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  • 301.
    Andersson, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quirk, Chris
    Royal Perth Hospital, WA Australien.
    Sullivan, John
    Liverpool Hospital, NSW Australien.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Cutaneous manifestations of internal disease2008In: Drug Discovery Today : Disease Mechanisms, ISSN 1740-6765, E-ISSN 1740-6765, Vol. 5, no 1, p. e113-e123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The skin mirrors the individual's well being. Visible for both the patient and the attending physician, it can be a source of information for the diagnosis of multi-system diseases and diseases of internal organs. Therapy is usually directed at the primary disease. Pharmaco-therapeutic options for internal diseases are at present not always optimal and specific management of side effects of drugs with vital indication may be necessary. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the cutaneous manifestations may help develop more efficacious, better tolerated therapy and improve the patient's situation.

  • 302.
    Andersson, Siv Folkhammar
    et al.
    Unit of Rehabilitation, Kalmar County Council, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriksson Welin, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Divison of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Arthritis management in primary care: A study of physiotherapists current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines2017In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis‐related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence‐based care.

    Methods

    Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire.

    Results

    Sixty‐four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p < 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p < 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA.

    Conclusions

    PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care.

  • 303.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Göteborg, Sweden/Borås University, School of Health Sciences,Borås Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fixing the Wounded or Keeping Lead in the Air: Tactical Officers’ Views of Emergency Care on the Battlefield2015In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 180, no 2, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify tactical officers’ views of pre-hospital emergency care in the field before an international mission. A qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach based on interviews was used. The result of this study is a set of descriptive categories on a collective level, showing the variation in how the tactical officers perceived the phenomenon of emergency care in the battlefield. The result can be viewed as (1) noncombat oriented including being able to do one’s specialist task, being able to talk with local people and being able to give first aid, (2) combat oriented including soldiers’ skills and roles in the unit, being able to act in the unit and being able to lead the care of  injured These findings are important for officers’ preparation for international missions. The interaction between military and medical knowledge on-site care should be developed between the tactical officer and the medical personnel in order to minimize suffering and to enhance the possibility for survival of the casualty.

  • 304.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 305.
    Andersson, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Thuresson Muhrman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Arbetsminne och receptivt lexikon hos barn med cochleaimplantat: en undersökning med SIPS och PPVT2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cochlear implants (CI) are one of the most important medical innovations in the last 20 years. A CI can enable hearing and spoken language in children with severe hearing impairment or deafness. However, many children with CIs do not reach the expected level of language. The reasons for this are not yet fully understood and further research is therefore necessary. In the present study 9 children, 6;7-12;4 years old with CIs participated. The purpose of this study was to investigate cognitive and language abilities with focus on working memory and receptive lexicon in children with CI. For this purpose selected parts of the computer based test battery SIPS (Sound Information Processing System) and PPVT (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test) were used. The test results were analysed on group level and on individual level. In addition the results were compared to results from a control group of children with normal hearing.

    The children with CIs achieved lower results than the control group did, measured on a group level. A few individuals though performed at the same level as the children in the control group which implies that it is possible for children with CIs to reach good results on the examined aspects. The results of this study also indicate that late implantation is not necessarily an obstacle for good language development. Correlations between working memory and lexicon were found both in the children with CIs and in the control group. No correlation between the investigated demographic factors and test results was found.

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  • 306.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Kristin
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsén, Monika Fagevik
    Department of Surgery and Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 37, article id 25886536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

    METHODS: This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay.

    RESULTS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

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  • 307.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

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  • 308.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-calibrated DCE MRI using Multi Scale Adaptive Normalized Averaging (MANA)2012In: Proceedings of the annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2012), 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Anderssson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Karlsson, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test - Revised Version á la Andersson & Karlsson2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test is a widely used test for measuring aspects of social cognition. The aim of the present study was to provide results from a group of typically developing Swedish children (age 9-12) and to compare these results with children and adults in other Swedish and English studies, as well as results from a group of children with Asperger syndrome. Method: A Swedish version of the child version of the test was completed by 83 controls and by six children with Asperger syndrome. Results were compared between the two groups and with data from other studies. Results: The children in the current study did not differ on scores compared to children in the same age group in other studies. The children in the current study scored significantly lower than adults in an earlier study. The results from the children with Asperger syndrome did not differ significantly to the results from the controls.

