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  • 251.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Sahin, Christofer
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Infektionskliniken i Östergötland.
    Edsjö, Anders
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Göteborg .
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Magtarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.2015Ingår i: Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine, ISSN 2090-6528, E-ISSN 2090-6536, Vol. 2015, s. 1-5, artikel-id 140616Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency.

  • 252.
    Johansson, Maria E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zhang, Xiao-Ying
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Peking University, Peoples R China.
    Edfeldt, Kristina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Anna M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Levin, Malin C.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Boren, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Li, Wei
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Novo Nordisk, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hedin, Ulf
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Low, Hann
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabet Institute, Australia.
    Sviridov, Dmitri
    Baker IDI Heart and Diabet Institute, Australia.
    Rios, Francisco J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Hansson, Goran K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yan, Zhong-Qun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Innate immune receptor NOD2 promotes vascular inflammation and formation of lipid-rich necrotic cores in hypercholesterolemic mice2014Ingår i: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 44, nr 10, s. 3081-3092Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease associated with the activation of innate immune TLRs and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)like receptor pathways. However, the function of most innate immune receptors in atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here, we show that NOD2 is a crucial innate immune receptor influencing vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis severity. 10-week stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP), the NOD2 cognate ligand, aggravated atherosclerosis, as indicated by the augmented lesion burden, increased vascular inflammation and enlarged lipid-rich necrotic cores in Ldlr(-/-) mice. Myeloid-specific ablation of NOD2, but not its downstream kinase, receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2, restrained the expansion of the lipid-rich necrotic core in Ldlr(-/-) chimeric mice. In vitro stimulation of macrophages with MDP enhanced the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and impaired cholesterol efflux in concordance with upregulation of scavenger receptor A1/2 and downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. Ex vivo stimulation of human carotid plaques with MDP led to increased activation of inflammatory signaling pathways p38 MAPK and NF-kappa B-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines. Altogether, this study suggests that NOD2 contributes to the expansion of the lipid-rich necrotic core and promotes vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  • 253.
    Johansson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Jullesson, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Liin, Sara
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biomolekylär och Organisk Elektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Electronic polymers in lipid membranes2015Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, nr 11242Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium: lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

  • 254.
    Johansson, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Combining test statistics and models in bootstrapped model rejection: it is a balancing act2014Ingår i: BMC Systems Biology, ISSN 1752-0509, E-ISSN 1752-0509, Vol. 8, nr 46Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Model rejections lie at the heart of systems biology, since they provide conclusive statements: that the corresponding mechanistic assumptions do not serve as valid explanations for the experimental data. Rejections are usually done usinge.g. the chi-square test (χ2) or the Durbin-Watson test (DW). Analytical formulas for the corresponding distributions rely on assumptions that typically are not fulfilled. This problem is partly alleviated by the usage of bootstrapping, a computationally heavy approach to calculate an empirical distribution. Bootstrapping also allows for a natural extension to estimation of joint distributions, but this feature has so far been little exploited.

    Results: We herein show that simplistic combinations of bootstrapped tests, like the max or min of the individual p-values, give inconsistent, i.e. overly conservative or liberal, results. A new two-dimensional (2D) approach based on parametric bootstrapping, on the other hand, is found both consistent and with a higher power than the individual tests, when tested on static and dynamic examples where the truth is known. In the same examples, the most superior test is a 2D χ2 vs χ2, where the second χ2-value comes from an additional help model, and its ability to describe bootstraps from the tested model. This superiority is lost if the help model is too simple, or too flexible. If a useful help model is found, the most powerful approach is the bootstrapped log-likelihood ratio (LHR). We show that this is because the LHR is one-dimensional, because the second dimension comes at a cost, and because LHR has retained most of the crucial information in the 2D distribution. These approaches statistically resolve a previously published rejection example for the first time.

    Conclusions: We have shown how to, and how not to, combine tests in a bootstrap setting, when the combinatio is advantageous, and when it is advantageous to include a second model. These results also provide a deeper insight into the original motivation for formulating the LHR, for the more general setting of nonlinear and non-nested models. These insights are valuable in cases when accuracy and power, rather than computational speed, are prioritized.

  • 255.
    Jufvas, Åsa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Human Adipocytes: Proteomic Approaches2016Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by increased levels of glucose in the blood originating from insulin resistance in insulin sensitive tissues and from reduced pancreatic insulin production. Around 400 million people in the world are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and the correlation with obesity is strong. In addition to life style induction of obesity and type 2 diabetes, there are indications of genetic and epigenetic influences. This thesis has focused on the characterization of primary human adipocytes, who play a crucial role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

    Histones are important proteins in chromatin dynamics and may be one of the factors behind epigenetic inheritance. In paper I, we characterized histone variants and posttranslational modifications in human adipocytes. Several of the specific posttranslational histone modifications we identified have been characterized in other cell types, but the majority was not previously known. Moreover, we identified a variant of histone H4 on protein level for the first time.

    In paper II, we studied specific histone H3 methylations in the adipocytes. We found that overweight is correlated with a reduction of H3K4me2 while type 2 diabetes is associated with an increase of H3K4me3. This shows a genome-wide difference in important chromatin modifications that could help explain the epidemiologically shown association between epigenetics and metabolic health.

    Caveolae is a plasma membrane structure involved in the initial and important steps of insulin signaling. In paper III we characterized the IQGAP1 interactome in human adipocytes and suggest that IQGAP1 is a link between caveolae and the cytoskeleton. Moreover, the amount of IQGAP1 is drastically lower in adipocytes from type 2 diabetic subjects compared with controls implying a potential role for IQGAP1 in insulin resistance.

    In conclusion, this thesis provides new insights into the insulin signaling frameworks and the histone variants and modifications of human adipocytes.

    Delarbeten
    1. Histone Variants and Their Post-Translational Modifications in Primary Human Fat Cells
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Histone Variants and Their Post-Translational Modifications in Primary Human Fat Cells
    2011 (Engelska)Ingår i: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic changes related to human disease cannot be fully addressed by studies of cells from cultures or from other mammals. We isolated human fat cells from subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue of female subjects and extracted histones from either purified nuclei or intact cells. Direct acid extraction of whole adipocytes was more efficient, yielding about 100 mu g of protein with histone content of 60%-70% from 10 mL of fat cells. Differential proteolysis of the protein extracts by trypsin or ArgC-protease followed by nanoLC/MS/MS with alternating CID/ETD peptide sequencing identified 19 histone variants. Four variants were found at the protein level for the first time; particularly HIST2H4B was identified besides the only H4 isoform earlier known to be expressed in humans. Three of the found H2A potentially organize small nucleosomes in transcriptionally active chromatin, while two H2AFY variants inactivate X chromosome in female cells. HIST1H2BA and three of the identified H1 variants had earlier been described only as oocyte or testis specific histones. H2AFX and H2AFY revealed differential and variable N-terminal processing. Out of 78 histone modifications by acetylation/trimethylation, methylation, dimethylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination, identified from six subjects, 68 were found for the first time. Only 23 of these modifications were detected in two or more subjects, while all the others were individual specific. The direct acid extraction of adipocytes allows for personal epigenetic analyses of human fat tissue, for profiling of histone modifications related to obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, as well as for selection of individual medical treatments.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2011
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medicin och hälsovetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65933 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0015960 (DOI)000286512900014 ()
    Anmärkning

    Original Publication: Asa Jufvas, Peter Strålfors and Alexander Vener, Histone Variants and Their Post-Translational Modifications in Primary Human Fat Cells, 2011, PLOS ONE, (6), 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0015960 Licensee: Public Library of Science (PLoS) http://www.plos.org/

    Tillgänglig från: 2011-02-28 Skapad: 2011-02-28 Senast uppdaterad: 2016-03-08
    2. Global differences in specific histone H3 methylation are associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes.
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Global differences in specific histone H3 methylation are associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes.
    Visa övriga...
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 5, nr 1, artikel-id 15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence indicates yet unknown epigenetic mechanisms underlying a propensity for overweight and type 2 diabetes. We analyzed the extent of methylation at lysine 4 and lysine 9 of histone H3 in primary human adipocytes from 43 subjects using modification-specific antibodies.

    RESULTS: The level of lysine 9 dimethylation was stable, while adipocytes from type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic overweight subjects exhibited about 40% lower levels of lysine 4 dimethylation compared with cells from normal-weight subjects. In contrast, trimethylation at lysine 4 was 40% higher in adipocytes from overweight diabetic subjects compared with normal-weight and overweight non-diabetic subjects. There was no association between level of modification and age of subjects.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings define genome-wide molecular modifications of histones in adipocytes that are directly associated with overweight and diabetes, and thus suggest a molecular basis for existing epidemiological evidence of epigenetic inheritance.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    BioMed Central, 2013
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Endokrinologi och diabetes
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99450 (URN)10.1186/1868-7083-5-15 (DOI)000329455000001 ()24004477 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2013-10-18 Skapad: 2013-10-18 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-06Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 256.
    Jufvas, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rajan, Meenu Rohini
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Jönsson, Cecilia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Scaffolding protein IQGAP1: an insulin-dependent link between caveolae and the cytoskeleton in primary human adipocytes?2016Ingår i: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 473, nr 19, s. 3177-3188Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The ubiquitously expressed IQ motif-containing GTPase activating protein-1 (IQGAP1) is a scaffolding protein implicated in an array of cellular functions, in particular by binding to cytoskeletal elements and signaling proteins. A role of IQGAP1 in adipocytes has not been reported. We therefore investigated the cellular IQGAP1 interactome in primary human adipocytes. Immunoprecipitation and quantitative mass spectrometry identified caveolae and caveolae-associated proteins as the major IQGAP1 interactors alongside cytoskeletal proteins. We confirmed co-localization of IQGAP1 with the defining caveolar marker protein caveolin-1 by confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay. Most interestingly, insulin enhanced the number of IQGAP1 interactions with caveolin-1 by five-fold. Moreover, we found a significantly reduced abundance of IQGAP1 in adipocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with cells from nondiabetic control subjects. Both the abundance of IQGAP1 protein and mRNA were reduced, indicating a transcriptional defect in diabetes. Our findings suggest a novel role of IQGAP1 in insulin-regulated interaction between caveolae and cytoskeletal elements of the adipocyte, and that this is quelled in the diabetic state.

  • 257.
    Jufvas, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Sjödin, Simon
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lundqvist, Kim
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Amin, Risul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Vener, Alexander V
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Global differences in specific histone H3 methylation are associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes.2013Ingår i: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 5, nr 1, artikel-id 15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence indicates yet unknown epigenetic mechanisms underlying a propensity for overweight and type 2 diabetes. We analyzed the extent of methylation at lysine 4 and lysine 9 of histone H3 in primary human adipocytes from 43 subjects using modification-specific antibodies.

