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  • 251.
    Sarkar, Priyabrata
    et al.
    University Calcutta, Department Polymer Science and Technology, Calcutta 700009, W Bengal, India.
    Banerjee, Suchanda
    University Calcutta, Department Polymer Science and Technology, Calcutta 700009, W Bengal, India.
    Bhattacharyay, Dipankar
    Calcutta Institute Technology, Department Chemistry Engn, Howrah 711316, W Bengal, India.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Electrochemical sensing systems for arsenate estimation by oxidation of L-cysteine2010In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1495-1501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, rapid electrochemical sensing systems for detection of arsenate by oxidation of L-cysteine are proposed. Three different sensing systems comprising of screen-printed electrode and standard electrodes were used for this study. The detector element i.e. L-cysteine was immobilized on the working electrodes of the transducers by in-situ polymerization of acylamide. The electrocatalytic oxidation of L-cysteine was performed by cyclic voltammentry and amperometry. All the systems presented linear response range up to 30 mu g L-1 of arsenic. The sensors were able to estimate arsenic below 10 mu g L-1 with a detection limit of 1.2-4.6 mu g L-1. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 252.
    Scarano, Simona
    et al.
    University Firenze Polo Science, Dipartimento Chim, Sesto Fiorentino, FI, Italy.
    Mascini, Marco
    University Firenze Polo Science, Dipartimento Chim, Sesto Fiorentino, FI, Italy.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Minunni, Maria
    University Firenze Polo Science, Dipartimento Chim, Sesto Fiorentino, FI, Italy.
    Surface plasmon resonance imaging for affinity-based biosensors2010In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 957-966Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SPR imaging (SPRi) is at the forefront of optical label-free and real-time detection. It offers the possibility of monitoring hundreds of biological interactions simultaneously and from the binding profiles, allows the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the interactions between the immobilised probes and the ligands in solution. We review the current state of development of SPRi technology and its application including commercially available SPRi instruments. Attention is also given to surface chemistries for biochip functionalisation and suitable approaches to improve sensitivity. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 253.
    SCHUBERT, F
    et al.
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    SAINI, S
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    MEDIATED AMPEROMETRIC ENZYME ELECTRODE INCORPORATING PEROXIDASE FOR THE DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE IN ORGANIC-SOLVENTS1991In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 245, no 2, p. 133-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An amperometric enzyme electrode incorporating horseradish peroxidase is described for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in organic solvents. The enzyme was co-adsorbed with an electron mediator, potassium hexacyanoferrate(II), on the surface of a graphite foil electrode, making reagentless measurement possible. The electrochemical reduction of the enzymatically oxidized mediator was utilized as the analytical signal. Studies in different solvent systems revealed that the electrode could be operated in dioxane, chloroform and chlorobenzene, the last two providing approximately double the sensitivity of the former. The presence of a small amount of aqueous buffer was essential for sensor activity. During 2 weeks of intermittent use, the sensitivity of the electrode decreased to 40% of its initial value. At least 50 assays could be performed with a single sensor.

  • 254.
    SCHUBERT, F
    et al.
    CTR INST MOLEC BIOL,W-1115 BERLIN,GERMANY; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    SAINI, S
    CTR INST MOLEC BIOL,W-1115 BERLIN,GERMANY; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    SCHELLER, F
    CTR INST MOLEC BIOL,W-1115 BERLIN,GERMANY; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    ORGANIC-PHASE ENZYME ELECTRODES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE AND PHENOL1992In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 7, no 03-jan, p. 408-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An amperometric horseradish peroxidase electrode is described for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in organic solvents. The enzyme was co-adsorbed with an electron mediator, hexacyanoferrate(II), to the surface of a graphite foil electrode making reagentless measurement possible. The electrochemical reduction of the enzymatically oxidized mediator was utilized as the analytical signal. The electrode can be operated in dioxane, chloroform and chlorobenzene, the presence of a small quantity of aqueous buffer being essential for activity. On this basis a small, probe-type sensor has been assembled the response of which is linearly related to hydrogen peroxide concentration between 0.05 and 1 mM. A tyrosinase sensor has been constructed by combining a Clark-type oxygen electrode with a membrane bearing adsorbed enzyme. The sensor is capable of measuring between 0.1 and 5 mM phenol in chloroform saturated with aqueous buffer.

  • 255.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Correspondence on "Can Nanoimpacts Detect Single-Enzyme Activity? Theoretical Considerations and an Experimental Study of Catalase Impacts"2017In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 3591-3593Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 256.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Screen printed microband array based biosensor for water monitoring2015In: The Frumkin Symposium, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Total phenol analysis of water using a laccase-based microsensor array2015In: Program of the XXIII International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics of the Bioelectrochemical Society. 14-18 June, 2015. Malmö, Sweden, Lausanne: Bioelectrochemical Society , 2015, p. 155-155Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The monitoring of phenolic compounds in raw waters and wastewaters is of great importance for environmental control. Use of biosensors for rapid, specific and simple detection of phenolic compounds is a promising approach. A number of biosensors have been developed for phenol detection. A general drawback of previously reported biosensors is their insufficient detection limits for phenols in water samples. One way to improve the detection limit is by the use of microelectrodes.

    Microband design of the microelectrodes combines convergent mass transport due to the microscale width and high output currents due to the macroscopic length. Among the various techniques available for microband electrode fabrication, we have chosen screen-printing which is a cost-effective production method.

    In this study, we report on the development of a laccase-based microscale biosensor operating under a convergent diffusion regime. Screen-printing followed by simple cutting was utilized for the fabrication of graphite microbands as a platform for further covalent immobilization of laccase. Numerical simulations, utilizing the finite element method with periodic boundary conditions, were used for modeling the voltammetric response of the developed microband electrodes. Anodization followed by covalent immobilization was used for the electrode modification with laccase. Direct and mediated laccase bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of phenols was studied on macro- and microscale graphite electrodes. Significant enhancement of the analytical performance was achieved by the establishment of convergent diffusion in the microscale sensor. Finally, the developed microsensor was utilized to monitor phenolic compounds in real waste water.

