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  • 251.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reproductive autonomous choice--a cherished illusion? Reproductive autonomy examined in the context of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, the plausibility of the notion of autonomy within reproductive medicine is discussed. The analysis of interviews indicates not only that there is a gap between theoretical discussions and concrete practice, but also that an increase in choice--paradoxically--can hamper couples' choice.

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  • 252.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Rättrådig kärlek. En etik för intima relationer2008In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 253.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self and other in global bioethics: Critical hermeneutics and the example of different death concepts2009In: Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our approach to global bioethics will depend, among other things, on how we answer the questions whether global bioethics is possible and whether it, if it is possible, is desirable. Our approach to global bioethics will also vary depending on whether we believe that the required bioethical deliberation should take as its principal point of departure that which we have in common or that which we have in common and that on which we differ. The aim of this article is to elaborate a theoretical underpinning for a bioethics that acknowledges the diversity of traditions and experiences without leading to relativism. The theoretical underpinning will be elaborated through an exploration of the concepts of sameness, otherness, self and other, and through a discussion of the conditions for understanding and critical reflection. Furthermore, the article discusses whether the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different can function as the normative core of this global bioethics. The article also discusses the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. These laws are helpful in order to highlight possible implications of the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different. Both of these laws open the door to more than one concept of death within one and the same legal system. Both of them relate preference for a particular concept of death to religious and/or cultural beliefs.

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  • 254.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self, Identities and Medicine: in HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, vol 17, no. 22009Other (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shared decision-making, gender and new technologies.2007In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 279-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much discussion of decision-making processes in medicine has been patient-centred. It has been assumed that there is, most often, one patient. Less attention has been given to shared decision-making processes where two or more patients are involved. This article aims to contribute to this special area. What conditions need to be met if decision-making can be said to be shared? What is a shared decision-making process and what is a shared autonomous decision-making process? Why make the distinction? Examples are drawn from the area of new reproductive medicine and clinical genetics. Possible gender-differences in shared decision-making are discussed.

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  • 256.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Simone Weil - personen, det heliga och etiken2010In: På Spaning / [ed] Hanna Stenström, Verbum , 2010, p. 117-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På spaning: från Svenska kyrkans forskardagar 2009. Detta är tredje delen i en forskningsserie som vänder sig till alla inom kyrka och akademi, baserad på Svenska kyrkans forskardagar för kyrkorelevant forskning 2009. Boken fokuserar kring fyra stora utmaningar: utmaningar i möten med den Andre, utmaningar i möten med samhället, utmaningar i möten mellan kyrkan och dess medlemmar, och slutligen utmaningar i möten mellan nutid och tradition. Bland skribenterna märks Jesper Svartvik, Kristin Zeiler, Kjell-Åke Nordquist, Sara Gehlin, Jan-Olof Aggedal, Kerstin Wimmer, Robert K Johnston, Elisabeth Gerle m fl.

  • 257.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Symposium on Genetics, Ethics and Identity.2009In: New genetics and society (Print), ISSN 1463-6778, E-ISSN 1469-9915, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 153-156Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 258.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Teologi för livets slut: Om palliativ sedering.2010In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weil2012In: Filosofi och medicin: från Platon till Foucault / [ed] Lennart Nordenfelt, Stockholm: Thales, 2012, p. 217-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who am I? When do "I" become another? An analytic exploration of identities, sameness and difference, genes and genomes.2007In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the impact of genetics and genomics on issues of identity and what do we mean when we speak of identity? This paper explores how certain concepts of identity used in philosophy can be brought together in a multi-layered concept of identity. It discusses the concepts of numerical, qualitative, personal and genetic identity-over-time as well as rival concepts of genomic identity-over-time. These are all understood as layers in the multilayered concept of identity. Furthermore, the paper makes it clear that our understanding of genomic identity and the importance attached to genomic sameness-over-time matters for the ethical questions raised by certain new gene technologies.

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  • 261.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    With Levinas against Levinas: Steps Towards a Phenomenological Ethics of Bodily Giving in Medicine2012In: The Body as Gift, Resource and Commodity: Exchanging Organ, Tissues and Cells in the 21st Century / [ed] Martin Gunnarson, Fredrik Svenaeus, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2012, p. 31-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from three metaphors—the body as gift, resource, and commodity—the book explores the contemporary exchange of organs, tissues, and cells. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating parts of the body, the underlying perspective from the side of states, authorities, and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall be understood as a resource. But medicine, as some of the contributors to this book show, is not sealed off from the market economy. Increasingly, therefore, body parts become commodities on legal as well as illegal markets.

