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  • 251.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ruban, A. V.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Karimi, A.
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL).
    Peil, O. E.
    Uppsala University.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mixing and decomposition thermodynamics of c-Ti1-xAlxN from first-principles calculations2007In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 75, no 045123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wedescribe an efficient first-principles method that can be used tocalculate mixing enthalpies of transition metal nitrides with B1 structureand substitutional disorder at the metal sublattice. The technique isbased on the density functional theory. The independent sublattice modelis suggested for the treatment of disorder-induced local lattice relaxationeffects. It supplements the description of the substitutional disorder withinthe coherent potential approximation. We demonstrate the excellent accuracy ofthe method by comparison with calculations performed by means ofthe projector augumented wave method on supercells constructed as specialquasirandom structures. At the same time, the efficiency of thetechnique allows for total energy calculations on a very finemesh of concentrations which enables a reliable calculation of thesecond concentration derivative of the alloy total energy. This isa first step towards first-principles predictions of concentrations and temperatureintervals where the alloy decomposition proceeds via the spinodal mechanism.We thus calculate electronic structure, lattice parameter, and mixing enthalpiesof the quasibinary alloy c-Ti1−xAlxN. The lattice parameter follows Vegard'slaw at low fractions of AlN but deviates increasingly withincreasing Al content. We show that the asymmetry of themixing enthalpy and its second concentration derivative is associated withsubstantial variations of the electronic structure with alloy composition. Thephase diagram is constructed within the mean-field approximation.

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  • 252.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shallcross, Sam
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Role of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric defects on the magnetic properties of the half-metallic ferromagnet NiMnSb2006In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 064418-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first material to be predicted from first-principles calculations as half-metallic was NiMnSb, and the research on this material has been intense due to its possible applications in spintronics devices. The failure of many experiments to measure spin polarization to more than a fraction of the predicted 100% has partly been blamed on structural defects. In this work a complete first-principles treatise of point defects, including nonstoichiometric antisites, interstitial and vacancy defects, as well as stoichiometric atomic swap defects in NiMnSb, is presented. We find that the formation energies of the defects span a large scale from 0.2 to 14.4 eV. The defects with low formation energies preserve the half-metallic character of the material. We also find that some of the defects increase the magnetic moment and thus can explain the experimentally observed increase of magnetic moments in some samples of NiMnSb. Most interesting in this respect are Mn interstitials which increase the magnetic moment, have a low formation energy, and keep the half-metallic character of the material.

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  • 253.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Steneget, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tholander, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tasnádi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Configurational disorder effects on adatom mobilities on Ti1-xAlxN(001) surfaces from first principles2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 85, no 24, p. 245422-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use metastable NaCl-structure Ti0.5Al0.5N alloys to probe effects of configurational disorder on adatom surface diffusion dynamics which control phase stability and nanostructural evolution during film growth. First-principles calculations were employed to obtain energy potential maps of Ti and Al adsorption on an ordered TiN(001) reference surface and a disordered Ti0.5Al0.5N(001) solid-solution surface. The energetics of adatom migration on these surfaces are determined and compared to isolate effects of configurational disorder. The results show that alloy surface disorder dramatically reduces Ti adatom mobilities. Al adatoms, in sharp contrast, experience only small disorder-induced differences in migration dynamics.

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  • 254.
    Alm, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Method development for identification of N-linked glycans by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and time of flight mass spectrometry2011Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, identification of glycans in a glycoprotein is a regulatory requirement and is a part of the characterization of the protein. Glycans are constructed of several monosaccharides linked together. N-linked glycans, which have been studied in this project, are attached to the nitrogen atom in asparagine.

    A method for separating N-linked glycans by high performance anion exchange chromatography had already been developed at the department. To develop a method for identification of the N-glycans by mass spectrometry, a desalting method on porous graphitic carbon (PGC) columns was used and optimized resulting in the eluents A (0,05% TFA in ACN:water 5:95 v/v) and B (0,05% TFA in ACN:water 50:50 v/v). Also the sample introduction on the mass spectrometer was optimized and resulted in a sensitive on-line liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach which gave mass spectrometric peaks with high signal to noise ratios and with high mass accuracy.

    The developed procedure was then successfully used on glycans cleaved from a glycoprotein separated by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detector.

     

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  • 255.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Variation in proactive - reactive personality types in the red junglefowl2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown in many species that individuals exhibit consistent differences in behaviour over time and/or across situations. These differences in behaviour are called personality. One way to categorise personality types typically used for rodents, is along a proactive-reactive gradient, which describes how individuals cope with stressful challenges. Proactive individuals pay less attention to their environment, form routines easily and take longer to adapt when routines are broken compared to reactive individuals. Avian species have to date rarely been described along this gradient, thus the generality of this description across species is unclear. The present study has investigated variation in proactivity-reactivity in red junglefowl chicks (Gallus gallus). To observe the chicks’ coping styles, a proactive-reactive test was conducted where the chicks were trained to form a routine, which was then broken. Their behavioural response to this was recorded and used as a measure for proactivity-reactivity. The behavioural response was then linked to individual behavioural variation in additional personality assays. Individuals that were more vigilant in the proactive-reactive test often uttered stress calls and took longer to complete the test. In contrast, individuals that walked more and did not utter stress calls had a shorter time to complete the test. These findings can be used to describe proactive red junglefowl chicks; those that are more stressed when routines are broken, compared to calmer reactive individuals. I found no difference in routine formation between proactive and reactive red junglefowl chicks, suggesting that what describes proactive and reactive individuals may vary across species.

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  • 256. Almer, J
    et al.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials .
    Hakansson, G
    Microstructure and thermal stability of arc-evaporated Cr-C-N coatings2004In: PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE, ISSN 1478-6443, Vol. 84, no 7, p. 611-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of C incorporation in the microstructure and thermal stability of arc-evaporated Cr-C-N coatings is explored via reactive growth in a mixed C2H4-N-2 environment. C is found to react more readily than N at both the Cr cathode and the coating surfaces, so that a C2H4-to-N-2 flow ratio of only 1% yields a C-to-N ratio of approximately 10% within the coatings. The as-deposited microstructures consist primarily of the delta-Cr(C, N) phase and possess high compressive residual stresses, which decrease with increasing C content. Post-deposition annealing up to 700degreesC results in depletion of lattice defects, and concomitant reductions in stress and coating hardness, together with phase transformations which suggest metastable phase formation during growth. Apparent activation energies for this lattice defect are found to be in the range expected for bulk diffusion of N and C (2.4-2.8 eV). The results suggest that inclusion of small amounts of C in this system offers the ability to reduce internal stresses while maintaining defect-related hardness increases, permitting growth of thicker and thus more wear-resistant coatings.

  • 257.
    Almer, Jonathan
    et al.
    IKP, Konstruktionsmaterial Linköpings universitet.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Materials.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Håkansson, Greger
    Tixon Brukens Sverige AB Linköping.
    Microstructural evolution during tempering of arc-evaporated Cr-N coatings2000In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cr-N coatings were arc-deposited at 50 and 300 V. The changes in the coating microstructure and phase content during tempering were monitored. As a result, the phase stability and activation energies for defect diffusion were determined as a function of ion energy.

