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  • 251.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Centre for Studies of Humans, Technology and Organization. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Organisational change, job strain and increased risk of stroke?: a pilot study2008In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The objective of this pilot study was to explore whether organisational change and work-related stress, as measured by the Job Content Questionnaire, were associated with first-ever stroke among working people aged 30–65.

    Methods: In a case-control study a total of 65 consecutive cases, aged 30–65 years of age, with first-ever stroke were recruited from four hospitals in Sweden during 2000–2002. During the same period, 103 random population controls in the same age interval were recruited. Data on job-related stress and traditional medical risk factors were collected by a questionnaire.

    Results: In the multivariate analyses, organisational change (OR 3.38) increased the likelihood of stroke, while experiencing an active job (OR 0.37) decreased the likelihood of stroke. Regarding risk factors outside work, age (OR 1.11), low physical activity (OR 5.21), low education (OR 2.48) and family history of stroke (OR 2.59) were associated with increased likelihood of stroke.

    Conclusion: This study suggests an association between organisational change, work-related stress and stroke. The likelihood of stroke was lower for people in active job situations.

  • 252.
    Neubeck, Truls
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Schneider, Thomas
    Famna—the Swedish Association for Non-Profit Health Care and Social Service providers.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Prospects and problems of transferring quality-improvement methods from health care to social services: two case studies2014In: The Permanente Journal, ISSN 1552-5767, E-ISSN 1552-5775, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    This study examines the use of quality-improvement (QI) methods in social services. Particularly the key aspects-generalizable knowledge, interprofessional teamwork, and measurements-are studied in projects from the QI program Forum for Values in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    This is a mixed-method case study. Two projects using standard QI methods and tools as used in health care were chosen as critical cases to highlight some problems and prospects with the use of QI in social services. The cases were analyzed through documented results and qualitative interviews with participants one year after the QI projects ended.

    RESULTS:

    The social service QI projects led to measurable improvements when they used standard methods and tools for QI in health care. One year after the projects, the improvements were either not continuously measured or not reported in any infrastructure for measurements. The study reveals that social services differ from health care regarding the availability and use of evidence, the role of professional expertise, and infrastructure for measurements.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We argue that QI methods as used in health care are applicable in social services and can lead to measurable improvements. The study gives valuable insights for QI, not only in social services but also in health care, on how to assess and sustain improvements when infrastructures for measurements are lacking. In addition, when one forms QI teams, the focus should be on functions instead of professions, and QI methods can be used to support implementation of evidence-based practice.

  • 253.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fostering practice-based innovation through reflection at work2012In: Practice-based Innovation: Insights, Applications and Policy Implications / [ed] Helinä Melkas, Vesa Harmaakorpi, Heidelberg: Springer , 2012, p. 155-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book describes and analyses the new environment for innovation, it does this with an emphasis on yet uncharted regions within the field of practice-based innovation, coming up with guidelines for innovation policy measures needed in order to realise this. While it focuses on these policies it also takes into account multi-actor innovation processes, user-driven innovation, "related variety" and many other aspects; aspects such as, just to name a few: communicating creative processes and distributing practice-based innovation; then there is creativity itself, encompassing new fields of knowledge and expertise. The authors go on to describe value networks, showing how to make practice-based innovations, explaining innovation diffusion and absorptive capacity. The book presents new insights as well as the latest research related to the frequently used term "innovation". Definitions are put forward, giving, by way of examples, a detailed description of concepts we draw upon when using these. Innovation as a concept is constantly being subdivided into increasingly finer distinctions, which, in turn, determine the discourse. The book takes a close look at these, further taking into account the challenges as well as the opportunities inherent in developing practice-based innovation procedures and policies of global importance, never losing sight of advancing long-term   effectiveness.

  • 254.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Nordström (Avby), Gunilla
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Integrating research-based and practice-based knowledge through workplace reflection2012In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 403-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to present a theoretical framework with the aim of contributing to improved understanding of how reflection can provide a mechanism to integrate research-based knowledge with the pre-existing practice-based knowledge.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper begins with an explanation of important concepts: research-based and practice-based knowledge, four levels of action and two modes of learning. Two mini cases concerning managers in the public sector in Sweden then provide an illustration of how research-based knowledge can be utilized to challenge practice-based knowledge. The concluding discussion addresses some of the challenges involved in achieving reflection in the workplace that utilizes research-based knowledge.

    Findings – The reflection programmes had several characteristics that facilitated their implementation: they achieved a balance between the workplace demands on the participating managers and time required for the reflection; the participants were specifically recruited, had full management support and were highly motivated to be part of the reflection groups; the facilitators played key roles in structuring the managers' discussions and linking their experiences to relevant research-based knowledge.

    Research limitations/implications – Methodological limitations of the cases constrain the conclusions to be drawn from these studies. However, it should be emphasized that the case studies were intended primarily as illustrations of how workplace reflection can be used to integrate research-based and practice-based knowledge. Obviously, there is a risk of social desirability bias because the interviewer was also involved in developing and implementing the reflection programmes. She also participated as a supervisor in mini case 2.

    Originality/value – The literature on reflection has largely focused on reflection in the context of education, training and preparing for work or a profession. The role of workplace reflection and learning for practitioners and managers in work has received far less attention. The emergence of the evidence-based practice (EBP) agenda has further highlighted the importance of workplace learning and reflection, as practitioners are increasingly expected to critically appraise research studies and integrate new findings into their practice. A more EBP requires reflecting practitioners who are able to synthesize research-based knowledge with their own practice-based knowledge acquired through experience. However, the process of integrating research-based and practice-based knowledge has not been the focus of much study.