  • 258.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A.
    Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Russia.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cholesterol Self-Powered Biosensor2014In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 86, no 19, p. 9540-9547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring the cholesterol level is of great importance, especially for people with high risk of developing heart disease. Here we report on reagentless cholesterol detection in human plasma with a novel single-enzyme, membrane-free, self-powered biosensor, in which both cathodic and anodic bioelectrocatalytic reactions are powered by the same substrate. Cholesterol oxidase was immobilized in a sol-gel matrix on both the cathode and the anode. Hydrogen peroxide, a product of the enzymatic conversion of cholesterol, was electrocatalytically reduced, by the use of Prussian blue, at the cathode. In parallel, cholesterol oxidation catalyzed by mediated cholesterol oxidase occurred at the anode. The analytical performance was assessed for both electrode systems separately. The combination of the two electrodes, formed on high surface-area carbon cloth electrodes, resulted in a self-powered biosensor with enhanced sensitivity (26.0 mA M-1 cm(-2)), compared to either of the two individual electrodes, and a dynamic range up to 4.1 mM cholesterol. Reagentless cholesterol detection with both electrochemical systems and with the self-powered biosensor was performed and the results were compared with the standard method of colorimetric cholesterol quantification.

  • 259.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A highly sensitive and self-powered cholesterol biosensor2014In: 24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 2014, Elsevier, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood cholesterol is a very important parameter for the assessment of atherosclerosis and other lipid disorders. The total cholesterol concentration in human blood should be less than 5.17 mM. Concentrations in the range 5.17 – 6.18 mM are considered borderline high risk and levels above 6.21 mM, high risk. Cholesterol determination with high accuracy is therefore necessary in order to differentiate these levels for medical screening or diagnosis. Several attempts to develop highly sensitive cholesterol biosensors have been described, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a self-powered cholesterol biosensor, i.e. a device delivering the analytical information from the current output of the energy of the biocatalytic conversion of cholesterol, without any external power source. This is particularly relevant to the development of inexpensive screening devices based on printed electronics.

     

    We present two complementary bioelectrocatalytic platforms suitable for the fabrication of a self-powered biosensor. Both are based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) immobilisation in a sol-gel matrix, as illustrated in Fig. 1 [1]. Mediated biocatalytic cholesterol oxidation [2] was used as the anodic reaction and electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide on Prussian Blue (PB) as the cathodic reaction. Due to a synergistic effect in the self-powered cholesterol biosensor, the analytical parameters of the overall device exceeded those of the individual component half-cells, yielding a sensitivity of 0.19 A M-1 cm-2 and a dynamic range that embraces the free cholesterol concentrations found in human blood.

     

    Thus, we have demonstrated the novel concept of highly sensitive cholesterol determination using the first self-powered cholesterol biosensor. This configuration is particularly promising for incorporation in emerging plastic- and paper-based analytical instruments for decentralised diagnostics and mobile health.

     

  • 260.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bioelectrocatalytic systems for health applications2016In: Biotechnology Advances, ISSN 0734-9750, E-ISSN 1873-1899, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 177-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a brief overview of bioelectrocatalytic devices for in vitro health applications, including food safety and environmental analysis, focusing on microelectrode- and microfluidic-based biosensors, paper-based point-of-care devices and wearable biosensors. The main hurdles and future perspectives are discussed. We then consider the role of electron transfer between a biocatalyst and an electrode in biosensor design. Brief descriptions of indirect, direct and mediated mechanisms are given. The principal strategies, as well as recent developments for modulation of electron transfer in biocatalytic systems are summarised. In conclusion, we highlight some of the challenges associated with improving these redox systems.

  • 261.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A
    Moscow State University, Russia.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Novel single-enzyme based self-powered biosensor2014In: 15th International Conference on Electroanalysis (ESEAC), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A screen-printed microband array biosensor for water monitoring2014In: 15th International Conference on Electroanalysis (ESEAC), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrocatalytic Currents from Single Enzyme Molecules2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 8, p. 2504-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single molecule enzymology provides an opportunity to examine details of enzyme mechanisms that are not distinguishable in biomolecule ensemble studies. Here we report, for the first time, detection of the current produced in an electrocatalytic reaction by a single redox enzyme molecule when it collides with an ultramicroelectrode. The catalytic process provides amplification of the current from electron-transfer events at the catalyst leading to a measurable current. This new methodology monitors turnover of a single enzyme molecule. The methodology might complement existing single molecule techniques, giving further insights into enzymatic mechanisms and filling the gap between fundamental understanding of biocatalytic processes and their potential for bioenergy production.

  • 264.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Unsubstitutedand insoluble phenothiazine as an electron-transfer mediator in enzymaticelectrochemical biosensors2013In: Nano-scaled arrangements of proteins, aptamers, andother nucleic acid structures – and their potential applications , COST Thematic Workshop, 8-9 October 2013, Helmholtz Zentrum fürUmweltforschung, Leipzig, Germany, Leipzig: Helmholtz Zentrum für Umweltforschung , 2013, p. O1-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady A.
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Unsubstituted phenothiazine as a superior water-insoluble mediator for oxidases2014In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 53, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mediation of oxidases glucose oxidase (GOx), lactate oxidase (LOx) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) by a new electron shuttling mediator, unsubstituted phenothiazine (PTZ), was studied. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating-disk electrode measurements in nonaqueous media were used to determine the diffusion characteristics of the mediator and the kinetics of its reaction with GOx, giving a second-order rate constant of 7.6×103–2.1×104 M−1 s−1 for water–acetonitrile solutions containing 5–15% water. These values are in the range reported for commonly used azine-type mediators, indicating that PTZ is able to function as an efficient mediator. PTZ and GOx, LOx and ChOx were successfully co-immobilised in sol–gel membrane on a screen-printed electrode to construct glucose, lactate and cholesterol biosensors, respectively, which were then optimised in terms of stability and sensitivity. The electrocatalytic oxidation responses showed a dependence on substrate concentration ranging from 0.6 to 32 mM for glucose, from 19 to 565 mM for lactate and from 0.015 to 1.0 mM for cholesterol detection. Oxidation of substrates on the surface of electrodes modified with PTZ and enzyme membrane was investigated with double-step chronoamperometry and the results showed that the PTZ displays excellent electrochemical catalytic activities even when immobilised on the surface of the electrode.