    The chapters of the book are arranged in a way that presents, one after the other, the three metaphors of the body, starting with the body as gift, proceeding by way of the body as resource, and ending in the body as commodity. Although all three metaphors as ways of conceptualizing and making use of the human body can be found throughout human history, the present drive of commercialization will increasingly force us to identify and scrutinize the way these metaphors are used. Not only in addressing the fascinating question of what kind of an object (subject) the human body is, but also in trying to decipher what interests lurk behind the use of the metaphors in question when claiming that human bodies, organs, tissues, and cells are gifts, resources or commodities. The ambition of this volume is to address and remedy the need of a hermeneutics not only of depth, but also of suspicion, in the case of organ transplantation and other medical technologies involving the transfer of human tissues and cells.

  • 262.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Furberg, E
    Stockholm University.
    Tufveson, G
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The ethics of non-heart-beating donation: how new technology can change the ethical landscape.2008In: Journal of medical ethics, ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 526-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global shortage of organs for transplantation and the development of new and better medical technologies for organ preservation have resulted in a renewed interest in non-heart-beating donation (NHBD). This article discusses ethical questions related to controlled and uncontrolled NHBD. It argues that certain preparative measures, such as giving anticoagulants, should be acceptable before patients are dead, but when they have passed a point where further curative treatment is futile, they are in the process of dying and they are unconscious. Furthermore, the article discusses consequences of technological developments based on improvement of a chest compression apparatus used today to make mechanical heart resuscitation. Such technological development can be used to transform cases of non-controlled NHBD to controlled NHBD. In our view, this is a step forward since the ethical difficulties related to controlled NHBD are easier to solve than those related to non-controlled NHBD. However, such technological developments also evoke other ethical questions.

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  • 263.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guntram, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lennerling, Anette
    Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Moral tales of parental living kidney donation: a parenthood moral imperative and its relevance for decision making2010In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 225-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free and informed choice is an oft-acknowledged ethical basis for living kidney donation, including parental living kidney donation. The extent to which choice is present in parental living kidney donation has, however, been questioned. Since parents can be expected to have strong emotional bonds to their children, it has been asked whether these bonds make parents unable to say no to this donation. This article combines a narrative analysis of parents' stories of living kidney donation with a philosophical discussion of conditions for parental decision-making. Previous research has shown that parents often conclude that it is "natural" to donate. Our study shows that this naturalness needs to be understood as part of a story where parental living kidney donation is regarded as natural and as a matter of non-choice. Our study also highlights the presence of a parenthood moral imperative of always putting one's child's needs before one's own. On the basis of these results, we discuss conditions for decision-making in the context of parental LKD. We argue that the presence of a parenthood moral imperative can matter with regard to the decision-making process when parents consider whether to volunteer as living kidney donors, but that it need not hamper choice. We emphasise the need for exploring relational and situational factors in order to understand parental decision-making in the context of parental LKD.

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  • 264.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Varför ifrågasätts inte andra icke-medicinska ingrepp?2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 7/1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 265.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Why do we perform surgery on newborn intersexed children? The phenomenology of the parental experience of having a child with intersex anatomies2009In: Feminist Theory, ISSN 1464-7001, E-ISSN 1741-2773, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 359-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few parents-to-be consider that their child may be born with ambiguous sex. Still, parents of a newborn child with ambiguous sex are expected to make a far-reaching decision for the child should the child be operated upon so that it has either female or male genitals? The aim of this article is to examine, phenomenologically, why parents decide to have their children undergo genital surgery when it is not necessary for the childs physiological functions. Drawing on phenomenological work by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Simone de Beauvoir and Sara Ahmed, we examine parents frustration when their childs sex is ambiguous and their experiences of the practice of medical sex assignment. We also examine parental identity work when the child has been assigned a sex and the interaction between parents and medical professionals when parents make decisions regarding surgery on their child. Furthermore, we provide a critical perspective on the surgical practice.

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  • 266.
    Ödman, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richt, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg , Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents conceptions of intensive group training. The case of cerebral palsy2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 293-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim was to explore what wants and needs intensive group training (IGT) fulfil for parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and what problems that may arise due to participation. Methods. A phenomenograpical approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit information about what participation means to parents. Results. Five overarching categories expressing positive functions of IGT were identified: IGT as knowledge promotion, as a complementary training resource, as a bracket to ordinary life, as a means to promote relations with therapists, and as a leisure-activity. One category: IGT as risk for ill-being expresses perceived problems. Each category is in turn divided into a number of subconceptions-13 conceptions of this kind were identified. Conclusions. The conceptions express positive and negative functions of IGT as perceived by parents. These functions in turn can be considered as reflections of basic wants and needs. The results demonstrate that IGT have a potential to contribute to feelings of enhanced care competence among parents, of being supported and of increased strength and vitality. All parents did not have needs of participation in IGT for themselves. There is also a risk that IGT is experienced as an additional burden and may have negative effects on family-functioning.