  • 258.
    Almgren, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nyengaard, Jens R
    Aarhus University.
    Persson, Bengt
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics .
    Lavebratt, Catharina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Carbamazepine protects against neuronal hyperplasia and abnormal gene expression in the megencephaly mouse2008In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 32, p. 364-376Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Almquist, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Electrochemical synthesis of electroactive polymers for drugrelease for bio scaffolds.2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stem cell based therapy has the potential to treat several severe diseases; Parkinson’s

    disease is one well- known example. Transplantation of stem cell derived cells into

    animal models is unfortunately often associated with tumour formation or- uncontrolled

    growth of the transplanted cells. One strategy to suppress this tumour formation might be

    to induce differentiation of these cells, which in turn would prevent them from dividing.

     

    Neuroblastoma tumors are known to demonstrate the complete transition from an

    undifferentiated state to a completely harmful, differentiated appearance and derived cells

    can be used as a model for cell differentiation and tumor suppression.

     

    In this Master Thesis’s the conducting polymers PEDOT and PPy, that upon formation

    can be doped with biologically active compounds which in- turn can be released in a

    controlled manner through electrical stimulation, were formed together with various

    drugs (e.g. Methotrexate and Mycophenolic Acid), here shown to have effect on

    Neuroblastoma cells. Neuroblastoma- derived cell line SH- SY5Y was used as a model

    system for neuronal differentiation and tumour inhibition. Release profiles of

    neuroblastoma active drugs following electrical stimulation were evaluated and the

    effects from electrochemical processes on simultaneously growing SH- SY5Y cells were

    investigated.

     

    The methods to deposit and release the drugs were based on electropolymerization and

    electrochemically controlled release, respectively. Controlled release of various drugs

    and compounds was monitored using Vis- and UV- spectroscopy and on some occasions

    using HPLC.

     

    The electrochemically controlled release of a biologically inactive compound that can be

    used as a negative control for electrochemical release in future experiments was shown

    and that resulting electrochemical processes have negative effects on neuroblastoma cell

    growth.

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  • 260. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Almstedt, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Protein Misfolding in Human Diseases2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several diseases well known that are due to aberrant protein folding. These types of diseases can be divided into three main categories:

    1. Loss-of-function diseases
    2. Gain-of-toxic-function diseases
    3. Infectious misfolding diseases

     

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to inherited mutations. The rare disease marble brain disease (MBD) also known as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS) can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. We have over the past 10-15 years studied the folding, misfolding and aggregation of the enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. In summary our HCA II folding studies have shown that the protein folds via an intermediate of molten-globule type, which lacks enzyme activity and the molten globule state of HCA II is prone to aggregation. One mutation associated with MBD entails the His107Tyr (H107Y) substitution. We have demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing mutation influencing the folding behavior of HCA II. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II towards populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The enormously destabilizing effects of the H107Y mutation is not due to loss of specific interactions of H107 with residue E117, instead it is caused by long range sterical destabilizing effects of the bulky tyrosine residue. We also showed that the folding equilibrium can be shifted towards the native state by binding of the small-molecule drug acetazolamide, and we present a small molecule inhibitor assessment with select sulfonamide inhibitors of varying potency to investigate the effectiveness of these molecules to inhibit the misfolding of HCA II H107Y. We also demonstrate that high concentration of the activator compound L-His increases the enzyme activity of the mutant but without stabilizing the folded protein.

     

    The infectious misfolding diseases is the smallest group of misfolding diseases. The only protein known to have the ability to be infectious is the prion protein. The human prion diseases Kuru, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob are characterized by depositions of amyloid plaque from misfolded prion protein (HuPrP) in various regions of the brain depending on disease. Amyloidogenesis of HuPrP is hence strongly correlated with prion disease.

    Our results show that amyloid formation of recHuPrP90-231 can be achieved starting from the native protein under gentle conditions without addition of denaturant or altered pH. The process is efficiently catalyzed by addition of preformed recHuPrP90-231 amyloid seeds. It is plausible that amyloid seeding reflect the mechanism of transmissibility of prion diseases. Elucidating the mechanism of PrP amyloidogenesis is therefore of interest for strategic prevention of prion infection.

