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  • 251. Sundblad, P
    et al.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Influence of posture on left ventricular long- and short-axis shortening2002In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 283, no 4, p. H1302-H1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    End-diastolic volume and left ventricular stroke volume are increased in the supine compared with upright position, but the contribution of long-axis (LAS) and short-axis shortening (SAS) to these changes with change in posture has not been established. We examined long- and short-axis motion and dimensions with echocardiography in 10 healthy subjects in the upright and supine position. Long-axis length at end diastole was almost identical, whereas the diastolic short-axis diameter was increased in the supine position. At end systole, there was a decreased long- axis length and increased short-axis length in the supine vs. upright position. Both LAS and SAS were enhanced in supine vs. upright positions [LAS: 9.3 +/- 2.2 vs. 15.1 +/- 3.1 mm (P < 0.001), SAS: 12.7 +/- 3.2 vs. 16.3 +/- 2.8 mm (P < 0.001)], presumably via Starling mechanisms. LAS increased more in the lateral part of the mitral annulus than in the septal part [7.7 +/- 2.6 vs. 4.0 +/- 2.8 mm (P < 0.006)], which implies that the more spherical form, in the supine position, induces more stretch at the lateral free wall than in the ventricular septum. These findings support the notion that Starling mechanisms affect systolic LAS.

  • 252.
    Sutherland, George
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Gasthuisberg Leuven, Belgium.
    Kukulsi, Tomasz
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Gasthuisberg Leuven, Belgium.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    D'hooge, Jan
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Gasthuisberg Leuven, Belgium.
    Arnold, Martina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Brandt, Einar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hatle, Liv
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Quantitation of left-ventricular asynergy by cardiac ultrasound2000In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical evaluation of regional delays in myocardial motion (myocardial asynchrony) has proved problematic, yet it remains an important functional parameter to evaluate. Prior attempts to quantify regional asynergy have met with limited success, often thwarted by the low temporal resolution of imaging-system data acquisition. If a delay in onset of motion of 30–40 msec is clinically important to measure, then data acquisition at frame rates of 50–100 per second is required. This is out of the current temporal resolution of angiographic, nuclear, or magnetic resonance studies. Only cardiac ultrasound can currently achieve the necessary frame rates. Furthermore, quantitative studies into the accuracy with which a trained observer can identify computed regional myocardial asynchrony in a left-ventricular 2-dimensional (2-D) image have shown that regional delays of <80 msec are not normally recognized in a moving image. This may be improved to 60 msec when either training is undertaken or comparative image review is used. However, this is still out of the temporal resolution required in clinical practice. Thus, visual interpretation of asynchrony is not sufficiently accurate. Two ultrasound data sets based on either integrated backscatter or Doppler myocardial imaging data may provide the solution. Doppler myocardial imaging is a new ultrasound technique which, in either its pulsed or color Doppler format, can achieve the required temporal resolution (with temporal resolutions of 8 msec and 16 msec, respectively). In contrast, color Doppler myocardial imaging, in its curved M-mode format, can display the timing of events during the cardiac cycle for all in-plane myocardial segments. This should allow the quantitation of regional delay for all systolic and diastolic events. Potentially, asynchrony due to regional ischemia, bundle branch block, ventricular premature beats, and ventricular preexcitation could all be identified and the degree of delay quantified. This overview will aim to establish the potential role of these new ultrasound methodologies in the recognition and quantitation of left-ventricular asynergy and how they might best be introduced into clinical practice.

  • 253.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Freely mobile right-sided atrial thrombus mimicking myxoma2001In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 195-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 254.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lundberg, Claes
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Szabo, Zoltan
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Olin, Christian
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Are electrocardiographic Q-wave criteria reliable for diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction after coronary surgery?1998In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 655-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A major assumption in cardiovascular medicine is that Q-waves on the electrocardiogram indicate major myocardial tissue damage. The appearance of a new Q-wave has therefore been considered the most reliable criterion for diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) in cardiac surgery. In a study, originally intended to evaluate troponin-T as a marker of PMI, analysis of our data aroused the need to address the reliability of Q-wave criteria for diagnosis of PMI.

    Methods: In 302 consecutive patients undergoing coronary surgery, Q-wave and other electrocardiogram (ECG) criteria were compared with biochemical markers of myocardial injury and the postoperative course. All ECGs were analysed by a cardiologist blinded to the biochemical analyses and the clinical course.