  • 266.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Collision-based Electrochemistry for Investigation of Direct Electron Transfer of a Single Enzyme Molecule2017In: 26th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors (Biosensors), Elsevier, 2017, p. 238-239Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eldectron transfer between a biorecognition element and an electrode is an essential element of bioelectrocatalytic systems, such as biosensors and biofuel cells. The number of working systems based on direct electron communication is limited and detailed investigations of the mechanism of the process are still required. Here, we present the use of a novel approach of collision-based bioelectrocatalysis to monitor electrocatalytic currents from individual redox enzyme molecules. This approach allowed us to calculate the individual turnover rates of these molecules and investigate the influence of the applied potential, pH and additions of inhibitor on the observed rates of direct electron transfer.

  • 267.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Total phenol analysis of weakly supported water using a laccase-based microband biosensor.2016In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 907, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The monitoring of phenolic compounds in wastewaters in a simple manner is of great importance for environmental control. Here, a novel screen printed laccase-based microband array for in situ, total phenol estimation in wastewaters and for water quality monitoring without additional sample pre-treatment is presented. Numerical simulations using the finite element method were utilized for the characterization of micro-scale graphite electrodes. Anodization followed by covalent modification was used for the electrode functionalization with laccase. The functionalization efficiency and the electrochemical performance in direct and catechol-mediated oxygen reduction were studied at the microband laccase electrodes and compared with macro-scale electrode structures. The reduction of the dimensions of the enzyme biosensor, when used under optimized conditions, led to a significant improvement in its analytical characteristics. The elaborated microsensor showed fast responses towards catechol additions to tap water – a weakly supported medium – characterized by a linear range from 0.2 to 10 μM, a sensitivity of 1.35 ± 0.4 A M−1 cm−2 and a dynamic range up to 43 μM. This enhanced laccase-based microsensor was used for water quality monitoring and its performance for total phenol analysis of wastewater samples from different stages of the cleaning process was compared to a standard method.

  • 268.
    Sergeyeva, TA
    et al.
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Piletsky, SA
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Piletska, EV
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Brovko, OO
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Karabanova, LV
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Sergeeva, LM
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Elskaya, AV
    Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Mol Biol and Genet, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine; Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; Natl Acad Science Ukraine, Institute Macromol Chemistry, UA-02160 Kiev, Ukraine; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    In situ formation of porous molecularly imprinted polymer membranes2003In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 36, no 19, p. 7352-7357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymer membranes for a model compound, atrazine, were prepared in situ from a monomer mixture containing methacrylic acid, tri(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate, and atrazine using U-V-initiated polymerization. To improve flexibility and mechanical stability of these membranes, oligourethane acrylate was added to the mixture of monomers. Polymeric additives were used to increase porosity of membranes and their permeability as well as to make them suited for filtration experiments. This process resulted in the formation of thin, flexible, and porous membranes containing atrazine-specific binding sites. The atrazine-imprinted membranes showed higher affinity to this herbicide than to structurally similar compounds (simazine, prometryn, and metribuzin). The binding capacity of MIP membranes was found to be significantly higher than that observed previously for MIP systems. The high affinity, specificity, and binding capacity of MIP membranes, together with their straightforward and easy preparation, provide a good basis for their application in separation and purification, e.g., in membrane chromatography.

  • 269.
    Setford, SJ
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; CEFAS, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England; .
    Kroger, S
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; CEFAS, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Organic phase immunosensors1999In: Analusis, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 600-609Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many analytical methods involving non-polar analytes require solvent extraction prior to measurement, The analysis procedure is greatly simplified if the method is able to function effectively in the more non-polar solvent extract, This consideration, coupled with the increasing need for simple, specific and rapid diagnostic and screening tools, has focused interest in the development of organic-phase immunosensors.

  • 270.
    Sheikhzadeh, E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Chamsaz, M.
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Label-free impedimetric biosensor for Salmonella Typhimurium detection based on poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer supported aptamer2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 80, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gram-negative bacterium, Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a food borne pathogen responsible for numerous hospitalisations and deaths all over the world. Conventional detection methods for pathogens are time consuming and labour-intensive. Hence, there is considerable interest in faster and simpler detection methods. Polypyrrole-based polymers, due to their intrinsic chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be valuable candidates for the fabrication of chemo/biosensors and functional surfaces. Similarly aptamers have been shown to be good alternatives to antibodies in the development of affinity biosensors. In this study, we report on the combination of Poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer and aptamer for the development of a label-less electrochemical biosensor suitable for the detection of S. Typhimurium. Impedimetric measurements were facilitated by the effect of the aptamer/target interaction on the intrinsic conjugation of the poly [pyrrole-co-3-carboxyl-pyrrole] copolymer and subsequently on its electrical properties. The aptasensor detected S. Typhimurium in the concentration range 10(2)-10(8) CFU mL(-1) with high selectivity over other model pathogens and with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 100 CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 3 CFU mL(-1). The suitability of the aptasensor for real sample detection was demonstrated via recovery studies performed in spiked apple juice samples. We envisage this to be a viable approach for the inexpensive and rapid detection of pathogens in food, and possibly in other environmental samples. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 271.
    Sheikhzadeh, Elham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chamsaz, M
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Housaindokht, M.R.
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Label-free impedimetric Salmonella aptasensor based on pyrrole (pyrrole -3-carboxyl acid ) copolymer and its application in apple juice analysis2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 272.
    Sheikhzadeh, Elham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chamsaz, M
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Label free impedimetric Salmonella aptasensor based on pyrrole (pyrrole -3-carboxyl acid ) copolymer.2015In: Sweden-Japan Seminar on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology – SJS-Nano, Linköping, Sweden, 10-11 March 2015, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Stockholm. , 2015, p. 32-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salmonella is a Gram-negative foodborne pathogen that can cause gastrointestinal infection that is the cause of numerous hospitalisations and deaths all over the world [1]. Conventional approaches for Salmonella detection, based on culture methods, are time-consuming and labour-intensive; this creates considerable need for the development of novel, fast and reliable approaches.

