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  • 301.
    Johansson, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Frederick, Ronald J
    Center for Courageous Living, Beverly Hills, California, USA .
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transdiagnostic, affect-focused, psychodynamic, guided self-help for depression and anxiety through the internet: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Cognitive behaviour therapy delivered in the format of guided self-help via the internet has been found to be effective for a range of conditions, including depression and anxiety disorders. Recent results indicate that guided self-help via the internet is a promising treatment format also for psychodynamic therapy. However, to date and to our knowledge, no study has evaluated internet-delivered psychodynamic therapy as a transdiagnostic treatment. The affect-phobia model of psychopathology by McCullough et al provides a psychodynamic conceptualisation of a range of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study will be to test the effects of a transdiagnostic guided self-help treatment based on the affect-phobia model in a sample of clients with depression and anxiety.

    Methods and analysis This study will be a randomised controlled trial with a total sample size of 100 participants. The treatment group receives a 10-week, psychodynamic, guided self-help treatment based on the transdiagnostic affect-phobia model of psychopathology. The treatment consists of eight text-based treatment modules and includes therapist contact in a secure online environment. Participants in the control group receive similar online therapist support without any treatment modules. Outcome measures are the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale and the 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). Process measures that concerns emotional processing and mindfulness are included. All outcome and process measures will be administered weekly via the internet and at 6-month follow-up.

    Discussion This trial will add to the body of knowledge on internet-delivered psychological treatments in general and to psychodynamic treatments in particular. We also hope to provide new insights in the effectiveness and working mechanisms of psychodynamic therapy based on the affect-phobia model.

  • 302.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid S.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Queens University, Canada .
    Mackey, Allison
    Queens University, Canada .
    Hakyemez, Hélène
    Queens University, Canada .
    Alexander, Elizabeth
    Queens University, Canada .
    Trang, Heather P.
    Queens University, Canada .
    Carlyon, Robert P.
    MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, England .
    Swinging at a Cocktail Party: Voice Familiarity Aids Speech Perception in the Presence of a Competing Voice2013In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1995-2004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People often have to listen to someone speak in the presence of competing voices. Much is known about the acoustic cues used to overcome this challenge, but almost nothing is known about the utility of cues derived from experience with particular voicescues that may be particularly important for older people and others with impaired hearing. Here, we use a version of the coordinate-response-measure procedure to show that people can exploit knowledge of a highly familiar voice (their spouses) not only to track it better in the presence of an interfering strangers voice, but also, crucially, to ignore it so as to comprehend a strangers voice more effectively. Although performance declines with increasing age when the target voice is novel, there is no decline when the target voice belongs to the listeners spouse. This finding indicates that older listeners can exploit their familiarity with a speakers voice to mitigate the effects of sensory and cognitive decline.

  • 303.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sahlen, Birgitta S.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute CLINTEC, Sweden.
    Uhlen, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute CLINTEC, Sweden.
    Semantic Processing in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: Large N400 Mismatch Effects in Brain Responses, Despite Poor Semantic Ability2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Difficulties in auditory and phonological processing affect semantic processing in speech comprehension for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. However, little is known about brain responses related to semantic processing in this group. We investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in DHH children with cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs), and in normally hearing controls (NH). We used a semantic priming task with spoken word primes followed by picture targets. In both DHH children and controls, cortical response differences between matching and mismatching targets revealed a typical N400 effect associated with semantic processing. Children with CI had the largest mismatch response despite poor semantic abilities overall; Children with CIalso had the largest ERP differentiation between mismatch types, with small effects in within-category mismatch trials (target from same category as prime) and large effects in between category mismatch trials (where target is from a different category than prime), compared to matching trials. Children with NH and HA had similar responses to both mismatch types. While the large and differentiated ERP responses in the CI group were unexpected and should be interpreted with caution, the results could reflect less precision in semantic processing among children with CI, or a stronger reliance on predictive processing.

  • 304.
    Kalnina, Liga
    et al.
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia; Latvian University, Latvia.
    Sauka, Melita
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Selga, Guntars
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia; Riga Stradins University, Latvia.
    Ligere, Renate
    Latvian University, Latvia.
    Karklina, Helena
    Latvian University, Latvia.
    Priedite, Ilga S.
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia.
    Larins, Viesturs
    Latvian Academic Sports Educ, Latvia.
    Body fat in children and adolescents participating in organized sports: Descriptive epidemiological study of 6048 Latvian athletes2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pressure among young athletes to meet body composition goals may lead to poor nutrition and affect growth. Aims: To examine the proportion of body fat (%BF), measured by bioimpedance analysis, among Latvian children and adolescents participating in organized sports. Methods: Our study had a nationally representative sample of 6048 young athletes, aged 10-17 years. Their %BF was measured using a multifrequency, 8-pole, bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyzer. Results: About 19.2% (CI 14.4-20.0) of boys and 15.1% (CI 14.0-16.3) of girls had a %BF value below the recommended levels. The %BF in young female athletes participating in aesthetic sports was lower than among their peers participating in other sports. Young male athletes participating in aesthetic sports had lower %BF levels at 10 and 12 years of age, compared with participants in weight-class sports; and lower levels of %BF from age 10-14 years, compared with participants in non-weight-sensitive sports. Conclusions: Almost every fifth child and adolescent participating in organized sports displayed critically low body fat levels. Body fat needs to be assessed regularly in young athletes, to prevent negative consequences on health.

  • 305.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Den hjärnvänliga arbetsplatsen: kognition, kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar och arbetsmiljö2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Dagens arbetsliv ställer allt större krav på kognitiva förmågor. Vi arbetar alltmer med information inte bara i traditionellt intellektuella yrken, utan även inom industri, hantverk och sjukvård. Informationsteknologi i form av datorer, avancerad teknisk utrustning och andra komplexa system blir allt viktigare att kunna hantera. Detta ställer nya krav på arbetsmiljöarbetet, något som gäller för alla arbetstagare, men särskilt för de av oss som har en kognitiv funktionsnedsättning.

    I denna rapport sammanfattar vi arbetsmiljörelaterade hinder förknippade med nedsatt funktion inom nio kognitiva områden: språk, exekutiva funktioner, minnesfunktioner, visuospatiala funktioner, snabbhet, uppmärksamhet, emotion/social kognition, mental trötthet samt global kognitiv förmåga/intelligens. Vi uppmärksammar även mental trötthet (”fatigue”) som ett viktigt problemområde i  sammanhanget.

    Den första delen av rapporten ger en bakgrund till området. Avsnittet ger en kort översikt över neuropsykologi och kognitiv neurovetenskap.

    Den andra delen sammanfattar kunskap om omfattningen av problemet: hur vanliga är kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar i arbetslivet? En stor del av de människor som är i yrkesverksam ålder antingen har, eller kommer någon gång under yrkeslivet att drabbas av kognitiva funktionsproblem. Vi uppskattar att detta berör en femtedel till en tredjedel av de yrkesverksamma. Eftersom kognitiv funktionsnivå långt ifrån enbart beror på individens begränsningar till följd av sjukdom eller annan funktionsnedsättning, utan även på miljön och dess krav på individen, är problemen och lösningar på dessa både giltiga och viktiga för alla.

    Rapportens andra del visar att kognitiv nedsättning inte begränsas till ett enstaka funktionellt område, exempelvis minnesbesvär, utan kan innefatta flera av de funktionella områden som berörs. Det finns alltså ingen enkel koppling mellan en sjukdom och vilka kognitiva funktionsproblem den medför för den enskilde arbetstagaren. Problemen måste ses i ljuset av både de erfarenheter och begränsningar den enskilde personen har och den aktuella arbetsuppgiften.