    Results: The incidence of positive Q-wave criteria was 8.1%. Combined biochemical (CK-MB≥70 μg/l) and Q-wave criteria were found in 1.0%. Patients with new Q-waves did not have CK-MB or troponin-T levels significantly different from those without Q-waves. More than 25% of the Q-waves were associated with plasma troponin-T below the reference level (<0.2 μg/l) on the fourth postoperative day. Q-wave criteria alone did not influence the postoperative course. In contrast, biochemical markers correlated with clinical outcome.

    Conclusions: The majority of Q-waves appearing after coronary surgery were not associated with major myocardial tissue damage, and according to troponin-T one-fourth of the Q-waves were not associated with myocardial necrosis. Furthermore, the appearance of Q-waves had little influence on short term clinical outcome. Therefore, the use of Q-wave criteria as the gold standard for diagnosis of PMI may have to be questioned.

  • 255.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kågedahl, B
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Olin, C
    Rutberg, H
    Unspecifik elevation of plasma CK-MB and troponin-T after coronary surgery2003In: European Society for Cardiovascular Surgery,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 256.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Echocardiographic Description of the Anatomic Relations within the Normal Aortic Root2007In: The Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 240-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim of the study: Diagnostic procedures continue to contain much hidden information that may substantially improve the understanding of the mechanisms of aortic valve disease and its treatment planning. The study aim, using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), was to describe in detail the anatomical and physiological properties of the normal human aortic root in vivo.

    Methods: The study included 32 patients referred for TEE for suspected cardiac sources of emboli, but diagnosed as normal. Images of the aortic valve in long axis (100-120∞) and short-axis (45-60∞) views were recorded in mid-systole and end-diastole. Parameters of the aortic root (subaortic diameter, sinotubular junction (STJ), maximal sinus diameter, sinus height, cusp diameter, cusp height, opening, coaptation and intercommissural distance) were measured. For repeatability and reliability, two investigators performed the same series of measurements on a subgroup of 11 patients.

    Results: Aortic valve parameters proved to be independent of age, gender, body weight and height, and also of body mass index and body surface area. The subaortic diameter showed no statistically significant connection to maximal sinus diameter or to STJ. No connection was found between STJ and cusp or sinus length in the long-axis view. A simplified regression equation describes the STJ as being three-quarters of the maximal sinus diameter. The valve opening was found to be ca. 80% of the subaortic diameter in systole. Length of coaptation proved to be independent of aortic diameters, but was approximately half of the left coronary (LC) and right coronary (RC) cusp height in diastole. This measurement model proved to be both reliable and reproducible.

    Conclusion: This reliable description of normal anatomic and geometric relations within the aortic root, through extended examination of the aortic root by echocardiography, may facilitate a better planning of aortic valve-preserving interventions.

  • 257.
    Tengblad, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is strongly associated with Arterial stiffness and Left ventricular mass in patients with type 2 diabetes.2007In: EASD2,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 258.
    Tengblad, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter and waist circumference as markers of early organ damage in patients with Type 2 diabetes2011In: Journal of Clinical Metabolism & Diabetes, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: In a cohort of 465 patients with Type 2 diabetes aged 55-66 years the associationbetween the anthropometric measures: Waist circumference (WC) and Sagittal abdominaldiameter (SAD) versus subclinical cardiovascular organ damage by measuring Pulse wavevelocity (PWV) and Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was studied.

    Methods: Blood pressure, weight, height and WC were measured within primary care. SADwas measured by using standardized calliper equipment. Blood samples were taken foranalysis of HbA1c and serum lipids. LVMI was measured by M-mode echocardiography.Aortic PWV was measured by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor®) over the carotid andfemoral arteries.

    Results: There were significant correlations between aortic PWV and WC (r=0.23; p<0.01)and SAD (r=0.25; p<0.01). LVMI was also correlated to WC (r=0.26; p<0.01) and SAD(r=0.25; p<0.01). When analysed in a multiple regression model, SAD and WC were bothassociated with PWV and LVMI, independently of age, sex, systolic blood pressure, serumlipids and HbA1c.

    Conclusion: This study shows that abdominal obesity, measured either with WC or SAD, is afeasible risk assessment tool for early subclinical organ damage in patients who have alreadydeveloped Type 2 diabetes.

