be even more advantageous if EHR systems can handle mappings of different objects types. Organizations also need to allocate adequate resources for managing its own mappings as well as contributing to the development of SNOMED CT as such.

    Finally, the project found that training of mapping personnel benefits from integrating theoretical instruction and practical use of SNOMED CT, and that finding the correct concept in SNOMED CT calls for clinical expertise in order to be successful.

  • 270.
    Hripscak, George
    et al.
    Columbia-Presbyterian Med Center, New York .
    Ludeman, Peter
    Ameritech Knowledge Data California.
    Pryor, T Allan
    LDS Hospital Utah.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Clayton, Paul
    Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Cener New York.
    Rationale for the Arden Syntax1994In: Computers and biomedical research, ISSN 0010-4809, E-ISSN 1090-2368, Vol. 27, p. 291-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Hucikova, Anezka
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cloud Computing in Healthcare: A Space of Opportunities and Challenges2016In: TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE WITH THE INTERNET OF THINGS, IOS PRESS , 2016, Vol. 221, p. 122-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 272.
    Hucikova, Anezka
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Overcoming Constraints in Healthcare with Cloud Technology2016In: UNIFYING THE APPLICATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS OF BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATICS, IOS PRESS , 2016, Vol. 226, p. 165-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitioning enterprise operations to the cloud brings a variety of opportunities and challenges. Such step requires a deep and complex understanding of all elements related to the technology as well as defining the manner in which specific cloud challenges can be dealt with. To provide a better understanding of these opportunities and challenges within healthcare, systematic literature overview and industrial cases review is used. Results of the two methods show interconnection between cloud deployment advantages and constrains. However, healthcare case studies provide interesting insights emphasizing cloud complexity and superposition which seems to balance organizational limitations.

  • 273.
    Häggblad, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Lindbergh, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Karlsson, M. G. Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Casimir-Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Myocardial tissue oxygenation estimated with calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during coronary artery bypass grafting2008In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 054030-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a study using a method able to assess tissue oxygenation, taking into account the absorption and the level of scattering in myocardial tissue using a calibrated fiber optic probe. With this method, interindividual comparisons of oxygenation can be made despite varying tissue optical properties during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). During CABG, there are needs for methods allowing continuous monitoring and prediction of the metabolism in the myocardial tissue. 14 patients undergoing CABG are investigated for tissue oxygenation during different surgical phases using a handheld fiber optic spectroscopic probe with a source-detector distance of less than 1 mm. The probe is calibrated using a light transport model, relating the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (mu(a) and mu()(s)) to the measured spectra. By solving the inverse problem, absolute measures of tissue oxygenation are evaluated by the sum of oxygenized hemoglobin and myoglobin. Agreement between the model and measurements is obtained with an average correlation coefficient R-2 of 0.96. Oxygenation is found to be significantly elevated after aorta cross-clamping and cardioplegic infusion, as well as after reperfusion, compared to a baseline (p < 0.05). Tissue oxygenation decreases during cardiac arrest and increases after reperfusion.

  • 274.
    Ivanusa, Teodora
    et al.
    Veterinary Faculty University of Ljubljana.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Diagnostic ssytems for assessing alveolar bone loss1997In: Medical Informatcs Europe 97,1997, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1997, p. 478-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Ivanusa, Teodora
    et al.
    Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana .
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Monitoring of alveolar bone loss in experimental periodonitis in dogs1998In: Word Veterinary Dental Congress 97,1997, 1998, p. 43-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 276.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Image processing renders tissue doppler obsolete?2002In: ASE Conference,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 277.
    Jarkonis, Rytis
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Preliminary report of work performed november Simulation of the field from an ultrasoud transducer at non linear wave bearing on contrast bubble exposure2003Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 278.
    Jeuthe, Julius
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Automatic Tissue Segmentation of Volumetric CT Data of the Pelvic Region2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic segmentation of human organs allows more accurate calculation of organ doses in radiationtreatment planning, as it adds prior information about the material composition of imaged tissues. For instance, the separation of tissues into bone, adipose tissue and remaining soft tissues allows to use tabulated material compositions of those tissues. This approximation is not perfect because of variability of tissue composition among patients, but is still better than no approximation at all. Another use for automated tissue segmentationis in model based iterative reconstruction algorithms. An example of such an algorithm is DIRA, which is developed at the Medical Radiation Physics and the Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization(CMIV) at Linköpings University. DIRA uses dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) data to decompose patient tissues into two or three base components. So far DIRA has used the MK2014 algorithm which segments human pelvis into bones, adipose tissue, gluteus maximus muscles and the prostate. One problem was that MK2014 was limited to 2D and it was not very robust.