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  • 267.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Demens: diagnosen som utmanar våra rädslor och fördomar2011In: Diagnos & identitet / [ed] Georg Drakos, Lars-Christer Hydén, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2011, p. 100-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 268. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fragile identities, patched-up worlds: Dementia and meaning-making in social interaction2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the identity work and the meaning- or sense-making that continue in the face of evolving dementia diseases, in social interaction, and the challenges for care this involves. The study adopts an actor-oriented approach and addresses the question of how persons with age-related progressive dementia diseases in everyday communication make sense of their situations, their surroundings, and their lives – all within the context of daily life in residential care. Of particular interest is how these persons handle issues of joint action in a shared world and how they establish and maintain an identity in the inte-raction. This is in spite of severe memory problems, disorientation in time and space, dif-fering understandings of the current situation, and difficulties in telling “accurate” and temporally ordered stories about their lives. The thesis also addresses the question of how caregivers may handle the complex interplay between residents in daily care, in maintain-ing and respecting these persons’ dignity.

    The study follows a growing tradition of studying interaction in dementia as mean-ing-based and situated in a context rather than merely as behavior caused by cognitive impairment. Methodologically, this is an ethnographic study based on observations made within a period of six months. The data consist of around 150 hours of video recordings and complementary field notes. This extensive material has made it possible to study the social interaction both in detail and situated in a larger context.

    The findings point to remaining competences and strategies that persons with demen-tia use actively and creatively in the ongoing interaction – and, given the premises, often in a rational way. This is discussed in terms of resources for dementia care, in relation to the great challenge of patching up and putting together a comprehensive socially shared world as well as maintaining continuity with the persons’ previous life histories in a way that preserves a positive self-identity.

    List of papers
    1. Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia
    2006 (English)In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 647-673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the productive aspects of confabulation as it occurs spontaneously in dementia care, in its context, and in interaction with other care recipients. Confabulation is approached as a social and discursive event with distinct narrative features; plots and formerly established genres of plots, storylines, are used by confabulators in order to understand, manage and interact socially in the present situation. Three main functions of confabulation are discerned: 1) making sense of the current situation (sense-making); 2) maintaining a personal identity in interaction with others (self-making); and 3) organizing and legitimizing joint action in the world (world-making). The resources used by confabulating subjects are sparse and not well adjusted to changing conditions, as the number of accessible storylines is limited. This makes it difficult to apply storylines that explain the current situation satisfactorily, provide useful guidelines for how to act, as well as preserve a positive self-identity. Helping with this constitutes a major challenge in dementia care.

    Keywords
    Alzheimer’s disease, communication, confabulation, context, dementiam, ethnography
    National Category
    Communication Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13251 (URN)10.1177/1461445606067333 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2013-09-04
    2. Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia
    2010 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 9, p. 21-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Disorientation as experienced by persons with progressive dementia diseases involves both existential and social dimensions. Based on video observations from a small residential care unit and exploring social interaction on a micro-level, this case study focuses on how a woman with vascular dementia actively tries to make sense of an everyday lunch situation. The analysis addresses strategies used by her to contextualize where she has ended up, and also how the meaning of the place is altered in communication. Findings point to social interaction between residents as an important resource to help maintain continuity with previous social life. However, there also seems to be an impending need for caregivers to help residents patch up their broken life-stories to render everyday situations comprehensible and the setting socially meaningful. Helping them find a way of placing themselves within it — also affording a positive self-identity and continuity with previous life history — is a major challenge in daily care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2010
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13252 (URN)10.1177/1471301210364449 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, focus is on how persons with AD use their remaining linguistic and cognitive resources, together with non-verbal aspects of the storytelling event, as resources in communicating and negotiating their identities in everyday encounters. The results of the analysis, focusing on the telling of the stories, indicate that other aspects than the temporal and referential organization of the narratives has become important resources for the teller in establishing and negotiating identity. The telling of temporally discontinuous narratives does not appear to affect or disrupt the teller's experience of some sort of a continuous sense of self and identity but are probably more a problem to persons without this kind of diagnosis. Being afflicted by AD most likely leads persons to try to invent and use alternative communicative recourses in order to sustain factors like their senses of self and identities. For researchers this makes it important to try to base their analysis on the actual organization of the talk and to focus on the functions of various responses and utterances in the interaction.