  • 259.
    Thorsson, Ola
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bjuvang, Agneta
    Malmö University.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Advantages of standardized criteria for the interpretation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition renography2009In: NUCLEAR MEDICINE COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 0143-3636, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 449-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of captopril renography to detect renovascular hypertension (RVH) using the standardized test criteria established at the consensus conference in Santa Fe 1995. The evaluation was made prospectively and in a clinical situation.less thanpgreater thanMethods Renal scintigraphy was performed with Tc-99m-MAG3 according to a 2-day protocol in patients receiving 25 mg captopril 1 h before the test. A baseline study was added only in patients showing abnormal findings in the captopril-stimulated study. All tests were re-evaluated according to the consensus criteria by two nuclear medicine specialists who were unaware of the original evaluation that was made by different doctors on duty at the nuclear medicine section at the time.less than/pgreater than less thanpgreater thanResults Using a 12-month clinical follow-up as a reference, 16 patients in a group of 164 hypertensive patients had RVH, that is, a prevalence of 10%. The re-evaluation and original evaluation indicated a sensitivity of 94 versus 100%, specificity of 97 versus 88%, accuracy of 97 versus 89%, positive predictive value of 83 versus 47%, and negative predictive value of 99 versus 100%. In 15 studies, results from the two evaluations were discordant and in 14 of these studies an originally false positive or intermediate study was re-evaluated as negative. The test result was highly decisive in the future management of patients, minimizing the number of renal angiograms that had to be performed and initiating a search for other causes of secondary hypertension.

    Conclusion Captopril renography is a useful and reliable test in patients with suspicion of RVH. Strict adherence to the diagnostic criteria and recommendations from the 1995 consensus conference further improved the performance of the test compared with clinical follow-up.

  • 260.
    Tisell, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel, Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Absolute quantification of LCModel water scaled metabolite concentration of 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using quantitative magnetic resoonance imaging (qMRI)2008In: ESMRMB,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 261.
    Tsolakis, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Grimelius, L
    Uppsala University.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Stridsberg, M
    Uppsala University.
    Falkmer, S
    Uppsala University.
    Expression of histidine decarboxylase and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in human enterochromaffin-like cells and gastric endocrine tumours2008In: XXVII International Congress of the International Academy of Pathology October 12-17, 2008, Athens, Greece: HISTOPATHOLOGY,ISSN 0309-0167, Volume 53, Sp Iss 1, 2008, Vol. 53, no Sp. Iss. 1, p. 113-114Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Valladares, Carlos
    et al.
    Kardiologiska kliniken Hjärtcentrum.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Callander, Margarita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Var det paradoxal embolism? Cerebellär infarkt, öppetstående foramen ovale och APC-resistens - en kontroversiell kombination och terapeutisk utmaning2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 845-848Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 263. von Bibra, Helene
    et al.
    Bone, D
    Voigt, Jens-Uwe
    Niklasson, U
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ryden, Lars
    Contrast echocardiography2000In: Zeitschrift für Kardiologie, ISSN 0300-5860, E-ISSN 1435-1285, Vol. 89, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intravenous application of an ultrasound contrast agent induces enhanced display of blood in all its pathways. Within cardiology, this principle is mainly utilized for signal enhancement of color Doppler and spectral Doppler in order to improve quantification of congenital and acquired valvular lesions and also for improved endocardial delineation during stress tests and in the evaluation of LV function. The new domaine of myocardial perfusion imaging by contrast echocardiography, however, needed profound technical developments before realization of the clinical potential could even be conceived. These are based on the complex reactions of microbubbbles in the acoustic field in order to allow the sensitive and bubble specific display of intramyocardial contrast effects. The presently available acquisition techniques, second harmonic imaging and harmonic power Doppler, demonstrate significant improvements if compared to traditional fundamental 2-d echocardiography, however, they are still subjected to important limitations. There are many anatomical, physiological, and technical reasons for insufficient display of intramyocardial microbubbles, the most important one being attenuation. It is hoped that the most recently developed imaging modality, pulse inversion technique, allows the necessary diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility in myocardial perfusion imaging.

  • 264.
    von Bibra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Voigt, J-U
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Fröman, M
    Bone, D
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Juhlin-Dannfeldt, A
    Interaction of microbubbles with ultrasound.1999In: Echocardiography, ISSN 0742-2822, E-ISSN 1540-8175, Vol. 16, p. 733-741Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Vánky, Farkas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Jorfeldt, Lennart
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Myocardial metabolism and energetics before and after valve replacement for aortic stenosis2005In: Scandinavian Association for Thoracic Surgery,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 266.
    Walker, Andrew
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ringqvist, Ivar
    Centrallasarettet i Västerås.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Accuracy of spectral Doppler flow and tissue velocity measurements in ultrasound systems2004In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood and tissue velocity are measured and analysed in cardiac, vascular and other applications of diagnostic ultrasound (US). An error in system calibration is a potential risk for misinterpretation of the measurements. To determine the accuracy in velocity calibration, we tested three common commercial US systems using a Doppler string phantom. We tested pulsed and continuous-wave Doppler modes for velocities relevant to both cardiac blood flow and tissue-velocity estimation. The US systems were tested with settings and transducers commonly used in cardiac applications. One system consistently overestimated velocity by about 5%, whereas the other two systems were quite accurate in velocity estimation. These findings emphasize the importance of continuous quality control of US equipment.