    Aim: The aim of this thesis work was to extend the MK2014 to 3D as well as to improve it. The task was structured to the following activities: selection of suitable segmentation algorithms, evaluation of their results and combining of those to an automated segmentation algorithm. Of special interest was image registration usingthe Morphon.

    Methods: Several different algorithms were tested.  For instance: Otsu's method followed by threshold segmentation; histogram matching followed by threshold segmentation, region growing and hole-filling; affine phase-based registration and the Morphon. The best-performing algorithms were combined into the newly developed JJ2016.

    Results: For the segmentation of adipose tissue and the bones in the eight investigated data sets, the JJ2016 algorithm gave better results than the MK2014. The better results of the JJ2016 were achieved by: (i) a new segmentation algorithm for adipose tissue which was not affected by the amount of air surrounding the patient and segmented smaller regions of adipose tissue and (ii) a new filling algorithm for connecting segments of compact bone. The JJ2016 algorithm also estimates a likely position for the prostate and the rectum by combining linear and non-linear phase-based registration for atlas based segmentation. The estimated position (center point) was in most cases close to the true position of the organs. Several deficiencies of the MK2014 algorithm were removed but the improved version (MK2014v2) did not perform as well as the JJ2016.

    Conclusions: JJ2016 performed well for all data sets. The JJ2016 algorithm is usable for the intended application, but is (without further improvements) too slow for interactive usage. Additionally, a validation of the algorithm for clinical use should be performed on a larger number of data sets, covering the variability of patients in shape and size.

  • 279.
    Jogbäck, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bildbaserad estimering av rörelse för reducering av rörelseartefakter2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Before reconstructing a three dimensional volume from an MR brain imaging sequence there is a need for aligning each slice, due to unavoidable movement of the patient during the scanning. This procedure is known as image registration and the method used primarily today is based on a selected slice being the reference slice and then registrating the neighbouring slices, which are assumed to be of minimal deviation.

    The purpose of this thesis is to use another method commonly used in computer vision - to estimate the motion from a regular videosequence, by tracking markers indicating movement. The aim is to create a robust estimation of the movement of the head, which in turn can be used to create a more accurate alignment and volume.

  • 280.
    Johansson, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Design and implementation of a clinical decision support system based on open standards.2001In: AMIA2001,2001, Washington: Hanley & Belfus Inc , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design of a clinical decision support system (DSS) that applies open standards such as HTTP, XML, ODBC, and Arden Syntax. We use the SOAP protocol in the DSS interface for events and actions to get a message-based, asynchronous communication based on open Internet standards. Preliminary results have shown that the proposed DSS interfaces facilitate a straightforward implementation process in a clinical laboratory.

  • 281.
    Johansson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Medical decision support systems based on the Arden Syntax in the clinical laboratory1994Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision Support Systems (DSSs) are computer systems that permit explicit representation of knowledge and can execute a computer program that uses the knowledge to assist in the decision process. A clinical DSS uses both clinical data and medical knowledge to help health professionals make clinical decisions. Developing a DSS can be a costly and time-consuming task. Sharing of knowledge can decrease costs and development time and therefore increase the use of DSSs in clinical practice.

    Arden Syntax is a standard specification for defining and sharing modular health knowledge bases among information systems and institutions. The medical knowledge is written as independent Medical Logic Modules (MLMs) and the scope of the standard is to facilitate sharing of knowledge.

    In this thesis a method is presented where medical knowledge, based on the Arden Syntax, is interpreted and used in a DSS. Furthermore, software tools for handling the MLMs in a computer are presented together with a system architecture for building a clinical DSS. Implementation of a DSS prototype, based on the presented method and tools, is demonstrated in a clinical laboratory environment.