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  • 310.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hermann, Julia M.
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, ZIBMT, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany, German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München‐Neuherberg, Germany.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Paediatric Department, CPH‐Direct, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Skrivarhaug, Torild
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Froehlich-Reiterer, Elke
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Maahs, David M.
    Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Stanford Diabetes Research Center, Stanford, California, USA.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Kapellen, Thomas
    University Children's Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Fritsch, Maria
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Birkebaek, Niels H.
    Department of Paediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Drivvoll, Ann K.
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Miller, Kellee
    Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, Florida, USA.
    Stephenson, Terence
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hofer, Sabine E.
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Fredheim, Siri
    Paediatric Department, CPH‐Direct, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Kummernes, Siv J.
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Foster, Nicole
    Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, Florida, USA.
    Amin, Rakesh
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hilgard, Doerte
    Pediatric Practice, Witten, Germany.
    Rami-Merhar, Birgit
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Dahl-Jorgensen, Knut
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Clements, Mark
    Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, USA University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, USA University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.
    Hanas, Ragnar
    Department of Paediatrics, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden and the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holl, Reinhard W.
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, ZIBMT, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München‐Neuherberg, Germany.
    Warner, Justin T.
    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    International benchmarking in type 1 diabetes: Large difference in childhood HbA1c between eight high-income countries but similar rise during adolescence-A quality registry study2020In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To identify differences and similarities in HbA1c levels and patterns regarding age and gender in eight high-income countries. Subjects 66 071 children and adolescents below18 years of age with type 1 diabetes for at least 3 months and at least one HbA1c measurement during the study period. Methods Pediatric Diabetes Quality Registry data from Austria, Denmark, England, Germany, Norway, Sweden, the United States, and Wales were collected between 2013 and 2014. HbA1c, gender, age, and duration were used in the analysis. Results Distribution of gender and age groups was similar in the eight participating countries. The mean HbA1c varied from 60 to 73 mmol/mol (7.6%-8.8%) between the countries. The increase in HbA1c between the youngest (0-9 years) to the oldest (15-17 years) age group was close to 8 mmol/mol (0.7%) in all countries (P &lt; .001). Females had a 1 mmol/mol (0.1%) higher mean HbA1c than boys (P &lt; .001) in seven out of eight countries. Conclusions In spite of large differences in the mean HbA1c between countries, a remarkable similarity in the increase of HbA1c from childhood to adolescence was found.

  • 311.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Futurum, Australia; Jonköping Academic Improvement Health and Welf, Germany.
    Teenagers with poor metabolic control already have a higher risk of microvascular complications as young adults2016In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 533-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate how HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes affects microvascular complications in young adults. Methods: All individuals registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry (SWEDIABKIDS) 13-18 years of age, and as adults registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry (NDR) in both the years 2011 and 2012 were included, in total 4250 individuals. Results: Of the individuals with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS 83.4% had retinopathy, 15.8% had microalbuminuria and 4.9% had macroalbuminuria in NDR. The logistic regression analysis showed that the OR to develop macroalbuminuria as a young adult was significantly higher in the group with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS (p &lt; 0.05). Among the patients with mean HbA1c above 78 mmol/mol in both registries there was a significantly higher proportion that had retinopathy, microalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.001) and/or macroalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.01) compared to the group with HbA1c below 57 mmol/mol in both registries. Only 6.5% of the persons in this study were over 30 years of age. Conclusions: Paediatric diabetes teams working with teenagers must be aware of the impact of good metabolic control during adolescence, and should intensify the care during this vulnerable period of life to reduce the risk of microvascular complications in young adults.

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  • 312.
    Andolf, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Möller, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prior placental bed disorders and later dementia: a retrospective Swedish register-based cohort study2020In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the association between a history of placental bed disorders and later dementia. Design Retrospective population-based cohort study. Setting Sweden. Sample All women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 (1 128 709). Methods Women with and without placental bed disorders (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy including pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, spontaneous preterm labour and birth, preterm premature rupture of membranes, abruptio placenta, late miscarriages) and other pregnancy complications were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register. International classification of disease was used. Data were linked to other National Registers. Participants were followed up until 2013. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios for women with and without pregnancy complications and were adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of vascular dementia and non-vascular dementia. Results Adjusted for cardiovascular disease and socio-demographic factors, an increased risk of vascular dementia was shown in women with previous pregnancy-induced hypertension (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.88, 95% CI 1.32-2.69), pre-eclampsia (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.23-2.16), spontaneous preterm labour and birth (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.12-2.42) or preterm premature rupture of membranes (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.08-2.37). No statistically significant increased risk was seen for other pregnancy complications or non-vascular dementia even though many of the point estimates indicated increased risks. Conclusions Women with placental bed disorders have a higher risk for vascular disease. Mechanisms behind the abnormal placentation remain elusive, although maternal constitutional factors, abnormal implantation as well as impaired angiogenesis have been suggested. Tweetable abstract Placental bed syndromes associated with vascular dementia even after adjusting for cardiovascular disease.