  • 267.
    Walker, Andrew
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ringqvist, Ivar
    Västerås.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Time delays in ultrasound systems can result in fallacious measurements.2002In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 28, p. 259-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even short time delays (less than 30 ms) in cardiac motion pattern may have clinical relevance. These delays can be measured with echocardiography, using techniques such as flow and tissue Doppler and M-mode together with external signals (e.g., ECG and phonocardiography). If one or more of these signals are delayed in relation to the other signals (asynchronous), an incorrect definition of cardiac time intervals can occur, the consequence of which is invalid measurement. To determine if this time delay in signal processing is a problem, we tested three common ultrasound (US) systems using the ECG as the reference signal. We used a digital ECG simulator and a Doppler string phantom to obtain test signals for flow and tissue pulsed Doppler, M-mode, phonocardiography, auxiliary and ECG signals. We found long time delays of up to 90 ms in one system, whereas delays were mostly short in the two other systems. The time delays varied relative to system settings. Consequently, to avoid these errors, precise knowledge of the characteristics of the system being used is essential.

    Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.

  • 268.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Falldiskuttion (Idrottshjärtat och screening - svenska riktlinjer och hur gör vi?)2007In: IX Svenska Kardiovaskulära vårmötet,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 269.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Signs of inflammation in different types of heart valve disease: The VOCIN study2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart valve dysfunction is a relatively common condition in the population, whereas significant heart valve disease is more unusual. The cause of different types of heart valve disease depends on which valve is concerned. Rheumatic heart valve disease, has for a long time been considered to constitute a post-inflammatory condition. During the 1990s it was also shown that the so-called non-rheumatic or degenerative tricuspid aortic stenosis, comprised signs of inflammation.

    In this study, 118 patients (the VOCIN study group) referred to the University Hospital for preoperative investigation due to significant heart valve disease, were examined regarding signs of inflammation.

    Twenty-nine aortic valves from patients with significant aortic stenosis were divided into tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves. The bicuspid aortic stenotic valves revealed signs of inflammation to a similar extent as the tricuspid valves. However, the tricuspid and bicuspid valves differed regarding distribution of calcification. In contrast, inflammation was not a predominant feature in 15 aortic and mitral valves from patients with significant heart valve regurgitation.

    Gross valvular pathology consistent with rheumatic aortic stenosis was found in 10 patients. These valves revealed a somewhat lower degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, but on the whole, there were no substantial differences when compared to non-rheumatic aortic stenotic valves. They did, however, reveal a similar distribution of calcification as the bicuspid, non-rheumatic aortic valves.

    The VOCIN study group was compared to an age- and gender matched control group with regard to history and signs of rheumatic disease. There was not any increased prevalence of clinical manifestations of non-cardiac inflammatory disease in patients with significant heart valve disease, when compared to healthy control subjects. However, patients with heart valve disease had significantly increased serum levels of inflammatory markers compared to controls. The increase in inflammatory markers remained significant even in the subgroup of non-rheumatic aortic stenosis devoid of coronary artery disease. These results indicate that a systemic inflammatory component is associated with stenotic, non-rheumatic heart valve disease.

    The similarities between different forms of calcific aortic valve disease indicate a similar pathogenesis. The question is raised whether aortic stenosis is one disease, mainly caused by a general and non-specific response to dynamic tissue stress due to an underlying malformation of the valve.

    List of papers
    1. T lymphocyte infiltration in non-rheumatic aortic stenosis: a comparative descriptive study between tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>T lymphocyte infiltration in non-rheumatic aortic stenosis: a comparative descriptive study between tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves
    2002 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 348-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The two most common causes of aortic stenosis are primary "degenerative" calcification of tricuspid aortic valves and secondary calcification of congenital bicuspid valves. T lymphocyte infiltration occurs in stenotic tricuspid aortic valves, indicating an inflammatory component, but it has not been shown whether it also occurs in stenotic bicuspid valves.

    Objective: To compare non-rheumatic tricuspid and bicuspid stenotic aortic valves for the presence and distribution of T lymphocytes.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Patients and design: Valve specimens were obtained from 29 patients (15 women, 14 men, mean age 69 years (range 52–81 years)), referred to the hospital for aortic valve replacement because of symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. There were 17 tricuspid valves (from 10 women and seven men, mean age 71 years) and 12 bicuspid valves (from five women and seven men, mean age 67 years). To identify mononuclear inflammatory cells, sections were stained with antibodies for CD3 (pan-T cell antigen, Dako 1:400) and then graded histologically according to the degree of T cell infiltrate.