  • 282.
    Johansson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Methods, design and development of clinical decision support systems based on the Arden syntax: with applications in the clinical laboratory1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision Support Systems (DSSs) are computer systems that permit explicit representation of knowledge and can execute a computer program that uses the knowledge to assist in the decision process. A clinical DSS uses both clinical data and medical knowledge to help health professionals make clinical decisions. Developing a DSS can be a costly and time-consuming task. Sharing of knowledge can decrease costs and development time and therefore increase the use of DSSs in clinical practice. One of the most important categories of DSSs in medicine is data driven systems where the knowledge base is linked to a clinical database. Methods that support knowledge base-database mapping are necessary when developing clinical DSSs.

    Arden Syntax is a standard specification for defining and sharing modular health knowledge bases among inflamation systems and institutions. The medical knowledge is written as independent Medical Logic Modules (MLMs) and the scope of the standard is to facilitate sharing of knowledge.

    In this thesis methods for implementing DSSs based on the Arden Syntax are described. Furthermore, DSS development tools and a system architecture for building clinical DSSs are presented, and design aspects such as database access, system validation, and platform independence are discussed. Clinical laboratory applications, where the DSS is integrated with an existing laboratory infotmation system for use in real time validation and interpretation of laboratory data, are implemented and evaluated. Since the DSS performs tasks that used to be done manually, such as retrieving the patients' previous test results, the system not only increases laboratory services but may also enhance diagnostic proficiency and save time. This experience has led to a search for other areas within the laboratory where a DSS can be both clinically valuable and cost-effective.

  • 283.
    Johansson, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Shahsavar, Nosrat
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Database and knowledge base integration - A data mapping method for Arden Syntax knowledge modules1996In: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 35, p. 302-309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Johansson, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Shahsavar, Nosrat
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Database and knowledge base integration in decision support systems1996In: AMIA 1996,1996, Washington: Hanley & belfus , 1996, p. 249-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Johansson, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    An object oriented approach to interpret medical knowledge based on the Arden Syntax1992In: AMIA1992,1992, New York: McGrawHill, Inc , 1992, p. 52-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 286.
    Johansson, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Global Linear Optimization Framework for Adaptive Filtering and Image Registration2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital medical atlases can contain anatomical information which is valuable for medical doctors in diagnosing and treating illnesses. The increased availability of such atlases has created an interest for computer algorithms which are capable of integrating such atlas information into patient specific dataprocessing. The field of medical image registration aim at calculating how to match one medical image to another. Here the atlas information could give important hints of which kinds of motion are plausible in different locations of the anatomy. Being able to incorporate such atlas specific information could potentially improve the matching of images and plausibility of image registration - ultimately providing a more correct information on which to base health care diagnosis and treatment decisions.

    In this licentiate thesis a generic signal processing framework is derived : Global Linear Optimization (GLO). The power of the GLO framework is first demonstrated quantitatively in a very high performing image denoiser. Important proofs of concepts are then made deriving and implementing three important capabilities regarding adaptive filtering of vector fields in medica limage registration:

    1. Global regularization with local anisotropic certainty metric.
    2. Allowing sliding motion along organ and tissue boundaries.
    3. Enforcing an incompressible motion in specific areas or volumes.

    In the three publications included in this thesis, the GLO framework is shown to be able to incorporate one each of these capabilities. In the third and final paper a demonstration is made how to integrate more and more of the capabilities above into the same GLO to perform adaptive processing on relevant clinical data. It is shown how each added capability improves the result of the image registration. In the end of the thesis there is a discussion which highlights the advantage of the contributions made as compared to previous methods in the scientific literature.

    List of papers
    1. Globally Optimal Displacement Fields Using Local Tensor Metric
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Globally Optimal Displacement Fields Using Local Tensor Metric
    2012 (English)In: Image Processing (ICIP), 2012 19th IEEE International Conference on, 2012, p. 2957-2960Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for regularizing displacement fields in image registration. The method uses the local structure tensor and gradients of the displacement field to impose a local metric, which is then used optimizing a global cost function. The method allows for linear operators, such as tensors and differential operators modeling the underlying physical anatomy of the human body in medical images. The algorithm is tested using output from the Morphon image registration algorithm on MRI data as well as synthetic test data and the result is compared to the initial displacement field. The results clearly demonstrate the power of the method and the unique features brought forth through the global optimization approach.