    Keywords
    identity, narrative, Alzheimer’s disease, performance, story-telling
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13253 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2008.01.001 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis
    2007 (English)In: Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, ISSN 1471-3012, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 507-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with issues of dignity in dementia care, in situations where staff members handle potential or actual conflicts and interaction problems between residents. Based on empirical data consisting of observations and video recordings, various coping strategies are identified in regard to whether or not, as well as when and how to interfere. Microethical analysis is used in order to discuss these coping strategies in relation to contextual conditions and ways of understanding, and values or aspects of dignity are highlighted. In dialogue with empirical data, nuances of ethical considerations are approached that are otherwise difficult to access analytically — thereby opening the door to a more reflective way of dealing with problematic situations in dementia care.

    Keywords
    coping strategies • conflict solving • ethics • ethnography • microethics
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13254 (URN)10.1177/1471301207084368 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2009-03-09Bibliographically approved
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  • 269.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia2010In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 9, p. 21-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disorientation as experienced by persons with progressive dementia diseases involves both existential and social dimensions. Based on video observations from a small residential care unit and exploring social interaction on a micro-level, this case study focuses on how a woman with vascular dementia actively tries to make sense of an everyday lunch situation. The analysis addresses strategies used by her to contextualize where she has ended up, and also how the meaning of the place is altered in communication. Findings point to social interaction between residents as an important resource to help maintain continuity with previous social life. However, there also seems to be an impending need for caregivers to help residents patch up their broken life-stories to render everyday situations comprehensible and the setting socially meaningful. Helping them find a way of placing themselves within it — also affording a positive self-identity and continuity with previous life history — is a major challenge in daily care.

  • 270.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reframing dementia in Swedish self-help group conversations: Constructing citizenship2012In: International journal of self help & self care, ISSN 1091-2851, E-ISSN 1541-4450, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 9-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores on a micro-level the activity of a self-help group for persons with dementia in Swedish municipal care, based on audio-recordings from 18 months' ethnographic fieldwork. The study focuses on the discursive construction of a shared meaning perspective and its inherent possibilities for liberation. Applying a citizenship perspective, the study approaches people with dementia as vulnerable to marginalization while at the same time capable of agency within the boundaries of their condition. The findings paint a complex picture involving opportunities and limitations of experiential knowledge, issues of double stigmatization, and constructs of being interrelated with other people and with the surrounding society. In the center is the overarching struggle of retaining citizenship in the face of the evolving disease.

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  • 271.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The subjectivity of disorientation: moral stakes and concerns2014In: Beyond Loss: dementia, identity, personhood / [ed] Lars-Christer Hydén, Hilde Lindemann, and Jens Brockmeier, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 191-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of interdisciplinary essays by international researchers tries to see beyond the loss in dementia, exploring it as transformation and change of personhood and identity that typically is embedded in social life. The chapters identify three important themes: persons and personhood, identity and agency, and the social and the communal.

  • 272.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia2006In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 647-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the productive aspects of confabulation as it occurs spontaneously in dementia care, in its context, and in interaction with other care recipients. Confabulation is approached as a social and discursive event with distinct narrative features; plots and formerly established genres of plots, storylines, are used by confabulators in order to understand, manage and interact socially in the present situation. Three main functions of confabulation are discerned: 1) making sense of the current situation (sense-making); 2) maintaining a personal identity in interaction with others (self-making); and 3) organizing and legitimizing joint action in the world (world-making). The resources used by confabulating subjects are sparse and not well adjusted to changing conditions, as the number of accessible storylines is limited. This makes it difficult to apply storylines that explain the current situation satisfactorily, provide useful guidelines for how to act, as well as preserve a positive self-identity. Helping with this constitutes a major challenge in dementia care.

  • 273.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nikku, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis2007In: Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, ISSN 1471-3012, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 507-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with issues of dignity in dementia care, in situations where staff members handle potential or actual conflicts and interaction problems between residents. Based on empirical data consisting of observations and video recordings, various coping strategies are identified in regard to whether or not, as well as when and how to interfere. Microethical analysis is used in order to discuss these coping strategies in relation to contextual conditions and ways of understanding, and values or aspects of dignity are highlighted. In dialogue with empirical data, nuances of ethical considerations are approached that are otherwise difficult to access analytically — thereby opening the door to a more reflective way of dealing with problematic situations in dementia care.

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