  • 255.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creatures of habit: accounting for the role of habit in implementation research on clinical behaviour change2012In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social cognitive theories on behaviour change are increasingly being used to understand and predict healthcare professionals intentions and clinical behaviours. Although these theories offer important insights into how new behaviours are initiated, they provide an incomplete account of how changes in clinical practice occur by failing to consider the role of cue-contingent habits. This article contributes to better understanding of the role of habits in clinical practice and how improved effectiveness of behavioural strategies in implementation research might be achieved. Discussion: Habit is behaviour that has been repeated until it has become more or less automatic, enacted without purposeful thinking, largely without any sense of awareness. The process of forming habits occurs through a gradual shift in cognitive control from intentional to automatic processes. As behaviour is repeated in the same context, the control of behaviour gradually shifts from being internally guided (e. g., beliefs, attitudes, and intention) to being triggered by situational or contextual cues. Much clinical practice occurs in stable healthcare contexts and can be assumed to be habitual. Empirical findings in various fields suggest that behaviours that are repeated in constant contexts are difficult to change. Hence, interventions that focus on changing the context that maintains those habits have a greater probability of success. Some sort of contextual disturbance provides a window of opportunity in which a behaviour is more likely to be deliberately considered. Forming desired habits requires behaviour to be carried out repeatedly in the presence of the same contextual cues. Summary: Social cognitive theories provide insight into how humans analytically process information and carefully plan actions, but their utility is more limited when it comes to explaining repeated behaviours that do not require such an ongoing contemplative decisional process. However, despite a growing interest in applying behavioural theory in interventions to change clinical practice, the potential importance of habit has not been explored in implementation research.

  • 256.
    Nilsson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Advisory Partnership in a Governmental Mandated Network2008In: Partnership - as a Strategy for Social Innovation and Sustainable Change / [ed] Lennart Svensson & Barbro Nilsson, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press , 2008, 1, p. 55-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Is partnership as an organisational principle a way to overcome the limitations of project-organisation and its focus on short-term outcomes? Or is the interest in partnership organisations only an expression of a trend or a fashion in the growing market for organisational development in complex situations? In this book 14 scholars get new data and make careful analysis of the partnership organisation both in theory and in practice. They analyse the effectiveness of the partnership organisation in implementing changes and innovation with long-term effects rather than short-term results. The ambition is to address practical dilemmas and problems in the partnership organisation by using different theoretical perspectives - theories about organisational learning, strategies for change, power and empowerment, gender analysis, governance and participation etc. The research presented is valuable in order to achieve deeper understanding of the pros and cons with the partnership organisation. When can it be useful? What kind of problems can be addressed? Which conditions are necessary if the partnership model is to be used? Editors are Lennart Svensson, professor of sociology at the University of Linkoping, Sweden and Barbro Nilsson, Ph.D. and lecturer of pedagogic at the Institution of Behaviour Science learning at the University of Linkoping. Also contributing are Ken Caplan, Leda Stott, Erik Lindhult, Ingela Malqvist, Marianne Parmsund, Ann-Christine Larsson, Maria Bogren, Sofia Wistus, Ragnar Andersson, Hanna Westberg, Anette Scoppetta and Gun Hedlund.

  • 257.
    Nilsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Partnerskap som stödsystem för arbetsplatslärande2010In: Arbetsplatslärande: - att leda och organisera kompetensutveckling / [ed] Henrik Kock, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idag finns det påtagliga brister i hur företag och andra organisationer använder och utvecklar medarbetarnas kunskaper och kompetens. Att förbättra lärande och kompetensutveckling är därför en viktig utmaning. Hur kan satsningar på kompetensutveckling lyckas? Hur ska företaget gå till väga för att stärka olika gruppers möjligheter till ett utvecklingsinriktat lärande i arbetet, ökad anställningsbarhet och en i övriga avseenden starkare position på arbetsmarknaden? Boken svarar på frågor som:- Varför satsar företag på kompetensutveckling?- Hur går företag konkret tillväga, vilka metoder och angreppssätt  används?- Vilka resultat och effekter når man?- På vilket sätt stödjer företaget bäst lärande och kompetensutveckling på arbetsplatsen? Boken är lämplig för studenter i pedagogik, vuxnas lärande och arbetslivets pedagogik och den vänder sig till företrädare för arbetsmarknadens parter samt de som arbetar med HR-frågor i företag och andra organisationer.

  • 258.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Leader development by men, for men - or not?2008In: Engendering Leadership Through Research Practice,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Same same, but different: Variations in Leadership Development Activities within a Swedish Context2007In: Nordic Conference on Adult Learning,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper I wish to present is an empirical paper, based on completed research. It-s a re-analyse of the empirical data previously presented in my dissertation from 2005, titled -Leader Development in Working Life. Contexts, Actors and (Dis)similarities between Educational Cultures-. The main focus of this paper is to discuss the similarities and dissimilarities of interpretations of global ideas pertaining to leadership and leadership development by various organizations within the same national context. More specifically, do Swedish organizations, which represent widely different branches of trade and sectors of the labour market, have more or less in common when it comes to their leadership development activities? If so, how can we best explain these differences/similarities? The primary theoretical perspective used in this paper is that of new institutionalism in organizational analysis theory, with a particular emphasis on the European/Nordic variant developed by Barbara Czarniawska, Guje Sevón, Kjell Arne Røvik among others. This model focuses on the translation of ideas rather then the notion of diffusion. Another influence in the current paper is the transformational model of social activity, originally presented by Roy Bhaskar and further developed by Margret Archer among others. Of particular interest is the idea of viewing individuals and society as two different kinds of powers, but with obvious points of contact between them. The empirical data was gathered during a two-year period from six different organizations within the Swedish labour market, representing both public and private sectors and different branches of trade. In depth analyses of written documents, multiple on site observations, and interviews with persons responsible for leader development ultimately served as the backbone for this study. This process resulted in six detailed case studies that were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition to these case studies, empirical data has also been obtained from current publication in Swedish press as well as course offering made by external leadership development consulting organizations.