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  • 313.
    Andolf, Ellika G.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown University, RI 02908 USA.
    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and later dementia: a Swedish National Register Study2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Our aim was to investigate the rate of vascular dementia and dementia in women with previous hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, since white matter lesions of the brain and cardiovascular disease are linked both to dementia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Material and methods. Prospective population-based registry study on all women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1975 (284 598). Women with and without hypertensive disorders in pregnancy were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register and linked to the National Patient Register, where data on somatic disease later in life were obtained. International classification of disease was used. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios for both groups and adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures were in-hospital diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and dementia. Results. No increased risks were seen for vascular dementia or dementia after any hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. If broken down in specific diagnoses for hypertensive disease in pregnancy, adjusted risks for vascular dementia after hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy the hazard ratio was 6.27 (95% CI 1.65-27.44). Higher risks for cardiovascular disease were confirmed. Conclusions. Because of the very low absolute risk, the wide confidence interval and risk of misclassification, our results on vascular dementia could be questioned. Considering the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, the findings of brain lesions and the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the possibly increased risk for all kinds of dementia must be investigated in larger and more well-defined cohorts.

  • 314. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Appetite in patients with heart failure: Assessment, prevalence and related factors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Appetite is an important component in nutrition for maintaining the food intake needed by the body. Decreased appetite is a common clinical problem in patients with heart failure. It has a negative impact on food intake and possibly on malnutrition and health outcomes. There is a lack of evidence on how to assess appetite in heart failure. Furthermore, there are knowledge gaps about factors associated with appetite and which role appetite plays for health status in heart failure.  

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate appetite in patients with heart failure. Four studies were conducted with the goal to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) (I) and to explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and related factors associated with appetite in patients with heart failure (II-IV).  

    Methods: A multicenter study was conducted in three outpatient heart failure clinics in the center of Sweden during 2009-2012. Data were collected through a baseline measurement (I-IV) and an 18-month follow-up (IV). The first study was a psychometric evaluation study (I), while the other studies had an observational cross-sectional design (II-III) and an observational prospective design (IV). One hundred and eighty-six patients diagnosed with heart failure and experiencing heart failure symptoms participated at baseline. At the 18-month follow-up study (IV), one hundred and sixteen participants from the baseline participated. Data were collected from medical records (pharmacological treatment, comorbidity, left ventricle ejection fraction, time of diagnosis), self-reported questionnaires (demographic background data, appetite, symptoms of depression, health status, sleep, self-reported physical activity), objective measurements (anthropometric assessment of body size, blood samples, six minutes’ walk test, and physical activity measured with an actigraph) and clinical assessment (New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification, and cognitive assessment). The main outcome variables included appetite (I, II and IV) and health status (III). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the studies (I-IV).  

    Results: The majority of the participants had moderate heart failure symptoms, i.e., NYHA class II (n=114, 61%). Most of the participants were men (n=130, 70%). Mean age was 70,7 years, (SD=11,0), and mean BMI was 28.7 (SD=5.3). The CNAQ showed acceptable psychometric properties for assessing appetite in patients with heart failure (I). This thesis shows that 38% of the participants experienced an appetite level that put them at risk of weight loss (I). It was shown that factors such as biological, medical, psychological (II) and physical activity/exercise capacity (IV) are associated with appetite. Also, appetite was associated with impaired health status. However, this association was found to be moderated by symptoms of depression (III). Neither appetite nor physical activity changed during the 18-month follow-up (IV).  