    Results: T lymphocyte infiltration was present in both tricuspid and bicuspid stenotic aortic valves, without any significant differences in extent or localisation.

    Conclusions: Stenotic bicuspid aortic valves show the same degree of T lymphocyte infiltration as degenerative tricuspid aortic valves. Inflammation needs to be considered in the pathogenesis of acquired aortic stenosis, irrespective of the primary valve anomaly.

    Keywords
    aortic valve stenosis, pathology, lymphocytes, inflammation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13046 (URN)10.1136/heart.88.4.348 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18 Last updated: 2009-08-21
    2. Role of inflammation in non-rheumatic, regurgitant heart valve disease: A comparative, descriptive study regarding apolipoproteins and inflammatory cells in non-rheumatic heart valve disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of inflammation in non-rheumatic, regurgitant heart valve disease: A comparative, descriptive study regarding apolipoproteins and inflammatory cells in non-rheumatic heart valve disease
    2007 (English)In: Cardiovascular pathology, ISSN 1054-8807, E-ISSN 1879-1336, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nonrheumatic aortic stenosis is the predominant cause of heart valve surgery in the Western world. Aortic and mitral regurgitation account for a lesser amount of the heart valve surgery. During the 1990s, inflammatory cell infiltrates have been demonstrated in nonrheumatic stenotic aortic valves. These findings suggest an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of nonrheumatic aortic valve stenosis. However, nonrheumatic regurgitant aortic and mitral valves have not been investigated in this respect. The aim of this study was to compare nonrheumatic regurgitant aortic and mitral valves with stenotic aortic valves regarding the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, apolipoprotein B, and apolipoprotein A-I.

    Methods: Valve specimens were obtained from 42 patients referred to hospital for surgery because of significant heart valve disease. From these patients, 29 aortic stenotic valves, 9 aortic regurgitant, and 6 mitral regurgitant valves, all nonrheumatic, were obtained for the study. Fourteen valves collected from subjects undergoing clinical/medicolegal autopsy were used as control. In order to identify mononuclear inflammatory cells and apolipoproteins, sections were investigated with immunohistochemical analyses and then categorized semiquantitatively.

    Results: Regurgitant and control valves showed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory cell infiltrate and a lower degree of apolipoprotein deposition as compared to stenotic aortic valves.

    Conclusions: The signs of inflammation seen in nonrheumatic aortic stenosis are not prominent features in the nonrheumatic, regurgitant valves. This is consistent with the multi-factorial pathogenesis of these conditions.

    Keywords
    Aortic valve regurgitation, Mitral valve regurgitation, T Lymphocytes, Apolipoproteins
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13047 (URN)10.1016/j.carpath.2006.10.004 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Inflammatory characteristics of aortic stenotic valves: a comparison between rheumatic and non-rheumatic aortic stenosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory characteristics of aortic stenotic valves: a comparison between rheumatic and non-rheumatic aortic stenosis
    2008 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13048 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18
    4. History and signs of rheumatic disease in patients with significant heart valve disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>History and signs of rheumatic disease in patients with significant heart valve disease
    Show others...
    2008 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13049 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18
  • 270.
    Wallby, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Steffensen, Thora
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    T lymphocyte infiltration in non-rheumatic aortic stenosis: a comparative descriptive study between tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves2002In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 348-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The two most common causes of aortic stenosis are primary "degenerative" calcification of tricuspid aortic valves and secondary calcification of congenital bicuspid valves. T lymphocyte infiltration occurs in stenotic tricuspid aortic valves, indicating an inflammatory component, but it has not been shown whether it also occurs in stenotic bicuspid valves.

    Objective: To compare non-rheumatic tricuspid and bicuspid stenotic aortic valves for the presence and distribution of T lymphocytes.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Patients and design: Valve specimens were obtained from 29 patients (15 women, 14 men, mean age 69 years (range 52–81 years)), referred to the hospital for aortic valve replacement because of symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. There were 17 tricuspid valves (from 10 women and seven men, mean age 71 years) and 12 bicuspid valves (from five women and seven men, mean age 67 years). To identify mononuclear inflammatory cells, sections were stained with antibodies for CD3 (pan-T cell antigen, Dako 1:400) and then graded histologically according to the degree of T cell infiltrate.

    Results: T lymphocyte infiltration was present in both tricuspid and bicuspid stenotic aortic valves, without any significant differences in extent or localisation.