  • 260.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Transforming global ideas of leadership to local organizations2006In: European Conference on Educational Research ECER,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on the transfer of global ideas of leadership to local organizations and their in-house leader development. It highlights the paradox of why we simultaneously can on one hand observe global ideas about leadership travel at high speed around the world, and on the other still see very different local realities. The context-actor perspective that I use as theoretical point of departure is influenced partly by the critical realist Roy Bhaskar-s transformational model of social activity, partly by new institutional theory and Bruno Latour and the process of translation. The latter can be described as a chain of actors influenced by global ideas, creating translations of these ideas that becomes new originals that other actors translate and so on. I also highlight the notion of isomorphic processes, containing powers in the context of the organization in combination with local actors. I use the concept educational culture as a way of describing a single organization-s specific way to manage leader development, i.e. their specific and original translation of the global ideas. The study is chiefly based on a case study of six organizations- leader development. All organizations are located in the same European country, Sweden. I have interviewed 13 persons that had the responsibility for creating, carrying out and developing leader development efforts in these organizations. I also studied different documents from these organizations, and observed when actors from one of the organizations met their colleagues from similar organizations for discussions concerning leader development. The analysis of the data has had a distinct feature of abduction, and I used eight constructed aspects and 131 variables when comparing the organizations. My result suggests that each organization has its own specific educational culture despite the traveling global ideas of leadership. Every organization is constructing leader development in its own specific way. Depending on what level (global, national, sector, branch of trade, organizational) you analyze the empirical data there is also some similarities. In spite that actors seem to prefer translating ideas from organizations within the same nation and branch of trade, there exist no simple connections between a certain context or field on the one hand, and the leader development among organizations from that specific context or field. The actors- contributions to the process of translating ideas from outside the organizations are important facts when one wants to understand how an educational culture is created and why it has the form it has. The actors in this study had both a space of action and strong conceptions about leadership that influenced how they dealt with the ideas from outside the organizations. The actors are not to be seen as passive importers, but rather as active translators that changes the original ideas. The actors are in their turn producing new originals. The actors turned out to be part o the organizations- human resources, and they were not seldom human resource managers and women with an academic background. It was above all these actors that had the responsibility for and organized the in-house leader development. There is a need for more research about how the local process of translation of global ideas is performed and how the actors- conceptions and space of action influences the in in-house leader development.

  • 261.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Kock, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Adult learning in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Kock, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Organisational Learning in Times of Crisis2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnqvist, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Davidson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Human Resource Development: att utveckla medarbetare och organisationer2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De flesta organisationer hävdar att personalen är deras viktigaste resurs, men lever inte upp till denna vackra formulering. Denna bok visar vägar från ord till handling.

    Här ges en grundlig introduktion till ämnesområdet Human Resource Development (HRD), vilket omfattar lärande, kompetensutveckling, utbildningsplanering, ledarskap, förändringsprocesser och kompetensförsörjning. Författarna presenterar också en modell för hur praktiker i yrkeslivet kan axla ett utvecklingsinriktat personalarbete.

    Till boken finns en webbplats som bl.a. innehåller en introduktionsfilm, ett diagnostiskt test, kapitelvisa kunskapstest och miniföreläsningar samt ett sluttest.

    Human Resource Development vänder sig till studenter på högskoleutbildningar, på både grundnivå och avancerad nivå, där frågor om utveckling av mänskliga resurser i arbetslivet är centrala. Boken riktar sig också till chefer med personalansvar och HR-praktiker som vill arbeta mer utvecklingsinriktat.

  • 264.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Enhancing individual employability: the perspective of engineering graduates2010In: Education + Training, ISSN 0040-0912, E-ISSN 1758-6127, Vol. 52, no 6/7, p. 540-551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    From Higher Education To Professional Practice: A comparative study of physicians' and engineers' learning and competence use2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this thesis is on describing and analysing recently graduated physicians’ and engineers’ experiences of the relationship between the professional education programs and the respective professional practices. The aim is to explore the professionals’ reasons for their educational and career choices, what they learn in professional education, the demands they encounter in the workplace, and the perceived needs and opportunities for learning and further development in their professional practices.

    This study is based on a comparative design and the empirical data have been collected in interviews with physicians and master’s level engineers in information technology.

    The theoretical framework is structured around three parts, consisting of theories of professionalisation, theories concerned with the functions of higher education, and theories concerned with the concepts of knowledge, competence and qualifications. There is a close relationship between the process of professionalisation, the authority of the professions, the legitimacy of professional knowledge, and the higher education institutions.

    The results indicate that theory and practice are intimately integrated in the physicians’ professional education, whereas the engineers’ experiences of the educational program are characterised by little overlap between theory and practice. Furthermore, the physicians emphasise the importance of theoretical specialist knowledge and socio-communicative competence while the engineers instead stress the importance of generalist competence. The educational knowledge base is relatively static for both physicians and engineers. However, whereas there is a correspondence between the educational and the professional knowledge base in the case of the physicians they are only a loosely coupled in the case of the engineers. This can be attributed to the changing nature of the engineers’ professional knowledge base, which is characterised by constant change. The physicians regard their professional education as a rational preparation for the world of work. Although education does provide a general foundation for further professional development and learning, the engineers associate their professional education more with a symbolic ritual. For physicians, the formal credentials are a legal requirement to practise the profession. Education is regarded as constituting an important credential also for the engineers as it increases individual employability. The physicians tend to emphasise the use value of the educational program, while the engineers instead stress the exchange value of their educational program.

  • 266.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Om anställningsbarhet i professionella grupper2009In: Anställningsbarhet: Perspektiv från utbildning och arbetsliv, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, 1, p. 71-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    De senaste åren har anställningsbarhet vuxit fram som ett centralt policybegrepp i Sverige. Det används ofta i diskussioner inom både utbildning och arbetsliv. Vanligt ställda frågor är: Leder utbildning till ökad anställningsbarhet? Får de studerande lära sig vad som krävs för att bli anställda? Ofta används begreppet okritiskt och dess betydelse är otydlig. I denna bok diskuteras och analyseras  anställningsbarhet och dess användning kritiskt. Exempel ges från bland annat personalvetarprogrammet, läkar- och civilingenjörsutbildningar, yrkes- och yrkeslärarutbildningar, hälsopreventivt arbete på arbetsplatsen och från kompetensutveckling av vårdbiträden inom omsorgen. Genom dessa exempel får läsaren bilder av vad anställningsbarhet kan vara, hur det tar sig uttryck till exempel genom införandet av olika managementidéer, och vilka konsekvenser det får för arbetets organisering och individers handlande. Boken vänder sig till blivande personalvetare, studie- och yrkesvägledare samt studerande inom pedagogik med inriktning på arbetsliv och vuxnas lärande.