    RESULTS: The level of lysine 9 dimethylation was stable, while adipocytes from type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic overweight subjects exhibited about 40% lower levels of lysine 4 dimethylation compared with cells from normal-weight subjects. In contrast, trimethylation at lysine 4 was 40% higher in adipocytes from overweight diabetic subjects compared with normal-weight and overweight non-diabetic subjects. There was no association between level of modification and age of subjects.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings define genome-wide molecular modifications of histones in adipocytes that are directly associated with overweight and diabetes, and thus suggest a molecular basis for existing epidemiological evidence of epigenetic inheritance.

  • 258.
    Jufvas, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Vener, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Histone Variants and Their Post-Translational Modifications in Primary Human Fat Cells2011Ingår i: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic changes related to human disease cannot be fully addressed by studies of cells from cultures or from other mammals. We isolated human fat cells from subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue of female subjects and extracted histones from either purified nuclei or intact cells. Direct acid extraction of whole adipocytes was more efficient, yielding about 100 mu g of protein with histone content of 60%-70% from 10 mL of fat cells. Differential proteolysis of the protein extracts by trypsin or ArgC-protease followed by nanoLC/MS/MS with alternating CID/ETD peptide sequencing identified 19 histone variants. Four variants were found at the protein level for the first time; particularly HIST2H4B was identified besides the only H4 isoform earlier known to be expressed in humans. Three of the found H2A potentially organize small nucleosomes in transcriptionally active chromatin, while two H2AFY variants inactivate X chromosome in female cells. HIST1H2BA and three of the identified H1 variants had earlier been described only as oocyte or testis specific histones. H2AFX and H2AFY revealed differential and variable N-terminal processing. Out of 78 histone modifications by acetylation/trimethylation, methylation, dimethylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination, identified from six subjects, 68 were found for the first time. Only 23 of these modifications were detected in two or more subjects, while all the others were individual specific. The direct acid extraction of adipocytes allows for personal epigenetic analyses of human fat tissue, for profiling of histone modifications related to obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, as well as for selection of individual medical treatments.

  • 259.
    Jullesson, David
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Rikard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rohini Rajan, Meenu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dominant negative inhibition data should be analyzed using mathematical modeling - re-interpreting data from insulin signaling.2015Ingår i: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 282, nr 4, s. 788-802Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As our ability to measure the complexity of intracellular networks has evolved, it has become increasingly clear that we need new methods for data analysis: methods involving mathematical modeling. Nevertheless, it is still uncontroversial to publish and interpret experimental results without a model-based proof that the reasoning is correct. In the present study, we argue that this attitude probably needs to change in the future. We illustrate this need for modeling by considering the common experimental technique of using dominant-negative constructs. More specifically, we consider published time-series and dose-response data which previously have been used to argue that the protein S6 kinase does not phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1 at a specific serine residue. Using a presented general approach to interpret such data, we now demonstrate that the given dominant-negative data are not conclusive (i.e. that in the absence of other proofs, S6 kinase still may be the kinase). Using simulations with uncertainty analysis and analytical solutions, we show that an alternative explanation is centered around depletion of substrate, which can be tested experimentally. This analysis thus illustrates both the necessity and the benefits of using mathematical modeling to fully understand the implications of biological data, even for a small system and relatively simple data.

  • 260.
    Kamolz, Lars-Peter
    et al.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Finnerty, Celeste
    University of Texas Medical Branch, TX 77555 USA.
    Kasper, Cornelia
    University of Nat Resources and Life Science, Austria.
    Editorial Material: Skin Regeneration, Repair, and Reconstruction in BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL, vol , issue 892031, pp2015Ingår i: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, s. 1-, artikel-id 892031Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 261.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Aziz, Abdul Maruf Asif
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rehman, Faazal
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Pitcairn, Caleb
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Barchiesi, Riccardo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Wendel Hansen, Mikaela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Gehlert, Don
    CNS Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
    Steensland, Pia
    Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Melanin-Concentrating Hormone and Its MCH-1 Receptor: Relationship Between Effects on Alcohol and Caloric Intake2016Ingår i: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 40, nr 10, s. 2199-2207Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reward and energy homeostasis are both regulated by a network of hypothalamic neuropeptide systems. The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and its MCH-1 receptor (MCH1-R) modulate alcohol intake, but it remains unknown to what extent this reflects actions on energy balance or reward. Here, we evaluated the MCH1-R in regulation of caloric intake and motivation to consume alcohol in states of escalated consumption.

    Methods: Rats had intermittent access (IA) to alcohol and were divided into high- and low-drinking groups. Food and alcohol consumption was assessed after administration of an MCH1-R antagonist, GW803430. Next, GW803430 was evaluated on alcohol self-administration in protracted abstinence induced by IA in high-drinking rats. Finally, the effect of GW803430 was assessed on alcohol self-administration in acute withdrawal in rats exposed to alcohol vapor. Gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R was measured in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in both acute and protracted abstinence.

    Results: High-drinking IA rats consumed more calories from alcohol than chow and GW803430 decreased both chow and alcohol intake. In low-drinking rats, only food intake was affected. In protracted abstinence from IA, alcohol self-administration was significantly reduced by pretreatment with GW803430 and gene expression of both MCH and the MCH1-R were dysregulated in hypothalamus and NAc. In contrast, during acute withdrawal from vapor exposure, treatment with GW803430 did not affect alcohol self-administration, and no changes in MCH or MCH1-R gene expression were observed.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest a dual role of MCH and the MCH1-R in regulation of alcohol intake, possibly through mechanisms involving caloric intake and reward motivation. A selective suppression of alcohol self-administration during protracted abstinence by GW803430 was observed and accompanied by adaptations in gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R. Selective suppression of escalated consumption renders the MCH1-R an attractive target for treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  • 262.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rehman, Faazal
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    University of Georgia, GA 30602 USA.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA.
    Steensland, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Correction: The melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor modulates alcohol-induced reward and DARPP-32 phosphorylation (vol 233, nr 12, pp. 2355–2363, 2016)2016Ingår i: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 233, nr 21-22, s. 3825-3825Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 263.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rehman, Faazal
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Damdazic, Ruslan
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    University of Georgia, GA 30602 USA.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Steensland, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    The melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor modulates alcohol-induced reward and DARPP-32 phosphorylation2016Ingår i: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 233, nr 12, s. 2355-2363Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is involved in the regulation of food intake and has recently been associated with alcohol-related behaviors. Blockade of MCH-1 receptors (MCH1-Rs) attenuates operant alcohol self-administration and decreases cue-induced reinstatement, but the mechanism through which the MCH1-R influences these behaviors remains unknown. MCH1-Rs are highly expressed in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) where they are co-expressed with dopamine (DA) receptors. MCH has been shown to potentiate responses to dopamine and to increase phosphorylation of DARPP-32, an intracellular marker of DA receptor activation, in the NAcSh. In the present study, we investigated the role of the MCH1-R in alcohol reward using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. We then used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to assess activation of downstream signaling after administration of a rewarding dose of alcohol. We found that alcohol-induced CPP was markedly decreased in mice with a genetic deletion of the MCH1-R as well as after pharmacological treatment with an MCH1-R antagonist, GW803430. In contrast, an isocaloric dose of dextrose did not produce CPP. The increase in DARPP-32 phosphorylation seen in wildtype (WT) mice after acute alcohol administration in the NAcSh was markedly reduced in MCH1-R knock-out (KO) mice. Our results suggest that MCH1-Rs regulate the rewarding properties of alcohol through interactions with signaling cascades downstream of DA receptors in the NAcSh.

  • 264.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.
    Rehman, Faazal
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Björk, Karl
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Solomon, Matthew
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Tapocik, Jenica
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Proinflammatory signaling regulates voluntary alcohol intake and stress-induced consumption after exposure to social defeat stress in mice2017Ingår i: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 22, nr 5, s. 1279-1288Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Proinflammatory activity has been postulated to play a role in addictive processes and stress responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) in regulation of voluntary alcohol consumption, alcohol reward and stress-induced drinking. Mice with a deletion of the IL-1 receptor I gene (IL-1RI KO) exhibited modestly decreased alcohol consumption. However, IL-1RI deletion affected neither the rewarding properties of alcohol, measured by conditioned place preference (CPP), nor stress-induced drinking induced by social defeat stress. TNF-a signaling can compensate for phenotypic consequences of IL1-RI deletion. We therefore hypothesized that double deletion of both IL-1RI and TNF-1 receptors (TNF-1R) may reveal the role of these pathways in regulation of alcohol intake. Double KOs consumed significantly less alcohol than control mice over a range of alcohol concentrations. The combined deletion of TNF-1R and IL-1RI did not influence alcohol reward, but did prevent increased alcohol consumption resulting from exposure to repeated bouts of social defeat stress. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-1RI and TNF-1R contribute to regulation of stress-induced, negatively reinforced drinking perhaps through overlapping signaling events downstream of these receptors, while leaving rewarding properties of alcohol largely unaffected.

  • 265.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Janzén, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. AstraZeneca, Sweden; Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre, Sweden.
    Durrieu, Lucia
    University of Buenos Aires, Argentina; University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Colman-Lerner, Alejandro
    University of Buenos Aires, Argentina; University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Kjellsson, Maria C.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nonlinear mixed-effects modelling for single cell estimation: when, why, and how to use it2015Ingår i: BMC Systems Biology, ISSN 1752-0509, E-ISSN 1752-0509, Vol. 9, nr 52Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies of cell-to-cell variation have in recent years grown in interest, due to improved bioanalytical techniques which facilitates determination of small changes with high uncertainty. Like much high-quality data, single-cell data is best analysed using a systems biology approach. The most common systems biology approach to single-cell data is the standard two-stage (STS) approach. In STS, data from each cell is analysed in a separate sub-problem, meaning that only data from the same cell is used to calculate the parameter values within that cell. Because only parts of the data are considered, problems with parameter unidentifiability are exaggerated in STS. In contrast, a related approach to data analysis has been developed for the studies of patient-to-patient variations. This approach, called nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NLME), makes use of all data, when estimating the patient-specific parameters. NLME would therefore be advantageous compared to STS also for the study of cell-to-cell variation. However, no such systematic evaluation of the two approaches exists. Results: Herein, such a systematic comparison between STS and NLME has been performed. Different examples, both linear and nonlinear, and both simulated and real experimental data, have been examined. With informative data, there is no significant difference in the results for either parameter or noise estimation. However, when data becomes uninformative, NLME is significantly superior to STS. These results hold independently of whether the loss of information is due to a low signal-to-noise ratio, too few data points, or a bad input signal. The improvement is shown to come from both the consideration of a joint likelihood (JLH) function, describing all parameters and data, and from an a priori postulated form of the population parameters. Finally, we provide a small tutorial that shows how to use NLME for single-cell analysis, using the free and user-friendly software Monolix. Conclusions: When considering uninformative single-cell data, NLME yields more accurate parameter and noise estimates, compared to more traditional approaches, such as STS and JLH.