    Rapportens tredje del diskuterar mer ingående arbetsmiljörelaterade konsekvenser av kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar. Den börjar med att sammanfatta en modell för att analysera funktionsnedsättningar som en produkt av fyra samverkande faktorer: individen (till exempel kognitiva funktionsbegränsningar efter en sjukdom), individens förhållningssätt (till exempel motivation), arbetsuppgiften och miljön. En kognitiv funktionsproblematik finns aldrig enbart i en av dessa faktorer utan i skärningspunkten mellan dessa faktorer. Av detta skäl är kunskap om arbetsmiljömässiga aspekter av kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar giltig för alla. Även de som inte har nedsatt kognitiv funktion hamnar i situationer där faktorer kopplade till miljön eller arbetsuppgiften (eller vår inställning till uppgiften) resulterar i att kognitiva förmågor belastas!

    Vidare identifierar och sammanfattar rapportens tredje del praktiska lösningar som stödjer arbetsförmåga vid nedsättning av funktioner inom de nio områden som rapporten omfattar: språk, exekutiva funktioner, minnesfunktioner, visuospatiala funktioner, snabbhet, uppmärksamhet, emotion/social kognition, mental trötthet samt global kognitiv förmåga/intelligens. Särskilt betonas att det idag finns många tillgängliga men sannolikt mindre ofta utnyttjade åtgärder som kan utnyttjas för att mildra eller eliminera arbetsmiljöproblem relaterade till kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar. Rapporten redovisar sju sådana övergripande åtgärder. Därtill diskuteras kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar i samband med arbetstagare som är över 65 år och arbetsgivarens roll. Avslutningsvis identifieras kunskapsbehov för fortsatt arbete inom området.

  • 306.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mårdh, Selina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Emotion and recollective experience in Alzheimer’s diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional changes are common in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, damage to brain regions involved in emotion is abundant in AD. Although these finding imply that emotion memory is severely compromised in AD, absolute or relative sparing of emotional memory has occasionally been reported. Hence, we wanted to clarify how well AD patients can remember emotion words. Eighteen AD patients and fifteen healthy older persons participated in the experiment. Participants studied neutral, positive, and negative words. Implicit and explicit memory was assessed in two tasks: a word-fragment completion task and a recognition task, respectively. In the latter task, participants were asked to provide recollective judgments when they indicated that they recognized a word from previous study. Results indicated that AD patients responded to valence, and in particular negative valence, similar to controls, that AD patients evidenced severe deficits as to recollective experience, and that implicit memory remained intact in AD.

  • 307.
    Kaspersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Smith, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Errors in extraction based summaries2012In: Proceedings of the eighth international conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Kaspersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Smith, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    This also affects the context - Errors in extraction based summaries2012In: Proceedings of the eighth international conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 309. Keidser, G
    et al.
    Hygge, S
    Seeto, M
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing status and fluid intelligence -data from UK Biobank.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 310. Keidser, G
    et al.
    Hygge, S
    Seeto, M
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing status and mental health - data from UK Biobank2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Keidser, Gitte
    et al.
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Australia.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gävle, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Seeto, Mark
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Australia.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The relationship between functional hearing and verbal reasoning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Verbal reasoning performance is an indicator of the ability to think constructively in everyday life, and relies particularly on semantic long-term memory and working memory. Using cross-sectional data from the UK Biobank resource, obtained on over 100,000 40-70 year olds, this study investigated the effect of functional hearing on numerical and linguistic verbal reasoning when controlling for age, gender, and education. The study further investigated if hearing aid usage mitigated the effect, and examined different pathways from hearing to verbal reasoning. Multiple regression analyses showed that poor functional hearing was significantly associated with reduced numerical and linguistic verbal reasoning scores, and that hearing aid usage mitigated the association among those with poor hearing. Hearing significantly interacted with education as larger negative effects of hearing were seen among those with higher levels of qualifications. Structural equation modelling showed that education partially confounded, and the central executive function completely mediated the association between hearing and verbal reasoning when controlling for age. The mediation effect by the central executive function was further partially confounded by computer usage. Findings encourage further investigations into a possible positive effect of hearing aid usage on verbal reasoning (and other cognitive tasks) and of multi-tasking computer games on the central executive function/working memory in middle-aged hearing-impaired adults.

  • 312.
    Keidser, Gitte
    et al.
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Seeto, Mark
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The Effect of Functional Hearing and Hearing Aid Usage on Verbal Reasoning in a Large Community-Dwelling Population2016In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. e26-e36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Verbal reasoning performance is an indicator of the ability to think constructively in everyday life and relies on both crystallized and fluid intelligence. This study aimed to determine the effect of functional hearing on verbal reasoning when controlling for age, gender, and education. In addition, the study investigated whether hearing aid usage mitigated the effect and examined different routes from hearing to verbal reasoning. Design: Cross-sectional data on 40- to 70-year-old community-dwelling participants from the UK Biobank resource were accessed. Data consisted of behavioral and subjective measures of functional hearing, assessments of numerical and linguistic verbal reasoning, measures of executive function, and demographic and lifestyle information. Data on 119,093 participants who had completed hearing and verbal reasoning tests were submitted to multiple regression analyses, and data on 61,688 of these participants, who had completed additional cognitive tests and provided relevant lifestyle information, were submitted to structural equation modeling. Results: Poorer performance on the behavioral measure of functional hearing was significantly associated with poorer verbal reasoning in both the numerical and linguistic domains (p < 0.001). There was no association between the subjective measure of functional hearing and verbal reasoning. Functional hearing significantly interacted with education (p < 0.002), showing a trend for functional hearing to have a greater impact on verbal reasoning among those with a higher level of formal education. Among those with poor hearing, hearing aid usage had a significant positive, but not necessarily causal, effect on both numerical and linguistic verbal reasoning (p < 0.005). The estimated effect of hearing aid usage was less than the effect of poor functional hearing. Structural equation modeling analyses confirmed that controlling for education reduced the effect of functional hearing on verbal reasoning and showed that controlling for executive function eliminated the effect. However, when computer usage was controlled for, the eliminating effect of executive function was weakened. Conclusions: Poor functional hearing was associated with poor verbal reasoning in a 40- to 70-year-old community-dwelling population after controlling for age, gender, and education. The effect of functional hearing on verbal reasoning was significantly reduced among hearing aid users and completely overcome by good executive function skills, which may be enhanced by playing computer games.

  • 313.
    Keidser, Gitte
    et al.
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Seeto, Mark
    National Acoust Labs, Australia.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    On the relationship between functional hearing and depression2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 653-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the effect of self-rated and measured functional hearing on depression, taking age and gender into account. Additionally, the study investigates if hearing-aid usage mitigates the effect, and if other physical health problems and social engagement confound it. Design: Cross-sectional data from the UK Biobank resource, including subjective and behavioural measures of functional hearing and multifactorial measures of depressive episodes and symptoms, were accessed and analysed using multi-regression analyses. Study sample: Over 100 000 community-dwelling, 39-70 year-old volunteers. Results: Irrespective of measurement method, poor functional hearing was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with higher levels of depressive episodes ( 0.16 factor scores) and depressive symptoms ( 0.30 factor scores) when controlling for age and gender. Associations were stronger for subjective reports, for depressive symptoms, and the younger participants. Females generally reported higher levels of depression. Hearing-aid usage did not show a mitigating effect on the associations. Other physical health problems particularly partially confounded the effects. Conclusion: Data support an association between functional hearing and depression that is stronger in the younger participants (40-49 years old) and for milder depression. The association was not alleviated by hearing-aid usage, but was partially confounded by other physical health problems.

  • 314.
    Keselman, Olga
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Restricting participation: Unaccompanied children in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings in Sweden2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall goal of this thesis was to highlight different communicative aspects of participation in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings with unaccompanied Russianspeaking children who had applied for asylum in Sweden between 2001 and 2005. Participation in the asylum process is guaranteed to these children by the Swedish Administrative Law and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which are incorporated in the Swedish Aliens Act. The Migration authorities in their work with asylum seeking minors have integrated principles of the best interests of the child and the principle of respecting the children’s views on matters concerning them.