  • 267.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    On the meaning of higher education in professional practice: the case of physicians and engineers2010In: Journal of Education and Work, ISSN 1363-9080, E-ISSN 1469-9435, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 255-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws on a longitudinal qualitative study of graduate transitions from higher education programmes to the world of work. In the study, 23 physicians and 20 master's level engineers in information technology, recently graduated from four different universities in Sweden, were interviewed. The aim of this article is to explore the graduates' perceptions of the function and impact of professional education in relation to professional practice. In the case of medicine, the educational and professional competence bases overlap significantly, and the professional education programme is viewed as a direct vocational preparation. However, the physicians argue that the transition to the workplace is associated with a need to reprioritise knowledge. The engineers consider the educational and professional competence bases to be only loosely coupled. Rather than focusing on the substance of the educational programme, the engineers consider the educational programme to constitute a broad foundation facilitating further learning and professional development in the workplace.

  • 268.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the Relationship between Education and Work in the Employability Discourse2011In: The 7th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 269.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Samarbete kring och utredning av långtidssjukskrivna2001Report (Other academic)
  • 270.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Axelsson, Rose-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Time of Change: Graduates' experiences' of the transition from higher education to working life2004In: The Positioning of Education in Contemporary Knowledge Society, Reykjavik: Iceland University of Education , 2004, p. 63-63Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from higher education to work is a period of significant change for the individual that will affect many parts of the new graduate's life and is also important from an organisational perspective. Our intention is to empirically investigate the processes that are taking place during this period of change. Specifically, the aim of this study is to explore how 24 recently graduated physicians and 24 civil engineers, from different universities in Sweden, perceive the transition from higher education to work and the first period at work. The interviews concerned the graduates' experiences and understandings. They were asked to talk about how they perceived and would like to characterise the transition, how they view their education retrospectively in relation to their present work, and notions of the encounter. In the qualitative analysis of the material we strived to find variation in the physicians' and the engineers' respective experiences in order to reach an understanding of what the transitional process means to the graduates and what the complexity in the transitional process entails for the graduate. This period is mainly characterised by learning how to tackle new situations that occur and to survive the every day work.

  • 271.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Employability and work ability: returning to the labour market after long-term absence2013In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse how people who return to the labour market after long-term sickness absenteeism and subsequent job loss differ in employability, work ability, health, educational level, age, and gender, compared to those who do not.

    PARTICIPANTS: The cohort consisted of 191 individuals, 20 men and 171 women, whose employment was terminated because they had not been able to return to their regular work after taking a long-term sick leave and rehabilitation measures.

    METHODS: This study is based on a postal questionnaire sent out to a cohort of previous employees in a Swedish municipality in 2008.

    RESULTS: At the time of the survey, 39% of the respondents had returned to the labour market and the remaining 61% had not. Return to the labour market after a long-term sick leave was positively associated with male gender, young age, and work ability, i.e. the ability to work with respect to health and work-related demands. Employability, educational level, and health were not significantly associated with a return to the labour market.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the discourse on employability, work ability is often neglected even though it is a central aspect of an individual's ability to obtain new employment.

  • 272.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology.
    Employability and talent management: challenges for HRD practices2012In: European Journal of Training and Development, ISSN 2046-9012, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 26-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this conceptual paper is to illuminate the problems that are associated with defining and identifying talent and to discuss the development of talent as a contributor to employability.Design/methodology/approach – The world of work is characterised by new and rapidly changing demands. Talent management has recently been the target of increasing interest and is considered to be a method by which organisations can meet the demands that are associated with increased complexity. Previous studies have often focused on the management of talent, but the issue of what exactly should be managed has generally been neglected. In this paper, the authors focus on discussing the substance of talent and the problems associated with identifying talent by using the following closely related concepts: employability, knowledge, and competence.Findings – Employability is central to employee performance and organisational success. Individual employability includes general meta-competence and context-bound competence that is related to a specific profession and organisation. The concept of employability is wider than that of talent, but the possession of talent is critical to being employable. In this paper, the authors suggest a model in which talent includes individual, institutional, and organisational-social dimensions.Practical implications – The illumination of different meanings of talent management and the substance of talent is crucial to the practical implication of central human resource development practices, such as training and development.Originality/value – The paper shows that clarification of the conceptual boundaries and the presentation of a typology that is relevant to the understanding of talent are central to the creation of valid talent management systems that aim to define and develop talent.

  • 273.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Adult learning, education, and the labour market in the employability regime2013In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 171-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to draw on the research and scholarly literature to explore the changing discourses and perspectives concerning adult learning, education, and the labour market in the employability regime. The focus of the nalysis is a Nordic context. The dominant employability regime maintains a technical-rational perspective on learning and employability. Education is predominantly regarded as an instrumental preparation for the labour market. The future demands of the labour market are largely unknown, however, and vocational and professional training may not provide sufficient preparation for the increasing complexities of work. Theoretical discussions have been dominated by an alleged mismatch between individual competence and the qualifications that are required in the world of work. There is no consensus regarding how the gap should be described, explained, or bridged. New demands on educational design have emerged, and ideas related to liberal education and ‘bildung’ have been reinserted into the political agenda, offering general preparation for a wider array of challenges.

  • 274.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Persson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Arbetsförmåga och anställningsbarhet efter långvarig sjukskrivning2009Report (Other academic)
  • 275.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rubenson, Kjell
    Centre for Policy Studies in Higher Education and Training (CHET) and the Department of Educational Sciences (EDST), Faculty of Education, the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada..
    Determinants of Employment-Related Informal and Formal Learning in Canada.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 276.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rubenson, Kjell
    University of British Columbia, Centre for Policy Studies in Education and Training, Department of Educational Studies.
    On the determinants of employment-related organised education and informal learning2014In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 304-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the distribution of employment-related organised education and informal learning in the Canadian workforce. The paper draws on a large-scale survey, the Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL), which was based on structured and standardised telephone interviews with a representative sample of 5783 Canadian members of the employed labour force. In exploring the determinants facilitating employment-related informal learning, three analytical categories of factors derived from previous research on learning participation were used: individual-level factors, job characteristics and workplace environment. The analyses focus on differences in individuals, jobs and workplace characteristics among adult workers who acquired or improved their job-related skills through different training pathways. In addition, analyses were performed to compare the extent to which these factors differ in their influence on learning decisions among workers who combine both organised education and informal learning and those who receive only informal learning. The results indicate that important predictors of participation in employment-related organised education and informal learning are age, educational attainment, learning skills, occupational class, education-job relation, degree of autonomy, degree of labour intensity, principal area of production and organisation size.