    Conductive polymers are poly-conjugated systems that present, at the same time, the properties of conductive materials and conventional polymers. Among them, polypyrrole and its derivatives are attracting a lot of attention in several fields including actuators and biosensors [2].

     

    Aptamers are single strand of DNA or RNA that can bind to specific target with high affinity showing in this way great potentiality as alternative to antibodies in affinity based biosensors [3].

     

    In the study presented herein the preparation, via electrodeposition, of a copolymer based on pyrrole and pyrrol 3-carboxylic acid and its application in the development of an aptamer based biosensor is presented. Immobilisation of aptamers, via EDC /NHS chemistry onto the synthetised polymer has been demonstrated via electrochemical techniques. The detection of different concentration of Salmonella was performed by incubation of the prepared electrode with different concentrations of bacteria, followed by impedance measurement in LiClO4 solution. A Nyquist plot of impedance spectra showed increase in the radii of the semicircle, corresponding to an increased charge transfer resistance, and associated to the interaction between the immobilised aptames and the bacteria in the sample. This initial result suggests that it should be possible to create a label-free sensor based on this method.

     

    [1] J. Yuan, Z. Tao, Y.Yu, X. Ma, Y. Xia, L. Wang, Z. Wang,Food Control 37 (2014) 188 – 192

    [2] R. Balint, N. J. Cassidy, S. H. Cartmell, Acta Biomaterialia 10 (2014) 2341–2353

    [3] S. Tombelli, M. Minunni, M. Mascini, Biosensors and Bioelectronics 20 (2005) 2424–2434

  • 273.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Delhi, India .
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shukla, S.K.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Delhi, India .
    Mishra, Sachin
    University of Delhi, India .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Self-Reporting Micellar Polymer Nanostructures for Optical Urea Biosensing2014In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 53, no 20, p. 8509-8514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the facile fabrication of a self-reporting, highly sensitive and selective optical urea nanobiosensor using chitosan-g-polypyrrole (CHIT-g-PPy) nanomicelles as a sensing platform. Urease was immobilized on the spherical micellar surface to create an ultrasensitive self-reporting nanobiosystem for urea. The resulting nanostructures show monodisperse size distributions before and after enzyme loading. The critical micelle concentration of the enzyme-immobilized polymer nanostructure was measured to be 0.49 mg/L in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. The nanobiosensor had a linear optical response to urea concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 30 mM with a response time of a few seconds. This promising approach provides a novel methodology for self-reporting bioassembly over nanostructure polymer micelles and furnishes the basis for fabrication of sensitive and efficient optical nanobiosensors.

  • 274.
    Shukla, Sudheesh K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cholesterol Oxidase Functionalised Polyaniline/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids for an Amperometric Biosensor2015In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 3373-3377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted much attention for analytical and biomedical applications. This paper describes the fabrication of a cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) immobilised polyaniline (PANI)/CNT composite electrode for the amperometric detection of cholesterol. The prepared ChOx/PANI/CNT/Au bioelectrode bound ChOx via the available functionalties of PANI (-NH2) and CNT (-COOH). Moreover, the CNT creates a network inside the matrix that strengthens the mechanical property of the bioelectrode. The multifunctional matrix is presumed to provide a 3D-mesoporous surface, which substantially enhances enzyme activity. The linear range of the biosensor for cholesterol oleate was 30-280 mu M with a response time of 10 sec.

  • 275.
    Silva, Eugenia
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Cranfield Hlth, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; University Florence, Dipartimento Chim, Florence, Italy; .
    Mascini, Marco
    Cranfield University, Cranfield Hlth, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; University Florence, Dipartimento Chim, Florence, Italy; .
    Centi, Sonia
    Cranfield University, Cranfield Hlth, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; University Florence, Dipartimento Chim, Florence, Italy; .
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Detection of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in milk using a disposable immunomagnetic electrochemical sensor2007In: Analytical Letters, ISSN 0003-2719, E-ISSN 1532-236X, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1371-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PCBs are among the most persistent and widely distributed pollutants in the global ecosystem and therefore it is of great importance for both human and environmental health to develop practical analytical systems to detect them. In this context, this work presents the application of an electrochemical immunosensor based on Screen-Printed Carbon-based Electrodes as transducers with antibody-coated magnetic microparticles as a solid phase. The immunoassay was based on direct competition between the analyte present in the samples and an alkaline phosphatase-labeled tracer. The product of the enzymatic reaction between AP and its substrate (alpha-naphthyl phosphate) was detected using differential pulse voltammetry. Sample extraction and clean-up was achieved using Solid Phase Extraction. Detection of low concentrations PCB was achieved and the method was shown to be applicable to both skimmed and whole milk. SPE was shown to improve the analysis.