    Conclusions: Stenotic bicuspid aortic valves show the same degree of T lymphocyte infiltration as degenerative tricuspid aortic valves. Inflammation needs to be considered in the pathogenesis of acquired aortic stenosis, irrespective of the primary valve anomaly.

  • 271.
    Wallby, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Steffensen, Thora
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Role of inflammation in non-rheumatic, regurgitant heart valve disease: A comparative, descriptive study regarding apolipoproteins and inflammatory cells in non-rheumatic heart valve disease2007In: Cardiovascular pathology, ISSN 1054-8807, E-ISSN 1879-1336, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nonrheumatic aortic stenosis is the predominant cause of heart valve surgery in the Western world. Aortic and mitral regurgitation account for a lesser amount of the heart valve surgery. During the 1990s, inflammatory cell infiltrates have been demonstrated in nonrheumatic stenotic aortic valves. These findings suggest an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of nonrheumatic aortic valve stenosis. However, nonrheumatic regurgitant aortic and mitral valves have not been investigated in this respect. The aim of this study was to compare nonrheumatic regurgitant aortic and mitral valves with stenotic aortic valves regarding the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, apolipoprotein B, and apolipoprotein A-I.

    Methods: Valve specimens were obtained from 42 patients referred to hospital for surgery because of significant heart valve disease. From these patients, 29 aortic stenotic valves, 9 aortic regurgitant, and 6 mitral regurgitant valves, all nonrheumatic, were obtained for the study. Fourteen valves collected from subjects undergoing clinical/medicolegal autopsy were used as control. In order to identify mononuclear inflammatory cells and apolipoproteins, sections were investigated with immunohistochemical analyses and then categorized semiquantitatively.

    Results: Regurgitant and control valves showed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory cell infiltrate and a lower degree of apolipoprotein deposition as compared to stenotic aortic valves.

    Conclusions: The signs of inflammation seen in nonrheumatic aortic stenosis are not prominent features in the nonrheumatic, regurgitant valves. This is consistent with the multi-factorial pathogenesis of these conditions.

  • 272.
    Wallin, Anders
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Ekberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lind, K
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Milos, V
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Granérus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Posterior cortical brain dysfunction in cognitively impaired patients with Parkinson´s disease - an rCBF scintigraphy study2007In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 347-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to visualize cortical function in Parkinson's patients with various degrees of cognitive impairment.

    Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with Parkinson's disease and three with Parkinson plus syndromes underwent cognitive assessment and rCBF using 99mTC-HMPAO-SPECT.

    Results: Almost no regional reductions in cerebral blood flow were seen in patients without cognitive impairment (n = 16). Limited, mainly posterior, blood flow reductions were seen in patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 14), whereas the reductions were extensive and bilaterally symmetric, involving both anterior and posterior brain regions in patients with dementia (n = 10).

    Conclusions: The findings suggest a widespread cortical, mainly posterior type of dysfunction and a relationship between the degree of cognitive impairment and the magnitude of the dysfunction.

  • 273.
    Wandt, Birger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Bojö, L
    Tolhagen, K
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Echocardiographic assessment of ejection fraction in left ventricular hypertrophy.1999In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 82, p. 192-198Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Warntjes, Marcel, Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Rapid magnetic resonance quantification on the brain: Optimization for clinical usage2008In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 320-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method is presented for rapid simultaneous quantification of the longitudinal T1 relaxation, the transverse T2 relaxation, the proton density (PD), and the amplitude of the local radio frequency B 1 field. All four parameters are measured in one single scan by means of a multislice, multiecho, and multidelay acquisition. It is based on a previously reported method, which was substantially improved for routine clinical usage. The improvements comprise of the use of a multislice spin-echo technique, a background phase correction, and a spin system simulation to compensate for the slice-selective RF pulse profile effects. The aim of the optimization was to achieve the optimal result for the quantification of magnetic resonance parameters within a clinically acceptable time. One benchmark was high-resolution coverage of the brain within 5 min. In this scan time the measured intersubject standard deviation (SD) in a group of volunteers was 2% to 8%, depending on the tissue (voxel size = 0.8 x 0.8 x 5 mm). As an example, the method was applied to a patient with multiple sclerosis in whom the diseased tissue could clearly be distinguished from healthy reference values. Additionally it was shown that, using the approach of synthetic MRI, both accurate conventional contrast images as well as quantification maps can be generated based on the same scan. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 275.
    Warntjes, Marcel JB
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery2010In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 10, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account.

    METHODS: The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images.

    RESULTS: The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images.

    CONCLUSIONS: The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold.

