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  • 301.
    Milanic, Matija
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Bjorgan, Asgeir
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Marraccini, Paolo
    CNR, Italy.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Randeberg, Lyngsnes
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Hyperspectral imaging for detection of cholesterol in human skin2015In: OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS AND SENSING XV: TOWARD POINT-OF-CARE DIAGNOSTICS, Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) , 2015, Vol. 9332, no 93320WConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high levels of cholesterol in the blood and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Early detection of hypercholesterolemia is necessary to prevent onset and progress of cardiovascular disease. Optical imaging techniques might have a potential for early diagnosis and monitoring of hypercholesterolemia. In this study, hyperspectral imaging was investigated for this application. The main aim of the study was to identify spectral and spatial characteristics that can aid identification of hypercholesterolemia in facial skin. The first part of the study involved a numerical simulation of human skin affected by hypercholesterolemia A literature survey was performed to identify characteristic morphological and physiological parameters. Realistic models were prepared and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain hyperspectral images. Based on the simulations optimal wavelength regions for differentiation between normal and cholesterol rich skin were identified Minimum Noise Fraction transformation (MNF) was used for analysis. In the second part of the study, the simulations were verified by a clinical study involving volunteers with elevated and normal levels of cholesterol. The faces of the volunteers were scanned by a hyperspectral camera covering the spectral range between 400 nm and 720 nm, and characteristic spectral features of the affected skin were identified Processing of the images was done after conversion to reflectance and masking of the images. The identified features were compared to the known cholesterol levels of the subjects. The results of this study demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging of facial skin can be a promising, rapid modality for detection of hypercholesterolemia

  • 302.
    Milanic, Matija
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Bjorgan, Asgeir
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lyngsnes Randeberga, Lise
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Detection of hypercholesterolemia using hyperspectral imaging of human skin2015In: CLINICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND IMAGING IV, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9537, no 95370CConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high blood levels of cholesterol and is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Xanthelasma is a subcutaneous lesion appearing in the skin around the eyes. Xanthelasma is related to hypercholesterolemia. Identifying micro-xanthelasma can thereforeprovide a mean for early detection of hypercholesterolemia and prevent onset and progress of disease. The goal of this study was to investigate spectral and spatial characteristics of hypercholesterolemia in facial skin. Optical techniques like hyperspectral imaging (HSI) might be a suitable tool for such characterization as it simultaneously provides high resolution spatial and spectral information. In this study a 3D Monte Carlo model of lipid inclusions in human skin was developed to create hyperspectral images in the spectral range 400-1090 nm. Four lesions with diameters 0.12-1.0 mm were simulated for three different skin types. The simulations were analyzed using three algorithms: the Tissue Indices (TI), the two layer Diffusion Approximation (DA), and the Minimum Noise Fraction transform (MNF). The simulated lesions were detected by all methods, but the best performance was obtained by the MNF algorithm. The results were verified using data from 11 volunteers with known cholesterol levels. The face of the volunteers was imaged by a LCTF system (400-720 nm), and the images were analyzed using the previously mentioned algorithms. The identified features were then compared to the known cholesterol levels of the subjects. Significant correlation was obtained for the MNF algorithm only. This study demonstrates that HSI can be a promising, rapid modality for detection of hypercholesterolemia.

  • 303.
    Molin, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shaga Devan, Kavitha
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Feature-enhancing zoom to facilitate Ki-67 hot spot detection2014In: Medical Imaging 2014: Digital Pathology, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2014, Vol. 9041, p. Art.nr. 90410W-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Image processing algorithms in pathology commonly include automated decision points such as classifications. While this enables efficient automation, there is also a risk that errors are induced. A different paradigm is to use image processing for enhancements without introducing explicit classifications. Such enhancements can help pathologists to increase efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. In our work, this paradigm has been applied to Ki-67 hot spot detection. Ki-67 scoring is a routine analysis to quantify the proliferation rate of tumor cells. Cell counting in the hot spot, the region of highest concentration of positive tumor cells, is a method increasingly used in clinical routine. An obstacle for this method is that while hot spot selection is a task suitable for low magnification, high magnification is needed to discern positive nuclei, thus the pathologist must perform many zooming operations. We propose to address this issue by an image processing method that increases the visibility of the positive nuclei at low magnification levels. This tool displays the modified version at low magnification, while gradually blending into the original image at high magnification. The tool was evaluated in a feasibility study with four pathologists targeting routine clinical use. In a task to compare hot spot concentrations, the average accuracy was 75±4.1% using the tool and 69±4.6% without it (n=4). Feedback on the system, gathered from an observer study, indicate that the pathologists found the tool useful and fitting in their existing diagnostic process. The pathologists judged the tool to be feasible for implementation in clinical routine.