  • 276.
    SKURIDIN, SG
    et al.
    VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,BEDFORD MK43 0AL,ENGLAND; .
    HALL, J
    VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,BEDFORD MK43 0AL,ENGLAND; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    YEVDOKIMOV, YM
    VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,BEDFORD MK43 0AL,ENGLAND; .
    RESTRUCTURING SPACE ORDERING OF (DNA-PROTAMINE) COMPLEXES IN LIQUID-CRYSTALLINE DISPERSIONS UNDER PROTEOLYTIC-ENZYME TREATMENT1995In: Liquid crystals (Print), ISSN 0267-8292, E-ISSN 1366-5855, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 595-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexes of DNA with the protamines stellin A and stellin B, in polymer-containing solutions, form both liquid crystalline phases and liquid crystalline dispersions. The non-specific organization of the (DNA-protamine) phase is determined by the presence of protamine cross links between the DNA molecules and not by the inherent anisotropy (cholesteric) double-stranded DNA molecules. Elimination of these cross links by proteolytic enzyme action causes an increase in the distance between the DNA molecules which results in the appearance of an intense band in the CD spectrum and a fingerprint (cholesteric) texture.

  • 277.
    Skuridin, SG
    et al.
    RUSSIAN ACAD SCI,VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; RUSSIAN STATE MED UNIV,MOSCOW 117869,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    Yevdokimov, YM
    RUSSIAN ACAD SCI,VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; RUSSIAN STATE MED UNIV,MOSCOW 117869,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    Efimov, VS
    RUSSIAN ACAD SCI,VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; RUSSIAN STATE MED UNIV,MOSCOW 117869,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    Hall, JM
    RUSSIAN ACAD SCI,VA ENGELHARDT MOLEC BIOL INST,MOSCOW 117984,RUSSIA; RUSSIAN STATE MED UNIV,MOSCOW 117869,RUSSIA; CRANFIELD UNIV,CRANFIELD BIOTECHNOL CTR,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    A new approach for creating double-stranded DNA biosensors1996In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 903-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principle of sandwich-type biosensors based on liquid-crystalline dispersions formed from [DNA-polycation] complexes is outlined. These biosensors will find application in the determination of a range of compounds and physical factors that affect the ability of a given polycationic molecule to maintain intermolecular crosslinks between neighbouring DNA molecules. In the case of liquid-crystalline dispersions formed from [DNA-protamine] complexes the lowest concentration of hydrolytic enzyme (trypsin) detectable was approximate to-10(-14) M. (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  • 278.
    Sodzel, Dzmitry
    et al.
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Belarus .
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P F
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Viter, Roman
    National Science Center FOTONIKA-LV, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia; Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, Odessa, Ukraine .
    Eriksson, Martin O
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holtz, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janot, Jean-Marc
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Bechelany, Mikhael
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Belma, Sebastien
    Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR5635 ENSCM UM CNRS, Université Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France .
    Smyntyna, Valentyn
    Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, Odessa, Ukraine .
    Kolesneva, Ekaterina
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus .
    Dubovskaya, Lyudmila
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.
    Volotovski, Igor
    Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.
    Ubelis, Arnolds
    National Science Center FOTONIKA-LV, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia .
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Control of hydrogen peroxide and glucose via UV and Visible Photoluminescence of ZnO nanoparticles.2015In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 182, no 9-10, p. 1819-1826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an indirect optical method for the determination of glucose via the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that is generated during the glucose oxidase (GOx) catalyzed oxidation of glucose. It is based on the finding that the ultraviolet (~374 nm) and visible (~525 nm) photoluminescence of pristine zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles strongly depends on the concentration of H2O2 in water solution. Photoluminescence is quenched by up to 90 % at a 100 mM level of H2O2. The sensor constructed by immobilizing GOx on ZnO nanoparticles enabled glucose to be continuously monitored in the 10 mM to 130 mM concentration range, and the limit of detection is 10 mM. This enzymatic sensing scheme is supposed to be applicable to monitoring glucose in the food, beverage and fermentation industries. It has a wide scope in that it may be extended to numerous other substrate or enzyme activity assays based on the formation of H2O2, and of assays based on the consumption of H2O2 by peroxidases.

  • 279.
    STANLEY, CJ
    et al.
    NOVO BIOLABS LTD,CAMBRIDGE CB4 1XG,ENGLAND; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    COX, RB
    NOVO BIOLABS LTD,CAMBRIDGE CB4 1XG,ENGLAND; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    CARDOSI, MF
    NOVO BIOLABS LTD,CAMBRIDGE CB4 1XG,ENGLAND; CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    AMPEROMETRIC ENZYME-AMPLIFIED IMMUNOASSAYS1988In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 112, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 280.
    Stephens, SK
    et al.
    ; .
    Tothill, IE
    ; .
    Warner, PJ
    ; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Detection of silage effluent pollution in river water using biosensors1997In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of silage effluent identified glucose and lactic acid as suitable markers for diagnosis of silage effluent pollution in river water. The use of biosensors, utilising the reactions of glucose oxidase and lactate oxidase to detect glucose and lactic acid respectively, in silage effluent, was investigated. The lactate sensor was able to detect effluent from mature silage at 1/1000 dilution, whilst the glucose sensor proved more suitable for detecting effluent from freshly ensiled grass, which contains higher levels of sugar than mature silage. In both cases the sensor response was within 60 s of exposure to the effluent. The potential of biosensors for rapid monitoring in the water industry was demonstrated in this work. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd

  • 281.
    Subrahmanyam, S
    et al.
    Cranfield Institute Technology, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Piletsky, SA
    Cranfield Institute Technology, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Piletska, EV
    Cranfield Institute Technology, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Chen, BN
    Cranfield Institute Technology, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Day, R
    Cranfield Institute Technology, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Bite-and-switch approach to creatine recognition by use of molecularly imprinted polymers2000In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 722-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of creatine is important in the analysis of athletes and body builders. Here is reported the preparation of a synthetic polymer using imprinting polymerization, which leaves the polymer with receptor-mimicking recognition sites that are specific for creatine. Molecular recognition results in a fluorescent complex (see Figure) and thus represents a bite-and-switch" mechanism.