    Conclusion: Decreased appetite is a serious phenomenon that needs attention in the care of patients with heart failure. Health care professionals can now use a validated and simple appetite instrument to assess appetite in heart failure. In addition, attention should be paid to elderly patients and those who have symptoms of depression, sleep problems, impaired cognitive function and impaired physical activity, as well as to patients on suboptimal medical treatment. Higher appetite was shown to contribute to a better health status, but this was only evident in patients without symptoms of depression. Therefore, special attention should be paid to symptoms of depression, as this risk factor affected the association between appetite and health status. This thesis enhances the understanding of the magnitude of the problem with decreased appetite in heart failure both in numbers and factors. New priorities in nutrition care and new ideas can be established, both in practice and in research, in order to improve a nutrition care that is vital for patients with heart failure.  

    List of papers
    1. Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE INC MEDICAL PUBLISHERS, 2015
    Keywords
    Appetite; heart failure; outpatient; psychometrics
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123773 (URN)10.1016/j.cardfail.2015.10.006 (DOI)000366230900004 ()26497759 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Center for Clinical Research and Sormland County Council, Sweden; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemason Foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-03-14
    2. Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    Keywords
    age; appetite; cognitive function; depression; heart failure; insomnia; outpatient; pharmacological treatment
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128929 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13220 (DOI)000375866200022 ()26879764 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Centre for Clinical Research Sormland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemason Foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-03-14
    3. Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2018
    Keywords
    appetite, association, depression, health status, heart failure, nutritional status
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139105 (URN)10.1097/JCN.0000000000000428 (DOI)000440241700003 ()28574973 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020167287 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-07-01 Created: 2017-07-01 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
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  • 315.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 316.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Centre Health Evaluat and Outcome Science, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Correction: Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure (vol 21, pg 954, 2015)2016In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 245-245Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 317.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Providence Health Care Research Institute, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 318.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 319.
    Andreas, Svensson
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Model Predictive Control with Invariant Sets in Artificial Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with Model Predictive Control (MPC) for artificial pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients. A control strategy exploiting invariant sets in MPC for blood glucose level control is developed, to the authors knowledge for the first time. The work includes various types of invariant sets relevant for the artificial pancreas problem, and different ways to incorporate them into the MPC strategy. The work is an extension to the zone MPC controller for artificial pancreas developed at University of California Santa Barbara and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute.

    The evaluation of the proposed control strategy is done in silico in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved metabolic simulator. The trials show some promising results in terms of more rapid meal responses and decreased variability between the subjects than the zone MPC. An attempt to robust control employing invariant sets proved to be less promising in the evaluations. The results indicate that the direct application of known robust control techniques is not appropriate, and that more appropriate robust control techniques must be searched for, or developed, more specific to the artificial pancreas control.

    Altogether, this thesis pinpoints a possible future direction of artificial pancreas control design, with MPC based on invariant sets.

    Download full text (pdf)
    AndreasSvensson_ModelPredictiveControlwithInvariantSetsinArtificialPancreasforType1DiabetesMellitus
  • 320.
    Andreassen, A. K.
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Andersson, B.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, F.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Eiskjaer, H.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Radegran, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Gude, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Solbu, D.
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway.
    Karason, K.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Arora, S.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Dellgren, G.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gullestad, L.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Everolimus Initiation With Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal in De Novo Heart Transplant Recipients: Three-Year Results From the Randomized SCHEDULE Study2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1238-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a randomized, open-label trial, de novo heart transplant recipients were randomized to everolimus (3-6ng/mL) with reduced-exposure calcineurin inhibitor (CNI; cyclosporine) to weeks 7-11 after transplant, followed by increased everolimus exposure (target 6-10ng/mL) with cyclosporine withdrawal or standard-exposure cyclosporine. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. A total of 110 of 115 patients completed the 12-month study, and 102 attended a follow-up visit at month 36. Mean measured GFR (mGFR) at month 36 was 77.4mL/min (standard deviation [SD] 20.2mL/min) versus 59.2mL/min (SD 17.4mL/min) in the everolimus and CNI groups, respectively, a difference of 18.3mL/min (95% CI 11.1-25.6mL/min; p &lt; 0.001) in the intention to treat population. Multivariate analysis showed treatment to be an independent determinant of mGFR at month 36. Coronary intravascular ultrasound at 36 months revealed significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy in the everolimus group compared with the CNI group. Biopsy-proven acute rejection grade 2R occurred in 10.2% and 5.9% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively, during months 12-36. Serious adverse events occurred in 37.3% and 19.6% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively (p=0.078). These results suggest that early CNI withdrawal after heart transplantation supported by everolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids with lymphocyte-depleting induction is safe at intermediate follow-up. This regimen, used selectively, may offer adequate immunosuppressive potency with a sustained renal advantage. A follow-up study of the SCHEDULE trial, which randomized de novo heart transplant recipients to everolimus with cyclosporine discontinuation or to standard-exposure cyclosporine, shows that measured glomerular filtration rate remains significantly higher in the everolimus group at three years posttransplant, with significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy compared to cyclosporine therapy.