  • 277.
    Nordström (Avby), Gunilla
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Professionalism encounters Evidence-based Practice (EBP): What effects can EBP have on knowledge use and learning in professional practice?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today it is common to talk about “lean organizations”, where focus lays on cost efficiency and resource allocation. In professional work, e.g. in healthcare and social services the trend is referred to as New Public Management (NPM), involving considerable structural changes and an inevitable shift towards a more quantitatively oriented mode of decision making. Especially the social care is under the loop for changes; striving to create a practice, measurable, knowledgeable and with the ability to demonstrate the efficiency of its methods and efforts; referred to as EBP. With an exclusive focus on task performance the value of workers´ ability to conceptualize problems and solutions and engage creatively with families in their historical and social context is undermined. The rules constituting the arguments in practical reasoning are becoming more and more structured. Related to theories of how professionals develop abstractions to create powerful knowledge systems the introduction of EBP could in fact have a negative effect on knowledge use and learning. More stringent methods may lessen the room for discretion, in turn circumscribing the professional knowledge and with this making professional expertize needless in executing the work. 

    The aim with this paper is to explore possible consequences of introducing EBP in professional practice (social work). The paper is divided into two parts. While the first part touches key concepts and theories of relevance, the following will analyze EBP’s possible effects on knowledge use and learning from aspects of significance; involving different research traditions, implementation strategies and situational aspects for discretion and learning. The paper concludes in a discussion of consequences following with the growing transparency and rationalization-movement.

  • 278.
    Nordström (Avby), Gunilla
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understandings of Evidence-based Practice among politicians, managers and executive staff in social welfare agencies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore and describe understandings of EBP among various actors in social welfare agencies in Sweden. Method Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with politicians, managers and executive staff in social welfare agencies in Sweden. Result The main findings suggest that there are four understandings concerning the concept of EBP. These are labeled: i) popular discourse; ii) procedural application; iii) transparent view; and iv) philosophical approach. Conclusion Although the analysis is ongoing, the results point to certain inconsistencies concerning how EBP is understood in social welfare practice. This variation in understandings is explained in terms of attitudes and beliefs regarding the view of practice, quality and knowledge. However, EBP was difficult to account for depending on what was expressed as deficient knowledge of EBP in the organization, as well as its’ ability to provide an applicable atmosphere.

  • 279.
    Nordström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap, Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rörlighet på arbetsmarknaden och återgång i arbete. Posterpresentation.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Nordström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap, Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sick leave and the impact of job-to-job mobility on future vocational situation.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Nordström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap, Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sick leave and the impact of job-to-job mobility on the future vocational situation2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Change of job could be a strategy in vocational rehabilitation when return to the original job is not possible, but research is very limited concerning the effects of job mobility on the future vocational situation. The aim of the study was to investigate whether job-to-job mobility affects the likelihood of remaining on the labour market over time among persons who are employed and have experienced long-term sick leave.

    Methods: In a longitudinal register study, cohorts from three base years (1994, 1999 and 2004) were created, based on the Swedish population who were 20–60 years old, had sickness allowance insurance, and were employed in the base year and the following year (n > 3,000,000). The likelihood that individuals on long-term sick leave were employed later depending on whether or not they changed workplace during the present or next year of long-term sick leave was analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Age, sector, industry, children, marital status, education, income, rate of sick leave and earlier sick leave and earlier mobility were taken into consideration.

    Results: Women with more than 180 days’ sick leave who changed workplaces were more likely to have a job later compared with those who did not change jobs. For men, the association was statistically significant with 1994 and 2004 as base years, but not in the cohort from 1999.

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that for those on long-term sick leave that changed workplaces, the opportunities to stay on the labour market might increase. However, the study has methodological limitations and the results for men are ambiguous. We do not therefore have enough evidence for recommending job change as a strategy for vocational rehabilitation.

  • 282.
    Nordström, Karin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    SICKNESS ABSENCE IN WORKPLACES: DOES IT REFLECT A HEALTHY HIRE EFFECT?2016In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, E-ISSN 1896-494X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 315-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sickness absence in workplaces may reflect working conditions. It may also reflect a "healthy hire effect," i.e., that workplaces recruit individuals with experience of sickness absence differently. The purpose of the study was to determine if a history of sickness absence among recruits is associated with the average level of sickness absence in workplaces. Material and Methods: In a register-based follow-up study, Swedish workplaces with at least 5 employees in 2006 were selected (approximately 127 000 workplaces with 3.9 million employees). The workplaces were categorized according to the average workplace sickness absence in 2006 and the recruits were categorized according to the individual sickness absence in 2005. The workplaces with a high average level of sickness absence were more likely than those with a low level to hire employees with high sickness absence in the year preceding employment: men - odds ratio (OR) = 7.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.6-7.8, women OR = 7.5, 95% CI: 6.9-8.1. Results: The results show that there is a greater likelihood of employing individuals with high levels of sickness absence in the workplaces with many days of the average sickness absence than in the workplaces with few days of the average sickness absence. Conclusions: The results suggest that sickness absence in workplaces may reflect a healthy hire effect.