  • 282.
    Subrahmanyam, S
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Piletsky, SA
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Piletska, EV
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Chen, BN
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Karim, K
    Cranfield University, Institute BioScience and Technology, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Bite-and-Switch approach using computationally designed molecularly imprinted polymers for sensing of creatinine2001In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 16, no 12-sep, p. 631-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for the selective detection of creatinine is reported, which is based on the reaction between polymerised hemithioacetal formed by allyl mercaptan, o-phthalic aldehyde, and primary amine leading to the formation Of fluorescent isoindole complex. This method has been demonstrated previously for the detection of creatine using creatine-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymers (MlPs) Since MlPs created using traditional methods were unable to differentiate between creatine and creatinine, a new approach to the rational design of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) selective for creatinine was developed using computer simulation. A virtual library of functional monomers was assigned and screened against the target molecule, creatinine, using molecular modelling software. The monomers giving the highest binding score were further tested using simulated annealing in order to mimic the complexation of the functional monomers with template in the monomer mixture. The result of this simulation gave an optimised MIP composition. The computationally designed polymer demonstrated superior selectivity in comparison to the polymer prepared using traditional approach, a detection limit of 25 muM and good stability. The Bite-and-Switch approach combined with molecular imprinting can be used for the design of assays and sensors, selective for amino containing substances. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 283.
    Subrahmanyam, S
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Piletsky, SA
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Application of natural receptors in sensors and assays2002In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 74, no 16, p. 3942-3951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensors are analytical devices that use a biological or biologically derived material immobilized at a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Although there are a large number of reviews on biosensors in general, there has been little systematic information. presented on the application of natural receptors in sensor technology. This perspective discusses broadly the fundamental properties of natural receptors; which make them an attractive option for use as biorecognition elements in. sensor technology. It analyses the current situation by reference to, typical examples, such as the application of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and G protein-linked receptors in affinity sensors and analyses the problems that need to be resolved prior to any commercialization of such devices.

  • 284.
    Szymanski, Mateusz
    et al.
    Natl Phys Lab, Teddington TW11 0LW, Middx, England.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Porter, Robert
    Natl Phys Lab, Teddington TW11 0LW, Middx, England.
    Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles and Its Application in Metalloimmunoassay2010In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work demonstrates the use of silver nanoparticles as a simple electrochemical biolabel to induce 10(6) signal enhancement. We propose it mechanism of measuring the silver nanoparticles oil a specific screen-printed planar carbon electrode, without the requirement for the harsh oxidant or toxic reagents described in prior-art for gold sol methods. The possible measurement process was validated with orthogonal techniques such as UV/Vis spectroscopy. dynamic light scattering and by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The findings Were utilized to develop a novel electrochemical sandwich immunoassay where the analyte concentration is directly proportional to ASV oxidation peak of silver. This technique in the future is envisaged to form the foundation of a generic Point of Care platform. The assay was applied to cardiac marker: myoglobin with detection limit of 3 ng/mL.

  • 285.
    Tang, AXJ
    et al.
    Natl University Ireland University Coll Cork, Department Chemistry, Cork, Ireland; Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Pravda, M
    Natl University Ireland University Coll Cork, Department Chemistry, Cork, Ireland; Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Guilbault, GG
    Natl University Ireland University Coll Cork, Department Chemistry, Cork, Ireland; Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Piletsky, S
    Natl University Ireland University Coll Cork, Department Chemistry, Cork, Ireland; Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Immunosensor for okadaic acid using quartz crystal microbalance2002In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 471, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An immunosensor for the determination of okadaic acid (OA) using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was developed and optimised in standard solutions. Several coupling techniques, protein A, protein G and polyethylenimine (PEI) with glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linking, were investigated for the determination of okadaic acid and a very good result was obtained with PEI coupling. With the PEI coupling method, the optimisation of incubation time for the activation of PEI on the crystal surface using GA, the effect of the dilution factor of OA-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate and the amount of antibody on crystal frequency were studied. Different molar ratios (4:1, 14:1, 30:1) of OA to bovine serum albumin for the conjugation were examined and the results using ELISA and a QCM showed that a ratio of 14:1 was slightly better than the other two. The strong attachment of the cross-linked complex to the gold surface resulted in an excellent storage lifetime of 38 days. However, the detection limit (1.9 mug/ml) and the sensitivity of the sensor were not satisfactory. Significant improvement of the performance of the device was obtained by incorporating an antibody-BSA hydrogel. Initial results showed that the minimum amount of analyte detectable and the sensitivity of the device were improved by 524- and 80-fold, respectively. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 286.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Deshpande, Swapneel R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    National Institute Mat Science, Japan JSR CREST, Japan .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of p53 gene point mutation using sequence-specific molecularly imprinted PoPD electrode2012In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An amperometric sequence-specific molecularly imprinted single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ss-ODN) biosensor was fabricated and characterised in this study. Using ss-ODN as the template and o-phenylenediamine as the functional monomer, the ODN biosensor was fabricated by an electropolymerisation process on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. The template ss-ODN was washed out of the ss-ODN/poly(o-phenylenediamine)(PoPD)/ITO electrode using sterilised basic ethanol-water. The resulting ss-ODN imprinted PoPD/ITO electrode was characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The amperometric responses, i.e., Delta i as a function of the target ss-ODN concentration was studied. The biosensor using ss-ODN imprinted PoPD/ITO as the working electrode showed a linear Delta current response to the target ss-ODN concentration within the range of 0.01-300 fM. The biosensor showed a sensitivity of 0.62 mu A/fM, with a response time of 14s. The present novel molecularly imprinted ss-ODN biosensor could greatly benefit in terms of cost-effectiveness, storage stability, ultra sensitivity and selectivity together with the potential for improved commercial genetic sensors.