    In this thesis, we have studied the conditions of participation in a highly complex, hybrid activity type, where participants face contradictory demands. Hybridity can be traced in communicative dilemmas which are difficult to solve and handle for all the participants involved, including the caseworkers, interpreters and children. The caseworkers are expected to control an interview in which whole of the communicative exchange is rendered by interpreters who influence the progress of the encounter. Contradiction lies in the fact that the caseworkers are expected to treat all asylum seekers equally both as a group and individually, by relating to general legal regulations and at the same time, take into account the interests and individual needs of an individual child. It might be difficult for these caseworkers to stay neutral and meet underage clients whose life stories and experiences, conduct and needs differ considerably from what is usually ascribed to children.

    Asylum seeking children come to Sweden to stay. Our results have shown that they take an active role in their attempts to lead to a positive outcome in their cases. In this respect, children’s testimonies and the impression they make as informants play a salient role. The communicative tasks faced by the adolescents are, however, difficult to achieve. Previous life conditions, vulnerability, psychosomatic problems, and memory and concentration difficulties may affect their performance. Other factors which might further impede these children from achieving their task is the pragmatic and linguistic deficiency, which they experience in a context where they lack communicative means and are not fully aware of the norms and regulations relevant for the encounter. Despite hese limitations, it seems that these minors try hard to shoulder their role as asylum seekers and informants actively and strategically. One strategy chosen by the children was to disclose information selectively. They tried to avoid answering questions which could reveal their age, origin or the whereabouts of their caregivers and thereby enable authorities to establish their identity and send them back. To compensate for their uncooperativeness in this area, the adolescents tended to provide information which had not been asked for.

    Our studies have shown that children could have been prevented by both the caseworkers and interpreters from expressing their views and opinions in a free and self-chosen way. In this respect, interpreters’ contributions were salient for what information was forwarded to the caseworkers. In some cases, they changed both the language and the format of the responses provided by the children. Some of the communicative strategies which were initiated by the interpreters could be linked to both their professional skills and to the hybridity and the complexity of the situation. Interpreters had difficulties staying neutral in relation to the children and orient them in the encounters. Age differences between the participants could also have an impact on how the children were treated and the respect and importance attributed to their voices. We have identified sequences where interpreters initiated monolingual exchanges with one of the interlocutors where they actively tried to exclude and discredit the children’s voices, something which often happened with the tacit approval of the caseworkers.

    Thus, it can be seen that communicative premises which are inherent in the asylum hearings influence the participant statuses of the children and their possibilities to express their asylum claims.

    List of papers
    1. Mediated communication with minors in asylum-seeking hearings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediated communication with minors in asylum-seeking hearings
    2008 (English)In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated caseworkers' information-seeking prompts in interviews with asylum-seeking minors and assesses the accuracy of the translations provided by interpreters. Twenty six Russian-speaking minors were individually interviewed by one of 10 caseworkers assisted by one of 17 interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the type of questions asked and the accuracy of the corresponding renditions. The actual and translated content of the messages were examined using a qualitative analysis. The study showed that interviewers relied heavily on focused questions, which are more likely to elicit inaccurate information. When open questions were asked, the interviewers tended to ask narrow 'directive' questions rather than broader 'invitations'. The interpreters' renditions of utterances were often inaccurate. Almost half of the misrepresentations altered the content and one third involved changes in the type of question asked. This indicates that both interviewers and translators clearly need special training to ensure that they serve asylum-seeking minors adequately. © The Author [2008]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-38215 (URN)10.1093/jrs/fem051 (DOI)42825 (Local ID)42825 (Archive number)42825 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-04-07
    2. Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews: what do theysay and what happens to their responses?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews: what do theysay and what happens to their responses?
    2010 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how asylum-seeking minors report information when formally interviewed. Twenty-six Russian-speaking minors (M= 16.0 years of age) were individually interviewed by officials assisted by one of eighteen interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the translated questions asked by the officials, the minors’ responses to them, and the accuracy with which the minors’ responses were rendered. The asylum-seeking minors distinguished themselves as active participants. They appeared eager to disclose relevant information despite being asked many potentially contaminating questions. Most of the children’s responses were accurately rendered but mistranslations can affect the fact–finding process substantially. Both the minors and the officials involved in the asylum-seeking process need to recognise that both the questions asked and the responses given may be influenced by the third parties involved, i.e. the interpreters.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
    Keywords
    Asylum hearings, informativeness, information-seeking prompts, accuracy of translation
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52745 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2206.2010.00681.x (DOI)000280709600007 ()
    Available from: 2010-01-12 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2018-09-11
    3. That is not necessary for you to know!: Negotiation of participation status of unaccompanied children in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>That is not necessary for you to know!: Negotiation of participation status of unaccompanied children in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Research and Practice in Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 83-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a study of how the participation status of asylum-seeking children is interactively constructed in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings. We have undertaken a discourse analysis of 50 non-repair side-sequences from 26 hearings with Russian-speaking, asylum-seeking children in Sweden. A side-sequence is here defined as a monolingual sequence conducted in only one of the languages involved in the interviews. It involves the interpreter and only one of the primary interlocutors. In this article, four extracts are chosen for a micro-analysis in order to elucidate how interpreters can challenge asylum-seeking children’s participant statuses. We show that the right of the child to make his or her voice heard can be challenged, especially when the interpreters exclude, distort, discredit and guide the voices of the children, which is often done with the tacit approval of caseworkers.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2010
    Keywords
    asylum hearing, children, interpreter-mediated talk, participation rights, side-sequences
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52748 (URN)10.1075/intp.12.1.04kes (DOI)000281640600004 ()
    Available from: 2010-01-12 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2010-09-24
    4. Trustworthiness at stake: Trust and distrust ininvestigative interviews with Russian adolescent asylum-seekers in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trustworthiness at stake: Trust and distrust ininvestigative interviews with Russian adolescent asylum-seekers in Sweden
    2010 (English)In: Trust and Conflict: Representation, culture and dialogue. Submitted to series Cultural dynamics of social representation / [ed] I. Marková, I. and A. Gillespie, Routledge , 2010, p. 240-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust, distrust and conflict between social groups have existed throughout the history of humankind, although their forms have changed. Using three main concepts: culture, representation and dialogue, this book explores and re-thinks some of these changes in relation to concrete historical and contemporary events. Part I offers a symbolic and historical analysis of trust and distrust while Parts II and III examine trust, distrust and conflict in specific events including the Cyprus conflict, Estonian collective memories, coping with HIV/AIDS in China, Swedish asylum seekers, the Cuban missile crisis and Stalinist confessions. With an impressive array of international contributors the chapters draw on a number of key concepts such as self and other, ingroup and outgroup, contact between groups, categorization, brinkmanship, knowledge, beliefs and myth.  Trust and Conflict offers a fresh perspective on the problems that arise from treating trust, distrust and conflict as simplified indicators. Instead, it proposes that human and social sciences can view these phenomena within the complex matrix of interacting perspectives and meta-perspectives that characterise the social world. As such it will be of interest to undergraduates, postgraduates and lecturers of human and social sciences especially social psychology, sociology, political science and communication studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2010
    Series
    Cultural dynamics of social representation
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52751 (URN)97-80-415-59346-5 (ISBN)
    Note

    This paper was also presented at the conference: "Communication of Trust and Conspiracy in Intergroup Interaction", Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici, Palazzo Serra di Cassano, Naples, Italy, on June 5-6, 2008.