  • 283.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Preventing discriminating attitudes through educational interventions?: A study of two anti-discrimination workshops for security guards2012In: The 40th Annual Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association: Everyday life, education and their transformations in a Nordic and globalized context, Department of Eduation, Aarhus University, Copenhagen, Denmark , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Norrman, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Moberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Frankelius, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Innovative methods for entrepreneurship and leadership teaching in CDIO-based engineering education2014In: Proceedings of the 10th International CDIO Conference, Barcelona: Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on mixed methods for teaching and learning; with special emphasis on individualized learning and engagement of students for reaching better results and relevance in CDIO (Conceiving, Designing, Implementing and Operating)-based engineering education. Four types of learning activities are discussed in the paper; “flipped classroom”, “experiential learning exercises”, “sharp live cases” and “theory-based practical exercises”. The empirical material consists of the authors’ own teaching experience. Based on a literature review and our own experience, we propose a model of components crucial to take into account when learning activities are designed and practiced. These components are stakeholders, pedagogics, technology and context.

  • 285.
    Norrman, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundberg, Amanda
    Demola East Sweden.
    André, Marcus
    Demola East Sweden.
    Simple Mockups - Tool to Enhance Visualisation and Creativity in Entrepreneurship Courses2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO framework encourages us to work with prototyping during the conceive and design phases integrated into engineering education. At Linköping university, we apply prototyping and working with simple mockups in several entrepreneurship and innovation courses in order to stimulate creative thinking and experimentation. We have seen that through working with a joint prototype, the students increase their level of engagement and self-confidence while learning to know each other, both as individuals, and according to their skills and competence. Prototyping events are appreciated as learning activities, not least as they signal a culture of playfulness and unpretentiousness within a course. We have also seen that it is important to inspire the participating students to reflect on the event in order to complete the learning process. In the paper we analyse and discuss our experience regarding how and at what time in a course simple prototypes can be used, how workshops can be developed, and what we have learned. 

  • 286.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Följeforskning i ett innovationsprojekt2009In: Lärande utvärdering genom följeforskning / [ed] Lennart Svensson, Göran Brulin, Sven Jansson, Karin Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2009, 1, p. 183-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här boken presenterar ett delvis nytt perspektiv på lärande utvärdering i interaktiva former. Frågan är hur man ska uppnå långsiktiga effekter, det vill säga en hållbar utveckling med hjälp av projekt. Detta är en viktig fråga inte minst i genomförandet av EU:s strukturfonder. I boken förankras begreppen kring lärande utvärdering i teori men huvuddelen av kapitlen utgår från exempel på lärande utvärdering och resonerar kring dessa. Viktiga delar i utvärderingsprocessen är exempelvis forskarens eller utvärderarens konstruktiva dialog med deltagarna, att granskningen är kritisk och att förhållningssättet växlar mellan närhet och distans. Gemensam kunskapsbildning är viktig i en lärande utvärdering och analysseminarier presenteras som ett sätt att nå dit. Målgrupp för boken är högskolestuderande bland annat inom sociologi, pedagogik, företagsekonomi och personalvetarprogram. Boken bör även kunna användas i högskolekurser och uppdragsutbildning för chefer, utvecklare, konsulter, projektledare och utvärderare.

  • 287.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Innovationer i offentlig sektor: En litteraturöversikt2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det står klart att innovationer i offentlig sektor – åtminstone inom innovationsstudier – är en ungt forskningsområde. Problemområdet innovationer i offentlig sektor är till sin natur tvärvetenskapligt. Diskussion om detta förs inom flera olika discipliner och forskningsområden. Jag har här valt att avgränsa mig från närliggande områden såsom organisationsteori, management-litteratur och förvaltningspolitik. Huvudfokus ligger istället på det område vi kan kalla innovationsstudier och de verktyg och logiker vi tar med oss därifrån. Avgränsningen innebär också att det är produkten (innovationen) och inte organisationen (entreprenörskap) som står i fokus. Denna avgränsning innebär att begreppet innovation är centralt. Syftet med litteraturöversikten blir då att sammanställa aktuell forskning inom området innovationer i offentlig sektor.

  • 288.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Innovativt klimat 2006: Om organisationsklimat och innovativt beteende i PIMM2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektplanen framhålls att man vill mäta det innovativa klimatet i organisationerna före och efter projektet. Därför genomfördes en mätning av det innovativa klimatet i ett litet antal enheter inom Norrköpings kommun och Östergötlands landsting. Syftet med denna rapport är därför att undersöka det innovativa klimatet i några enheter inom Norrköpings kommun och Östergötlands landsting. Hur detta har gått till, och vad jag menar (och inte menar) med begreppet innovativt klimat beskrivs i denna del av rapporten.

  • 289.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Ongoing evaluation in an innovation project2009In: Learning through ongoing evaluation / [ed] Lennart Svensson, Göran Brulin, Sven Jansson, Karin Sjöberg, Lund, 2009, 1, p. 189-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a relatively new perspective of learning evaluation in interactive forms. The question is how long-term effects can be achieved, i.e. a sustainable development with the aid of projects. This is an important question, particularly in the context of EU Structural Funds. In the book learning evaluation concepts are grounded in theory. The majority of chapters also include practical examples of learning evaluation and discuss these in some depth. Important aspects of the evaluation process include the researcher?s or evaluator?s constructive dialogue with the participants, the importance of critical examination, and that approaches shift between proximity and distance. Common knowledge formation is important in a learning evaluation and analysis seminars are presented as a way of achieving this. The book?s target groups include university students in the fields of sociology, education, business economics and management and human resources management. The book could also be used in university courses and in-service training for managers, developers, consultants, project managers

  • 290.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding innovation in a municipal context: A conceptual discussion2013In: Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice., ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 315-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how local government practioners understand the concept of innovation in a municipal concept. The rainbow eceonomy concept is used to distinguish between three different attitudes toward the word innovation among practioners. One important conclusion is that the poor understanding of innovation among practioners will strengthen the view of the public sector as non-innovative and incapacitate the concept as a human instrument.

  • 291.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Everyday innovation in elderly care and healthcare2009In: Organising work for innovation and growth: experiences and efforts in ten companies / [ed] Marianne Döös, Lena Wilhelmson, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2009, 1, p. 101-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational innovations are of prime importance to successful companies. Innovative ways of organising work can improve production efficency and productivity, but also develop conditions for organisations that promote the creative and innovative capacity of all its members.

    In this book researchers contribute to the understanding of how the high road strategy for development can take place in practice. They shed light upon the query how companies work in practise to create organisational conditions that promote innovation, competitiveness and growth.