  • 276.
    Wernstedt, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Sjöstedt, Camilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ekman, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Du, Hongkai
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Thuomas, Karl Åke
    Sabbatsberg.
    Areskog, Nils Holger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Adaptation of cardiac morphology and function to endurance and strength training: A comparative study using MR imaging and echocardiography in males and females2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) were measured in endurance-trained (10 male, m, 10 female, f), strength-trained athletes (8 m, 10 f) and untrained subjects (9 m, 10 f). LV dimensions were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography and the results were equal irrespective of method. Endurance-trained m and f had significantly higher LV volumes and mass than both strength-trained and controls. No VO2 max or dimensional differences were seen between strength-trained and untrained subjects. In endurance-trained males, LV volumes and mass/kg bw were higher than in endurancetrained females. There was no significant gender difference for strength-trained or untrained subjects regarding body weight-related heart dimensions. It is concluded that LV dimensions and volumes are strongly dependent on oxygen transport capacity in normal subjects practising different modes of training, and that the gender differences, if LV dimensions are related to aerobic work capacity, are smaller than previously reported.

  • 277.
    Westin, C.-F.
    et al.
    Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States, Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02115, United States.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Loock, T.
    Sjoqvist, L.
    Kikinis, R.
    Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    A multielement RF coil for MRI guidance of interventional devices2001In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate localization of minimally invasive devices is critical to the success of interventional procedures. Device orientation and tip position are two of the most important pieces of information needed to define device location for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventional procedures. While a single one-element micro coil incorporated into an interventional device has proven to be effective in some applications, it can only supply tip position information. However, multiple positions on the device are necessary to also determine its orientation. For this purpose, a novel single micro coil design with three separate winding elements that provides both the device orientation and tip position is described in this study. Definition of MR scan planes, by using the device orientation and the target tissue location, permits automatic tracking of the insertion of the device. Furthermore, devices that include this coil design are permitted to bend to a limited extent. This makes the micro coil design appropriate for many flexible interventional devices. Reliable near-real-time tracking of three points on an interventional device is demonstrated on a 0.2T MRI system with modest gradient performance. Phantom and in vivo animal experiments are used to demonstrate the utility of this new coil design. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 278.
    Wigström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    The effects of maxwell terms on particle traces calculated from 3D cine phase contrast images1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 93-93Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Masked nocturnal hypertension - a novel marker of risk in type 2 diabetes.2009In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1258-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of masked nocturnal hypertension (MNHT) and its impact on arterial stiffness and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Middle-aged patients (n = 414) with type 2 diabetes underwent clinic and ambulatory BP measurements and applanation tonometry. RESULTS: MNHT (clinic BP < 130/80 mmHg and night-time BP > or = 120/70 mmHg) was found in 7.2% of patients (n = 30). Compared with patients with both clinical and nocturnal normotension (n = 70), patients with MNHT had higher aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) (10.2 +/- 1.8 m/s vs 9.4 +/- 1.7 m/s; p = 0.03) and higher central BP (117.6 +/- 13.9/74.0 +/- 9.1 mmHg vs 110.4 +/- 16.4/69.7 +/- 9.6 mmHg, p = 0.04). In patients with clinical normotension, night-time systolic BP correlated significantly with PWV. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Thirty per cent of patients with clinical normotension had nocturnal hypertension. This was accompanied by increased arterial stiffness and higher central BP. We conclude that in clinically normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, ambulatory BP measurement may help clinicians to identify patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

  • 280.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    MASKED NOCTURNAL HYPERTENSION IN TYPE 2 DIABETES - A NEW MARKER OF RISK2009In: in JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, vol 27, 2009, Vol. 27, p. S169-S169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 281.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes correlates with both ambulatory and central blood pressure but not with glycemic control2007In: 17th meeting on Hypertension,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 282.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Correlations between left ventricular mass and conventional, ambulatory and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes.2007In: 17th meeting on Hypertension,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 283.
    Wilkenshoff, UM
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hatle, Liv
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sovany, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sutherland, George R
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Age-dependent changes in regional diastolic function evaluated by color Doppler myocardial imaging: A comparison with pulsed Doppler indexes of global function.2001In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 14, no 10, p. 959-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goals of this study were to evaluate possible normal age-related changes in regional myocardial relaxation as detected by color Doppler myocardial imaging (CDMI) velocities and to compare the extent of any such changes with age-induced changes in global diastolic function. In 80 healthy subjects (aged 21 to 72 years, equally subdivided by decades) the mitral flow velocities in early diastole (E) and atrial contraction (A) were recorded as were the velocities of left ventricular (W) motion of early (EDV) and late diastole (LDV) in the 16 standard LV segments, and their ratios were calculated. in healthy persons younger than 40 years, all segments showed an EDV/LDV ratio > 1, whereas in healthy persons aged 40 years or older the mean EDV of all segments decreased, and the mean LDV increased, resulting in a significant decrease of the mean EDV/LDV ratio with age. Values of EDV/LDV ratios were higher than E/A ratios (P < .0001), but their changes with age correlated well with each other (r = 0.805). With increasing age, an EDV/LDV ratio <1 was observed more often in basal segments (P < .001, compared with mid and apical segments) and less often in segments of anteroseptal and posterior walls viewed from the parasternal window. The presence of > 50% segments with an EDV/LDV ratio <1 was associated with an E/A ratio <1. Regional diastolic function indexes as evaluated by CDMI changed with increasing age in a heterogeneous way and influenced global diastolic function parameters.