    Available from: 2010-01-12 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2013-04-19Bibliographically approved
  • 315.
    Keselman, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lamb, Michael E.
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3 RQ, UK.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews: what do theysay and what happens to their responses?2010In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how asylum-seeking minors report information when formally interviewed. Twenty-six Russian-speaking minors (M= 16.0 years of age) were individually interviewed by officials assisted by one of eighteen interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the translated questions asked by the officials, the minors’ responses to them, and the accuracy with which the minors’ responses were rendered. The asylum-seeking minors distinguished themselves as active participants. They appeared eager to disclose relevant information despite being asked many potentially contaminating questions. Most of the children’s responses were accurately rendered but mistranslations can affect the fact–finding process substantially. Both the minors and the officials involved in the asylum-seeking process need to recognise that both the questions asked and the responses given may be influenced by the third parties involved, i.e. the interpreters.

  • 316.
    Keselman, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    That is not necessary for you to know!: Negotiation of participation status of unaccompanied children in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings2010In: International Journal of Research and Practice in Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 83-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a study of how the participation status of asylum-seeking children is interactively constructed in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings. We have undertaken a discourse analysis of 50 non-repair side-sequences from 26 hearings with Russian-speaking, asylum-seeking children in Sweden. A side-sequence is here defined as a monolingual sequence conducted in only one of the languages involved in the interviews. It involves the interpreter and only one of the primary interlocutors. In this article, four extracts are chosen for a micro-analysis in order to elucidate how interpreters can challenge asylum-seeking children’s participant statuses. We show that the right of the child to make his or her voice heard can be challenged, especially when the interpreters exclude, distort, discredit and guide the voices of the children, which is often done with the tacit approval of caseworkers.

  • 317.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lost in Translation: Speech recognition and memory processes in native and non-native language perception2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis employed an integrated approach and investigated intra- and inter-individual differences relevant for normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) adults in native (Swedish) and non-native (English) languages in adverse listening conditions. The integrated approach encompassed the role of cognition as a focal point of interest as well as perceptualauditory and linguistic factors. Paper I examined the extent to which proficiency in a non-native language influenced native and non-native speech perception performance for NH listeners in noise maskers compared to native and non-native speech maskers. Working memory capacity in native and non-native languages and non-verbal intelligence were also assessed. The design of paper II was identical to that of paper I, however the participants in paper II had a hearingimpairment. The purpose of paper III was to assess how NH and HI listeners subjectively evaluated the perceived disturbance from the speech- and noise maskers in the native and nonnative languages. Paper IV examined how well native and non-native stories that were presented unmasked and masked with native and non-native speech were recalled by NH listeners. Paper IV further investigated the role of working memory capacity in the episodic long-term memory of story contents as well as proficiency in native and non-native languages. The results showed that generally, the speech maskers affected performance and perceived disturbance more than the noise maskers did. Regarding the non-native target language, interference from speech maskers in the dominant native language is taxing for speech perception performance, perceived disturbance and memory processes. However, large inter- individual variability between the listeners was observed. Part of this variability relates to non-native language proficiency. Perceptual and cognitive effort may hinder efficient long-term memory encoding, even when stimuli are appropriately identified at a perceptual level. A large working memory capacity (WMC) provides a better ability to suppress distractions and allocate processing resources to meet assigned objectives. The relatively large inter-individual differences in this thesis, require an individualized approach in clinical or educational settings when non-native persons or people with hearing impairment need to perceive and remember potentially vital information. Individua  differences in the very complex process of speech understanding and recall need to be further addressed by future studies. The relevance of cognitive factors and language proficiency provides opportunities for individuals who face difficulties to compensate using other abilities.

    List of papers
    1. The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception perfomance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception perfomance
    2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions, including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating noise) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. Our approach with focus on proficiency and the assessment of external as well as internal, listener-related factors allowed us to examine which variables explained intra- and interindividual differences in native and non-native speech perception performance. The main result was that in the non-native target, the level of English proficiency is a decisive factor for speech intelligibility in noise. High English proficiency improved performance in all four conditions when the target language was English. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native target. The study also confirmed that the SRTs were better when target language was native compared to non-native.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Frontiers Research Foundation, 2014
    Keywords
    English proficiency; native; non-native; speech perception; informational masking; energetic masking; working memory
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109224 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00651 (DOI)000338777900001 ()25071630 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers
    2015 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 19, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated how hearing-impaired listeners perceive native (Swedish) and nonnative (English) speech in the presence of noise- and speech maskers. Speech reception thresholds were measured for four different masker types for each target language. The maskers consisted of stationary and fluctuating noise and two-talker babble in Swedish and English. Twenty-three hearing-impaired native Swedish listeners participated, aged between 28 and 65 years. The participants also performed cognitive tests of working memory capacity in Swedish and English, nonverbal reasoning, and an English proficiency test. Results indicated that the speech maskers were more interfering than the noise maskers in both target languages. The larger need for phonetic and semantic cues in a nonnative language makes a stationary masker relatively more challenging than a fluctuating-noise masker. Better hearing acuity (pure tone average) was associated with better perception of the target speech in Swedish, and better English proficiency was associated with better speech perception in English. Larger working memory and better pure tone averages were related to the better perception of speech masked with fluctuating noise in the nonnative language. This suggests that both are relevant in highly taxing conditions. A large variance in performance between the listeners was observed, especially for speech perception in the nonnative language.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2015
    Keywords
    speech perception; native and nonnative; noise- and speech maskers; nonnative language proficiency; cognitive abilities
    National Category
    General Language Studies and Linguistics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118984 (URN)10.1177/2331216515579127 (DOI)000354486300002 ()25910504 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [349-2007-8654]

    Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-05 Last updated: 2019-06-27
    3. Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech
    2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to address how 43 normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners subjectively experienced the disturbance generated by four masker conditions (i.e., stationary noise, fluctuating noise, Swedish two-talker babble and English two-talker babble) while listening to speech in two target languages, i.e., Swedish (native) or English (non-native). The participants were asked to evaluate their noise-disturbance experience on a continuous scale from 0 to 10 immediately after having performed each listening condition. The data demonstrated a three-way interaction effect between target language, masker condition, and group (HI versus NH). The HI listeners experienced the Swedish-babble masker as significantly more disturbing for the native target language (Swedish) than for the non-native language (English). Additionally, this masker was significantly more disturbing than each of the other masker types during the perception of Swedish target speech. The NH listeners, on the other hand, indicated that the Swedish speech-masker was more disturbing than the stationary and the fluctuating noise-maskers for the perception of English target speech. The NH listeners perceived more disturbance from the speech maskers than the noise maskers. The HI listeners did not perceive the speech maskers as generally more disturbing than the noise maskers. However, they had particular difficulty with the perception of native speech masked by native babble, a common condition in daily-life listening conditions. These results suggest that the characteristics of the different maskers applied in the current study seem to affect the perceived disturbance differently in HI and NH listeners. There was no general difference in the perceived disturbance across conditions between the HI listeners and the NH listeners.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Frontiers, 2015
    Keywords
    perceived disturbance, native, non-native, speech maskers, noise maskers, working memory
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Neurosciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121032 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01065 (DOI)000359938800001 ()
    Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate how well normal-hearing adults recalled Swedish (native) and English (non-native) fictional stories masked by speech in Swedish and English. Each story was 15 min long and divided into three parts of 5 min each. One part was masked by Swedish speech, one by English speech and one was presented unmasked as a baseline. Audibility was rated immediately after listening to each fragment. Episodic long-term memory was assessed using 24 multiple choice questions (4AFC). Every 8 questions corresponded to 5 min of recorded story and included 4 simple and 4 complex questions. Participants also performed complex span test of working memory capacity and proficiency tests in Swedish and English. The main result was that the stories in quiet were significantly better recalled than the stories masked by Swedish. Although the stimuli were correctly identified at the perceptual level, challenging listening