  • 287.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mishra, Ajay K.Nanomaterials Research Centre, Department of Chemical Technology, University of Johannesburg, South Africa.Kobayashi, HisatoshiBiofunctional Materials at Biomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, Anthony P.F.Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

    Divided into 4 parts: Inorganic Materials; Organic Materials; Composite Materials; and Biomaterials, the 22 chapters cover the latest research and developments in the processing, properties, and applications of intelligent nanomaterials. Included are molecular device materials, biomimetic materials, hybrid-type functionalized polymers-composite materials, information-and energy-transfer materials, as well as environmentally friendly materials.

  • 288.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra KumarFunctional Nanomaterials Group, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany.Kobayashi, HisatoshiInternational Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent nanomaterials2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overall, this book presents a detailed and comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art development of different nanoscale intelligent materials for advanced applications. Apart from fundamental aspects of fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials, it also covers key advanced principles involved in utilization of functionalities of these nanomaterials in appropriate forms. It is very important to develop and understand the cutting-edge principles of how to utilize nanoscale intelligent features in the desired fashion. These unique nanoscopic properties can either be accessed when the nanomaterials are prepared in the appropriate form, e.g., composites, or in integrated nanodevice form for direct use as electronic sensing devices. In both cases, the nanostructure has to be appropriately prepared, carefully handled, and properly integrated into the desired application in order to efficiently access its intelligent features. These aspects are reviewed in detail in three themed sections with relevant chapters: Nanomaterials, Fabrication and Biomedical Applications; Nanomaterials for Energy, Electronics, and Biosensing; Smart Nanocomposites, Fabrication, and Applications.

  • 289.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra KumarFunctional Nanomaterials, Institute for Materials Science, University of Kiel, Germany.Kobayashi, HisatoshiWPI Research center MANA, National Institute for Material Science, Tsukuba Japan.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition.2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overall, this book presents a detailed and comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art development of different nanoscale intelligent materials for advanced applications. Apart from fundamental aspects of fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials, it also covers key advanced principles involved in utilization of functionalities of these nanomaterials in appropriate forms. It is very important to develop and understand the cutting-edge principles of how to utilize nanoscale intelligent features in the desired fashion. These unique nanoscopic properties can either be accessed when the nanomaterials are prepared in the appropriate form, e.g., composites, or in integrated nanodevice form for direct use as electronic sensing devices. In both cases, the nanostructure has to be appropriately prepared, carefully handled, and properly integrated into the desired application in order to efficiently access its intelligent features. These aspects are reviewed in detail in three themed sections with relevant chapters: Nanomaterials, Fabrication and Biomedical Applications; Nanomaterials for Energy, Electronics, and Biosensing; Smart Nanocomposites, Fabrication, and Applications.

  • 290.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar
    Functional Nanomaterials, Institute for Materials Science, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    WPI Research center MANA, National Institute for Material Science, Tsukuba Japan.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface2016In: Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition. / [ed] Tiwari, A., Mishra, Y.K., Kobayashi, H., Turner, A.P.F., USA: Wiley-Scrivener , 2016, p. xvii-xxChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 291.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar
    Functional Nanomaterials Group, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface: Intelligent Nanomaterials2016In: Intelligent Nanomaterials, 2nd Edition / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Yogendra Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Anthony P. F. Turner, John Wiley & Sons, 2016, p. xvii-xxChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patra, HirakLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Advanced Bioelectronic Materials2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book covers the recent advances in the development of bioelectronics systems and their potential application in future biomedical applications starting from system design to signal processing for physiological monitoring, to in situ biosensing.

    Advanced Bioelectronics Materialshas contributions from distinguished international scholars whose backgrounds mirror the multidisciplinary readership ranging from the biomedical sciences, biosensors and engineering communities with diverse backgrounds, interests and proficiency in academia and industry. The readers will benefit from the widespread coverage of the current literature, state-of-the-art overview of all facets of advanced bioelectronics materials ranging from real time monitoring, in situ diagnostics, in vivo imaging, image-guided therapeutics, biosensors, and translational biomedical devices and personalized monitoring.

  • 293.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patra, Hirak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preface2015In: Advanced bioelectronics materials / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Hirak Patra and Anthony Turner, Beverly, MA, USA: Wiley-Scrivener , 2015, p. XV-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 294.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ramalingam, MuruganInstitut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Université de Strasbourg (UdS), France.Kobayashi, HisatoshiBiomaterials Centre, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.Turner, Anthony P. F.Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biomedical materials and diagnostic devices2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "The functional materials with the most promising outlook have the ability to precisely adjust the biological phenomenon in a controlled mode. Engineering of advanced bio- materials has found striking applications in used for biomedical and diagnostic device applications, such as cell separation, stem-cell, drug delivery, hyperthermia, automated DNA extraction, gene targeting, resonance imaging, biosensors, tissue engineering and organ regeneration"--Provided by publisher. 