  • 266.
    Kashefi-Kheyrabadi, Leila
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biosensorer och bioelektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. University of Isfahan, Iran.
    Mehrgardi, Masoud
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biosensorer och bioelektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. University of Isfahan, Iran.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biosensorer och bioelektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biosensorer och bioelektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Ultrasensitive detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells using a label-free aptasensor2014Ingår i: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 86, nr 10, s. 4956-4960Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and has no effective cure, especially in later stages. The development of a tangible protocol for early diagnosis of this disease remains a major challenge. In the present manuscript, an aptamer-based, label-free electrochemical biosensor for the sensitive detection of HepG2, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, is described. The target cells are captured in a sandwich architecture using TLS11a aptamer covalently attached to a gold surface and a secondary TLS11a aptamer. The application of TLS11a aptamer as a recognition layer resulted in a sensor with high affinity for HepG2 cancer cells in comparison with control cancer cells of human prostate, breast and colon tumours. The aptasensor delivered a wide linear dynamic range over 1 × 102 – 1 × 106 cell/mL, with a detection limit of 2 cell/mL. This protocol provides a precise method for sensitive detection of liver cancer with significant advantages in terms of simplicity, low cost, and stability.

  • 267.
    Kastbom, Alf
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Klingberg, E
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Verma, Deepti
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Carlsten, H
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Forsblad-dElia, H
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wesamaa, J
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Cedergren, Jan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Reumatologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Reumatologiska kliniken i Östergötland.
    Söderkvist, P
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Genetic variants in CARD8 but not in NLRP3 are associated with ankylosing spondylitis2013Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, nr 6, s. 465-468Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is important for interleukin-1beta (IL-1 beta) processing as part of an innate immune response. Caspase recruitment domain family, member 8 (CARD8) is an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) and possibly also a part of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The objective of this study was to evaluate one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CARD8 and three SNPs in NLRP3 in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) susceptibility and disease phenotype. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: We recruited 492 AS patients from Southern Sweden fulfilling the modified New York criteria for AS, and assessed phenotypic characteristics from medical records and questionnaires. Patients with psoriasis or clinically overt inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were excluded, as were patients without human leucocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27). Three NLRP3 SNPs (rs35829419, rs4353135, and rs10733113) and one SNP in CARD8 (rs2043211) were genotyped by commercially available TaqMan assays, and the results compared at genotype and allele levels to those of 793 population-based controls. In a subgroup of the patients (n = 169), faecal calprotectin was assessed as a marker of subclinical intestinal inflammation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The minor allele (A) of CARD8-C10X (rs2043211) was associated with a decreased risk of AS in a dominant model [odds ratio (OR) 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.94, p = 0.012] and at the allelic level (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97, p = 0.02), but was not associated with levels of faecal calprotectin. There was no association regarding NLRP3 SNPs and AS susceptibility, and none of the investigated SNPs were associated with iritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, or peripheral joint involvement. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: In a Swedish population, the minor allele of CARD8-C10X is associated with a decreased risk of AS, but not with levels of faecal calprotectin or disease phenotype.

  • 268.
    Kesik-Brodacka, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Institute Biotechnol and Antibiot, Poland.
    Lipiec, Agnieszka
    Warsaw University of Life Science, Poland.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Jedlina, Luiza
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Miedzinska, Katarzyna
    Polish Academic Science, Poland; Queens Medical Research Institute, Scotland.
    Mikolajczak, Magdalena
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Plucienniczak, Andrzej
    Institute Biotechnol and Antibiot, Poland.
    Legocki, Andrzej B.
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Wedrychowicz, Halina
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Immune response of rats vaccinated orally with various plant-expressed recombinant cysteine proteinase constructs when challenged with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae2017Ingår i: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 11, nr 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cysteine proteinases of Fasciola hepatica are important candidates for vaccine antigens because of their role in fluke biology and host-parasite relationships. In our previous experiments, we found that a recombinant cysteine proteinase cloned from adult F. hepatica ( CPFhW) can protect rats against liver fluke infections when it is administered intramuscularly or intranasally in the form of cDNA. We also observed considerable protection upon challenge following mucosal vaccination with inclusion bodies containing recombinant CPFhW produced in Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore oral vaccination, which may be the desired method of delivery and is potentially capable of preventing infections at the site of helminth entry. To provide antigen encapsulation and to protect the vaccine antigen from degradation in the intestinal tract, transgenic plant-based systems are used. Methodology Conclusions We obtained substantial protection after oral administration of the plant-produced hybrids of CPFhW and HBcAg. The highest level of protection (65.4%)was observed in animals immunised with transgenic plants expressing the mature CPFhW enzyme flanked by Gly-rich linkers and inserted into c/e1 epitope of truncated HBcAg. The immunised rats showed clear IgG1 and IgM responsesIn the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protective ability of mucosal vaccinations of 12-week- old rats with CPFhW produced in a transgenic-plant-based system. To avoid inducing tolerance and to maximise the immune response induced by oral immunisation, we used the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein ( HBcAg) as a carrier. Animals were immunised with two doses of the antigen and challenged with 25 or 30 metacercariae of F. hepatica. Conclusions We obtained substantial protection after oral administration of the plant-produced hybrids of CPFhW and HBcAg. The highest level of protection (65.4%) was observed in animals immunised with transgenic plants expressing the mature CPFhW enzyme flanked by Gly- rich linkers and inserted into c/e1 epitope of truncated HBcAg. The immunised rats showed clear IgG1 and IgM responses to CPFhW for 4 consecutive weeks after the challenge.

  • 269.
    Khabou, Boudour
    et al.
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Tababi, Mouna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Siala-Sahnoun, Olfa
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Rebai, Ahmed
    Ctr Biotechnol Sfax, Tunisia.
    Fakhfakh, Faiza
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Potential dysfunctional effects of synonymous variants: Insights from an exhaustive in silico analysis of the ABCB4 gene2018Ingår i: Annals of Human Genetics, ISSN 0003-4800, E-ISSN 1469-1809, Vol. 82, nr 6, s. 457-468Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The multiple drug resistance 3 (MDR3) protein is a canalicular phospholipid translocator involved in the bile secretion and encoded by the ABCB4 gene. Its deficiency is related to a large spectrum of liver diseases. Taking into account the increased evidence about the involvement of synonymous variants in inherited diseases, this study aims to explore the putative effects of silent genetic variants on the ABCB4 expression. We performed an exhaustive computational approach using ESE finder, RegRNA 2.0, MFOLD, SNPfold, and %MinMax software added to the measurement of the Relative Synonymous Codon Usage. This analysis included 216 synonymous variants distributed throughout the ABCB4 gene. Results have shown that 11 synonymous coding SNPs decrease the ESE activity, while 8 of them change the codon frequency. Besides, the c.24Camp;gt;T variation, located 21 nucleotides downstream the start A (Adenine) U (Uracil) G (Glutamine) AUG causes an increase in the local stability. Moreover, the computational analysis of the 3UTR region showed that six of the eight variants located in this region affected the Wild Type (WT) pattern of the miRNA targets sites and/or their proper display. The 26 sSNPs retained as putatively functional possessed a very low allele frequency, supporting their pathogenicity. In conclusion, the obtained results suggest that some synonymous SNPs in the ABCB4 gene, considered up to now as neutral, may be involved in the MDR3 deficiency.

  • 270.
    Kim, Woojin Scott
    et al.
    Neuroscience Research Australia, Barker Street, Randwick 2031, NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW, Australia.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Halliday, Glenda M
    Neuroscience Research Australia, Barker Street, Randwick 2031, NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW, Australia.
    Alpha-synuclein biology in Lewy body diseases.2014Ingår i: Alzheimer's research & therapy, ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 6, nr 5, artikel-id 73Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    α-Synuclein is an abundantly expressed neuronal protein that is at the center of focus in understanding a group of neurodegenerative disorders called α-synucleinopathies, which are characterized by the presence of aggregated α-synuclein intracellularly. Primary α-synucleinopathies include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, with α-synuclein also found secondarily in a number of other diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Understanding how α-synuclein aggregates form in these different disorders is important for the understanding of its pathogenesis in Lewy body diseases. PD is the most prevalent of the α-synucleinopathies and much of the initial research on α-synuclein Lewy body pathology was based on PD but is also relevant to Lewy bodies in other diseases (dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease). Polymorphism and mutation studies of SNCA, the gene that encodes α-synuclein, provide much evidence for a causal link between α-synuclein and PD. Among the primary α-synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy is unique in that α-synuclein deposition occurs in oligodendrocytes rather than neurons. It is unclear whether α-synuclein originates from oligodendrocytes or whether it is transmitted somehow from neurons. α-Synuclein exists as a natively unfolded monomer in the cytosol, but in the presence of lipid membranes it is thought to undergo a conformational change to a folded α-helical secondary structure that is prone to forming dimers and oligomers. Posttranslational modification of α-synuclein, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination and nitration, has been widely implicated in α-synuclein aggregation process and neurotoxicity. Recent studies using animal and cell models, as well as autopsy studies of patients with neuron transplants, provided compelling evidence for prion-like propagation of α-synuclein. This observation has implications for therapeutic strategies, and much recent effort is focused on developing antibodies that target extracellular α-synuclein.

  • 271.
    Kirchheiner Rasmussen, Mads
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Enger, Martin
    Oslo Hudlegesenter, Norway.
    Dahlborn, Anna-Karin
    Novartis Healthcare AB, Sweden.
    Juvik, Sin
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway.
    Fagerhed, Laura
    Novartis Finland Oy, Finland.
    Dodge, Rikke
    Novartis Healthcare, Denmark.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Hudkliniken i Östergötland.
    The Importance of Achieving Clear or Almost Clear Skin for Patients: Results from the Nordic Countries of the Global "Clear about Psoriasis" Patient Survey2019Ingår i: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 99, nr 2, s. 158-163Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriasis is a stigmatizing chronic skin condition in which impairment of quality of life is associated with visibility of skin lesions, disease activity and severity. The ultimate goal of treatment is complete clearance of skin symptoms. The worldwide "Clear About Psoriasis" survey explored patients perspectives on clear/almost clear skin and the impact of psoriasis on daily life. We report here results from the Nordic countries (n = 609). Of respondents, 44% achieved clear/almost clear skin with their current treatment, of which 71% were comfortable discussing this expectation with their physician, compared with only 46% of patients who had not achieved clear/almost clear skin. Of patients who achieved clear/almost clear skin, 85% reported treatment satisfaction vs. 39% who had not. Psoriasis profoundly affected daily life, with 88% of respondents reporting discrimination/humiliation and 61% reporting an impact on their professional life. This report highlights stigmatization among Nordic patients with psoriasis and the potential to improve physician-patient communication.