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Neurosciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121033 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
  • 318.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. ENT/Audiology and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate how well normal-hearing adults recalled Swedish (native) and English (non-native) fictional stories masked by speech in Swedish and English. Each story was 15 min long and divided into three parts of 5 min each. One part was masked by Swedish speech, one by English speech and one was presented unmasked as a baseline. Audibility was rated immediately after listening to each fragment. Episodic long-term memory was assessed using 24 multiple choice questions (4AFC). Every 8 questions corresponded to 5 min of recorded story and included 4 simple and 4 complex questions. Participants also performed complex span test of working memory capacity and proficiency tests in Swedish and English. The main result was that the stories in quiet were significantly better recalled than the stories masked by Swedish. Although the stimuli were correctly identified at the perceptual level, challenging listening

  • 319.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. ENT/Audiology and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to address how 43 normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners subjectively experienced the disturbance generated by four masker conditions (i.e., stationary noise, fluctuating noise, Swedish two-talker babble and English two-talker babble) while listening to speech in two target languages, i.e., Swedish (native) or English (non-native). The participants were asked to evaluate their noise-disturbance experience on a continuous scale from 0 to 10 immediately after having performed each listening condition. The data demonstrated a three-way interaction effect between target language, masker condition, and group (HI versus NH). The HI listeners experienced the Swedish-babble masker as significantly more disturbing for the native target language (Swedish) than for the non-native language (English). Additionally, this masker was significantly more disturbing than each of the other masker types during the perception of Swedish target speech. The NH listeners, on the other hand, indicated that the Swedish speech-masker was more disturbing than the stationary and the fluctuating noise-maskers for the perception of English target speech. The NH listeners perceived more disturbance from the speech maskers than the noise maskers. The HI listeners did not perceive the speech maskers as generally more disturbing than the noise maskers. However, they had particular difficulty with the perception of native speech masked by native babble, a common condition in daily-life listening conditions. These results suggest that the characteristics of the different maskers applied in the current study seem to affect the perceived disturbance differently in HI and NH listeners. There was no general difference in the perceived disturbance across conditions between the HI listeners and the NH listeners.

  • 320.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers2015In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 19, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated how hearing-impaired listeners perceive native (Swedish) and nonnative (English) speech in the presence of noise- and speech maskers. Speech reception thresholds were measured for four different masker types for each target language. The maskers consisted of stationary and fluctuating noise and two-talker babble in Swedish and English. Twenty-three hearing-impaired native Swedish listeners participated, aged between 28 and 65 years. The participants also performed cognitive tests of working memory capacity in Swedish and English, nonverbal reasoning, and an English proficiency test. Results indicated that the speech maskers were more interfering than the noise maskers in both target languages. The larger need for phonetic and semantic cues in a nonnative language makes a stationary masker relatively more challenging than a fluctuating-noise masker. Better hearing acuity (pure tone average) was associated with better perception of the target speech in Swedish, and better English proficiency was associated with better speech perception in English. Larger working memory and better pure tone averages were related to the better perception of speech masked with fluctuating noise in the nonnative language. This suggests that both are relevant in highly taxing conditions. A large variance in performance between the listeners was observed, especially for speech perception in the nonnative language.

  • 321.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Performance, proficiency and perceived disturbance in native and non-native languages2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying speech in adverse listening conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how speech maskers (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) and noise maskers (stationary and fluctuating noise) interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). Listening disturbance for each condition was rated on a continuous scale. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Normal-hearing (n = 23) and hearing-impaired (n = 23) native Swedish listeners participated, age-range between 28 and 65 years.

    The SRTs were better for native as compared to non-native speech. In both groups, speech perception performance was lower for the speech than the noise maskers, especially for non-native target speech. The level of English proficiency is important for non-native speech intelligibility in noise. A three-way interaction effect on the subjective rating scores indicated that the hearing loss affects the subjective disturbance of Swedish babble in native and non-native language perception.

    Conclusion: Speech perception and subjective disturbance is influenced by a complex interaction between masker types and individual abilities.

  • 322.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The effects of native and non-native target and distractor language on speech perception are modulated by non-native proficiency2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying speech in noisy conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility and thereby an increased cognitive load. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, 13 females and 10 males, age-range between 28 and 64 years.The main result was that the target language, masker type and English proficiency all affected speech perception. The SRT’s were better when the target language was Swedish. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. High English proficiency was beneficial in three out of four conditions when the target language was English. The findings suggest that English proficiency is essential regarding automaticity in perceiving this non-native language

  • 323.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception perfomance2014In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions, including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating noise) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. Our approach with focus on proficiency and the assessment of external as well as internal, listener-related factors allowed us to examine which variables explained intra- and interindividual differences in native and non-native speech perception performance. The main result was that in the non-native target, the level of English proficiency is a decisive factor for speech intelligibility in noise. High English proficiency improved performance in all four conditions when the target language was English. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native target. The study also confirmed that the SRTs were better when target language was native compared to non-native.

  • 324.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    As clear as crystal or all Greek...? The combined effect of hearing impairment and L2 on speech perception in noise.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    As clear as crystal or all Greek...? The combined effects of hearing impairment and language on speech perception in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Boldt, Jesper B
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael S
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Kongevejen 243, DK-3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Wang, DeLiang
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering and Center for Cognitive Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 .
    Role of mask pattern in intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy speech2009In: Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 1415-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech was measured on a group of normal hearing individuals across mixture signal to noise ratio (SNR) levels, masker types, and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals using two different schemes: an ideal binary mask computed by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units and a target binary mask computed by comparing the local target energy against the long-term average speech spectrum. By depicting intelligibility scores as a function of the difference between mixture SNR and local SNR threshold, alignment of the performance curves is obtained for a large range of mixture SNR levels. Large intelligibility benefits are obtained for both sparse and dense binary masks. When an ideal mask is dense with many ones, the effect of changing mixture SNR level while fixing the mask is significant, whereas for more sparse masks the effect is small or insignificant.

  • 327.
    Klein, Olivier
    et al.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Hardwicket, Tom E.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Aust, Frederik
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Breuer, Johannes
    GESIS Leibniz Inst Social Sci, Germany.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Mohr, Alicia Hofelich
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55455 USA.
    IJzerman, Hans
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Vanpaemel, Wolf
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Frank, Michael C.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    A Practical Guide for Transparency in Psychological Science2018In: COLLABRA-PSYCHOLOGY, E-ISSN 2474-7394, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The credibility of scientific claims depends upon the transparency of the research products upon which they are based (e.g., study protocols, data, materials, and analysis scripts). As psychology navigates a period of unprecedented introspection, user-friendly tools and services that support open science have flourished. However, the plethora of decisions and choices involved can be bewildering. Here we provide a practical guide to help researchers navigate the process of preparing and sharing the products of their research (e.g., choosing a repository, preparing their research products for sharing, structuring folders, etc.). Being an open scientist means adopting a few straightforward research management practices, which lead to less error prone, reproducible research workflows. Further, this adoption can be piecemeal each incremental step towards complete transparency adds positive value. Transparent research practices not only improve the efficiency of individual researchers, they enhance the credibility of the knowledge generated by the scientific community.

  • 328.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Frank, Ina
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    A confirmatory factor analytic validation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory2015In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Because the postulated three-factor structure of the internationally widely used Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) has not been confirmed yet by a confirmatory factor analytic approach this was the central aim of the current study. Methods: From a clinical setting, N = 373 patients with chronic tinnitus completed the THI and further questionnaires assessing tinnitus-related and psychological variables. In order to analyze the psychometric properties of the THI, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and correlational analyses were conducted. Results: CFA provided a statistically significant support for a better fit of the data to the hypothesized three-factor structure (RMSEA = .049, WRMR = 1.062, CFI = .965, TLI = .961) than to a general factor model (RMSEA = .062, WRMR = 1.258, CFI = .942, TLI = .937). The calculation of Cronbachs alpha as indicator of internal consistency revealed satisfactory values (.80-.91) with the exception of the catastrophic subscale (.65). High positive correlations of the THI and its subscales with other measures of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression, high negative correlations with tinnitus acceptance, moderate positive correlations with anxiety sensitivity, sleeping difficulties, tinnitus loudness, and small correlations with the Big Five personality dimensions confirmed construct validity. Conclusion: Results show that the THI is a highly reliable and valid measure of tinnitus-related handicap. In contrast to results of previous exploratory analyses the current findings speak for a three-factor in contrast to a unifactorial structure. Future research is needed to replicate this result in different tinnitus populations.