    List of papers
    1. Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 342, no 2, p. 619-633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to mutations. The disease marble brain syndrome (MBS), known also as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS), can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. One mutation associated with MBS entails the His107Tyr substitution. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation. The loss-of-function is clearly a folding defect, since the mutant shows 64% of CO2 hydration activity compared to that of the wild-type at low temperature where the mutant is folded. On the contrary, its stability towards thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) denaturation is highly compromised. Using activity assays, CD, fluorescence, NMR, cross-linking, aggregation measurements and molecular modeling, we have mapped the properties of this remarkable mutant. Loss of enzymatic activity had a midpoint temperature of denaturation (Tm) of 16 °C for the mutant compared to 55 °C for the wild-type protein. GuHCl-denaturation (at 4 °C) showed that the native state of the mutant was destabilized by 9.2 kcal/mol. The mutant unfolds through at least two equilibrium intermediates; one novel intermediate that we have termed the molten globule light state and, after further denaturation, the classical molten globule state is populated. Under physiological conditions (neutral pH; 37 °C), the His107Tyr mutant will populate the molten globule light state, likely due to novel interactions between Tyr107 and the surroundings of the critical residue Ser29 that destabilize the native conformation. This intermediate binds the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) but not as strong as the molten globule state, and near-UV CD reveals the presence of significant tertiary structure. Notably, this intermediate is not as prone to aggregation as the classical molten globule. As a proof of concept for an intervention strategy with small molecules, we showed that binding of the CA inhibitor acetazolamide increases the stability of the native state of the mutant by 2.9 kcal/mol in accordance with its strong affinity. Acetazolamide shifts the Tm to 34 °C that protects from misfolding and will enable a substantial fraction of the enzyme pool to survive physiological conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Elsevier, 2004
    Keywords
    Misfolding, loss-of-function, aggregation, molten globule, misfolding inhibitor
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21072 (URN)10.1016/j.jmb.2004.07.024 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    2. Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.
    2008 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1288-1298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Marble brain disease (MBD) also known as Guibaud−Vainsel syndrome is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. HCA II is a 259 amino acid single domain enzyme and is dominated by a 10-stranded β-sheet. One mutation associated with MBD entails the H107Y substitution where H107 is a highly conserved residue in the carbonic anhydrase protein family. We have previously demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation [Almstedt et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 342, 619−633]. Here, the exceptional destabilization by the H107Y mutation has been further investigated. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II toward populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The native state stability of the mutants was in the following order:  wt > H107N > E117A > H107A > H107F > H107Y > H107N/E117A > H107A/E117A. In conclusion:  (i) H107N is least destabilizing likely due to compensatory H-bonding ability of the introduced Asn residue. (ii) Double mutant cycles surprisingly reveal additive destabilization of H107N and E117A showing that H107 and E117 are independently stabilizing the folded protein. (iii) H107Y and H107F are exceptionally destabilizing due to bulkiness of the side chains whereas H107A is more accommodating, indicating long-range destabilizing effects of the natural pathogenic H107Y mutation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Washington: ACS, 2008
    Keywords
    mutant mapping, carbonic anhydrase, misfolding, loss-of-function, molten globule
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21056 (URN)10.1021/bi701720p (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    3. Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 48, no 23, p. 5358-5364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome or Marble brain disease (MBD) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. Here we report a small-molecule stabilization study of the exceptionally destabilized HCA II mutant H107Y employing inhibitors based on p-aminobenzoyisulfonamide compounds and 1,3,4-thiadiazolylsulfonamides as well as amino acid activators. Protein stability assays showed a significant stabilization by the aromatic sulfonamide inhibitors when present at 10 mu M concentration, providing shifts of the midpoint of thermal denaturation between 10 degrees C and 16 degrees C and increasing the free energies of denaturation 0.5-3.0 kcal/mol as deduced from GuHCl denaturation. This study could be used as a starting point for the design of small-molecule folding modulators and possibly autoactivatable molecules for suppression of misfolding of destabilized HCA II mutants.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19548 (URN)10.1021/bi900128e (DOI)
    Note
    On the day of the defence date tha status of this articel was In Manuscript.Available from: 2009-06-29 Created: 2009-06-26 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    4. Amyloid fibrils of human prion protein are spun and woven from morphologically disordered aggregates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amyloid fibrils of human prion protein are spun and woven from morphologically disordered aggregates
    2009 (English)In: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation and infectivity of prions in human prionopathies are likely associated with conversion of the mainly α-helical human prion protein, HuPrP, into an aggregated form with amyloid-like properties. Previous reports on efficient conversion of recombinant HuPrP have used mild to harsh denaturing conditions to generate amyloid fibrils in vitro. Herein we report on the in vitro conversion of four forms of truncated HuPrP (sequences 90-231 and 121-231 with and without an N-terminal hexa histidine tag) into amyloid-like fibrils within a few hours by using a protocol (phosphate buffered saline solutions at neutral pH with intense agitation) close to physiological conditions. The conversion process monitored by thioflavin T, ThT, revealed a three stage process with lag, growth and equilibrium phases. Seeding with preformed fibrils shortened the lag phase demonstrating the classic nucleated polymerization mechanism for the reaction. Interestingly, comparing thioflavin T kinetics with solubility and turbidity kinetics it was found that the protein initially formed non-thioflavionophilic, morphologically disordered aggregates that over time matured into amyloid fibrils. By transmission electron microscopy and by fluorescence microscopy of aggregates stained with luminescent conjugated polythiophenes (LCPs); we demonstrated that HuPrP undergoes a conformational conversion where spun and woven fibrils protruded from morphologically disordered aggregates. The initial aggregation functioned as a kinetic trap that decelerated nucleation into a fibrillation competent nucleus, but at the same time without aggregation there was no onset of amyloid fibril formation. The agitation, which was necessary for fibril formation to be induced, transiently exposes the protein to the air-water interface suggests a hitherto largely unexplored denaturing environment for prion conversion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Austin: Landes Bioscience Journals, 2009
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21064 (URN)10.4161/pri.3.4.10112 (DOI)000280061100009 ()
    Available from: 2009-09-28 Created: 2009-09-28 Last updated: 2019-11-08
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    Protein Misfolding in Human Diseases
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  • 261.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Unfolding a folding disease: folding, misfolding and aggregation of the marble brain syndrome-associated mutant H107Y of human carbonic anhydrase II2004In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 342, no 2, p. 619-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most loss-of-function diseases are caused by aberrant folding of important proteins. These proteins often misfold due to mutations. The disease marble brain syndrome (MBS), known also as carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (CADS), can manifest in carriers of point mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. One mutation associated with MBS entails the His107Tyr substitution. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation. The loss-of-function is clearly a folding defect, since the mutant shows 64% of CO2 hydration activity compared to that of the wild-type at low temperature where the mutant is folded. On the contrary, its stability towards thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) denaturation is highly compromised. Using activity assays, CD, fluorescence, NMR, cross-linking, aggregation measurements and molecular modeling, we have mapped the properties of this remarkable mutant. Loss of enzymatic activity had a midpoint temperature of denaturation (Tm) of 16 °C for the mutant compared to 55 °C for the wild-type protein. GuHCl-denaturation (at 4 °C) showed that the native state of the mutant was destabilized by 9.2 kcal/mol. The mutant unfolds through at least two equilibrium intermediates; one novel intermediate that we have termed the molten globule light state and, after further denaturation, the classical molten globule state is populated. Under physiological conditions (neutral pH; 37 °C), the His107Tyr mutant will populate the molten globule light state, likely due to novel interactions between Tyr107 and the surroundings of the critical residue Ser29 that destabilize the native conformation. This intermediate binds the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) but not as strong as the molten globule state, and near-UV CD reveals the presence of significant tertiary structure. Notably, this intermediate is not as prone to aggregation as the classical molten globule. As a proof of concept for an intervention strategy with small molecules, we showed that binding of the CA inhibitor acetazolamide increases the stability of the native state of the mutant by 2.9 kcal/mol in accordance with its strong affinity. Acetazolamide shifts the Tm to 34 °C that protects from misfolding and will enable a substantial fraction of the enzyme pool to survive physiological conditions.

  • 262.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thermodynamic interrogation of a folding disease. Mutant mapping of position 107 in human carbonic anhydrase II linked to marble brain disease.2008In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1288-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marble brain disease (MBD) also known as Guibaud−Vainsel syndrome is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. HCA II is a 259 amino acid single domain enzyme and is dominated by a 10-stranded β-sheet. One mutation associated with MBD entails the H107Y substitution where H107 is a highly conserved residue in the carbonic anhydrase protein family. We have previously demonstrated that the H107Y mutation is a remarkably destabilizing folding mutation [Almstedt et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 342, 619−633]. Here, the exceptional destabilization by the H107Y mutation has been further investigated. A mutational survey of position H107 and a neighboring conserved position E117 has been performed entailing the mutants H107A, H107F, H107N, E117A and the double mutants H107A/E117A and H107N/E117A. All mutants were severely destabilized versus GuHCl and heat denaturation. Thermal denaturation and GuHCl phase diagram and ANS analyses showed that the mutants shifted HCA II toward populating ensembles of intermediates of molten globule type under physiological conditions. The native state stability of the mutants was in the following order:  wt > H107N > E117A > H107A > H107F > H107Y > H107N/E117A > H107A/E117A. In conclusion:  (i) H107N is least destabilizing likely due to compensatory H-bonding ability of the introduced Asn residue. (ii) Double mutant cycles surprisingly reveal additive destabilization of H107N and E117A showing that H107 and E117 are independently stabilizing the folded protein. (iii) H107Y and H107F are exceptionally destabilizing due to bulkiness of the side chains whereas H107A is more accommodating, indicating long-range destabilizing effects of the natural pathogenic H107Y mutation.

  • 263.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Amyloid fibrils of human prion protein are spun and woven from morphologically disordered aggregates2009In: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation and infectivity of prions in human prionopathies are likely associated with conversion of the mainly α-helical human prion protein, HuPrP, into an aggregated form with amyloid-like properties. Previous reports on efficient conversion of recombinant HuPrP have used mild to harsh denaturing conditions to generate amyloid fibrils in vitro. Herein we report on the in vitro conversion of four forms of truncated HuPrP (sequences 90-231 and 121-231 with and without an N-terminal hexa histidine tag) into amyloid-like fibrils within a few hours by using a protocol (phosphate buffered saline solutions at neutral pH with intense agitation) close to physiological conditions. The conversion process monitored by thioflavin T, ThT, revealed a three stage process with lag, growth and equilibrium phases. Seeding with preformed fibrils shortened the lag phase demonstrating the classic nucleated polymerization mechanism for the reaction. Interestingly, comparing thioflavin T kinetics with solubility and turbidity kinetics it was found that the protein initially formed non-thioflavionophilic, morphologically disordered aggregates that over time matured into amyloid fibrils. By transmission electron microscopy and by fluorescence microscopy of aggregates stained with luminescent conjugated polythiophenes (LCPs); we demonstrated that HuPrP undergoes a conformational conversion where spun and woven fibrils protruded from morphologically disordered aggregates. The initial aggregation functioned as a kinetic trap that decelerated nucleation into a fibrillation competent nucleus, but at the same time without aggregation there was no onset of amyloid fibril formation. The agitation, which was necessary for fibril formation to be induced, transiently exposes the protein to the air-water interface suggests a hitherto largely unexplored denaturing environment for prion conversion.