  • 304. Möller, K.O
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Fagrell, B
    Introduction to Laser Doppler Flowmetry1999In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, ISSN 0928-7329, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305. Mörk, C.
    et al.
    Asker, C.L.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Kvernebo, K.
    Erythromelagia: A Condition with Increased Arteriovenous Shunting2000In: 21th European Conference on Microcirculation,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 306. Mörk, C.
    et al.
    Asker, C.L.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Kvernebo, K.
    Erythromelagia: A syndrome of dysfunctional vascular dynamics2001In: Forum for Nordic dermato-venereology,2001, 2001, p. 34-34Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Mörk, Cato
    et al.
    Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norge.
    Kvernebo, Knut
    Ulleval University Hospital, Oslo, Norge.
    Asker, Claes
    IMT Linköpings universitet.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Reduced skin capillary density during attacks of erythromelalgia implies arteriovenous shunting as pathogenetic mechanism2002In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 119, p. 949-953Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 308. Mörk, Cato
    et al.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Asker, Claes
    Kvernebo, Knut
    The prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol reduces symptoms and microvascular arteriovenous shunting in erythromelalgia - A double-blind, crossover, placebo-compared study2004In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 122, no 3, p. 587-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on previous experience with parenteral prostanoids, we studied the effect of misoprostol treatment, an orally administered prostaglandin E1 analog, in patients with erythromelalgia. Treatment with placebo was followed by treatment with misoprostol (0.4-0.8 mg per d), both for 6 wk. The patients (n = 21) and a study nurse who administered the trial were blinded. The endpoints were change in pain and need for cooling and global assessment of the treatment. Following central body heat provocation, global skin perfusion, capillary morphology, and change in pain were also recorded before and after each treatment period. Results were compared with data from healthy control subjects (n = 11) that did not undergo treatment. Clinical safety and tolerability evaluation included physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, and monitoring of adverse events. All clinical outcome measures were significantly better after treatment with misoprostol (p < 0.01) as compared with placebo treatment and after a 3- mo follow-up without treatment. The heat-induced increase in global perfusion after misoprostol treatment was similar to the control group and significantly lower when compared with baseline (p < 0.01) and placebo treatment (p < 0.05), respectively. This study demonstrates that misoprostol is clinically superior to placebo in patients with erythromelalgia. The results of the perfusion studies may imply that the mechanism of action of the beneficial effect of misoprostol is reduced microvascular arteriovenous shunting in affected skin.

  • 309.
    Narasimha Reddy, Vaka
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comparison and Optimization of Insonation Strategies for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Evolution of vulnerable carotid plaques are crucial reason for cerebral ischemic strokes and identifying them in the early stage can become very important in avoiding the risk of stroke. In order to improve the identification and quantification accuracy of infancy plaques better visualization techniques are needed. Improving the visualization and quantification of neovascularization in carotid plaque using contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging still remains a challenging task. In this thesis work, three optimization techniques are proposed, which showed an improvement in the sensitivity of contrast agents when compared to the conventional clinical settings and insonation strategies. They are as follows:1) Insonation at harmonic specific (2nd harmonic) resonance frequency instead of resonance frequency based on maximum energy absorption provides enhanced nonlinear contribution.2) At high frequency ultrasound imaging, shorter pulse length will provide improved harmonic signal content when compared to longer pulse lengths. Applying this concept to multi- pulse sequencing (Pulse Inversion and Cadence contrast pulse sequencing) resulted in increased magnitude of the remaining harmonic signal after pulse summations.3) Peak negative pressure optimization of Pulse Inversion and Cadence contrast pulse sequencing was showed to further enhance the nonlinear content of the backscattered signal from contrast microbubbles without increasing the safety limits, defined by the mechanical index.The results presented in this thesis are based on computational modeling (Bubblesim software) and as a future continuation we plan to verify the simulation results with vitro studies.