    Keywords
    Image Processing, Image Registration, Regularization, Optimization, Tensor
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing Signal Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81947 (URN)10.1109/ICIP.2012.6467520 (DOI)978-1-4673-2534-9 (ISBN)
    Conference
    2012 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, September 30 - October 3, 2012, Orlando, Florida, USA
    Projects
    Dynamic Context Atlases for Image Denoising and Patient Safety
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2011-5176Swedish Research Council, 2007-4786
    Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-26 Last updated: 2015-04-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Motion Field Regularization for Sliding Objects using Global Linear Optimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motion Field Regularization for Sliding Objects using Global Linear Optimization
    2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In image registration it is often necessary to employ  regularization in one form or another to be able to find a plausible  displacement field. In medical applications, it is useful to define  different constraints for different areas of the data. For instance  to measure if organs have moved as expected after a finished  treatment. One common problem is how to find plausible motion  vectors far away from known motion. This paper introduces a new  method to build and solve a Global Linear Optimizations (GLO)  problem with a novel set of terms which enable specification of  border areas to allow a sliding motion. The GLO approach is  important especially because it allows simultaneous incorporation of  several different constraints using information from medical atlases  such as localization and properties of organs. The power and  validity of the method is demonstrated using two simple, but  relevant 2D test images. Conceptual comparisons with previous  methods are also made to highlight the contributions made in this  paper. The discussion explains important future work and experiments  as well as exciting future improvements to the GLO framework.

    Keywords
    Image Registration, Missing Data, Medical Image Processing, Global Linear Optimization
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112210 (URN)
    Conference
    The 4th International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods, Januari 10-12, Lisbon, Portugal
    Projects
    Dynamic Context Atlases for Image Denoising and Patient SafetyGlobal Linear Optimization
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2011-5176Linnaeus research environment CADICS
    Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2015-04-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Regularization in Medical Image Registration using Global Linear Optimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regularization in Medical Image Registration using Global Linear Optimization
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Common problems in image registration include having large parts of the images contain noisy, uncertain, missing or impossible motion. Regularization is the field that aims to overcome these problems. In this article, we propose a novel framework : Global Linear Optimization (GLO) which we demonstrate has the capabilities to simultaneously and globally regularize with respect to : (1) anisotropic certainty of prior motion field, (2) sliding of organ boundaries and (3) incompressibility of organ interiors. The power of the presented framework consists of being able to spatially adapt which subsets of the data each constraint should affect and then solve a large sparse linear equations system which automatically propagates a solution over the data set through an overlapping localized metric. We demonstrate the validity of the methods and the power of the GLO framework on relevant test cases and on medical data from the DIR-lab.

    Keywords
    Keywords—Image Registration, Medical Image Analysis, Regularization, Adaptive Filtering, Medical Atlases, Global Methods, Optimization, Global Linear Optimization, Structure Tensor, Anisotropic Filtering, Partial Differential Equations
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing Other Computer and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117140 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 287.
    Johansson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Regularization in Medical Image Registration using Global Linear OptimizationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Common problems in image registration include having large parts of the images contain noisy, uncertain, missing or impossible motion. Regularization is the field that aims to overcome these problems. In this article, we propose a novel framework : Global Linear Optimization (GLO) which we demonstrate has the capabilities to simultaneously and globally regularize with respect to : (1) anisotropic certainty of prior motion field, (2) sliding of organ boundaries and (3) incompressibility of organ interiors. The power of the presented framework consists of being able to spatially adapt which subsets of the data each constraint should affect and then solve a large sparse linear equations system which automatically propagates a solution over the data set through an overlapping localized metric. We demonstrate the validity of the methods and the power of the GLO framework on relevant test cases and on medical data from the DIR-lab.

  • 288.
    Johansson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forsberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Globally Optimal Displacement Fields Using Local Tensor Metric2012In: Image Processing (ICIP), 2012 19th IEEE International Conference on, 2012, p. 2957-2960Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for regularizing displacement fields in image registration. The method uses the local structure tensor and gradients of the displacement field to impose a local metric, which is then used optimizing a global cost function. The method allows for linear operators, such as tensors and differential operators modeling the underlying physical anatomy of the human body in medical images. The algorithm is tested using output from the Morphon image registration algorithm on MRI data as well as synthetic test data and the result is compared to the initial displacement field. The results clearly demonstrate the power of the method and the unique features brought forth through the global optimization approach.