  • 264.
    Almstedt, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rafstedt, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Supuran, Claudiu T
    University of Florence.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease2009In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 48, no 23, p. 5358-5364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome or Marble brain disease (MBD) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) gene. Here we report a small-molecule stabilization study of the exceptionally destabilized HCA II mutant H107Y employing inhibitors based on p-aminobenzoyisulfonamide compounds and 1,3,4-thiadiazolylsulfonamides as well as amino acid activators. Protein stability assays showed a significant stabilization by the aromatic sulfonamide inhibitors when present at 10 mu M concentration, providing shifts of the midpoint of thermal denaturation between 10 degrees C and 16 degrees C and increasing the free energies of denaturation 0.5-3.0 kcal/mol as deduced from GuHCl denaturation. This study could be used as a starting point for the design of small-molecule folding modulators and possibly autoactivatable molecules for suppression of misfolding of destabilized HCA II mutants.

  • 265.
    Almyras, Georgios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanoscale engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sangiovanni, Davide Giuseppe
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ruhr Univ Bochum, Germany.
    Sarakinos, Kostas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanoscale engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Semi-Empirical Force-Field Model For The Ti1-XAlXN (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) System2019In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a modified embedded atom method (MEAM) semi-empirical force-field model for the Ti1-xAlxN (0 x 1) alloy system. The MEAM parameters, determined via an adaptive simulated-annealing (ASA) minimization scheme, optimize the models predictions with respect to 0 K equilibrium volumes, elastic constants, cohesive energies, enthalpies of mixing, and point-defect formation energies, for a set of approximate to 40 elemental, binary, and ternary Ti-Al-N structures and configurations. Subsequently, the reliability of the model is thoroughly verified against known finite-temperature thermodynamic and kinetic properties of key binary Ti-N and Al-N phases, as well as properties of Ti1-xAlxN (0 amp;lt; x amp;lt; 1) alloys. The successful outcome of the validation underscores the transferability of our model, opening the way for large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of, e.g., phase evolution, interfacial processes, and mechanical response in Ti-Al-N-based alloys, superlattices, and nanostructures.

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  • 266.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chey, Chan Oeurn
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nour, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods2015In: AIP Advances, ISSN 2158-3226, E-ISSN 2158-3226, Vol. 5, no 8, article id 087180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 degrees C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (mu-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

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  • 267.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iandolo, Donata
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of ZnO seed layer precursor molar ratio on the density of interface defects in low temperature aqueous chemically synthesized ZnO nanorods/GaN light-emitting diodes2016In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 119, no 16, p. 165702-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS) of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) has been attracting considerable research interest due to its great potential in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The influence of the molar ratio of the zinc acetate (ZnAc): KOH as a ZnO seed layer precursor on the density of interface defects and hence the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in LT-ACS of ZnO NRs/GaN LEDs has been systematically investigated. The material quality of the as-prepared seed layer as quantitatively deduced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is found to be influenced by the molar ratio. It is revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence that the seed layer molar ratio plays a significant role in the formation and the density of defects at the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure interface. Consequently, LED devices processed using ZnO NRs synthesized with molar ratio of 1:5M exhibit stronger yellow emission (similar to 575 nm) compared to those based on 1:1 and 1:3M ratios as measured by the electroluminescence. Furthermore, seed layer molar ratio shows a quantitative dependence of the non-radiative defect densities as deduced from light-output current characteristics analysis. These results have implications on the development of high-efficiency ZnO-based LEDs and may also be helpful in understanding the effects of the ZnO seed layer on defect-related non-radiative recombination. Published by AIP Publishing.

  • 268.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Seed layer synthesis effect on the concentration of interface defects and emission spectra of ZnO nanorods/p-GaN light-emitting diode2017In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 214, no 1, article id 1600333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the low-temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS), holds great promises for the synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanostructure-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and hence require parameter tuning for optimal performance. N-ZnO nanorods (NRs)/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs have been synthesized by the LT-ACS using ZnO nanoparticle (NPs) seed layers prepared with different precursor solutions. The effect of these seed layers on the interface defect properties and emission intensity of the as-synthesized n-Zn/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs has been demonstrated by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) and electroluminescence (EL) measurements, respectively. A significant reduction of the interface defects in the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure synthesized from a seed layer prepared from zinc acetate (ZnAc) with a mixture of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) (donated as ZKH seed) compared with those prepared from ZnAc and KOH (donated as ZK seed) is observed as revealed by spatially resolved CL. Consequently, the LEDs based on n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN prepared from ZKH seed show an improvement in the yellow emission (approximate to 578nm) compared to that based on the ZK seed as deduced from the electroluminescence measurements. The improvement in the yellow EL emission on the ZKH LED probably attributed to the low presence of the non-radiative defect as deduced by light-output current (L-I) characteristics analysis.

  • 269.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Savoyant, Adrien
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    An effective low-temperature solution synthesis of Co-doped [0001]-oriented ZnO nanorods2017In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 121, no 21, article id 215102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate an efficient possibility to synthesize vertically aligned pure zinc oxide (ZnO) and Co-doped ZnO nanorods (NRs) using the low-temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (90 degrees C). Two different mixing methods of the synthesis solutions were investigated for the Co-doped samples. The synthesized samples were compared to pure ZnO NRs regarding the Co incorporation and crystal quality. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements confirmed the substitution of Co2+ inside the ZnO NRs, giving a highly anisotropic magnetic Co2+ signal. The substitution of Zn2+ by Co2+ was observed to be combined with a drastic reduction in the core-defect (CD) signal (g similar to 1.956) which is seen in pure ZnO NRs. As revealed by the cathodoluminescence (CL), the incorporation of Co causes a slight red-shift of the UV peak position combined with an enhancement in the intensity of the defect-related yellow-orange emission compared to pure ZnO NRs. Furthermore, the EPR and the CL measurements allow a possible model of the defect configuration in the samples. It is proposed that the as-synthesized pure ZnO NRs likely contain Zn interstitial (Zn-i(+)) as CDs and oxygen vacancy (V-O) or oxygen interstitial (O-i) as surface defects. As a result, Co was found to likely occupy the Zn-i(+), leading to the observed CDs reduction and hence enhancing the crystal quality. These results open the possibility of synthesis of highly crystalline quality ZnO NRs-based diluted magnetic semiconductors using the low-temperature aqueous chemical method. Published by AIP Publishing.