  • 284.
    Wisten, A.
    et al.
    Medicinkliniken, Sunderby sjukhus, Luleå, Sweden.
    Jernelov, L.
    Jernelöv, L., Pliktverket, Regionkontor, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäckstrand, B.
    n/a.
    Lovgren, T.
    Lövgren, T., Avdelningen för planering och urval, De båda sist nämn da Pliktverket, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lofmark, R.
    Löfmark, R., Centrum för bioetik, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Service Administration continues to take an ECG at conscription draft board [Pliktverket fortsätter ta EKG vid värnpliktsmönstring]2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 285. Wisten, Aase
    et al.
    Jernelöv, Leif
    Bäckstrand, Björn
    Lövgren, Thomas
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pliktverket fortsätter ta EKG vid värnpliktsmönstring.2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 10, no 672, p. 675-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Wranne, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Hök, Bertil
    Inte så lätt att använda stetoskopet på rätt sätt: Askulationens svåra konst bör ha stort utrymme i läkarutbildningen.1999In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 96, p. 2981-2984Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 287.
    Wranne, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wallentin, Ingemar
    Ekokardiografi - En oundgänglig metod i kardiovaskulär diagnostik2000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 97, no 42, p. 4712-4720Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    [No abstract available]

  • 288. Xiong, C
    et al.
    Hök, Bertil
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    A bioacoustic method for timing of respiration at cardiac investigations1995In: Clinical Physiology, ISSN 0144-5979, E-ISSN 1365-2281, Vol. 15, p. 151-157Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 289. Yang, P C
    et al.
    Santos, J M
    Nguyen, P K
    Scott, G C
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    McConnell, M V
    Wright, G A
    Nishimura, D G
    Pauly, J M
    Hu, B S
    Dynamic Real-Time Architecture in Magnetic Resonance Coronary Angiography - A Prosepctive Clinical Trial2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 6, p. 885-894Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 290.
    Yoon, EJ
    et al.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Engvall, J
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Brandt, E
    Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, A
    Reversal of blood flow in the descending aorta: Implications for Doppler quantitation of aortic insufficiency2002In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 425A-425AConference paper (Other academic)
  • 291.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carotisstenos, logistik. Vilka opereras och när.2007In: Svenska Neurologmötet,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 292.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Duplexundersökning med måltidsprovokation vid bukangina2006In: Kardiovaskulära vårmöte,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 293.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology .
    Hallman, Daniel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Diameter and compliance of the great saphenous vein2008In: Experimental Biology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    CT angiography - clinical experience from Linköping University Hospital2008In: X Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2008, 2008, p. 40-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Long-term follow-up in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy using Tissue Doppler Imaging2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 368-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and describe different echocardiographic parameters and their change over time during almost 10 years follow-up period.

    Methods: Fifteen patients (9 male, 6 female), aged 22-58 years (mean 40) with a diagnosis of ARVC, were followed up for a period of 6-10 years (mean 8.7). Twelve-lead and a signal- averaged ECG was recorded. Tricuspid and mitral annular motion and tissue Doppler imaging were registered by echocardiography. Wall motion score index (WMSI) was calculated for the left and right ventricles.

    Results: We registered significant reduction in systolic tissue velocity on right ventricle free wall between the first and last investigations: 7-17cm/s (mean 11.8) to 4-15 (mean 9.1), p=0.005. WMSI increased by at least 0.2 in 10/14 patients for the right and in 8/15 patients for the left ventricle. A decrease in velocity time integral for the left ventricular outflow was observed (16-30 to 13-21, p=0.009).

    Conclusion: ARVC is a progressive disease with individual variation. Left ventricular involvement may occur early in the disease. Tissue Doppler imaging is a useful tool to follow-up right ventricular abnormalities.

3456 251 - 295 of 295
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