  • 329.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    et al.
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Jasper, Kristine
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Schweda, Isabell
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Role of Fear-Avoidance Cognitions and Behaviors in Patients with Chronic Tinnitus2013In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 84-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated the role of fear-avoidance—a concept from chronic pain research—in chronic tinnitus. A self-report measure the “Tinnitus Fear-Avoidance Cognitions and Behaviors Scale (T-FAS)” was developed and validated. Furthermore, the role of fear-avoidance behavior as mediator of the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and tinnitus handicap was investigated. From a clinical setting, N = 373 patients with chronic tinnitus completed questionnaires assessing tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory), anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3), personality factors (Big Five Inventory-10), and fear-avoidance. To analyze the psychometric properties, principal component analysis with parallel component extraction and correlational analyses were used. To examine a possible mediating effect, hierarchical regression analysis was applied. The principal component analysis resulted in a three-factor solution: Fear-avoidance Cognitions, Tinnitus-related Fear-Avoidance Behavior, and Ear-related Fear-Avoidance Behavior. Internal consistency was satisfactory for the total scale and all subscales. High correlations between tinnitus-related handicap scales, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and the T-FAS were found, whereas associations with personality factors were low. Moreover, results indicate a significant partial mediation of fear-avoidance behaviors in the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and the cognitive dimension of tinnitus handicap. Results show that fear-avoidance behavior plays an important role in tinnitus handicap. More attention should be paid to this concept in research and clinical practice of psychotherapy for chronic tinnitus.

  • 330.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    et al.
    Philipps University, Germany.
    Schmelzer, Katarina
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Ditzen, Beate
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Psychosocial Profile of Women with Premenstrual Syndrome and Healthy Controls: A Comparative Study2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 752-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to modern bio-psychosocial theories of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), the aim of this study is to investigate systematically associations between selected psychosocial factors and premenstrual symptoms in different menstrual cycle phases. Several psychosocial variables were assessed, in a sample of German women with PMS (N = 90) and without premenstrual complaints (N = 48) during the follicular and luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Presence of PMS was indicated by analysis of contemporary daily ratings of premenstrual symptom severity and impairment for one menstrual cycle. Regarding perceived chronic stress (AE (2) = 0.34), self-efficacy (AE (2) = 0.12), and two dimensions of self-silencing (0.06 aeamp;lt;currencyamp;gt;aEuroeAE (2) aeamp;lt;currencyamp;gt;aEuroe0.11) analyses revealed only a significant effect of group. Regarding body dissatisfaction and somatosensory amplification, a significant effect of group (0.07 aeamp;lt;currencyamp;gt;aEuroeAE (2) aeamp;lt;currencyamp;gt;aEuroe0.16) and additionally a group by menstrual cycle phase interaction (AE (2) = 0.06) was identified. Regarding relationship quality, a significant effect of menstrual cycle phase (AE (2) = 0.08) and a group by menstrual cycle phase interaction (AE (2) = 0.06) was demonstrated. In respect to sexual contentment, acceptance of premenstrual symptoms, and the remaining two dimensions of self-silencing statistical analyses revealed no effects at all. Linear multiple regression analysis revealed that 20 % of the variance in PMS symptom severity was explained by the psychosocial variables investigated. Body dissatisfaction ( = 0.26, p = 0.018) and the divided self-dimension of self-silencing ( = 0.35, p = 0.016) were significant correlates of PMS severity. Results of this study are consistent with previous research and additionally show patterns of associations between specific psychosocial factors and PMS in dependence of menstrual cycle phase that have not been researched before. The role of the psychosocial variables we investigated in regard to the development and maintenance of PMS should be clarified in future research.

  • 331.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand; Philipps Univ, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Probst, Thomas
    Donau Univ, Austria.
    Personality traits predict and moderate the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for chronic tinnitus2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate whether the Big Five personality traits predict the outcome of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and whether they moderate the outcome between ICBT and face-to-face group cognitive behavioural therapy (GCBT). Design: This study investigated the Big Five personality traits as predictors and moderators of the outcome (tinnitus handicap) in a trial comparing ICBT and GCBT for chronic tinnitus. Study sample: N= 84 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomised to either ICBT (n = 41) or GCBT (n = 43). Results: A multilevel model for discontinuous change was performed. Higher scores on the "openness" scale of the Big Five Personality inventory (BFI-10) predicted a lower tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI) at post-treatment in ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Openness moderated the outcome at post-treatment in favour of ICBT (p amp;lt;0.05). Higher scores on the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale predicted a more favourable outcome in ICBT at 6-month (p amp;lt;0.05) and 12-month follow-up (pamp;lt; 0.05), but the BFI-10 "conscientiousness" scale was positively associated with the THI at baseline (pamp;lt;0.05). Conclusions: ICBT might be the preferred treatment choice for tinnitus patients being open towards new experiences. Moreover, ICBT requires autonomous work and self-motivation by the patient in order to have an impact.

  • 332.
    Kleinstäuber, Maria
    et al.
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tausch, Kristine
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Schweda, Isabell
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    The role of fear avoidance in tinnitus patients2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 333.
    Knudsen, Line V
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted.

    DESIGN:

    This paper is based on a literature review and our recent experience with the conduction of an international interdisciplinary qualitative study in audiology.

    RESULTS:

    We describe some available qualitative methods for sampling, data collection, and analysis and we discuss the rationale for choosing particular methods. The focus is on four approaches which have all previously been applied to audiologic research: grounded theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis, conversational analysis, and qualitative content analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This article provides a review of methodological issues useful for those designing qualitative research projects in audiology or needing assistance in the interpretation of qualitative literature.

  • 334.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.
    Boston University, MA 02215 USA .
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    The pupil response is sensitive to divided attention during speech processing2014In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 312, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dividing attention over two streams of speech strongly decreases performance compared to focusing on only one. How divided attention affects cognitive processing load as indexed with pupillometry during speech recognition has so far not been investigated. In 12 young adults the pupil response was recorded while they focused on either one or both of two sentences that were presented dichotically and masked by fluctuating noise across a range of signal-to-noise ratios. In line with previous studies, the performance decreases when processing two target sentences instead of one. Additionally, dividing attention to process two sentences caused larger pupil dilation and later peak pupil latency than processing only one. This suggests an effect of attention on cognitive processing load (pupil dilation) during speech processing in noise.