  • 289.
    Johansson, Rickard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Kreutz, Clemens
    Physics Department, University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Timmer, Jens
    Physics Department, University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    A two-dimensional bootstrap approach to model discriminationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 290.
    Jonsson, Jens
    et al.
    Inst för medicinsk teknik Linköpigs universitet.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Design features for internet-based quality of life instrument in inflammatory bowel disease1999In: AMIA99,1999, Philadelphia: Hanley & Belfus Inc , 1999, p. 1092-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 291.
    Jonsson, Jens
    et al.
    IMT LIU.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Quantitative collagen as a golden standard in different diagnosing of fibotic changes in liver tissue1999In: Medical Informatics Europe99,1999, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1999, p. 749-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Joukes, Erik
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Cornet, Ronald
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Bruijne, Martine C.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Keizer, Nicolette F.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Eliciting end-user expectations to guide the implementation process of a new electronic health record: A case study using concept mapping2016In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 87, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the usability of concept mapping to elicit the expectations of healthcare professionals regarding the implementation of a new electronic health record (EHR). These expectations need to be taken into account during the implementation process to maximize the chance of success of the EHR. Setting: Two university hospitals in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in the preparation phase of jointly implementing a new EHR. During this study the hospitals had different methods of documenting patient information (legacy EHR vs. paper-based records). Method: Concept mapping was used to determine and classify the expectations of healthcare professionals regarding the implementation of a new EHR. A multidisciplinary group of 46 healthcare professionals from both university hospitals participated in this study. Expectations were elicited in focus groups, their relevance and feasibility were assessed through a web-questionnaire. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling and clustering methods were used to identify clusters of expectations. Results: We found nine clusters of expectations, each covering an important topic to enable the healthcare professionals to work properly with the new EHR once implemented: usability, data use and reuse, facility conditions, data registration, support, training, internal communication, patients, and collaboration. Average importance and feasibility of each of the clusters was high. Conclusion: Concept mapping is an effective method to find topics that, according to healthcare professionals, are important to consider during the implementation of a new EHR. The method helps to combine the input of a large group of stakeholders at limited efforts. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 293.
    Joukes, Erik
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Cornet, Ronald
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Keizer, Nicolette
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Bruijne, Martine
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Collect Once, Use Many Times: End-Users Dont Practice What They Preach2016In: EXPLORING COMPLEXITY IN HEALTH: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS APPROACH, IOS PRESS , 2016, Vol. 228, p. 252-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data in an Electronic Health Record must be recorded once, in a standardized and structured way at the point of care to be reusable within the care process as well as for secondary purposes (collect once, use many times (COUMT) paradigm). COUMT has not yet been fully adopted by staff in every organization. Our study intends to identify concepts that underlie its adoption and describe its current status in Dutch academic hospitals. Based on literature we have constructed a model that describes these concepts and that guided the development of a questionnaire investigating COUMT adoption. The questionnaire was sent to staff working with patient data or records in seven out of eight Dutch university hospitals. Results show high willingness of end-users to comply to COUMT in the care process. End-users agree that COUMT is important, and that they want to work in a structured and standardized way. However, end-users indicate to not actually use terminology or information standards, but often register diagnoses and procedures in free text, and experience repeated recording of data. In conclusion, we found that COUMT is currently well adopted in mind, but not yet in practice.

  • 294.
    Joukes, Erik
    et al.
    Dept. of Medical Informatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Keizer, Nicolette
    Dept. of Medical Informatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Cornet, Ronald
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Composite Quality of Care Scores, Electronic Health Record Maturity Models, and their Associations; Preliminary Literature Review Results.2013In: Proceedings of Studies in Health Technology & Informatics, vol. 192, 2013, Vol. 192, p. 981-981Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To accurately assess the association between the use of EHR systems and the quality of healthcare we need (composite) measures for quality of healthcare, and a model to measure the maturity of the EHR. This Medline-based literature study therefore focussed on three topics; (1) methods to compose a measure for quality of care based on individual quality indicators (QI), (2) models to measure EHR maturity, and (3) the association between the former two. Composite quality is most often measured using opportunity-based scores, maturity is measured in functionalities or levels. EHR maturity measures are not used extensively in biomedical literature. Most studies found a positive association between EHR use and the quality of care but almost none of them differentiate in maturity of EHR which hampers firm conclusions about this relation.