  • 295.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sharma, Yashpal
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Hattori, Shinya
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Terada, Dohiko
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Sharma, Ashok K.
    DCR University of Science and Technology, India.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kobayashi, Hisatoshi
    National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Influence of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-CNT-polyaniline three-dimensional electrospun microfabric scaffolds on cell growth and viability2013In: Biopolymers, ISSN 0006-3525, E-ISSN 1097-0282, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 334-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect on: 1) the bulk surface; and 2) the three-dimensional non-woven microfabric scaffolds of poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline on growth and viability of  mice fibroblast cells L929. The poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline was prepared using coupling chemistry and electrospinning was then used for the fabrication of responsive, nonwoven microfabric scaffolds. The electrospun microfabrics were assembled in regular three-dimensional scaffolds with OD: 400-500 mm; L: 6-20 cm. Mice fibroblast cells L929 were seeded on the both poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline bulk surface as well as non-woven microfabric scaffolds. Excellent cell proliferation and viability was observed on poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline non-woven microfabric matrices in compare to poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline bulk and commercially available Matrigel™ even with a range of cell lines up to 168 h. Temperature dependent cells detachment behaviour was observed on the poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline scaffolds by varying incubation at below lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacylamide). The results suggest that poly(N-isopropylacylamide)-CNT-polyaniline non-woven microfabrics could be used as a smart matrices for applications in tissue engineering.

  • 296.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, AnthonyLinköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biosensors Nanotechnology2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new emerging field that combines nanoscale materials and biosensor technology is receiving increased attention. Nanostructures have been used to achieve direct wiring of biosensing elements to electrode surfaces, to promote bio-reactions, to impose nanobarcodes on biomaterials, and to amplify the signal from bio-recognition events. Nanomaterials based biosensors have found wide spread applications in the environmental and medical applications for their sensitivity, specificity, rapidity, simplicity, and cost-effectiveness. In the same pursuit, Biosensors Nanotechnology provides detailed review chapters on a range of nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoribbons, nanorods, nanobelts and nanosheets in the construction of biosensors with set applications of biosensors nanotechnology for biological and chemical analyses, food safety industry, biomedical diagnostics, clinical detection, and environmental monitoring.

  • 297.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Preface2014In: Biosensors Nanotechnology / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari and Anthony Turner, John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. xv-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Tombelli, S
    et al.
    Sez Chim Analit, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Sez Igiene, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Mascini, M
    Sez Chim Analit, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Sez Igiene, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Sacco, C
    Sez Chim Analit, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Sez Igiene, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    A DNA piezoelectric biosensor assay coupled with a polymerase chain reaction for bacterial toxicity determination in environmental samples2000In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 418, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report the realisation of a DNA piezoelectric biosensor coupled with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of a specific bacterial toxicity factor. Biotinylated 23-mer probes were immobilised on the streptavidin coated gold surface of a quartz crystal; streptavidin was covalently bound to the thiol/dextran modified gold surface. The hybridisation of the immobilised probe with a synthetic oligonucleotide was investigated; the absence of non-specific adsorption was verified using a non-complementary oligonucleotide. Many cycles of measurements can be performed on the same crystal surface by regenerating the single strand with 1 mM HCl. The same hybridisation reaction was then performed using real samples of DNA extracted from bacteria and amplified by PCR. The PCR product was a fragment of a specific gene of Aeromonas hydrophila. The piezoelectric biosensor was able to distinguish samples containing the gene or not; in this way it was possible to determine the pathogenicity of different Aeromonas strains isolated from water, vegetables or human specimens. Experiments with non-specific samples confirmed the absence of adsorption or non-specific effects on the quartz crystal treated with the reported procedure. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 299.
    Tombelli, S
    et al.
    University Florence, Dipartimento Chim, I-50121 Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Mascini, M
    University Florence, Dipartimento Chim, I-50121 Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Improved procedures for immobilisation of oligonucleotides on gold-coated piezoelectric quartz crystals2002In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 17, no 12-nov, p. 929-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high sensitivity and specificity of DNA hybridisation techniques makes them powerful tools for environmental or clinical analysis. This work describes the development of a DNA piezoelectric biosensor for the detection of the hybridisation reaction. Attention was focused on the choice of the coating chemistry that could be used for the immobilisation of oligonucleotides onto the gold surface of the quartz crystal. Four immobilisation procedures were tested and compared considering the amount of immobilised probe, the extent of the hybridisation reaction, the possibility of regeneration and the absence of non-specific adsorption. All the experiments were performed with oligonucleotides of 25 bases (probe, target and non-complementary oligonucleotide). The four coating methods were all based on the use of self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Three of them employed the interaction between streptavidin and biotin for the immobilisation of a biotinylated probe. Results indicated that immobilisation of a biotinylated probe on streptavidin linked to a layer of carboxylated dextran provides higher sensitivity for the detection of the hybridisation reaction, absence of non-specific adsorption and a higher stability with respect to the regeneration step. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 300.
    Tombelli, S
    et al.
    University Florence, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; INRCA, Lab Biol Mol, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Mascini, R
    University Florence, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; INRCA, Lab Biol Mol, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Braccini, L
    University Florence, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; INRCA, Lab Biol Mol, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Anichini, M
    University Florence, Dipartimento Sanita Pubbl Epidemiol and Chim Analit, Florence, Italy; INRCA, Lab Biol Mol, Florence, Italy; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Coupling of a DNA piezoelectric biosensor and polymerase chain reaction to detect apolipoprotein E polymorphisms2000In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 15, no 08-jul, p. 363-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report the coupling of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with a piezoelectric biosensor to detect a point mutation in a human gene. Biotinylated 23-mer probes were immobilised on the streptavidin coated gold surface of a quartz crystal; streptavidin was covalently bound to the thiol/dextran modified gold surface. The hybridisation of the immobilised probes with a short sequence (23 mer) complementary, non-complementary and mismatched DNA was investigated: the device was able to distinguish the different synthetic oligonucleotides. Many cycles of measurements can be performed on the same crystal surface regenerating the single strand of DNA with 1 mM of HCl. The same hybridisation reaction was then performed using real samples of human DNA extracted from blood and amplified by PCR, following a standard procedure for genetic detection of the polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene. The procedure was able to distinguish the sequences present in the different samples, which differ only in one base: in this way it was possible distinguish between different groups of genotypes with apoE typing. Experiments with blank samples confirmed the absence of adsorption or non-specific effects on the quartz crystal treated with the reported procedure. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

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