  • 272.
    Kissopoulou, Antheia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Cty Council Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk genetik.
    Gréen, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk genetik.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för kardiovaskulär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Cty Council Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk genetik.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk genetik. Region Östergötland, Centrum för verksamhetsstöd och utveckling.
    Homozygous missense MYBPC3 Pro873His mutation associated with increased risk for heart failure development in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy2018Ingår i: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 716-723Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary autosomal-dominant disorder of the myocardium with variable expressivity and penetrance. Occasionally, homozygous sarcomere genetic variants emerge while genotyping HCM patients. In these cases, a more severe HCM phenotype is generally seen. Here, we report a case of HCM that was diagnosed clinically at 39years of age. Initial symptoms were shortness of breath during exertion. Successively, he developed a wide array of severe clinical manifestations, which progressed to an ominous end-stage heart failure that resulted in heart transplantation. Genotype analysis revealed a missense MYBPC3 variant NM_000256.3:c.2618Camp;gt;A,p.(Pro873His) that presented in the homozygous form. Conflicting interpretations of pathogenicity have been reported for the Pro873His MYBPC3 variant described here. Our patient, presenting with two copies of the variant and devoid of a normal allele, progressed to end-stage heart failure, which supports the notion of a deleterious effect of this variant in the homozygous form.

  • 273.
    Klang Årstrand, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Turkina, Maria V
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Isolation of Cytosolic Ribosomes2017Ingår i: Isolation of Plant Organelles and Structures: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Nicolas L. Taylor, A. Harvey Millar, New York: Springer, 2017, Vol. 1511, s. 241-247Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes a method of plant cytosolic ribosomes isolation typically used for further proteomic studies. Detailed description procedures including plant material disruption, various centrifugation steps, sucrose cushion centrifugation, and quality control of preparation are provided.

  • 274.
    Klawonn, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Fritz, Michael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bonaventura, Jordi
    NIDA, MD USA.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Urban
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Granseth, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Michaelides, Michael
    NIDA, MD USA; Johns Hopkins Sch Med, MD USA.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Motivational valence is determined by striatal melanocortin 4 receptors2018Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 128, nr 7, s. 3160-3170Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It is critical for survival to assign positive or negative valence to salient stimuli in a correct manner. Accordingly, harmful stimuli and internal states characterized by perturbed homeostasis are accompanied by discomfort, unease, and aversion. Aversive signaling causes extensive suffering during chronic diseases, including inflammatory conditions, cancer, and depression. Here, we investigated the role of melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4Rs) in aversive processing using genetically modified mice and a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with aversive stimuli. In normal mice, robust aversions were induced by systemic inflammation, nausea, pain, and. opioid receptorinduced dysphoria. In sharp contrast, mice lacking MC4Rs displayed preference or indifference toward the aversive stimuli. The unusual flip from aversion to reward in mice lacking MC4Rs was dopamine dependent and associated with a change from decreased to increased activity of the dopamine system. The responses to aversive stimuli were normalized when MC4Rs were reexpressed on dopamine D1 receptor-expressing cells or in the striatum of mice otherwise lacking MC4Rs. Furthermore, activation of arcuate nucleus proopiomelanocortin neurons projecting to the ventral striatum increased the activity of striatal neurons in an MC4R-dependent manner and elicited aversion. Our findings demonstrate that melanocortin signaling through striatal MC4Rs is critical for assigning negative motivational valence to harmful stimuli.

  • 275.
    Klawonn, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rådberg, Carl F.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lindström, Sarah
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ericson, Mia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Granseth, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Fritz, Michael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    The Sigma-2 Receptor Selective Agonist Siramesine (Lu 28-179) Decreases Cocaine-Reinforced Pavlovian Learning and Alters Glutamatergic and Dopaminergic Input to the Striatum2017Ingår i: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 8, artikel-id 714Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug addiction is a chronic, debilitating disease that affects millions of people around the world causing a substantial societal burden. Despite decades of research efforts, treatment possibilities remain limited and relapse represents the most treatmentresistant element. Neurosteroid sigma-1 receptors have been meticulously studied in psychostimulant reinforced Pavlovian learning, while the sigma-2 receptor subtype has remained unexplored. Recent development of selective sigma-2 receptor ligands have now made it possible to investigate if the sigma-2 receptor system is a potential target to treat drug addiction. We examined the effect of the sigma-2 receptor agonist Siramesine (Lu 28-179) on cocaine-associated locomotion, Pavlovian learning, and reward neurocircuitry using electrophysiology recordings and in vivo microdialysis. We found that Siramesine significantly attenuated conditioned place preference acquisition and expression, as well as it completely blocked cocaine-primed reinstatement. Siramesine, in a similar manner as the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD 1063, decreased acute locomotor responses to cocaine. Immunohistochemistry suggests co-expression of progesterone receptor membrane component 1/sigma-2 receptors and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in presynaptic boutons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings of neurons in the NAc indicated that Siramesine decreases the presynaptic release probability of glutamate. Further, we demonstrated, via in vivo microdialysis, that Siramesine significantly decreased cocaine-evoked dopamine release in the striatum of freely moving mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that sigma-2 receptors regulate neurocircuitry responsible for positive reinforcement and thereby play a role in cocaine-reinforced Pavlovian behaviors.

  • 276.
    Klawonn, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken.
    Lindström, Sarah
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Singh, Anand Kumar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Wess, Jurgen
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Fritz, Michael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Muscarinic M4 Receptors on Cholinergic and Dopamine D1 Receptor-Expressing Neurons Have Opposing Functionality for Positive Reinforcement and Influence Impulsivity2018Ingår i: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5099, Vol. 11, artikel-id 139Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine has been implicated in reward learning and drug addiction. However, the roles of the various cholinergic receptor subtypes on different neuron populations remain elusive. Here we study the function of muscarinic M4 receptors (M4Rs) in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) expressing neurons and cholinergic neurons (expressing choline acetyltransferase; ChAT), during various reward-enforced behaviors and in a "waiting"-impulsivity test. We applied cell-type-specific gene deletions targeting M4Rs in D1RCre or ChATCre mice. Mice lacking M4Rs in D1R-neurons displayed greater cocaine seeking and drug-primed reinstatement than their littermate controls in a Pavlovian conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Furthermore, the M4R-D1RCre mice initiated significantly more premature responses (PRs) in the 5-choice-serial-reaction-time-task (5CSRTT) than their littermate controls, indicating impaired waiting impulse control. In contrast, mice lacking M4Rs in cholinergic neurons did not acquire cocaine Pavlovian conditioning. The M4R-ChATCre mice were also unable to learn positive reinforcement to either natural reward or cocaine in an operant runway paradigm. Immediate early gene (IEG) expression (cFos and FosB) induced by repeated cocaine injections was significantly increased in the forebrain of M4R-D1RCre mice, whereas it remained normal in the M4R-ChATCre mice. Our study illustrates that muscarinic M4Rs on specific neural populations, either cholinergic or D1R-expressing, are pivotal for learning processes related to both natural reward and drugs of abuse, with opposing functionality. Furthermore, we found that neurons expressing both M4Rs and D1Rs are important for signaling impulse control.

  • 277.
    Klionsky, Daniel J.
    et al.
    University of Michigan, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; University of Michigan, Life Sciences Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, USA .
    Boman, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Kurz, Tino
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Zughaier, Susu M.
    Emory University, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition)2016Ingår i: Autophagy, ISSN 1554-8627, E-ISSN 1554-8635, Vol. 2, nr 1, s. 1-222Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
  • 278.
    Koh, Li Buay
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Swedish Nanoscience Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm , Sweden .
    Mitra, Debbie
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, ON, Canada.
    Noel, Christopher
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, ON, Canada.
    Merett, Kimberley
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, ON, Canada.
    Odorcic, Silvia
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, ON, Canada.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Ögonkliniken US/LiM.
    Jackson, William Bruce
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, ON, Canada.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Center for Biomimetic Sensor Science, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Swedish Nanoscience Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Epoxy Cross-Linked Collagen and Collagen-Laminin Peptide Hydrogels as Corneal Substitutes2013Ingår i: Journal of Functional Biomaterials, ISSN 2079-4983, E-ISSN 2079-4983, Vol. 4, nr 3, s. 162-177Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A bi-functional epoxy-based cross-linker, 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE), was investigated in the fabrication of collagen based corneal substitutes. Two synthetic strategies were explored in the preparation of the cross-linked collagen scaffolds. The lysine residues of Type 1 porcine collagen were directly cross-linked using l,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE) under basic conditions at pH 11. Alternatively, under conventional methodology, using both BDDGE and 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as cross-linkers, hydrogels were fabricated under acidic conditions. In this latter strategy, Cu(BF4)2·XH2O was used to catalyze the formation of secondary amine bonds. To date, we have demonstrated that both methods of chemical cross-linking improved the elasticity and tensile strength of the collagen implants. Differential scanning calorimetry and biocompatibility studies indicate comparable, and in some cases, enhanced properties compared to that of the EDC/NHS controls. In vitro studies showed that human corneal epithelial cells and neuronal progenitor cell lines proliferated on these hydrogels. In addition, improvement of cell proliferation on the surfaces of the materials was observed when neurite promoting laminin epitope, IKVAV, and adhesion peptide, YIGSR, were incorporated. However, the elasticity decreased with peptide incorporation and will require further optimization. Nevertheless, we have shown that epoxy cross-linkers should be further explored in the fabrication of collagen-based hydrogels, as alternatives to or in conjunction with carbodiimide cross-linkers.

  • 279.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Elizondo, Rodolfo A.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Edin, Joel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Olsen, David
    FibroGen Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Merrett, Kimberley
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute–Vision Programme, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Lee, Chang-Jang
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute–Vision Programme, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicinsk teknik, Biomedicinsk instrumentteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Polarek, James
    FibroGen Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Ögonkliniken US/LiM.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Effect of Surgical Technique on Corneal Implant Performance2014Ingår i: Translational Vision Science & Technology, ISSN 2164-2591, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 1-13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the effect of a surgical technique on biomaterial implant performance, specifically graft retention.

     

    Methods: Twelve mini pigs were implanted with cell-free, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) hydrogels as substitutes for donor corneal allografts using overlying sutures with or without human amniotic membrane (HAM) versus interrupted sutures with HAM. The effects of the retention method were compared as well as the effects of collagen concentration (13.7% to 15% RHCIII).