  • 335.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The effect of reward on listening effort as reflected by the pupil dilation response2018In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 367, p. 106-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening to speech in noise can be effortful but when motivated people seem to be more persevering. Previous research showed effects of monetary reward on autonomic responses like cardiovascular reactivity and pupil dilation while participants processed auditory information. The current study examined the effects of monetary reward on the processing of speech in noise and related listening effort as reflected by the pupil dilation response. Twenty-four participants (median age 21 yrs) performed two speech reception threshold (SRT) tasks, one tracking 50% correct (hard) and one tracking 85% correct (easy), both of which they listened to and repeated sentences uttered by a female talker. The sentences were presented with a single male talker or, in a control condition, in quiet. Participants were told that they could earn a high (5 euros) or low (0.20 euro) reward when repeating 70% or more of the sentences correctly. Conditions were presented in a blocked fashion and during each trial, pupil diameter was recorded. At the end of each block, participants rated the effort they had experienced, their performance, and their tendency to quit listening. Additionally, participants performed a working memory capacity task and filled in a need-for-recovery questionnaire as these tap into factors that influence the pupil dilation response. The results showed no effect of reward on speech perception performance as reflected by the SRT. The peak pupil dilation showed a significantly larger response for high than for low reward, for the easy and hard conditions, but not the control condition. Higher need for recovery was associated with a higher subjective tendency to quit listening. Consistent with the Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening, we conclude that listening effort as reflected by the peak pupil dilation is sensitive to the amount of monetary reward. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 336.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    VU University Medical Centre.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M
    VU University Medical Centre.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Centre.
    Pupil Dilation Uncovers Extra Listening Effort in the Presence of a Single-Talker Masker2012In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Recent research has demonstrated that pupil dilation, a measure of mental effort (cognitive processing load), is sensitive to differences in speech intelligibility. The present study extends this outcome by examining the effects of masker type and age on the speech reception threshold (SRT) and mental effort. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: In young and middle-aged adults, pupil dilation was measured while they performed an SRT task, in which spoken sentences were presented in stationary noise, fluctuating noise, or together with a single-talker masker. The masker levels were adjusted to achieve 50% or 84% sentence intelligibility. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The results show better SRTs for fluctuating noise and a single-talker masker compared with stationary noise, which replicates results of previous studies. The peak pupil dilation, reflecting mental effort, was larger in the single-interfering speaker condition compared with the other masker conditions. Remarkably, in contrast to the thresholds, no differences in peak dilation were observed between fluctuating noise and stationary noise. This effect was independent of the intelligibility level and age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: To maintain similar intelligibility levels, participants needed more mental effort for speech perception in the presence of a single-talker masker and then with the two other types of maskers. This suggests an additive interfering effect of speech information from the single-talker masker. The dissociation between these performance and mental effort measures underlines the importance of including measurements of pupil dilation as an independent index of mental effort during speech processing in different types of noisy environments and at different intelligibility levels.

  • 337.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    VU University Medical Cente, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Cente, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Cente, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The influence of informational masking on speech perception and pupil response in adults with hearing impairment2014In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 1596-1606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent pupillometry study on adults with normal hearing indicates that the pupil response during speech perception (cognitive processing load) is strongly affected by the type of speech masker. The current study extends these results by recording the pupil response in 32 participants with hearing impairment (mean age 59 yr) while they were listening to sentences masked by fluctuating noise or a single-talker. Efforts were made to improve audibility of all sounds by means of spectral shaping. Additionally, participants performed tests measuring verbal working memory capacity, inhibition of interfering information in working memory, and linguistic closure. The results showed worse speech reception thresholds for speech masked by single-talker speech compared to fluctuating noise. In line with previous results for participants with normal hearing, the pupil response was larger when listening to speech masked by a single-talker compared to fluctuating noise. Regression analysis revealed that larger working memory capacity and better inhibition of interfering information related to better speech reception thresholds, but these variables did not account for inter-individual differences in the pupil response. In conclusion, people with hearing impairment show more cognitive load during speech processing when there is interfering speech compared to fluctuating noise. (C) 2014 Acoustical Society of America.

  • 338.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of ENT/Audiology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    Department of ENT/Audiology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Department of ENT/Audiology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Processing Load Induced by Informational Masking Is Related to Linguistic Abilities2012In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often assumed that the benefit of hearing aids is not primarily reflected in better speech performance, but that it is reflected in less effortful listening in the aided than in the unaided condition. Before being able to assess such a hearing aid benefit the present study examined how processing load while listening to masked speech relates to inter-individual differences in cognitive abilities relevant for language processing. Pupil dilation was measured in thirty-two normal hearing participants while listening to sentences masked by fluctuating noise or interfering speech at either 50% and 84% intelligibility. Additionally, working memory capacity, inhibition of irrelevant information, and written text reception was tested. Pupil responses were larger during interfering speech as compared to fluctuating noise. This effect was independent of intelligibility level. Regression analysis revealed that high working memory capacity, better inhibition, and better text reception were related to better speech reception thresholds. Apart from a positive relation to speech recognition, better inhibition and better text reception are also positively related to larger pupil dilation in the single-talker masker conditions. We conclude that better cognitive abilities not only relate to better speech perception, but also partly explain higher processing load in complex listening conditions.

  • 339.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    et al.
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Disentangling the contribution of auditory and cognitive funcions to pupil dilation during speech comprehension in adverse listening condistions2012In: Disentangling the contribution of auditory and cognitive funcions to pupil dilation during speech comprehension in adverse listening condistions. HEAD-seminar, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    How to measure the impact of premenstrual symptoms? Development and validation of the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire2016In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 807-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With 75% of women of reproductive age affected, premenstrual symptoms are very common, ranging from emotional and cognitive to physical symptoms. Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder can lead to substantial functional interference and psychological distress comparable to that of dysthymic disorders. The assessment of this impact is required as a part of the diagnostic procedure in the DSM-5. In the absence of a specific measure, the authors developed the PMS-Impact Questionnaire. A sample of 101 women reporting severe premenstrual complaints was assessed with the twenty-two items in the questionnaire during their premenstrual phase in an ongoing intervention study at the Philipps-University Marburg from August 2013 until January 2015. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution (labeled Psychological Impact and Functional Impact) with 18 items. A Cronbachs alpha of 0.90 for Psychological Impact and of 0.90 for Functional Impact indicated good reliability. Convergent construct validity was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with the Pain Disability Index. Low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10 indicated good divergent validity. The PMS-Impact Questionnaire was found to be a valid, reliable, and an economic measure to assess the impact of premenstrual symptoms. In future research, cross validations and confirmatory factor analyses should be conducted.

  • 341.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Internet-based cognitive behavioural self-help for premenstrual syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2014In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 15, no 472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: With a prevalence of 3 to 8% among women of reproductive age, severe premenstrual symptoms are very common. Symptoms range from emotional and cognitive to physical changes. Severe symptoms (that is, premenstrual syndrome) can have a strong impact on everyday functioning and quality of life. Impairment can be as serious as that of dysthymic disorders. Many affected women receive either no treatment at all or are unsatisfied with their treatment. Although there is some evidence for the reduction of distress through cognitive behavioural therapy, there are only a small number of randomised controlled trials carefully investigating the efficacy of this psychotherapeutic approach. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioural self-help treatment for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome. Methods/design: The study is conducted as a randomised controlled trial. The complex diagnostic assessment includes the completion of a symptom diary over two consecutive cycles and a telephone interview. Eligible women are randomly assigned to either a treatment or a wait-list control group. The intervention is based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and is provided via the internet. It consists of 14 different modules on which participants work over 8 consecutive weeks. In addition to written information, participants receive email feedback from a clinical psychologist on a weekly basis. Participants assigned to the wait-list receive the treatment after the end of the waiting period (8 weeks). The primary outcome measure is the Premenstrual Syndrome Impairment Measure. Secondary outcomes include the Premenstrual Syndrome Coping Measure, the Short-Form Social Support Questionnaire, the Questionnaire for the Assessment of Relationship Quality, and the Perceived Stress Scale. Data is collected during the premenstrual (luteal) phase at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Discussion: So far, there is no study investigating internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for premenstrual syndrome. The programme approaches the problem of high prevalence in combination with severe impairment and insufficient treatment options.

  • 342.
    Kues, Johanna N
    et al.
    Kues Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Krzikalla, Clara
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    The effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the report of positive and negative premenstrual changes.2018In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 16-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although women predominantly report negative premenstrual changes, a substantial portion of women also reports positive changes. Little is known about factors related to report of positive and negative premenstrual changes. The aim of this experimental study at the Philipps-University of Marburg from January and February 2015 was to investigate the effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of premenstrual changes. A total of 241 healthy women were randomly assigned either to an experimental group (EG) reading: (1) text focusing on negative and positive premenstrual changes (EG1 (+/-)); (2) text focusing on negative changes (EG2 (-)); or (3) control group (CG) text. At least one positive premenstrual change was reported by the majority of the participating women. The results of the MANOVA and discriminant analysis showed that, after having read the text, EG2 (-) reported more negative and fewer positive premenstrual changes in a retrospective screening compared to EG1 (+/-) and CG. No significant difference was observed between EG1 (+/-) and CG. The results show the negative influence of information focusing on negative premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of both negative and positive premenstrual changes.