    It is not always the revolutionary changes that ensure a company's success. It is not the incremental continuous changes either. What matters is seeing things differently and learning to think in new ways, both when it comes to organising internal work processes and external cooperation. Welcome to the shifting of minds.

  • 292.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Om ägarskap av långsiktiga och oförutsedda effekter2013In: Att fånga effekter av program och projekt / [ed] Lennart Svensson, Göran Brulin, Sven Jansson, Karin Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 177-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Stora projekt som finansieras av EU utvärderas alltid. Men är dessa utvärderingar rättvisande? Letar man efter de verkliga och hållbara effekterna? Att fånga effekter av stora projekt är en svår uppgift. Inte minst beror det på att verkningarna kan vara av många olika slag - oväntade, icke avsedda, överraskande, dolda och ibland utanför målområdet. Det gör det inte mindre angeläget: dessa effekter kan vara viktigare än de planerade, avsedda och förväntade. I denna bok beskrivs resultatet av ett flertal analyser av utvecklings­arbete i stora projekt och program - i organisationer, på regional nivå, i nationella program med mera. Slutsatserna dras från teoretiska analyser samt från en lång rad empiriska studier. Boken vänder sig till forskare, regionalt utvecklingsansvariga och myndighetsföreträdare. Den kan användas i utbildning av olika slag - inom flera områden i högskolan och till projektledare, utvärderare, följeforskare och finansiärer samt projektägare.

  • 293.
    Nählinder, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Östgöta Textile" an innovative network in a triple helix logic: towards peer incubating2014In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 391-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tells the story of a group of small, creative firms collaborating in a regional network and forming an association to promote growth. The network is a triple helix context and supports the firms to growth through what we call a peer-incubating process. This article builds on an action-research project supporting the development of the association and the network ‘Östgöta Textile’. The analysis of the Ostgota Textile network shows that the local and low-tech firms have received critical support from the academic and governmental networks during the formative process. The main conclusion and implication is that by supporting a triple helix network, even in other sectors than traditional high tech industries, entrepreneurial activities and growth can lead to growth in small firms.

  • 294.
    Per, Nilsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordström (Avby), Gunilla
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Integrating Research-based and Practice-based Knowledge through Workplace Reflection2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Pidgeon, Michelle
    et al.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Karlberg, Anne-Marie
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Allman, R.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Campbell, J.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Edwards, H.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Delgatty, Elinor
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Howes, S
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Jacobi, A-M.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Murphy, J.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Regan, R
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Rubin, E.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Tao, H.
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    Andres, Lesley
    Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
    The EDST Graduate Student Supervision Survey2005Report (Other academic)
  • 296.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad universitet.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Grupporganisation: inflytande eller utnyttjande?2007In: Arbetsmarknad & arbetsliv / utges av Arbetsmarknadsstyrelsen och Arbetslivsinstitutet, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 2, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Rehme, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Peter
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Credibility-Driven Entrepreneurship: A Study of the First Sale2011In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, ISSN 1465-7503, E-ISSN 2043-6882, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how external stakeholders influence the first sale of technologybased business-to-business start-up companies. We combine entrepreneurship theory with marketing theory to describe start-ups’ marketing and selling activities and how they reach key milestones. The study shows how two firms, an e-business firm and a new product development firm acquired their first customers. The analysis provides a picture of how a network of the firms’ founders, board members, and owners contributed to their first sales. It also highlights the importance of sales activities, relationships, and industrial knowledge. It examines the importance of external stakeholders’ relative positions in the web of relationships and how relevant these are in affecting outcomes and speed to market. This article concludes that the first sale follows a timeline with three important phases of activities involving credibility, closing, and operations. We find that that credibility is best obtained through establishing relationships.

  • 298.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychosocial Work Conditions and Aspects of Health2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s working life has led to new requirements and conditions at the workplace, and additional factors may be of importance for employees’ health. Most earlier research has taken place in stable organizations, and has not taken changes in organizations into account. The way in which psychosocial work conditions affect employees’ health and well-being has been the topic of several studies but mental ill health is still one of the most common causes of sick leave in Sweden. Little attention is given to the importance of the workplace and organizational context for employees’ health. The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how different aspects of health are associated with psychosocial work conditions in today’s working life.

    This thesis comprises two empirical studies. The first study is a longitudinal study, based on questionnaire data from 1010 employees at the Swedish Labour Market Administration. The second study is designed as a prospective cohort study, based on questionnaire data from 8430 employees in ten organizations, participating in the LOHP project. Linear and logistic regressions were performed to investigate associations between psychosocial work conditions and different aspects of health. Multilevel analysis was performed in one paper.

    The main findings in Paper I are that traditional job stress models are better for predicting ill health than good health. Different psychosocial work conditions may however, be useful for measuring different aspects of health, depending on whether the purpose is to prevent ill health or to promote health. In Paper II, psychosocial work conditions and symptoms of burnout were found to differ between different hierarchical levels, and different psychosocial work conditions were associated with symptoms of burnout at different hieratical levels. Paper III showed that psychosocial work conditions predict voluntary job mobility, and this may be due to two forces for job mobility: job dissatisfaction and career development. In Paper IV, a strong association between high work ability and better performance was found. Clear goals and expectations may result in improved psychosocial work conditions and work ability, which in turn affects employees’ performance.

    This thesis has provided knowledge regarding different aspects of health and psychosocial work conditions. Conditions at the organizational and workplace level set the prerequisites for if and how employees use their resources and their ability to act. Access to resources and the capacity to use them may vary depending on the employees’ hierarchal position. Occupational health research needs to focus on differences in psychosocial work conditions at different hierarchical levels. Organizations with clear goals and expectations may create more favourable conditions at work, supporting employees’ room for manoeuver, social capital and their ability to cope with working life, hence promoting health. Health promotion has a holistic approach and considers the work environment, the individual and the interplay between them. However, most health interventions at workplaces are directed to employees’ health behaviour rather than improvements in organizational and work conditions. To develop a good work environment it is necessary to identify conditions at work that promote different aspects of health. These conditions need to be tackled at the organizational, workplace and individual level, as good health is shaped by the interplay between the employee and the conditions for work.