  • 295.
    Junfors, Allan
    et al.
    SPRI Stockholm.
    Wallin, Sven-Bertil
    SPRI Stockholm.
    Thurin, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Carlsson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    A conceptual model for a terminological system for healthcare in Sweden1996In: Medical Informatics Europe 96,1996, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1996, p. 203-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 296.
    Kanza, G.
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Data Mining in Cancer Registries: A Case for Design Studies2013In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013 / [ed] L.M. Roa Romero, Springer, 2013, p. 1417-1420Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer registries are created, managed and data mined to gain knowledge about long term patient outcomes, effects of medication, clinical factors influencing patients’ wellbeing. Equally important is the insight into the cost effectiveness of cancer treatments, and securing data input from different medical centers and enable competent data analysis and meaningful results. Interest among different user groups (physicians, researchers, health care administrators, policy makers) cerates expectations regarding the results and active role in the development and in interactive use of the information. This paper discusses several design cases in which data mining could be implemented to enable efficient and user friendly knowledge extraction. Three important design cases have been identified following the pathways that the users typically make: 1. ensemble data mining from long term national registries; 2. ensemble data mining form the dedicated clinical web-databases; 3. ensemble distributed data mining and analysis.

  • 297.
    Karlholm, Jörgen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Westelius, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Object Tracking Based on the Orientation Tensor Concept1995In: SCIA9, Uppsala, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A scheme for performing generalized convolutions is presented. A flexibleconvolver, which runs on standard workstations, has been implemented. It isdesigned for maximum throughput and flexibility. The implementation incorporatesspatio-temporal convolutions with configurable vector combinations. Itcan handle general multi-linear operations, i.e. tensor operations on multidimensionaldata of any order. The input data and the kernel coefficients canbe of arbitrary vector length. The convolver is configurable for IIR filters inthe time dimension. Other features of the implemented convolver are scatteredkernel data, region of interest and subsampling. The implementation is doneas a C-library and a graphical user interface in AVS (Application VisualizationSystem).A scheme for performing generalized convolutions is presented. A flexible convolver, which runs on standard workstations, has been implemented. It is designed for maximum throughput and flexibility. The implementation incorporates spatio-temporal convolutions with configurable vector combinations. It can handle general multi-linear operations, i.e. tensor operations on multidimensional data of any order. The input data and the kernel coefficients can be of arbitrary vector length. The convolver is configurable for IIR filters in the time dimension. Other features of the implemented convolver are scattered kernel data, region of interest and subsampling. The implementation is done as a C-library and a graphical user interface in AVS (Application Visualization System).

  • 298.
    Karlsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Automated Whole Body Muscle Segmentation & Classification2012In: ISMRM workshop on Fat-­‐Water Separation: Insights, Applications & Progress in MRI, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 299.
    Karlsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vallin, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Automated Whole Body Muscle Quantification Based on a 10 min MR-Exam2012In: Proceedings of the annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2012), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Karlsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An Investigation of Fat Infiltration of the Multifidus Muscle in Patients With Severe Neck Symptoms Associated With Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorder2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. BACKGROUND: Findings of fat infiltration in cervical spine multifidus, as a sign of degenerative morphometric changes due to whiplash injury, need to be verified. OBJECTIVES: To develop a method using water/fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate fat infiltration and cross-sectional area of multifidus muscle in individuals with whiplash associated disorders (WADS) compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Fat infiltration and cross-sectional area in the multifidus muscles spanning the C4 to C7 segmental levels were investigated by manual segmentation using water/fat-separated MRI in 31 participants with WAD and 31 controls, matched for age and sex. RESULTS: Based on average values for data spanning C4 to C7, participants with severe disability related to WAD had 38% greater muscular fat infiltration compared to healthy controls (P = .03) and 45% greater fat infiltration compared to those with mild to moderate disability related to WAD (P = .02). There were no significant differences between those with mild to moderate disability and healthy controls. No significant differences between groups were found for multifidus cross-sectional area. Significant differences were observed for both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration between segmental levels. CONCLUSION: Participants with severe disability after a whiplash injury had higher fat infiltration in the multifidus compared to controls and to those with mild/moderate disability secondary to WAD. Earlier reported findings using T1-weighted MRI were reproduced using refined imaging technology. The results of the study also indicate a risk when segmenting single cross-sectional slices, as both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration differ between cervical levels.

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