  • 310.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    4. New Possibilities for skin imager (interview with G Nilsson), Sweden Today, No 12007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 311.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Bringing Bioengineering Innovations to the Market2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 312.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    DERMATECH 2010 - Bildanalys inomdermatology. Visioner för medicinsk bildanalys i Östergötland2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 313.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Från medicinska behov och tekniska idéer till medicintekniska innovationer och företagsbildning2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2008,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 314.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Föreläsningsturné, Frankrike (i samarbete med exporrådet Frankrike), 24-29 juni 20072007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 315.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    High resolution2000Report (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    History of laser Doppler technology2000In: European Conference on Microcirculation,2000, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler and spectroscopy techniques in skin microcirculation assessment2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 318.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler imagingstudies of tissue perfusion1998In: Advances inOptical Imaging and Photon Migration TOpical Meeting,1998, 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 319.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging: basic principles, clinical and experimental applications and recent development1997In: Congress of International Society for Skin Imaging,1997, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 320.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging - principles and potential applications2001In: International Society for Skin Imaging meeting,2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging, trends in optics and photonics1998In: Adv of Optical Imaging & Photon Migration, 1998, p. 275-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Medical Needs Meet New Technologies2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 323.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Opportunities and limitations in LAser Doppler perfusion monitoring and imaging for assessment of tissue blood flow1997In: International Symposium on Computer-aided Noninvasive vascular diagnostics,1997, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 324.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Self-testing of the skin, algorithms for Tissue Viability Imaging2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 325.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    TiVi600 technology combines polarization spectroscopy with advanced image processing, Nya Metoder för Effektivare Läkemedelsprövning.2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 326.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Computer-aided assessment of Psoriasis-area2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 327.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Computer-aided image processing method to determine tissue viscoelasticity2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 328.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Self-testing of the skin2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 329.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Leahy, J.
    ODoherty, J.
    Polarization Spectroscopy camera: a new technique for mapping redness2007In: 16th congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Leahy, J.
    ODoherty, J.
    Tissue Viability Imaging in Dermatology2007In: 21th World congress of Dermatology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leahy, M.
    Department of Physics University of Limeric, Ireland.
    O´Doherty, J.
    Department of Physics University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy2008In: Opto-Electronics Review, ISSN 1230-3402, E-ISSN 1896-3757, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 309-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0–4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  • 332.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring and Imaging. Biomedical Photonics Handbook2003In: Biomedical photonics handbook / [ed] Tuan Vo-Dinh, CRC Press , 2003, p. -1872Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrates interdisciplinary research and development on instrumentation, methods, and clinical applications. This book is of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, students, and clinical providers.

  • 333.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler perfusion,monitoring and imaging2003In: Biomedical Photonics Handbook / [ed] Tuan Vo-Dinh., London: CRC Press , 2003, p. 15-1-15-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrates interdisciplinary research and development on instrumentation, methods, and clinical applications. This book is of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, students, and clinical providers.

  • 334.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring and Imaging2003In: Biomedical Photonics Handbook / [ed] Tuan Vo-Dinh, CRC Press , 2003, 1, p. -1872Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide variety of biomedical photonic technologies have been developed recently for clinical monitoring of early disease states; molecular diagnostics and imaging of physiological parameters; molecular and genetic biomarkers; and detection of the presence of pathological organisms or biochemical species of clinical importance. However, available information on this rapidly growing field is fragmented among a variety of journals and specialized books.Now researchers and medical practitioners have an authoritative and comprehensive source for the latest research and applications in biomedical photonics. Over 150 leading scientists, engineers, and physicians discuss state-of-the-art instrumentation, methods, and protocols in the Biomedical Photonics Handbook. Editor-in-Chief Tuan Vo-Dinh and an advisory board of distinguished scientists and medical experts ensure that each of the 65 chapters represents the latest and most accurate information currently available.