  • 321.
    Andreassen, A.K.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Andersson, B.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, F.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Eiskjaer, H.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Rdegran, G.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Gude, E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Solbu, D.
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway .
    Sigurdardottir, V.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Arora, S.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Dellgren, G.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Gullestad, L.
    University of Oslo, Norway University of Oslo, Norway University of Oslo, Norway .
    Everolimus Initiation and Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal in Heart Transplant Recipients: A Randomized Trial2014In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1828-1838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a randomized, open-label trial, everolimus was compared to cyclosporine in 115 de novo heart transplant recipients. Patients were assigned within 5 days posttransplant to low-exposure everolimus (3-6 ng/mL) with reduced-exposure cyclosporine (n 56), or standard-exposure cyclosporine (n = 59), with both mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. In the everolimus group, cyclosporine was withdrawn after 7-11 weeks and everolimus exposure increased (6-10 ng/mL). The primary efficacy end point, measured GFR at 12 months posttransplant, was significantly higher with everolimus versus cyclosporine (mean +/- SD: 79.8 +/- 17.7 mL/min/1.73m 2 vs. 61.5 +/- 19.6 mL/min/1.73m 2; pless than0.001). Coronary intravascular ultrasound showed that the mean increase in maximal intimal thickness was smaller (0.03 mm [95% CI 0.01, 0.05 mm] vs. 0.08 mm [95% CI 0.05, 0.12 mm], p = 0.03), and the incidence of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was lower (50.0% vs. 64.6%, p = 0.003), with everolimus versus cyclosporine at month 12. Biopsy-proven acute rejection after weeks 7-11 was more frequent with everolimus (p = 0.03). Left ventricular function was not inferior with everolimus versus cyclosporine. Cytomegalovirus infection was less common with everolimus (5.4% vs. 30.5%, pless than0.001); the incidence of bacterial infection was similar. In conclusion, everolimus-based immunosuppression with early elimination of cyclosporine markedly improved renal function after heart transplantation. Since postoperative safety was not jeopardized and development of CAV was attenuated, this strategy may benefit long-term outcome.

  • 322.
    Andreasson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sigurdsson, Gudmundur V
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pegenius, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hallbook, Tove
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cortical excitability measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation in children with epilepsy before and after antiepileptic drugs2020In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To evaluate cortical excitability with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in children with new-onset epilepsy before and after antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Method Fifty-five drug-naive patients (29 females, 26 males; 3-18y), with new-onset epilepsy were recruited from 1st May 2014 to 31st October 2017 at the Child Neurology Department, Queen Silvias Childrens Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. We performed TMS in 48 children (23 females, 25 males; mean [SD] age 10y [3y], range 4-15y) with epilepsy (27 generalized and 21 focal) before and after the introduction of AEDs. We used single- and paired-pulse TMS. We used single-pulse TMS to record resting motor thresholds (RMTs), stimulus-response curves, and cortical silent periods (CSPs). We used paired-pulse TMS to record intracortical inhibition and facilitation at short, long, and intermediate intervals. Results There were no differences in cortical excitability between children with generalized and focal epilepsy at baseline. After AED treatment, RMTs increased (p=0.001), especially in children receiving sodium valproate (p=0.005). CSPs decreased after sodium valproate was administered (p=0.050). As in previous studies, we noted a negative correlation between RMT and age in our study cohort. Paired-pulse TMS could not be performed in most children because high RMTs made suprathreshold stimulation impossible. Interpretation Cortical excitability as measured with RMT decreased after the introduction of AEDs. This was seen in children with both generalized and focal epilepsy who were treated with sodium valproate, although it was most prominent in children with generalized epilepsy. We suggest that TMS might be used as a prognostic tool to predict AED efficacy.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-02-16 11:21
  • 323. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    André, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rules of Thumb and Management of Common Infections in General Practice2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with problem solving of general practitioners (GPs), which is explored with different methods and from different perspectives. The general aim was to explore and describe rules of thumb and to analyse the management of respiratory and urinary tract infections (RTI and UTI) in general practice in Sweden. The results are based upon focus group interviews concerning rules of thumb and a prospective diagnosis-prescription study concerning the management of patients allocated a diagnosis of RTI or UTI. In addition unpublished data are given from structured telephone interviews concerning specific rules of thumb in acute sinusitis and prevailing cough.