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  • 270.
    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma
    et al.
    Departamento de Biología Aplicada, Universidad Miguel Hernández.
    Rivera, Fransisco J.
    Laboratory of Stem Cells and Neurogeneration, Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Facultu of Medicine and Center for INterdiciplinary Studies on the Nervous System (CISNe), Universitad Austral de Chile; Institute for Molecular Regenerative MEdicine and Spinal Cord Injury and Tissue Regeneration Center Salzburg (SCI-TReCS), Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austira.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bisphenol-A and metabolic diseases: epigenetic developmental and transgenerational basis2016In: Environmental Epigenetics, ISSN 2058-5888, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to environmental toxicants is now accepted as a factor contributing to the increasing incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases around the world. Such environmental compounds are known as ‘obesogens’. Among them, bisphenol-A (BPA) is the most widespread and ubiquitous compound affecting humans and animals. Laboratory animal work has provided conclusive evidence that early-life exposure to BPA is particularly effective in predisposing individuals to weight gain. Embryonic exposure to BPA is reported to generate metabolic disturbances later in life, such as obesity and diabetes. When BPA administration is combined with a high-fat diet, there is an exacerbation in the development of metabolic disorders. Remarkably, upon BPA exposure of gestating females, metabolic disturbances have been found both in the offspring and later in life in the mothers themselves. When considering the metabolic effects generated by an early developmental exposure to BPA, one of the questions that arises is the role of precursor cells in the etiology of metabolic disorders. Current evidence shows that BPA and other endocrine disruptors have the ability to alter fat tissue development and growth by affecting the capacity to generate functional adipocytes, as well as their rate of differentiation to specific cell types. Epigenetic mechanisms seem to be involved in the BPA-induced effects related to obesity, as they have been described in both in vitro and in vivo models. Moreover, recent reports also show that developmental exposure to BPA generates abnormalities that can be transmitted to future generations, in a process called as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

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  • 271.
    Alpat, B.
    et al.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy; Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Gulgun, M.A.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Corapcioglu, G.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yildizhan Özyar, Melike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Di Lazzaro, P.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Murra, D.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Kaplanoglu, T.
    Maprad Srl, Italy.
    Postolache, V
    Maprad Srl, Italy.
    Mengali, S.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Simeoni, M.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Urbani, A.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Testing of substrates for flexible optical solar reflectors: irradiations of nano-hybrid coatings of polyimide films with 20 keV electrons and with 200-400 nm ultraviolet radiation2019In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 14, article id T06003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the frame of a project aimed at developing a new type of optical solar reflectors we present the scientific and technological issues addressed during irradiations of nano-hybrid coatings on polyimide films by using 20 keV electron beam from a modified use of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and with ultraviolet (UV) dose equal to 300 space-equivalent Sun hours. Details of a new approach to use SEM for low energy electron irradiations and of a new UV irradiation setup are given.

  • 272.
    Alriksson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Höns återhämtning efter stress samt domesticeringens effekter: En biologisk studie med ett lärarperspektiv2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The biological study has shown that behaviour of laying hens has changed through domestication and the hens have adapted to live with humans. They have developed less fear of humans and more resistance to stress. In this study hens’ recovery after a stressful experience has been studied. A comparison between the breeds White Leghorn and red junglefowl has been made to see how the domestication has affected the recovery. The questions of this study are therefore: How long does it take for hens’ to recover their natural behaviour, not stressrelated, after a stressful experience? Are there any differences in recovery between the different breeds White Leghorn and red junglefowl? The results did not show a specific time for recovery, but a distinct recovery was noticed in Relaxed Behaviour, Comfort Behaviour, Perch, Vocalisation and Stand Alert. This beacause of the behaviours differed significantly with time. Also significant differences existed between the breeds, both in behaviours that showed recovery and in behavious that did not. A conclusion of what breed that recovered fastest was difficult to make. This because of the differences of behaviour showed different tendencies in recovery. The differences in recovery between the sexes showed tendencies that the males recovered fastest. The domestication has also been studied from a teacherperspective. The study showed that domestication can be a part of biologyeducation in the fields of evolution and genetics in the grades 7-9.

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  • 273.
    Alriksson, Felicia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Individuell tillväxt och substratval hos en lokalt differentierad population av Asellus aquaticus2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Local differentiation may occur during a short period of time and is part of the formation of new species. The isopod Asellus aquaticus is an example of a species in which local adaptation has occurred during a short period of time. An establishment of stonewort (Chara spp.) vegetation in Lake Tåkern (in the 2000) resulted in two different Asellus ecotypes; a lighter pigmented, smaller one that lives among stoneworts grazing periphytic algae, and a darker, larger ecotype that feeds on decaying leaves in reed (Phragmites australis vegetation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are differences in growth between ecotypes, depending on whether the food was periphytic algae or leaves, and to study the choice of substrates between the two food types. For the study, animals from both habitats were brought in from Lake Tåkern to the laboratory. I found that both the reed and the stonewort animals grew better when feeding on periphytic algae than on leaves, but that there was no difference in weight gain between the two ecotypes. There was no indication that the animals preferred any of the substrates. Results suggest that despite earlier noted differences in behavior, size and pigmentation (which differentiation had brought), there is no evidence that Asellus aquaticus has adapted to feed on plant matter prevailing in their original habitat. The animals grew better when the food was algae maybe due to that the algae, as previous studies show, are easier assimilated, whereas Asellus has to eat a larger amount of leaves to reach the same energy intake.

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    Examensarbete Biologi Felicia Alriksson
  • 274.
    Al-Saidi, W A
    et al.
    University of Pittsburgh, USA .
    Asher, Sanford A
    University of Pittsburgh, USA .
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Resonance Raman Spectra of TNT and RDX Using Vibronic Theory, Excited-State Gradient, and Complex Polarizability Approximations2012In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 116, no 30, p. 7862-7872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geometries, UV absorption bands, and resonance Raman (RR) cross sections of TNT and RDX are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with the Coulomb attenuated B3LYP exchange-correlation functional. The absorption and RR spectra are determined with use of vibronic (VB) theory, excited-state gradient, and complex polarizability (CPP) approximations. We examined lowenergy isomers (two for TNT and four for RDX) whose energies differ by less than 1 kcal/mol, such that they would appreciably be populated at room temperature. The two TNT isomers differ by an internal rotation of the methyl group, while the four conformers of RDX differ by the arrangements of the nitro group relative to the ring. Our theoretical optical properties of the TNT and RDX isomers are in excellent agreement with experimental and recent CCSD-EOM results, respectively. For the two TNT isomers, the ultraviolet RR (UVRR) spectra are similar and in good agreement with recently measured experimental results. Additionally, the UVRR spectra computed using the excited-state and CPP approaches compare favorably with the VB theory results. On the other hand, the RR spectra of the RDX conformers differ from one another, reflecting the importance of the positioning of the NO2 groups with respect to the ring. In the gas phase or in solution, RDX would give a spectrum associated with a conformationally averaged structure. It is encouraging that the computed spectra of the conformers show similarities to recent measured RDX spectra in acetonitrile solution, and reproduce the 10-fold decrease in the absolute Raman cross sections of RDX compared to TNT for the observed 229 nm excitation. We show that in TNT and RDX vibrational bands that couple to NO2 or the ring are particularly resonance enhanced. Finally, the computed RDX spectra of the conformers present a benchmark for understanding the RR spectra of the solid-phase polymorphs of RDX.