  • 335.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Tenland, T.
    Wahlberg, J.E.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Laser Doppler Flowmetry A New Technique for Noninvasive Assessment of Skin Blood Flow.1983In: Cosmetics and toiletries, ISSN 0361-4387, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 97-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 336.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tenland, T.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biomedical Applications of Laser-Light Scattering1982In: Biomedical Applications of Laser-Light Scattering / [ed] David B. Sattelle, Amsterdam: Elsevier Biomedical press , 1982, p. 335-348Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Tenland, Torsten
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    The use of Laser Doppler flowmetry in microvascular research1981In: International vascular symposium,1981, 1981Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Detecting tissue microcirculation from backscattered polarized light2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 339.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Detecting tissue microcirculation from backscattered polarized light2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 340.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Non-invasive system to monitor microcirculation2008Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 341.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Zhai, Hongbo
    Department of Dermatology University of California, USA.
    Chan, Heidi P.
    Department of Dermatology University of California, USA.
    Farahmand, Sara
    Department of Dermatology University of California, USA.
    Maibach, Howard I.
    Department of Dermatology University of California, USA.
    Assessment of skin vasoconstriction using Tissue Viability Imaging2008In: 13th International Congress of Biorheology and 6th International Conference on Clinical Hemorheology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 342.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhai, Hongbo
    P Chan, Heidi
    University of California.
    Farahmand, Sara
    University of California.
    Maibach , Howard I
    University of California.
    Cutaneous bioengineering instrumentation standardization: the Tissue Viability Imager2009In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) is a new bioengineering technology intended for remote two-dimensional mapping of skin red blood cell concentration (RBCconc). Before use in the laboratory, work-site and dermatology clinic, critical performance parameters of this emerging technology require careful evaluation.

    To assess short- and long-term stability, image uniformity, distance and image size dependence, ambient light and curvature influence in a production batch of Tissue Viability Imagers.

    Four Tissue Viability Imagers from the same production batch were evaluated at two laboratories (one industrial and one dermatological) with respect to critical parameter performance.

    The average systematic drift in sensitivity over time was 0.27% and < 1.02% for all four units tested. Difference in sensitivity between units was limited to 4.1% and was due to offset rather than gain deviation. Spatial variation in image uniformity was below 3.08% and 1.93% in the corners and centre of an individual image, respectively. This spatial variation could be further reduced to 0.25% and 0.13%, respectively by image normalization. Ambient light from a 40 W bulb or a 11 W fluorescent light source at a distance of 50-60 cm above the object, reduced the recorded values by about 10%, while the camera to object distance and image size had no detectable influence on sensitivity. Curved objects, such as human forearm, demonstrated an edge effect limited to below 10%.

    The critical TiVi performance parameters evaluated proved stable in relation to expected variations in skin RBCconc over time. Calibration by way of a two-point method may reduce differences in sensitivity between instruments to further facilitate inter-laboratory comparison of results.

  • 343.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elektriska säkerhetsproblem i: Styrd värmedyna för kliniskt bruk1974Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 344.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elektriska säkerhetsproblem II: En överblick över medicintekniska säkerhetsfrågor1974Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 345.
    Nilsson, Gert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elektriska säkerhetsproblem III: Referenslista1974Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 346.
    Nilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Light interaction with human cutaneous blood vessels determined by Monte Carlo simulation - compensation for pathlength dependence in laser Doppler flowmetry1998In: European Conference on Microcirculation,1998, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 347. ODoherty, J.
    et al.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Leahy, MJ.
    O'Doherty Investigation of Microvascular Red Blood Cell Proliferation in Dermal Tissue2006In: Institute of Physics IOP Ireland Annual Spring Meeting,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 348. ODoherty, J.
    et al.
    McNamara, P.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Leahy, MJ.
    Observing RBC concentration in human dermal tissue. Implementation and computer modelling.2006In: Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland, Section of Biomedical Sciences,Summer Meeting, University of Limerick.,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 349.
    O'doherty, Jim
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Plassey Technological Park, Limerick, Ireland.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Leahy, Martin J.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Plassey Technological Park, Limerick, Ireland.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sub-epidermal imaging using polarized light spectroscopy for assessment of skin microcirculation2007In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 472-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: Many clinical conditions that affect the microcirculation of the skin are still diagnosed and followed up by observational methods alone in spite of the fact that non-invasive, more user-independent and objective methods are available today. Limited portability, high cost, lack of robustness and non-specificity of findings are among the factors that have hampered the implementation of these methods in a clinical setting. The aim of this study is to present and evaluate a new, portable and easy-to-use imaging technology for investigation of the red blood cell (RBC) concentration in the skin microvasculature based on the method of polarization light spectroscopy using modified standard digital camera technology.