    List of papers
    1. Evaluation of job stress models for predicting health at work
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of job stress models for predicting health at work
    2011 (English)In: WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Few workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions are designed to improve work conditions. Methods for measurement of work conditions are often developed from a risk factor perspective rather than a WHP perspective. More knowledge is needed on the work conditions that promote health in order to develop a good work environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the Demand Control Support model, the Effort Reward Imbalance model and the Job Characteristic Inventory are correlated, if the subscales predict health and to analyze which combination of subscales is the most useful predictor of health longitudinally. <br> <br>Participants: The study used questionnaire data from 662 civil servants at baseline and at follow-up 2 years later. <br> <br>Method: The data were analysed by multiple regressions. <br> <br>Results: A new model; effort, reward, and variety, was found having a higher predictive power to predict health than the original models. <br> <br>Conclusions: To promote health at work, social relations and health-mediating work conditions are important because these conditions may buffer health. Health can be assumed to be a resource that is created in everyday activities and interactions in workplaces, and there is a need to develop health measure instruments based on holistic health theories.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOS Press, 2011
    Keywords
    Work conditions, job stress models, health, workplace health promotion
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57254 (URN)10.3233/WOR-2011-1223 (DOI)000294446900012 ()
    Available from: 2010-06-15 Created: 2010-06-15 Last updated: 2013-09-03
    2. Investigating Work Conditions and Burnout at Three Hierarchical Levels
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating Work Conditions and Burnout at Three Hierarchical Levels
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 1157-1163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the differences in work conditions and symptoms of burnout, and the association between work conditions and symptoms of burnout at the three hierarchical levels: subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Methods: Analyses were based on questionnaire data from 4096 employees in nine organizations, containing three hierarchical levels: subordinates (n=3659), first-line managers (n=345), and middle managers (n=92).

    Results: Work conditions were found to differ between the three hierarchical levels, mostly between subordinates and managers. Managers experienced fewer symptoms of burnout than subordinates. Furthermore, the association between work conditions and burnout differed for subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Conclusions: Occupational health research needs to focus more on differences between hierarchical levels regarding work conditions and burnout.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95575 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0b013e31829b27df (DOI)000330448800005 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2013-07-09 Created: 2013-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. The importance of work conditions and health for voluntary job mobility: a two-year follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of work conditions and health for voluntary job mobility: a two-year follow-up
    2012 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Changing jobs is part of modern working life. Within occupational health, job mobility   has mainly been studied in terms of employees' intentions to leave their jobs. In contrast to actual turnover, turnover intentions are not definite and only reflect the probability that an individual will change job. The aim of this study was to determine what work conditions predict voluntary job mobility and to examine if good health or burnout predicts voluntary job mobility.

    Methods

    The study was based on questionnaire data from 792 civil servants. The data were analysed   using logistic regressions.

    Results

    Low variety and high autonomy were associated with increased voluntary job mobility.   However, the associations between health and voluntary job mobility did not reach   significance. Possible explanations for the null results may be that the population   was homogeneous, and that the instruments for measuring global health are too coarse   for a healthy, working population.

    Conclusions

    Voluntary job mobility may be predicted by high autonomy and low variety. The former may reflect that individuals with high autonomy have stronger career development motives; the latter may reflect the fact that low variety leads to job dissatisfaction. In contrast to our results on job content, global health measurements are not strong   predictors of voluntary job mobility. This may be because good health affects job mobility through several offsetting channels, involving the resources and ability to seek a new job. Future work should use more detailed measurements of health or   examine other work settings so that we may learn more about which of the offsetting effects of health dominate in different contexts.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73497 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-12-682 (DOI)000311956700001 ()
    Available from: 2012-01-05 Created: 2012-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    4. Work ability and performance: associations with clarity of work and work conditions: A multilevel study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work ability and performance: associations with clarity of work and work conditions: A multilevel study
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s flexible working life has resulted in loose structures, less predictability and increased uncertainty for employees. Uncertainty regarding what work tasks to carry out may result in low job satisfaction and high tension, but also in reduced performance and effectiveness. Conversely, organizations with clear goals and strategies provide better opportunities for employees to understand what is expected and how to perform the work. This paper explores associations with clarity of work, work conditions and work ability, and secondly if work ability affects performance, given the organizational and work conditions. The study was based on questionnaire data from 4442 subordinates in 10 organizations in different sectors. The data were analysed by multilevel logistic regressions. High clarity of work, high control and high social capital were associated with higher work ability and better performance. High demands were associated with lower work ability and lower performance. High work ability was associated with better performance. The results imply that good work ability is an important factor for employees’ performance, affected by socio-demographic factors, but mostly with organizational and work conditions. Organizations with clear goals creates more favorable work conditions that support employees’ control, their ability to cope with working life and their performance.

    Keywords
    Work ability, performance, clarity of work, work conditions, multilevel
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95577 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-07-09 Created: 2013-07-09 Last updated: 2013-09-03Bibliographically approved
  • 299.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of job stress models for predicting health at work2011In: WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Few workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions are designed to improve work conditions. Methods for measurement of work conditions are often developed from a risk factor perspective rather than a WHP perspective. More knowledge is needed on the work conditions that promote health in order to develop a good work environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the Demand Control Support model, the Effort Reward Imbalance model and the Job Characteristic Inventory are correlated, if the subscales predict health and to analyze which combination of subscales is the most useful predictor of health longitudinally. <br> <br>Participants: The study used questionnaire data from 662 civil servants at baseline and at follow-up 2 years later. <br> <br>Method: The data were analysed by multiple regressions. <br> <br>Results: A new model; effort, reward, and variety, was found having a higher predictive power to predict health than the original models. <br> <br>Conclusions: To promote health at work, social relations and health-mediating work conditions are important because these conditions may buffer health. Health can be assumed to be a resource that is created in everyday activities and interactions in workplaces, and there is a need to develop health measure instruments based on holistic health theories.

  • 300.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of Job Stress Models for Predicting Health at Work. Oral presentation.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
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