  • 343.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Danermark, Berth
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, 702 81 Örebro, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rørtangvej, 3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Importance of “Process Evaluation” in Audiological Rehabilitation: Examples from Studies on Hearing Impairment2014In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2014, p. 1-7, article id 168684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of this paper is to discuss the importance of “evaluating the process of change” (i.e., process evaluation) in people with disability by studying their lived experiences. Detailed discussion is made about “why and how to investigate the process of change in people with disability?” and some specific examples are provided from studies on patient journey of persons with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, methodological aspects in process evaluation are discussed in relation to various metatheoretical perspectives. The discussion has been supplemented with relevant literature. The healthcare practice and disability research in general are dominated by the use of outcome measures. Even though the values of outcome measures are not questioned, there seems to be a little focus on understanding the process of change over time in relation to health and disability. We suggest that the process evaluation has an additional temporal dimension and has applications in both clinical practice and research in relation to health and disability.

  • 344.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: lessons from a failed clinical trial2014In: BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders, ISSN 1472-6815, E-ISSN 1472-6815, Vol. 14, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persons with a hearing impairment have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed ‘patient journey’ models of person with hearing impairment and their communication partners (CPs). The study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using the patient journey model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System: NCT01611129, registered 2012 May 14).

    Method

    The study employed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design. Even though we had intended to recruit 158 participants, we only managed to recruit 80 participants who were assigned to one of two groups: (1) Intervention group; and (2) WLC. Participants from both groups completed a 30 day internet-based counseling program (group 2 waited for a month before intervention) based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focus on self-reported hearing disability, self-reported depression and anxiety, readiness to change and self-reported hearing disability acceptance were administered pre- and post-intervention.

    Results

    The trial results suggest that the intervention was not feasible. Treatment compliancy was one of the main problems with a high number of dropouts. Only 18 participants completed both pre- and post-intervention outcome measures. Their results were included in the analysis. Results suggest no statistically significant differences among groups over time in all four measures.

    Conclusions

    Due to the limited sample size, no concrete conclusions can be drawn about the hypotheses from the current study. Furthermore, possible reasons for failure of this trial and directions for future research are discussed.

  • 345.
    Kästner, Lena
    et al.
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Cardin, Velia
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Capek, Sheryl M.
    University of Manchester.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological processing across modalities: Evidence from sign language2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 346.
    Kästner, Lena
    et al.
    Ruhr-University, Bochum..
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London.
    Capek, Cheryl Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The What and Where of Sign Language2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 347.
    Kästner, Lena
    et al.
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Capek, Cheryl M
    University of Manchester.
    The"what" and "where" of sign language2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 348.
    Lakens, D.
    et al.
    Human-Technology Interaction, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Adolfi, F.G.
    National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Albers, C.J.
    Heymans Institute for Psychological Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Anvari, F.
    College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Apps, M.A.J.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Argamon, S.E.
    Department of Computer Science, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Baguley, T.
    Department of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Becker, R.B.
    Faculty of Linguistics and Literature, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Benning, S.D.
    Psychology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, United States.
    Bradford, D.E.
    Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States.
    Buchanan, E.M.
    Psychology, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, United States.
    Caldwell, A.R.
    Health Human Performance and Recreation, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States.
    Van Calster, B.
    Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Carlsson, R.
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Chen, S.-C.
    Department of Human Development and Psychology, Tzu-Chi University, Hualien City, Taiwan.
    Chung, B.
    Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, VIC, Canada.
    Colling, L.J.
    Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Collins, G.S.
    Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Crook, Z.
    Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Cross, E.S.
    School of Psychology, Bangor University, Bangor, United Kingdom; Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Daniels, S.
    Ramsey Decision Theoretics, Washington, DC, United States.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Debruine, L.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Dunleavy, D.J.
    College of Social Work, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States.
    Earp, B.D.
    Departments of Psychology and Philosophy, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Feist, M.I.
    Department of English, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA, United States.
    Ferrell, J.D.
    Department of Psychology, St. Edwards University, Austin, TX, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States.
    Field, J.G.
    Department of Management, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Fox, N.W.
    Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States.
    Friesen, A.
    Department of Political Science, Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, United States.
    Gomes, C.
    Booking.com, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gonzalez-Marquez, M.
    Department of English, American and Romance Studies, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Grange, J.A.
    School of Psychology, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom.
    Grieve, A.P.
    Centre of Excellence for Statistical Innovation, UCB Celltech, Slough, United Kingdom.
    Guggenberger, R.
    Translational Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; International Centre for Ethics in Sciences and Humanities, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
    Grist, J.
    Department of Radiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Van Harmelen, A.-L.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Hasselman, F.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Hochard, K.D.
    Department of Psychology, University of Chester, Chester, United Kingdom.
    Hoffarth, M.R.
    Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY, United States.
    Holmes, N.P.
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Ingre, M.
    Department of Psychology, Education, and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Isager, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isotalus, H.K.
    School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Johansson, C.
    Occupational Orthopaedics and Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Juszczyk, K.
    Faculty of Modern Languages and Literatures, Institute of Linguistics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Kenny, D.A.
    Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States.
    Khalil, A.A.
    Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Konat, B.
    Social Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Lao, J.
    Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Larsen, E.G.
    School of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom.
    Lodder, G.M.A.
    Department of Sociology/ICS, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Lukavský, J.
    Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Madan, C.R.
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Manheim, D.
    Pardee RAND Graduate School, RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA, United States.
    Martin, S.R.
    Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States.
    Martin, A.E.
    Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Mayo, D.G.
    Department of Philosophy, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, United States.
    McCarthy, R.J.
    Center for the Study of Family Violence and Sexual Assault, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, United States.
    McConway, K.
    School of Mathematics and Statistics, Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom.
    McFarland, C.
    Skyscanner, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Nio, A.Q.X.
    School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Nilsonne, G.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.
    De Oliveira, C.L.
    Laboratory of Behavioral Neurobiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    De Xivry, J.-J.O.
    Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Parsons, S.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Pfuhl, G.
    Department of Psychology, UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Quinn, K.A.
    Department of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Sakon, J.J.
    Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY, United States.
    Saribay, S.A.
    Department of Psychology, Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Schneider, I.K.
    Psychology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Selvaraju, M.
    Saudi Human Genome Program, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Integrated Gulf Biosystems, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Sjoerds, Z.
    Cognitive Psychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Smith, S.G.
    Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Smits, T.
    Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Spies, J.R.
    Center for Open Science, Charlottesville, VA, United States; Department of Engineering and Society, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Sreekumar, V.
    Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, M.D., United States.
    Steltenpohl, C.N.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN, United States.
    Stenhouse, N.
    Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States.
    Swiatkowski, W.
    Department of Social Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Iversity of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Vadillo, M.A.
    Departamento de Psicología Básica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Van Assen, M.A.L.M.
    Department of Methodology and Statistics, Tilburg University, Tilburg, Netherlands; Department of Sociology, Utrecht University the, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Williams, M.N.
    School of Psychology, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Williams, S.E.
    Psychology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, United States.
    Williams, D.R.
    Psychology, University of California Davis, Davis, United States.
    Yarkoni, T.
    Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States.
    Ziano, I.
    Marketing Department, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Zwaan, R.A.
    Department of Psychology, Education, and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Justify your alpha2018In: Nature Human Behaviour, ISSN 2397-3374, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 168-171Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 349.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Stages of change in adults who failed an online hearing screening2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 350.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Knudsen, Line V
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    DESIGN:

    Individual semi-structured interviews were completed.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users.

    RESULTS:

    Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

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