    Results: All implanted corneas showed initial haze that cleared with time, resulting in corneas with optical clarity matching those of untreated controls. Biochemical analysis showed that by 12 months post operation, the initial RHCIII implants had been completely remodeled, as type I collagen, was the major collagenous protein detected, whereas no RHCIII could be detected. Histological analysis showed all implanted corneas exhibited regeneration of epithelial and stromal layers as well as nerves, along with touch sensitivity and tear production. Most neovascularization was seen in corneas stabilized by interrupted sutures.

    Conclusions: This showed that the surgical technique used does have a significant effect on the overall performance of corneal implants, overlying sutures caused less vascularization than interrupted sutures.

    Translational Relevance: Understanding the significance of the suturing technique can aid the selection of the most appropriate procedure when implanting artificial corneal substitutes. The same degree of regeneration, despite a higher collagen content indicates that future material development can progress toward stronger, more resistant implants.

  • 280.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Animal models ad in vitro alternatives in regenerative medicine: Focus on biomaterials development2014Ingår i: Innovative Strategies in Tissue Engineering / [ed] Mayuri S. Prasad & Paolo Di Nardo, Aalborg, Denmark: River Publishers, 2014, s. 37-51Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 281.
    Krauss, Tobias
    et al.
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Links, Thera P.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Bancoss, Irina
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Kvachenyuk, Andrey
    NAMS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Gomez de las Heras, Karim Villar
    Serv Salud Castilla La Mancha SESCAM, Spain.
    Yukina, Marina Y.
    Endocrinol Res Ctr, Russia.
    Petrov, Roman
    Bakhrushin Bros Moscow City Hosp, Russia.
    Bullivant, Garrett
    Univ Hlth Network, Canada.
    von Duecker, Laura
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany.
    Jadhav, Swati
    King Edward Mem Hosp, India.
    Ploeckinger, Ursula
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Schalin-Jantti, Camilla
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Pfeifer, Marija
    Univ Med Ctr, Slovenia.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    MSC Mem Inst, Poland.
    Sanso, Gabriela
    Hosp Ninos Dr Ricardo Gutierrez, Argentina.
    Qi, Xiaoping
    Wenzhou Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ugurlu, M. Umit
    Marmara Univ, Turkey.
    Diaz, Rene E.
    Hosp Salvador, Chile.
    Wohllk, Nelson
    Univ Chile, Chile.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Inst Cardiol, Poland.
    Aberle, Jens
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Lourenco Jr, Delmar M.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Pereira, Maria A. A.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Fragoso, Maria C. B. V
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hoff, Ana O.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Almeida, Madson Q.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Violante, Alice H. D.
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Ouidute, Ana R. P.
    Fed Univ Ceara UFC, Brazil.
    Zhang, Zhewei
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Recasens, Monica
    Hosp Univ Girona, Spain.
    Robles Diaz, Luis
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Spain.
    Kunavisarut, Tada
    Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Wannachalee, Taweesak
    Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Sirinvaravong, Sirinart
    Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Jonasch, Eric
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, TX 77030 USA.
    Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Israel.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Israel.
    Beltsevich, Dmitry
    Endocrinol Res Ctr, Russia.
    Egorov, Viacheslav I
    Bakhrushin Bros Moscow City Hosp, Russia.
    Bausch, Dirk
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Schott, Matthias
    Heinrich Heine Univ, Germany.
    Tiling, Nikolaus
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Pennelli, Gianmaria
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Zschiedrich, Stefan
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany.
    Daerr, Roland
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany; Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Ruf, Juri
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany.
    Denecke, Timm
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Link, Karl-Heinrich
    Asklepios Paulinen Klin, Germany.
    Zovato, Stefania
    IRCCS, Italy.
    von Dobschuetz, Ernst
    Acad Teaching Hosp Univ Hamburg, Germany.
    Yaremchuk, Svetlana
    NAMS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Amthauer, Holger
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Dept Gen Surg, Turkey.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungary; Semmelweis Univ, Hungary.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Huyssens Fdn Clin, Germany.
    Huber, Tobias B.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Seufert, Jochen
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ekaterina, Raymond H.
    Univ Toronto, Canada; Mt Sinai Hosp, Canada.
    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk genetik.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians Univ Munich, Germany.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    MSC Mem Inst, Poland.
    Barontini, Marta
    Hosp Ninos Dr Ricardo Gutierrez, Argentina.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Inst Cardiol, Poland.
    Shah, Nalini
    King Edward Mem Hosp, India.
    Young, William F. Jr.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Veneto Inst Oncol IOV IRCCS, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs Univ, Germany.
    Bausch, Birke
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Preventive medicine of von Hippel-Lindau disease-associated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors2018Ingår i: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 25, nr 9, s. 783-793Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are rare in von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) but cause serious morbidity and mortality. Management guidelines for VHL-PanNETs continue to be based on limited evidence, and survival data to guide surgical management are lacking. We established the European-American-Asian-VHL-PanNET-Registry to assess data for risks for metastases, survival and long-term outcomes to provide best management recommendations. Of 2330 VHL patients, 273 had a total of 484 PanNETs. Median age at diagnosis of PanNET was 35 years (range 10-75). Fifty-five (20%) patients had metastatic PanNETs. Metastatic PanNETs were significantly larger (median size 5 vs 2 cm; P amp;lt; 0.001) and tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) was faster (22 vs 126 months; P = 0.001). All metastatic tumors were amp;gt;= 2.8 cm. Codons 161 and 167 were hotspots for VHL germline mutations with enhanced risk for metastatic PanNETs. Multivariate prediction modeling disclosed maximum tumor diameter and TVDT as significant predictors for metastatic disease (positive and negative predictive values of 51% and 100% for diameter cut-off amp;gt;= 2.8 cm, 44% and 91% for TVDT cut-off of amp;lt;= 24 months). In 117 of 273 patients, PanNETs amp;gt; 1.5 cm in diameter were operated. Ten-year survival was significantly longer in operated vs non-operated patients, in particular for PanNETs amp;lt; 2.8 cm vs amp;gt;= 2.8 cm (94% vs 85% by 10 years; P = 0.020; 80% vs 50% at 10 years; P = 0.030). This study demonstrates that patients with PanNET approaching the cut-off diameter of 2.8 cm should be operated. Mutations in exon 3, especially of codons 161/167 are at enhanced risk for metastatic PanNETs. Survival is significantly longer in operated non-metastatic VHL-PanNETs.

  • 282.
    Krishna Tummala, Gopi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Joffre, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lopes, Viviana R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. NAMS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hyperelastic Nanocellulose-Reinforced Hydrogel of High Water Content for Ophthalmic Applications2016Ingår i: ACS BIOMATERIALS SCIENCE and ENGINEERING, ISSN 2373-9878, Vol. 2, nr 11, s. 2072-2079Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A nanocellulose-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel material of exceptionally high water content for ophthalmic applications is presented (amp;gt;90 wt %), which also features a hitherto unprecedented combination of optical, mechanical, viscoelastic, oxygen permeability, and biocompatibility properties. The hydrogel combines the desired softness with remarkable strain-dependent mechanical strength and thereby demonstrates hyperelastic, rubber-like mechanical properties. The observed unusual mechanical behavior is due to both high water content and the combination of relatively stiff cellulose nanowhiskers entangled in a soft polymer matrix of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), thus mimicking the structural characteristics of the corneas main constituents, i.e., water and collagen.

  • 283.
    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Grigelioniene, Giedre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hammarsjo, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lee, Hye-Ran
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Norrköping. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Grigelionis, Gintautas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kim, Ok-Hwa
    Woorisoa Childrens Hospital, South Korea.
    Nishimura, Gen
    Tokyo Metropolitan Childrens Medical Centre, Japan.
    Cho, Tae-Joon
    4 Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
    Extending the phenotype of BMPER-related skeletal dysplasias to ischiospinal dysostosis2016Ingår i: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, ISSN 1750-1172, E-ISSN 1750-1172, Vol. 11, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ischiospinal dysostosis (ISD) is a polytopic dysostosis characterized by ischial hypoplasia, multiple segmental anomalies of the cervicothoracic spine, hypoplasia of the lumbrosacral spine and occasionally associated with nephroblastomatosis. ISD is similar to, but milder than the lethal/semilethal condition termed diaphanospondylodysostosis (DSD), which is associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of bone morphogenetic protein-binding endothelial regulator protein (BMPER) gene. Here we report for the first time biallelic BMPER mutations in two patients with ISD, neither of whom had renal abnormalities. Our data supports and further extends the phenotypic variability of BMPER-related skeletal disorders.

  • 284.
    Kugelberg, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Veneto Institute Oncology IRCCS, Italy .
    Fassina, Ambrogio
    University of Padua, Italy .
    Backdahl, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Veneto Institute Oncology IRCCS, Italy University of Padua, Italy .
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik.
    Dahia, Patricia L.
    University of Texas Health Science Centre San Antonio, TX 78229 USA .
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    University of Freiburg, Germany .
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Role of SDHAF2 and SDHD in von Hippel-Lindau Associated Pheochromocytomas2014Ingår i: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 38, nr 3, s. 724-732Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) develop from the adrenal medulla and are often part of a hereditary syndrome such as von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome. In VHL, only about 30 % of patients with a VHL missense mutation develop PCCs. Thus, additional genetic events leading to formation of such tumors in patients with VHL syndrome are sought. SDHAF2 (previously termed SDH5) and SDHD are both located on chromosome 11q and are required for the function of mitochondrial complex II. While SDHAF2 has been shown to be mutated in patients with paragangliomas (PGLs), SDHD mutations have been found both in patients with PCCs and in patients with PGLs. Materials and methods Because loss of 11q is a common event in VHL-associated PCCs, we aimed to investigate whether SDHAF2 and SDHD are targets. In the present study, 41 VHL-associated PCCs were screened for mutations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in SDHAF2 or SDHD. Promoter methylation, as well as mRNA expression of SDHAF2 and SDHD, was studied. In addition, immunohistochemistry (IHC) of SDHB, known to be a universal marker for loss of any part the SDH complex, was conducted. Results and conclusions LOH was found in more than 50 % of the VHL-associated PCCs, and was correlated with a significant decrease (p less than 0.05) in both SDHAF2 and SDHD mRNA expression, which may be suggestive of a pathogenic role. However, while SDHB protein expression as determined by IHC in a small cohort of tumors was lower in PCCs than in the surrounding adrenal cortex, there was no obvious correlation with LOH or the level of SDHAF2/SDHD mRNA expression. In addition, the lack of mutations and promoter methylation in the investigated samples indicates that other events on chromosome 11 might be involved in the development of PCCs in association with VHL syndrome.