    Methods: The use of orthogonal linear polarization filters over both the flash source and the detector array removes the polarization-retaining light reflected from the epidermal layer. Only the depolarized light backscattered from the papillary dermal matrix reaches the detector array. By separating the RGB color planes of an image acquired in this manner and applying a dedicated image processing algorithm, spectroscopic information about the chromophores in the dermal tissue can be attained. If the algorithm is based on a differential principle in which the normalized differences between the individual values of the red and green color plane are calculated, tissue components with similar spectral signature in both planes are suppressed, while components with different spectral signatures such as RBCs are enhanced.

    Results: In vitro fluid models compare well with theory and computer simulations in describing a linear relationship between the imager output signal termed the tissue viability index (TiVi index) and RBC concentration in the physiological range of 0-4% RBC fraction of tissue volume (cc=0.997, n=20). The influence of oxygen saturation on the calculated RBC concentration is limited to within -3.9% for values within the physiological range (70-100% oxygen saturation). Monte Carlo simulations provide information about the sampling depth (about 0.5mm on the average) of the imaging system. In vivo system evaluation based on iontophoresis of acetylcholine displays a heterogeneous pattern of vasodilatation appearing inside the electrode area after about 10min. Topical application of methyl nicotinate and clobetasol propionate further demonstrates the capacity to document the extent and intensity of both an increase (erythema) and a decrease (blanching) in the skin RBC concentration without movement artifact and with compensation for irregularity in pigmentation.

    Conclusions: Polarization light spectroscopy imaging for assessment of RBC concentration in the skin microvasculature is a robust and accessible technique for the clinical setting. Additionally, the technique has pre-clinical research applications for investigation of the spatial and temporal aspects of skin erythema and blanching as well as a potential role in drug development, skin care product development and skin toxicological assessment.

  • 350.
    O'Doherty, Jim
    et al.
    Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, United Kingdom.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enfield, Joey
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Nilsson, Gert E
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Leahy, Martin J.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tissue viability imaging (TiVi) in the assessment of divergent beam UV-B provocation2011In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 303, no 2, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In routine clinical phototesting and in basic research, naked eye dermatological assessment is the "gold standard" for determining the patient's minimal erythemal dose (MED). In UV-B testing with a divergent, radially attenuating beam of characterised dosimetry, laser Doppler perfusion imaging has been previously used to give quantitative description of reactivity to doses above the MED in addition to a "single-dose" objective determination of the MED itself. In the present paper, the recently developed tissue viability imaging (TiVi) technology is presented for the first time as a reliable, easily applicable, high-resolution alternative to LDPI in the divergent beam testing concept. Data obtained after provocation with a range of doses was analysed in order to determine the reaction diameter, which can be related to the MED using field dosimetry. The dose-response features of exposure above the MED and the relationship between naked eye readings and the diameter were determined from the image data. TiVi data were obtained faster than LDPI data and at a higher spatial resolution of 100 μm instead of 1 mm. A tool was developed to centre over the erythema area of the acquired image. Response data could be plotted continuously against dose. Thresholding of processed images compared to naked eye "gold standard" readings showed that the normal skin value +4 standard deviations produced a good fit between both methods. A linear fitting method for the dose-response data provided a further method of determination of the reaction diameter (MED). Erythemal "volume under the surface (VUS)" for the reaction provided a new concept for visualising information. TiVi offers advantages over LDPI in the acquisition and analysis of data collected during divergent beam testing. An increased amount of data compared to traditional phototesting is easily and more objectively obtained which increases applicability in the clinical and research environment.

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