  • 275.
    Altgärde, Noomi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Local release of lithium from sol-gel coated orthopaedic screws: an in vitro and in vivo study2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    In orthopaedic practice, fractures are usually stabilised with metal screws or rods. This is done in order to keep the fracture parts in place during the rather slow healing process. The healing time can potentially be reduced by local- or systemic treatment with different bone promoting drugs. In later years, lithium, otherwise used to treat bipolar disease, has shown promise to be such a drug.

     

    The aim of this master thesis was to find a way to coat metal bone screws with lithium and to characterise the coating. The coating was to be designed in such a way that it could release lithium to the surrounding bone tissue.

     

    Lithium chloride was incorporated into a titanate sol-gel and attached to silicon wafers and stainless steel screws by dip coating. Wafers were used for initial in vitro studies of how lithium changed coating characteristics. This was studied using ellipsometry, AFM and SEM. Lithium is most probably physisorbed and not incorporated into the network building up the sol-gel. Coating structure is changed as more lithium is incorporated. For large amounts of lithium, the nanoparticles normally formed when curing the sol-gel are inhibited. One effect of this is reduced bioactivity, seen as a reduced ability for calcium phosphate crystals to nucleate on the coating when immersed in simulated body fluid.

    Lithium release was investigated using AAS. Lithium is released from the coating, showing a burst effect. By changing the number of coating layers used, the release profile can be partly altered. The coating was also applied to screws, showing good attachment, and the lithium release profile was similar to the one seen from wafers.

    Finally, a screw model was used in rats to assess the effect of local lithium treatment from screws and systemic lithium treatment on fracture healing. In the model, a screw was inserted in tibia, mimicking a fracture. When the bone around the screw was healed, a pullout test was performed, giving information about the strength of the bone surrounding the screw. No significant difference could be found for either local- or systemic lithium treatment compared to control. However, when evaluating the strength of intact bone in a similar way, a positive effect of systemic lithium treatment could be seen. Therefore, it is still likely that lithium has a positive effect on bone and further studies are needed to fully evaluate its role in fracture healing.

     

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  • 276.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anderson, W. Gary
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Ecophysiology methods: Refining the old, validating the new and developing for the future2016In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A, ISSN 1095-6433, E-ISSN 1531-4332, Vol. 202Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 277.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Axelsson, Michael
    Department of Zoology University of Göteborg.
    Intrinsic autoregulation of cardiac output in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at different heart rates2004In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 207, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Claireaux, G.
    Sandblom, E.
    Farrell, A.P.
    McKenzie, D.J.
    Axelsson, M.
    Gastrointestinal blood flow and postprandial metabolism in swimming sea bass dicentrarchus labrax2008In: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, ISSN 1522-2152, E-ISSN 1537-5293, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 663-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In trout and salmon, the metabolic costs of exercise and feeding are additive, which would suggest that gastrointestinal blood flow during exercise is maintained to preserve digestive and absorptive processes related to the specific dynamic action (SDA) of food. However, in most published studies, gastrointestinal blood flow drops during swimming, hypoxia, and general stress. To test whether gastrointestinal blood flow is spared during exercise after feeding, sea bass were instrumented with flow probes to measure cardiac output and celiacomesenteric blood flow while swimming in a respirometer before and after feeding. Swimming at 2 body lengths per second (bl s-1) increased metabolic rate considerably more than did feeding (208% vs. 32% increase, respectively, relative to resting), and a similar pattern was observed for cardiac output. In unfed fish, resting gastrointestinal blood flow was mL 13.8 ± 0.5 min-1 kg-1. After feeding, resting gastrointestinal blood flow increased by 82% but then decreased progressively with increasing swimming speeds. At 2 bl s-1, gastrointestinal blood flow in fed fish was not significantly different compared with that in unfed swimming fish, and, therefore, the data do not support the gastrointestinal sparing hypothesis. The magnitude of the SDA was maintained despite the decrease in gastrointestinal blood flow and the consequent reduction in oxygen supply to the gut. An estimate of maximal oxygen flow to the gastrointestinal tract after feeding yielded 2.6 mmol O2 h-1 kg-1, but this amount is not able to cover the oxygen demand of 3.16 mmol O2 h -1 kg-1. Therefore, the SDA must reflect metabolic processes in tissues other than those directly perfused by the celiacomesenteric artery. © 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  • 279.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crossley II, D.
    n/a.
    Villamor, E.
    n/a.
    Prenatal development of cardiovascular regulation in avian species.2009In: Cardio-respiratory control in vertebrates: comparative and evolutionary aspects, Dordrecht Heidelberg London New York: Springer , 2009, 1, p. 397-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this book is the evolution of cardiovascular and respiratory control in vertebrates. Life originated in water, which has constantly changing temperatures and O2 levels. Fish gills can extract up to 80% of their inspired O2, because they have a countercurrent bloodstream. Oxygen sensors have been found within the gill arches of ray-finned fish such as carp and trout, and these O2 sensors screen the inspired water and the capillary blood. Very likely, land vertebrates and the lungfish arose as a sister group, and both possess real lungs. Lungfish include 6 species, inhabiting shallow lakes or rivers, whereas the second ramification includes all the land vertebrates. A possible ancestor to the lungfish and land vertebrates has been discovered in China, and this fossil (Styloichthys) bridges a gap. Living 417 million years ago, it could represent one of the last ramifications before the common ancestor to the lungfish and land vertebrates. In addition, rather constant atmospheric O2 levels permit a joint acid-base regulation by the lung and the kidney. Likewise, lungfish and land vertebrates share a central control of pulmonary ventilation, while the peripheral receptor contribution to acid-base regulation is minor

  • 280.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gräns, Albin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ontogeny of vocalizations and movements in response to cooling in chickens fetuses2007In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 91, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindgren, Isa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Giraldo-Deck, Lina Maria
    University of Mayor San Andres, Bolivia.
    Matthei, Alberto
    Tinamou Chile SL, Chile.
    Garitano-Zavala, Alvaro
    University of Mayor San Andres, Bolivia.
    Aerobic performance in tinamous is limited by their small heart. A novel hypothesis in the evolution of avian flight2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 15964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some biomechanical studies from fossil specimens suggest that sustained flapping flight of birds could have appeared in their Mesozoic ancestors. We challenge this idea because a suitable musculoskeletal anatomy is not the only requirement for sustained flapping flight. We propose the "heart to fly" hypothesis that states that sustained flapping flight in modern birds required an enlargement of the heart for the aerobic performance of the flight muscles and test it experimentally by studying tinamous, the living birds with the smallest hearts. The small ventricular size of tinamous reduces cardiac output without limiting perfusion pressures, but when challenged to fly, the heart is unable to support aerobic metabolism (quick exhaustion, larger lactates and post-exercise oxygen consumption and compromised thermoregulation). At the same time, cardiac growth shows a crocodilian-like pattern and is correlated with differential gene expression in MAPK kinases. We integrate this physiological evidence in a new evolutionary scenario in which the ground-up, short and not sustained flapping flight displayed by tinamous represents an intermediate step in the evolution of the aerobic sustained flapping flight of modern birds.