  • 285.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Proteomics as a multifaceted tool in medicine and environmental assessment2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteomics is evolving as a multi-faceted tool for addressing various biochemical and biomedical queries in the field of scientific research. This involves various stages, ranging from sample preparation to data analysis and biological interpretation. Sample preparation involves isolating proteins from the sample source, purifying and digesting them to initiate shotgun proteomics. Shotgun proteomics identifies proteins by bottom-up proteomic approaches where proteins are identified from the fragmentation spectra of their own peptides.

    Paper I: deals with the simplification of functional characterization for nanoparticles intended for use in biomedicine. Proteomics was constructive in differentiating and semi-quantifying the surface of protein corona. This could be beneficial in predicting the interactions between nanoparticles and a biological entity like the cell or a receptor protein and provide initial valuable information related to targeting, uptake and safety.

    Paper II: deals with understanding effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on endothelial cells. A combinatorial approach, involving transcriptomics and proteomics was used to identify aberrations in the permeability and integrity of endothelial cells and tissues. Our study also investigated the correlation of size and how they motivated a differential cellular response. In case of intravenous entry for nanoparticles in targeted drug delivery systems, endothelial cells are the first barrier encountered by these drug carriers. This evaluation involving endothelial cell response could be very instrumental during the designing of NP based drug delivery systems.

    Paper III: Pharmaceuticals and its metabolites could be very hazardous, especially if its disposal is not managed properly. Since water bodies are the ultimate sink, these chemicals could end up there, culminating in toxicity and other ‘mixture effects’ in combination with other factors. To evaluate the effects of the pharmaceutical, propranolol and climatic factors like low salinity conditions, a microcosm exposure was designed and shotgun proteomics helped understand its impact on mussel gills. In this study too, a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics unveiled molecular mechanisms altered in response to stressors, both individually and in combination.

    Paper IV: An interplay of various factors like EBF1 and PAX5 determines B-cell lineage and commitment. This might have been materialized by direct and transient proteinprotein interactions. A unique method called BioID helped screen relevant interactions in living cells by the application of a promiscuous biotin ligase enzyme capable of tagging proteins through biotinylation based on a proximity radius. Biotinylation of endogenous proteins enabled their selective isolation by exploiting the high affinity of biotin and streptavidin on streptavidin coated agarose beads, leading to their identification by mass spectrometry. The biotinylated proteins were potential candidate interactors of EBF1 and PAX5, which were later confirmed by sequencing techniques like ChIP-Seq, ATAC seq, and visualization techniques like proximity ligation assay (PLA).

    Delarbeten
    1. Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles
    2017 (Engelska)Ingår i: Nanoscale Horizons, ISSN 2055-6756, nr 1, s. 55-64Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Engineered nanoparticles for biomedical applications requireincreasing effectiveness in targeting specific cells while preservingnon-target cell’s safety. We developed a surface proteomicsmethod for a rapid and systematic analysis of the interphasebetween the nanoparticle protein corona and the targeting cellsthat could implement the rapid prototyping of nanomedicines.Native nanoparticles entering in a protein-rich liquid mediaquickly form a macromolecular structure called protein corona.This protein structure defines the physical interaction betweennanoparticles and target cells. The surface proteins compose thefirst line of interaction between this macromolecular structureand the cell surface of a target cell. We demonstrated that SUSTU(SUrface proteomics, Safety, Targeting, Uptake) provides aqualitative and quantitative analysis from the protein coronasurface. With SUSTU, the spatial dynamics of the protein coronasurface can be studied. Data from SUSTU would ascertain thenanoparticle functionalized groups exposed at destiny that couldcircumvent preliminary in vitro experiments. Therefore thismethod could implement the analysis of nanoparticle targetingand uptake capability and could be integrated into a rapidprototyping strategy which is a major challenge in nanomaterialscience. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifierPXD004636.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017
    Nyckelord
    nanoparticle, protein corona, mass spectrometry, surface proteomics, targeting, rapid prototyping, nanomedicine
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Biokemi och molekylärbiologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132406 (URN)10.1039/c6nh00162a (DOI)000391450000006 ()
    Projekt
    Nanoimpact; nanoparticles and rapid prototyping
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-11-09 Skapad: 2016-11-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-04-17Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm
    Visa övriga...
    2016 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 137, s. 97-106Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceuticals, among them the β-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol, are an important group of environmental contaminants reported in European waters. Laboratory exposure to pharmaceuticals on marine species has been performed without considering the input of the ecosystem flow. To unravel the ecosystem response to long-term exposure to propranolol we have performed long-term exposure to propranolol and low salinity in microcosms. We applied shotgun proteomic analysis to gills of Mytilus edulis from those Baltic Sea microcosms and identified 2071 proteins with a proteogenomic strategy. The proteome profiling patterns from the 587 highly reproductive proteins among groups define salinity as a key factor in the mussel´s response to propranolol. Exposure at low salinity drives molecular mechanisms of adaptation based on a decrease in the abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins, signalling and intracellular membrane trafficking pathway combined with a response towards the maintenance of transcription and translation. The exposure to propranolol combined with low salinity modulates the expression of structural proteins including cilia functions and decrease the expression membrane protein transporters. This study reinforces the environment concerns of the impact of low salinity in combination with anthropogenic pollutants and anticipate critical physiological conditions for the survival of the blue mussel in the northern areas.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Elsevier, 2016
    Nyckelord
    Mytilus edulis, shotgun proteomics, propranolol, low salinity, environmental monitoring, climate change
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Biokemi och molekylärbiologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124213 (URN)10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.010 (DOI)000374368800010 ()
    Forskningsfinansiär
    Vetenskapsrådet
    Anmärkning

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council-Natural Science; VR-NT; Carl Trygger Foundation; Oscar and Lilli Lamms Minne Foundation; Angpanneforening Research Foundation; Magnus Bergsvall Foundation; IKERBASQUE; Basque Foundation for Science; VINNOVA; County Council of Oste

    Tillgänglig från: 2016-01-22 Skapad: 2016-01-22 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-11-30Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 286.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bayat, Narges
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Proteomic Analysis of Endothelial Cells Exposed to Ultrasmall Nanoparticles Reveals Disruption in Paracellular and Transcellular Transport2019Ingår i: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 19, nr 5, artikel-id 1800228Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The large interactive surfaces of nanoparticles (NPs) increase the opportunities to develop NPs for vascular targeting. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to NPs reveals the cellular response and turns the focus into the impairment of the endothelial permeability. Here, quantitative proteomics and transcriptome sequencing are combined to evaluate the effects of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of TiO2-USNPs and TiO2-NPs on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells react to preserve the semi-permeable properties that are essential for vascular tissue fluid homeostasis, vascular development, and angiogenesis. The main impact of the exposure was alteration of functional complexes involved in cell adhesion, vesicular transport, and cytoskeletal structure. Those are the core cellular structures that are linked to the permeability and the integrity of the endothelial tissue. Moreover, the extracellular proteins uptake along wih the NPs into the endothelial cells escape the lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings improve the understanding of the interaction of NPs with endothelial cell. The effects of the studied NPs modulating cell-cell adhesion and vesicular transport can help to evaluate the distribution of NPs via intravenous administration.

  • 287.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Farinha, Ana Paula
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bayat, Narges
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Arrhenius laboratories, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentristy, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain.
    Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles2017Ingår i: Nanoscale Horizons, ISSN 2055-6756, nr 1, s. 55-64Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineered nanoparticles for biomedical applications requireincreasing effectiveness in targeting specific cells while preservingnon-target cell’s safety. We developed a surface proteomicsmethod for a rapid and systematic analysis of the interphasebetween the nanoparticle protein corona and the targeting cellsthat could implement the rapid prototyping of nanomedicines.Native nanoparticles entering in a protein-rich liquid mediaquickly form a macromolecular structure called protein corona.This protein structure defines the physical interaction betweennanoparticles and target cells. The surface proteins compose thefirst line of interaction between this macromolecular structureand the cell surface of a target cell. We demonstrated that SUSTU(SUrface proteomics, Safety, Targeting, Uptake) provides aqualitative and quantitative analysis from the protein coronasurface. With SUSTU, the spatial dynamics of the protein coronasurface can be studied. Data from SUSTU would ascertain thenanoparticle functionalized groups exposed at destiny that couldcircumvent preliminary in vitro experiments. Therefore thismethod could implement the analysis of nanoparticle targetingand uptake capability and could be integrated into a rapidprototyping strategy which is a major challenge in nanomaterialscience. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifierPXD004636.

  • 288.
    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Schultz, Sebastian
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Alkhori, Liza
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Cilia-Mediated Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila2014Ingår i: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 7, nr 3, s. 672-680Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cilia mediate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrates and Hh deregulation results in several clinical manifestations, such as obesity, cognitive disabilities, developmental malformations, and various cancers. Drosophila cells are nonciliated during development, which has led to the assumption that cilia-mediated Hh signaling is restricted to vertebrates. Here, we identify and characterize a cilia-mediated Hh pathway in Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons. We demonstrate that several fundamental key aspects of the vertebrate cilia pathway, such as ciliary localization of Smoothened and the requirement of the intraflagellar transport system, are present in Drosophila. We show that Cos2 and Fused are required for the ciliary transport of Smoothened and that cilia mediate the expression of the Hh pathway target genes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Hh signaling in Drosophila can be mediated by two pathways and that the ciliary Hh pathway is conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates.

  • 289.
    Lademann, J.
    et al.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Richter, H.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Knorr, F.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Patzelt, A.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Darvin, M. E.
    Charite University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Ruehl, E.
    Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    Cheung, Kwan Yee
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lai, K. K.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Renneberg, R.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biosensorer och bioelektronik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Triggered release of model drug from AuNP-doped BSA nanocarriers in hair follicles using IRA radiation2016Ingår i: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 30, s. 388-396Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in the field of dermatotherapy have resulted in research efforts focusing on the use of particle-based drug delivery systems for the stimuli-responsive release of drugs in the skin and skin appendages, i.e. hair follicles and sebaceous glands. However, effective and innocuous trigger mechanisms which result in the release of the drugs from the nanocarriers upon reaching the target structures are still lacking. For the first time, the present study demonstrated the photo-activated release of the model drug fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) from topically applied gold nanoparticle-doped bovine serum albumin (AuNPs-doped BSA) particles (approx. 545 nm) using water-filtered infrared A (IRA) radiation in the hair follicles of an ex vivo porcine skin model. The IRA radiation-induced plasmonic heating of the AuNPs results in the partial decomposition or opening of the albumin particles and release the model drug, while control particles without AuNPs show insignificant release. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using IRA radiation to induce release of encapsulated drugs from plasmonic nanocarriers for the targeting of follicular structures. However, the risk of radiation-induced skin damage subsequent to repeated applications of high infrared dosages may be significant. Future studies should aim at determining the suitability of lower infrared A dosages, such as for medical treatment regimens which may necessitate repeated exposure to therapeutics. Statement of significance Follicular targeting using nanocarriers is of increasing importance in the prophylaxis and treatment of dermatological or other diseases. For the first time, the present study demonstrated the photo activated release of the model drug fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) from topically applied gold nanoparticle-doped bovine serum albumin (AuNPs-doped BSA) particles using water-filtered infrared A (IRA) radiation in the hair follicles of an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using wIRA radiation to induce release of encapsulated drugs for the targeting of follicular structures, and provide a new vision on the development of optically addressable delivery systems for controlled release of drugs in the skin and skin appendages, i.e. hair follicles and sebaceous glands. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 290.
    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rohlin, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aravidis, Christos
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nordling, Margareta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik. University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilbert, M. E. F.
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population2016Ingår i: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 2823-2835Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch-repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  • 291. Landén, M
    et al.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Wallin, A
    Blennow, K
    The apolipoprotein E allele epsilon 4 does not correlate with the number of senile plaques or neurofibrillary tangles in patients with Alzheimer's disease.1996Ingår i: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 61, nr 4, s. 352-256Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been implicated in regenerative processes in the brain after trauma, as well as in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Inheritance of a specific apo epsilon allele (apo epsilon 4) determines in part the risk and the mean age at onset of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE has been found to bind isoform specifically to beta-amyloid protein, the major component of senile plaques, and to the microtubule associated protein tau, which forms paired helical filaments and neurofibrillary tangles. The aim was to further examine the relation between apo epsilon alleles, especially apo epsilon 4, and the development of neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    METHODS: Brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 44) and vascular dementia (n = 11) and of age matched controls (n = 29) were studied. Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were quantified.

    RESULTS: No correlation was found between the number of apo epsilon 4 alleles and the number of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus or the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease, or vascular dementia, or control groups. No significant differences in duration or severity of dementia were found between patients with or. without the apo epsilon 4 allele. No increased frequency of apo epsilon 4 was found in vascular dementia. CONCLUSION AND COMMENT: Although the apo epsilon genotype clearly affects whether Alzheimer's disease will develop or not, the present study suggests that it has no influence on pathology or clinical intellectual status, once the dementia has manifested itself. No increased apo epsilon 4 allele frequency was found in neuropathologically diagnosed patients with vascular dementia in whom concomitant Alzheimer's disease can be excluded.

  • 292.
    Larsson, Max
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Pax2 is persistently expressed by GABAergic neurons throughout the adult rat dorsal horn.2017Ingår i: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 638, s. 96-101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor Pax2 is required for the differentiation of GABAergic neurons in the mouse dorsal horn. Pax2 continues to be expressed in the adult murine spinal cord and has been used as a presumed marker of GABAergic neurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the adult mouse, although a strict association between adult Pax2 expression and presence of GABA throughout the dorsal horn has not been firmly established. Moreover, whether Pax2 is selectively expressed in GABAergic dorsal horn neurons also in the rat is unknown. Here, immunofluorescent labeling of Pax2 and GABA in the lumbar spinal cord of adult rats was used to investigate this issue. Indeed, essentially all GABA immunoreactive neurons in laminae I-V were immunolabeled for Pax2. Conversely, essentially all Pax2 immunopositive neurons in these laminae exhibited somatic GABA immunolabeling. These results indicate persistent Pax2 expression in GABAergic neurons in the adult rat dorsal horn, supporting the hypothesis that Pax2 may be required for the maintenance of a GABAergic phenotype in mature inhibitory dorsal horn neurons in the rat. Furthermore, Pax2 may be used as a selective and specific general somatic marker of such neurons.

  • 293.
    Larsson, Max
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bergersen, Linda Hildegard
    Department of Oral Biology, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Gundersen, Vidar
    Department of Anatomy, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Immunogold electron microscopic quantification of small molecular compounds and proteins at synapses and other neural profiles2015Ingår i: Immunocytochemistry and related techniques: Part IV / [ed] Adalberto Merighi and Laura Lossi, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, s. 281-297Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes procedures for quantifi cation of postembedding labeling at brain synapses using computer-based tools. The postembedding electron microscopic immunogold method allows detection of epitopes with a resolution of about 20–30 nm. However, plasma membranes belonging to different cells and membranes of intracellular organelles can often be located even closer together. Localizing epitopes at such membranes can reliably be performed by using computer programs, such as ImageJ, which offers automated quantifi cation of gold particles. The present chapter provides a practical description of how to use ImageJ and plug- ins to obtain an accurate representation of the subcellular localization of proteins and small molecular compounds.

  • 294.
    Laskar, Amit
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för inflammationsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Li, Wei
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Fodipir and Its Dephosphorylated Derivative Dipyridoxyl Ethyldiamine Are Involved in Mangafodipir-Mediated Cytoprotection against 7 beta-Hydroxycholesterol-Induced Cell Death2013Ingår i: Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-7012, E-ISSN 1423-0313, Vol. 92, nr 3-4, s. 182-186Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Mangafodipir exerts pharmacological effects, including vascular relaxation and protection against oxidative stress and cell death induced by oxysterols. Additionally, mangafodipir has been proposed for cardiovascular imaging. The primary metabolites of mangafodipir, manganese dipyridoxyl ethyldiamine (MnPLED) and its constituent dipyridoxyl diphosphate (Dp-dp) also known as fodipir, are pharmacologically active. However, whether they affect oxysterol-induced cytotoxicity is currently unknown. In this study, we examine whether the mangafodipir metabolite affects 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol (7 beta-OH)-induced cell death and identify the underlying mechanisms. Methods: U937 cells were pretreated or not with mangafodipir substrate (Ms; 200 pm), MnPLED (100 mu mol/l) or Dp-dp (100 mu mol/l) for 8 h and then exposed to 7 beta-OH (28 mu mol/l) for 18 h. Results: Our results revealed that pretreatment with MnPLED or Dp-dp protected against 7 beta-OH-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptosis, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). MnPLED and Dp-dp, in par with Ms, confer protection against 7 beta-OH-induced cytotoxicity by reducing cellular ROS and stabilization of the lysosomal membrane. Conclusion: These results suggest that fodipir is the pharmacologically active part in the structure of mangafodipir, which prevents 7 beta-OH-induced cell death by attenuating cellular ROS and by preventing LMP. In addition, MnPLED, which is the dephosphorylated product of fodipir, exerts a similar protective effect against 7 beta-OH-induced cytotoxicity. This result indicates that dephosphorylation of fodipir does not affect its pharmacological actions. Altogether our result confirms the cytoprotective effect of mangafodipir and justifies its potential use as a cytoprotective adjuvant.

  • 295.
    Laskar, Amit
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Experimentell patologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Yuan, XiMing
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Experimentell patologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Li, Wei
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Dimethyl Sulfoxide Prevents 7 beta-Hydroxycholesterol-Induced Apoptosis by Preserving Lysosomes and Mitochondria2010Ingår i: JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOLOGY, ISSN 0160-2446, Vol. 56, nr 3, s. 263-267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a widely used vehicle for water-insoluble substances and exerts a wide range of pharmacologic effects including anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties. Additionally, in an animal model, DMSO inhibited cholesterol- induced atherosclerosis. Despite such profound pharmacologic effects, mechanisms at the cellular level are not well understood. Atherogenic oxysterols, especially 7-oxysterols, are potent inducers of oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, and are elevated in human atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, we first investigated the effect of DMSO on 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol-induced apoptosis of U937 cells and then focused on its influences on production of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal, and mitochondrial membrane permeability. Our results revealed that DMSO protected U937 cells against 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol- induced cell death by preventing lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and reactive oxygen species production. Our results also emphasize the necessity for appropriate solvent control groups in experimental models in which DMSO has been used to examine drug effect or identify pathways.