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  • 282.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    Letter regarding article by Kahn et al. "Predictive adaptive responses to maternal high-fat diet prevent endothelial dysfunction but not hypertension in adult rat offspring" (Adaption is not predictive)2005In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 111, p. 166-166Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 283.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery and Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Sylhet Agricultural University, Sylhet, Bangladesh.
    Venhoranta, Heli
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Helsinki, Department of Production Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Saari, Finland.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Expression of Immune Regulatory Genes in the Porcine Internal Genital Tract Is Differentially Triggered by Spermatozoa and Seminal Plasma2019In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 3, article id 513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mating or cervical deposition of spermatozoa or seminal plasma (SP) modifies the expression of genes affecting local immune defense processes at the oviductal sperm reservoir in animals with internal fertilization, frequently by down-regulation. Such responses may occur alongside sperm transport to or even beyond the reservoir. Here, immune-related gene expression was explored with cDNA microarrays on porcine cervix-to-infundibulum tissues, pre-/peri-ovulation. Samples were collected 24 h post-mating or cervical deposition of sperm-peak spermatozoa or SP (from the sperm-peak fraction or the whole ejaculate). All treatments of this interventional study affected gene expression. The concerted action of spermatozoa and SP down-regulated chemokine and cytokine (P00031), interferon-gamma signaling (P00035), and JAK/STAT (P00038) pathways in segments up to the sperm reservoir (utero-tubal junction (UTJ)/isthmus). Spermatozoa in the vanguard sperm-peak fraction (P1-AI), uniquely displayed an up-regulatory effect on these pathways in the ampulla and infundibulum. Sperm-free SP, on the other hand, did not lead to major effects on gene expression, despite the clinical notion that SP mitigates reactivity by the female immune system after mating or artificial insemination.

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  • 284.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez-Serrano, Cristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barranco, Isabel
    Univ Girona, Spain.
    Roca, Jordi
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Transcriptome of Pig Spermatozoa, and Its Role in Fertility2020In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, Vol. 21, no 5, article id 1572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study presented here we identified transcriptomic markers for fertility in the cargo of pig ejaculated spermatozoa using porcine-specific micro-arrays (GeneChip((R)) miRNA 4.0 and GeneChip((R)) Porcine Gene 1.0 ST). We report (i) the relative abundance of the ssc-miR-1285, miR-16, miR-4332, miR-92a, miR-671-5p, miR-4334-5p, miR-425-5p, miR-191, miR-92b-5p and miR-15b miRNAs, and (ii) the presence of 347 up-regulated and 174 down-regulated RNA transcripts in high-fertility breeding boars, based on differences of farrowing rate (FS) and litter size (LS), relative to low-fertility boars in the (Artificial Insemination) AI program. An overrepresentation analysis of the protein class (PANTHER) identified significant fold-increases for C-C chemokine binding (GO:0019957): CCR7, which activates B- and T-lymphocytes, 8-fold increase), XCR1 and CXCR4 (with ubiquitin as a natural ligand, 1.24-fold increase), cytokine receptor activity (GO:0005126): IL23R receptor of the IL23 protein, associated to JAK2 and STAT3, 3.4-fold increase), the TGF-receptor (PC00035) genes ACVR1C and ACVR2B (12-fold increase). Moreover, two micro-RNAs (miR-221 and mir-621) were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in high-fertility males. In conclusion, boars with different fertility performance possess a wide variety of differentially expressed RNA present in spermatozoa that would be attractive targets as non-invasive molecular markers for predicting fertility.

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  • 285.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khan, Kabirul Islam
    Chattogram Vet and Anim Sci Univ, Bangladesh.
    Lopez-Bejar, Manel
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Martinez-Serrano, Cristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chicken seminal fluid lacks CD9-and CD44-bearing extracellular vesicles2020In: Reproduction in domestic animals, ISSN 0936-6768, E-ISSN 1439-0531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The avian seminal fluid (SF) is a protein-rich fluid, derived from the testis, the rudimentary epididymis and, finally, from the cloacal gland. The SF interacts with spermatozoa and the inner cell lining of the female genital tract, to modulate sperm functions and female immune responsiveness. Its complex proteome might either be free or linked to extracellular vesicles (EVs) as it is the case in mammals, where EVs depict the tetraspanin CD9; and where those EVs derived from the epididymis (epididymosomes) also present the receptor CD44. In the present study, sperm-free SF from Red Jungle Fowl, White Leghorn and an advanced intercross (AIL, 12th generation) were studied using flow cytometry of the membrane marker tetraspanin CD9, Western blotting of the membrane receptor CD44 and electron microscopy in non-enriched (whole SF) or enriched fractions obtained by precipitation using a commercial kit (Total Exosome Precipitation Solution). Neither CD9- nor CD44 could be detected, and the ultrastructure confirmed the relative absence of EVs, raising the possibility that avian SF interacts differently with the female genitalia as compared to the seminal plasma of mammals.

  • 286.
    Alvi, Naveed ul Hassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nour, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of helium-ion bombardment on the optical properties of ZnO nanorods/p-GaN light emitting diodes2011In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 6, no 628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) catalytic growth method were irradiated with 2 MeV helium (He+) ions. The fabricated LEDs were irradiated with fluencies of ~ 2×1013 ions/cm2 and ~ 4×1013 ions/cm2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the morphology of the irradiated samples is not changed. The as-grown and He+ irradiated LEDs showed rectifying behaviour with the same I-V characteristics. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed that there is a blue shift of approximately 0.0347 eV and 0.082 eV in the near band emission (free exciton) and green emission of the irradiated ZnO nanorods, respectively. It was also observed that the PL intensity of the near band emission was decreased after irradiation of the samples. The electroluminescence (EL) measurements of the fabricated LEDs showed that there is a blue shift of 0.125 eV in the broad green emission after irradiation and the EL intensity of violet emission approximately centred at 398 nm was nearly disappeared after irradiations. The color rendering properties shows a small decrease in the color rendering indices of 3% after 2 MeV He+ ions irradiation.

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  • 287.
    Alvinge, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University.
    Evaluation of emergent macrophytes as a source forbiogas production after mechanical, alkaline and fungalpretreatments.2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Two species of emergent macrophytes, Typha latifolia (common cattail) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) were evaluated as substrates for biogas production. The specific methane yield for each plant was obtained by batch wise anaerobic digestion in 300-mL bottles. Three different pretreatments were evaluated for increased biogas production; mechanical milling, alkaline treatment with lime and fungal degradation with Pleurotus ostreatus (oyseter mushroom).The methane yield for Typha latifolia and Phalaris arundinacea was determined to 300 and 323mL methane per g VS, respectively. There was no statistical difference in methane yield between the two species. Milling pretreatment increased the biogas yield with 16 % by average compared to untreated plant. Alkaline pretreatment with lime increased the biogas yield with 27 % at roomtemp. and 22 % at 55 °C. The fungal pretreatment decreased the biogas production by 20 % and is probably not suitable for this kind of substrate.The results showed that emergent macrophytes have a biogas yield similar to other plants already tested (grasses) and commonly used (pasture crops) in large scale reactors. However, emergent macrophytes and grasses cause mechanical problems in a reactor due to their structure. Probably some kind of milling must be done to decrease the fiber length of the emergent macrophytes. The costs for harvest, transport, handling and possible pretreatment of the emergent macrophytes have to be estimated and included in the overall cost calculations. This can tell if emergent macrophytes should be used as a substrate for biogas production.

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  • 288. Amandusson, H.
    et al.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Alcohol dehydrogenation over Pd versus PdAg membranes2001In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 217, no 1-2, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dehydrogenation of methanol and ethanol and the subsequent permeation of hydrogen through Pd and Pd70Ag30 membranes, respectively, have been studied. In order to keep a continuous hydrogen permeation rate, oxygen needs to be added to the alcohol supply. Without oxygen, the decomposition products will form a contaminating layer on the upstream membrane surface. The extraction of hydrogen from ethanol is six times more effective through a Pd70Ag30 membrane than through a pure Pd membrane (at optimum conditions). For methanol, the hydrogen permeation is 30% larger through a Pd70Ag30 membrane than through a membrane of pure Pd. The increased hydrogen permeation yield through Pd70Ag30 compared to Pd can be attributed mainly to a lower upstream consumption of hydrogen due to water formation, but also to an increased conversion of the alcohol in the presence of oxygen. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 289. Amandusson, H.
    et al.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Effect of CO and O2 on hydrogen permeation through a palladium membrane2000In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 153, no 4, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen permeation through a 25-µm thick palladium membrane during continuous exposures of hydrogen together with different combinations of oxygen and carbon monoxide has been studied at membrane temperatures of 100 °C-250 °C (total pressures of 40-150 Torr). Both CO and O2, individually, inhibit hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The cause of the inhibition is, however, somewhat different. CO blocks available hydrogen dissociation sites, while oxygen both blocks dissociation sites and also consumes adsorbed hydrogen through the production of water. When a combination of CO and O2 is supplied together with hydrogen, new reaction pathways will emerge. The carbon dioxide formation will dominate the water forming reaction, and consequently, the blocking effect caused by the formation of water will be suppressed. In a mixture of CO+O2+H2, the hydrogen permeation can become either larger or smaller than that due to only O2+H2 or CO+H2 depending on the CO/O2 ratio. It is thus possible to find a situation where carbon monoxide and oxygen react to form CO2 leaving adsorbed hydrogen free to permeate the membrane.

  • 290. Amandusson, H.
    et al.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Hydrogen permeation through surface modified Pd and PdAg membranes2001In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 193, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrogen permeation through surface modified Pd and Pd70Ag30 membranes has been studied at temperatures between 100 and 350°C. Silver has been evaporated on Pd and Pd70Ag30 foils with a thickness of 25µm in order to study the role of the surface composition in comparison with the membrane bulk composition. The Pd70Ag30-based membranes display the largest permeation rates at temperatures below 200°C, while Pd membranes with 20Å silver evaporated on the upstream side show the largest permeation rates above 200°C. There are, consequently, different rate limiting processes above and below 200°C: at temperatures below 200°C, the bulk diffusion through the membrane is rate limiting, while at temperatures above 200°C, the influence of the surface composition starts to become significant. It has further been concluded that a sharp silver concentration gradient from the surface to the bulk is important for the hydrogen permeation rate at temperatures above 200°C. Adding oxygen to the hydrogen supply will almost totally inhibit the hydrogen permeation rate when a pure Pd membrane surface is facing the upstream side, while for silver-containing surfaces the presence of oxygen has almost no effect. On a clean Pd surface, oxygen effectively consumes adsorbed hydrogen in a water forming reaction. With Ag on the surface, no water formation is detected. Co-supplied CO inhibits the permeation of hydrogen in a similar manner on all studied membrane surfaces, independent of surface silver content. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 291. Amandusson, H.
    et al.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Isotopic study of ethanol dehydrogenation over a palladium membrane2000In: Journal of Catalysis, ISSN 0021-9517, E-ISSN 1090-2694, Vol. 195, no 2, p. 376-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dehydrogenation of ethanol and the subsequent permeation were studied on a Pd membrane in a continuous ethanol supply. Hydrogen could not be extracted as efficiently from ethanol as from methanol. In ethanol, at least four of the six hydrogen atoms were not available for permeation because of methane formation. Hydrogens bonded to a carbon atom in a C-O group were available for permeation, while hydrogen atoms bonded to a carbon atom without oxygen were not. The efficiency of hydrogen permeation from ethanol was 5% compared to that of pure hydrogen, which could be compared to 25% for methanol compared to pure hydrogen. The hydrogen permeation could be enhanced by adding CO to the EtOH + O2 supply. The permeation probability of the hydrogen bonded to the methylene hydrogen increased while the water formation with this hydrogen atom decreased. Acetic acid was formed upstream when oxygen was in excess. The differently bonded hydrogen atoms in an ethanol molecule experienced different reaction pathways. The results did not contradict the models made from surface experiments in ultrahigh vacuum by Davis and Barteau, Holroyd and Bowker, or Bowker et al.

  • 292.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydrogen extraction from methanol over a palladium membrane1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydrogen permeation through modified palladium and palladium-silver2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydrogen permeation through surface modified Pd and PdAg membranes and the effect of co-supplied O2 and CO2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Identification of Pd membrane permeated hydrogen from ethanol1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 296.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of carbon monoxide and oxygen on hydrogen permeation through a palladium membrane -and its effect on dehydrogenation of methanol and ethanol1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jämförelse av alkohol-dehydrogenering över palladium respektive palladium-silver membran2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Methanol induced hydrogen permeation through a Pd membrane1999In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 442, no 2, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dehydrogenation of methanol and the subsequent permeation of hydrogen through a 25 μm thick palladium film has been studied in a catalytic membrane reactor. At the temperature studied, 350°C, the decomposition pathway for methanol on clean palladium surfaces is believed to lead to Had and a carbonaceous overlayer. The released hydrogen can either desorb or permeate the palladium membrane. During a continuous supply of methanol hydrogen permeation is reduced and, eventually, totally quenched by the growing carbon monoxide/carbon coverage. Adding oxygen in the methanol supply can balance the increasing carbonaceous coverage through the production of carbon dioxide. In such a case, it is concluded that no CO bond scission occurs. The methanol/oxygen ratio is crucial for the hydrogen permeation rate. Isotope-labelled methanol, CH3OH, CH3OD, CD3OH and CD3OD, shows that it is preferentially the methyl (or methoxy) hydrogen that permeates the membrane.

  • 299.
    Amandusson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dannetun, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Permeation of methyl hydrogen in isotopically labelled methanol through palladium membranes1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 300.
    Amarasinghe Vithanage, Dimali
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wang, Ergang
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wang, Zhongqiang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ma, Fei
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Yartsev, Arkady
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sundström, Villy
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Pascher, Torbjörn
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Charge Carrier Dynamics of Polymer: Fullerene Blends: From Geminate to Non-Geminate Recombination2014In: Advanced Energy Materials, ISSN 1614-6832, Vol. 4, no 8, article id 1301706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The charge carrier dynamics of a new polymer-fullerene blend are examined on the femtosecond to the millisecond time scale. The full time range is globally fitted using a chemical reaction rate model that includes all key processes, charge generation, energy transfer, charge separation, and recombination, over the full 12 orders of magnitude in time and a factor of 33 in light intensity. Particular attention is paid to the charge recombination processes and it is found that they are highly material specific. Comparison of the dynamics to those of a previously studied polymer: fullerene blend reveals that while for one blend the recombination dynamics are mainly controlled by geminate recombination, the charge recombination in the presently studied polymer: fullerene blend are entirely controlled by non-geminate electron-hole recombination. Carrier density dependence of the non-geminate recombination rate is analyzed and a correlated disorder model of site energies is proposed to explain the observed dependency.

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