  • 296.
    Lawrenson, Kate
    et al.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Kar, Siddhartha
    University of Cambridge, England.
    McCue, Karen
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Kuchenbaeker, Karoline
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Li, Qiyuan
    Xiamen University, Peoples R China; Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Delgado, Melissa K.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Lee, Janet M.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Aittomaki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Arun, Banu K.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Arver, Brita
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Cancer Institute New Jersey, NJ 08903 USA.
    Barile, Monica
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain; Centre Invest Red Enfermedades Raras, Spain.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Bisogna, Maria
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Bjorge, Line
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Blot, William
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Int Epidemiol Institute, MD 20850 USA.
    Bogdanova, Natalia
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Bojesen, Anders
    Vejle Hospital, Denmark; Seoul National University, South Korea; Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Institute Clin Pharmacol, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Brennan, Paul
    Int Agency Research Canc, France.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Bruinsma, Fiona
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Brunet, Joan
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Ahmad Buhari, Shaik
    National University of Health Syst, Singapore.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Butzow, Ralf
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Buys, Saundra S.
    University of Utah, UT 84112 USA.
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain.
    Campbell, Ian
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia.
    Canniotto, Rikki
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Chiquette, Jocelyne
    University of Quebec, Canada.
    Choi, Ji-Yeob
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Cook, Linda S.
    University of New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Cox, Angela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cramer, Daniel W.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Cross, Simon S.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA 19111 USA.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon, France.
    Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland; Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dennis, Joe
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    University Hospital Vall Hebron, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Doherty, Jennifer A.
    Geisel School Medical Dartmouth, NH 03755 USA.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Dumont, Martine
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ellis, Steve
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Engel, Christoph
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Lee, Eunjung
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Gareth Evans, D.
    University of Manchester, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Feliubadalo, Lidia
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Foretova, Lenka
    Masaryk Mem Cancer Institute, Czech Republic; Medical Fac MU, Czech Republic.
    Fostira, Florentia
    Aghia Paraskevi Attikis, Greece.
    Foulkes, William D.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Fridley, Brooke L.
    University of Kansas, KS 66103 USA.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gambino, Gaetana
    University of and University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90024 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, MD 20892 USA; Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra
    UCL EGA Institute Womens Heatlh, England.
    Ghoussaini, Maya
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Glasspool, Rosalind
    Beatson West Scotland Cancer Centre, Scotland.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66160 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill University, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT 84132 USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Greene, Mark H.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    INSERM, France; University of Paris 11, France.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Emily
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Harrington, Patricia A.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Hartman, Mikael
    National University of Health Syst, Singapore; National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Hassan, Norhashimah
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia.
    Healey, Sue
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Heitz, Florian
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Dr Horst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Herzog, Josef
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Danish Cancer Soc Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hogdall, Claus K.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hollestelle, Antoinette
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Hulick, Peter J.
    NorthShore University of Health Syst, IL 60201 USA.
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Institute Oncol, Russia.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Ito, Hidemi
    Aichi Cancer Centre, Japan.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Centre Innovat Med, Lithuania.
    Jensen, Allan
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    John, Esther M.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA 94538 USA.
    Johnson, Nichola
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Kabisch, Maria
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Kang, Daehee
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Kapuscinski, Miroslav
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Khan, Sofia
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kruger Kjaer, Susanne
    Danish Cancer Soc Research Centre, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    Aghia Paraskevi Attikis, Greece.
    Kosma, Veli-Matti
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Kristensen, Vessela
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland; Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Kwong, Ava
    Hong Kong Sanat and Hospital, Peoples R China; University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain.
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, Belgium; University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Le, Nhu
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    De Leeneer, Kim
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Li, Jingmei
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Lophatananon, Artitaya
    University of Warwick, England.
    Loud, Jennifer T.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Lu, Karen
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    University of Hawaii, HI 96813 USA.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Marme, Frederik
    Heidelberg University, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Massuger, Leon F. A. G.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon, France.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    McLean, Catriona
    Alfred Hospital, Australia.
    McNeish, Iain
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Menon, Usha
    UCL EGA Institute Womens Heatlh, England.
    Mensenkamp, Arjen R.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Muir, Kenneth
    University of Warwick, England; University of Manchester, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    University of Health Network, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Ness, Roberta B.
    University of Texas Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Research Institute City Hope, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nord, Silje
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Odunsi, Kunle
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
    Olswold, Curtis
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    OMalley, David
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA; James Graham Brown Cancer Centre, OH 43210 USA.
    Orlow, Irene
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10017 USA.
    Orr, Nick
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Osorio, Ana
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain.
    Kyung Park, Sue
    Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Pearce, Celeste L.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97239 USA; Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97239 USA.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    FIRC Italian Fdn Cancer Research, Italy.
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33606 USA.
    Poole, Elizabeth M.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Pylkas, Katri
    Centre NordLab, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Radice, Paolo
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rantala, Johanna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Usman Rashid, Muhammad
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Shaukat Khanum Mem Cancer Hospital and Research Centre SKMCH and RC, Pakistan.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit National Israeli Cancer Control Centre, Israel; Carmel Hospital, Israel.
    Rhenius, Valerie
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Rhiem, Kerstin
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale University, CT 06510 USA.
    Rodriguez, Gus
    NorthShore University of HealthSyst, IL 60201 USA.
    Anne Rossing, Mary
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98109 USA; University of Washington, WA 98109 USA.
    Rudolph, Anja
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Salvesen, Helga B.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sangrajrang, Suleeporn
    National Cancer Institute, Thailand.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Schildkraut, Joellen M.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA; Duke Cancer Institute, NC 27710 USA.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Sellers, Thomas A.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33606 USA.
    Seynaeve, Caroline
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Shah, Mitul
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Shen, Chen-Yang
    Academic Sinica, Taiwan; China Medical University, Taiwan.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    Centre Leon Berard, France; University of Lyon 1, France.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Song, Honglin
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Soucy, Penny
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi och klinisk genetik. University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; Institute Curie, France; Sorbonne Paris Cite, France.
    Sutter, Christian
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Swerdlow, Anthony
    Institute Cancer Research, England; Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Tchatchou, Sandrine
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncology Institute, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Teo, Soo H.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Beth Terry, Mary
    Columbia University, NY 10027 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Grazia Tibiletti, Maria
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Latvian Biomed Research and Study Centre, Latvia.
    Tognazzo, Silvia
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ewart Toland, Amanda
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain; Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    University of Oxford, England; University of Oxford, England.
    Torres, Diana
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Pontificia University of Javeriana, Colombia.
    Truong, Therese
    INSERM, France; University of Paris 11, France.
    Tseng, Chiu-chen
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Vachon, Celine
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    van Doorn, Helena C.
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Vant Veer, Laura J.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Vanderstichele, Adriaan
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Vergote, Ignace
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Wang, Qin
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice S.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Wildiers, Hans
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Centre NordLab, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Wu, Anna H.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Yoon, Sook-Yee
    Sime Darby Medical Centre, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Yu, Jyh-Cherng
    National Def Medical Centre, Taiwan.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Zheng, Ying
    Shanghai Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Kum Khanna, Kum
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Simard, Jacques
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Monteiro, Alvaro N.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33612 USA.
    French, Juliet D.
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA; Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Freedman, Matthew L.
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England; University of Cambridge, England.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Pharoah, Paul D.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Edwards, Stacey L.
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus2016Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, artikel-id 12675Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10−20), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10−13), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10−16) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10−5). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10−3) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10−3). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3′-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk.

  • 297.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy, Odessa, Ukraine .
    Kuffova, Lucia
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Forrester, John V.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    Vironova AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Cathelicidin LL-37 and HSV-1 Corneal Infection: Peptide Versus Gene Therapy2014Ingår i: Translational Vision Science & Technology, ISSN 2164-2591, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 1-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential utility of collagen-based corneal implants with anti?Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 activity achieved through sustained release of LL-37, from incorporated nanoparticles, as compared with cell-based delivery from model human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) transfected to produce endogenous LL-37. Methods: We tested the ability of collagen-phosphorylcholine implants to tolerate the adverse microenvironment of herpetic murine corneas. Then, we investigated the efficacy of LL-37 peptides delivered through nanoparticles incorporated within the corneal implants to block HSV-1 viral activity. In addition, LL-37 complementary DNA (cDNA) was transferred into HCECs to confer viral resistance, and their response to HSV-1 infection was examined. Results: Our implants remained in herpetic murine corneas 7 days longer than allografts. LL-37 released from the implants blocked HSV-1 infection of HCECs by interfering with viral binding. However, in pre-infected HCECs, LL-37 delayed but could not prevent viral spreading nor clear viruses from the infected cells. HCECs transfected with the LL-37 expressed and secreted the peptide. Secreted LL-37 inhibited viral binding in vitro but was insufficient to protect cells completely from HSV-1 infection. Nevertheless, secreted LL-37 reduced both the incidence of plaque formation and plaque size. Conclusion: LL-37 released from composite nanoparticle-hydrogel corneal implants and HCEC-produced peptide, both showed anti?HSV-1 activity by blocking binding. However, while both slowed down virus spread, neither was able on its own to completely inhibit the viruses. Translational Relevance: LL-37 releasing hydrogels may have potential utility as corneal substitutes for grafting in HSV-1 infected corneas, possibly in combination with LL-37 producing therapeutic cells.

  • 298.
    Levander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Farmakologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ryden, I
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Påhlsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Effects of alpha 1-acid Glycoprotein Fucosylation on its Ca2+ Mobilizing Capacity in Neutrophils2009Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, nr 5, s. 412-420Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently showed that the acute-phase protein alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) induces rises in cytosolic calcium concentration, [Ca2+](i,) in neutrophils through sialic acid dependent interactions with the neutrophil receptors siglec-5 and/or siglec-14. Whereas both siglec-5 and siglec-14 have a relatively broad specificity for sialylated oligosaccharide structures, including both structures with terminal alpha 2-3 or alpha 2-6 linked sialic acid, there is a markedly reduced affinity to the fucosylated epitope sialyl Lewis x (SLe(x)). Increased fucosylation, leading to increased expression of SLe(x) on AGP is commonly associated with inflammatory conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether an increased SLe(x) expression would affect the Ca2+-mobilizing effect of AGP. AGP with elevated fucose content isolated from patients with untreated chronic joint inflammation showed a decreased [Ca2+](i) modulatory effect on neutrophils compared to normally fucosylated AGP. Furthermore a hyperfucosylated AGP form produced by in vitro fucosylation, that consequently had an elevated expression of SLe(x), could not elicit a [Ca2+](i) increase in neutrophils. The role of the carbohydrate portion of AGP in modulating neutrophil responses was further strengthened by showing that synthetic glycoconjugates carrying oligosaccharides with terminal alpha 2-3 or alpha 2-6 linked sialic acid were able to mimic the Ca2+-mobilizing effect of AGP whereas a synthetic glycoconjugate carrying SLe(x) was not. Based on these data, we conclude that increased fucosylation can alter the ability of AGP to induce neutrophil signalling and further supports an important role of the oligosaccharide chains of AGP in the modulation of leukocyte functions during an inflammatory process.

  • 299.
    Li, Fengfu
    et al.
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada / University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Hurley, Bernard
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada / University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Liu, Yun
    Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, and Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada.
    Leonard, Brian
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada / University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada / University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Controlled release of bevacizumab through nanospheres for extended treatment of age-related macular degeneration.2012Ingår i: The open ophthalmology journal, ISSN 1874-3641, Vol. 6, s. 54-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bevacizumab (Avastin(®)) has been used by ophthalmologists in many countries as an off-label drug for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Due to its short half-life necessitating frequent intravitreal injection, a method for sustained delivery is in need. We demonstrated that bevacizumab could be released in a sustained fashion over 90 days from nano- and microspheres fabricated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactic acid), respectively. The drug release rate could be adjusted by alteration of the drug/polymer ratio. The use of such nano- and microspheres as bevacizumab delivery vehicles may improve the treatment of wet AMD.

  • 300.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Kornmark, Louise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Experimentell patologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Kardiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken.
    Forssell, Claes
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Kärlkirurgi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Kardiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken.
    Cathepsin L is significantly associated with apoptosis and plaque destabilization in human atherosclerosis2009Ingår i: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 202, nr 1, s. 92-102Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Human atherosclerotic lesions overexpress elastolytic and collagenolytic cathepsins with unclear pathological implications. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among expression of cathepsin L. macrophage apoptosis in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, clinical symptoms and plaque severity Of human carotid atheroma.

    Methods and results: Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (n = 49) showed that expression of lysosomal cathepsin L was significantly increased in atherosclerotic plaques with formation of the necrotic core and rupture of the cap. In those Plaques, cathepsin L was associated mainly with CD68-positive macrophages, whereas significant lower levels of smooth muscle cell actin were detected. The expression of cathepsin L in these plaques was also correlated with apoptosis and the stress protein ferritin. Plaques from symptomatic patients showed greater increased levels of cathepsin L than those front asymptomatic patients. Human monocyte-derived macrophages from CAD patients (n = 7) showed significantly higher levels of cathepsin L, cellular lipids and apoptosis versus cells from matched healthy donors (n = 7). 7Beta-hydroxycholesterol significantly enhanced cathepsin L in cells from healthy donors but not in Cells from CAD patients. Moreover. macrophage apoptosis was significantly correlated with expression of cathepsin L in cell nuclei and membranes.

    Conclusion: The results Suggest that cathepsin L is involved in death of macrophages necrotic Core formation and development of atherosclerotic plaque instability. Macrophage lysosomal cathepsin L and related apoptosis may be potential targets for modulation or imaging of vulnerable plaques in human atherosclerosis.

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