    GPs were able to verbalize their rules of thumb, which could be called tacit knowledge. A specific set of rules of thumb was used for rapid assessment when emergency and psychosocial problems were identified. Somatic problems seemed to be the expected, normal state. In the further consultation the rules of thumb seemed to be used in an act of balance between the individual and the general perspective. There was considerable variation between the rules of thumb of different GPs for patients with acute sinusitis and prevailing cough. In their rules of thumb the GPs seemed to integrate their medical knowledge and practical experience of the consultation. A high number of near-patient antigen tests to probe Streptococcus pyogenes (Strep A tests) and C-reactive protein (CRP) tests were performed in patients, where testing was not recommended. There was only a slight decrease in antibiotic prescribing in patients allocated a diagnosis of RTI examined with CRP in comparison with patients not tested. In general, the GPs in Sweden adhered to current guidelines for antibiotic prescribing. Phenoxymethylpenicillin (PcV) was the preferred antibiotic for most patients allocated a diagnosis of respiratory tract infection.

    In conclusion, the use of rules of thumb might explain why current practices prevail in spite of educational efforts. One way to change practice could be to identify and evaluate rules of thumb used by GPs and disseminate well adapted rules. The use of diagnostic tests in patients with infectious illnesses in general practice needs critical appraisal before introduction as well as continuing surveillance. The use of rules of thumb by GPs might be one explanation for variation in practice and irrational prescribing of antibiotics in patients with infectious conditions.

    List of papers
    1. Asking for ’rules of thumb’: a way to discover tacit knowledge in general practice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asking for ’rules of thumb’: a way to discover tacit knowledge in general practice
    2002 (English)In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Research in decision-making has identified heuristics (rules of thumb) as shortcuts to simplify search and choice.

    Objective. To find out if GPs recognize the use of rules of thumb and if they could describe what they looked like.

    Methods. An explorative and descriptive study was set up using focus group interviews. The interview guide contained the questions: Do you recognize the use of rules of thumb? Are you able to give some examples? What are the benefits and dangers in using rules of thumb? Where do they come from? The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the templates in the interview guide, and the examples of rules were classified by editing analysis.

    Results. Four groups with 23 GPs were interviewed. GPs recognized using rules of thumb, producing examples covering different aspects of the consultation. The rules for somatic problems were formulated as axiomatic simplified medical knowledge and taken for granted, while rules for psychosocial problems were formulated as expressions of individual experience and were followed by an explanation. The rules seemed unaffected by the sparse objections given. A GP’s clinical experience was judged a prerequisite for applying the rules. The origin of many rules was via word-of-mouth from a colleague. The GPs acknowledged the benefits of using the rules, thereby simplifying work.

    Conclusion. GPs recognize the use of rules of thumb as an immediate and semiconscious kind of knowledge that could be called tacit knowledge. Using rules of thumb might explain why practice remains unchanged although educational activities result in more elaborate knowledge.

    Keywords
    Decision-making, focus groups, general practice, heuristics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13634 (URN)10.1093/fampra/19.6.617 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-03-29 Created: 2003-03-29 Last updated: 2009-08-17
    2. Use of rules of thumb in the consultation in general practice: an act of balance between the individual and the general perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of rules of thumb in the consultation in general practice: an act of balance between the individual and the general perspective
    2003 (English)In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 514-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Rules of thumb used by GPs could be considered as empirical evidence of intuition and a link between science and practice in general practice.

    Objective. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the description of the application of rules of thumb with regard to different situations in general practice.

    Methods. An explorative and descriptive study was started with focus group interviews. Four groups with 23 GPs were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and analysed, and the rules and their application were classified by an editing analysis.

    Results. A specific set of rules of thumb was used for rapid assessment, when emergency and psychosocial problems were identified. When the main focus of the problems was identified as somatic or psychosocial, the GPs did not disregard the other aspects but described the use of rules in a simultaneous individualizing and generalizing process. The rules contained probability reasoning and risk assessment.

    Conclusion. Rules of thumb seemed to serve as a link between theoretical knowledge and practical experience and were used by the GPs in an act of balance between the individual and the general perspective.

    Keywords
    Consultation, focus groups, general practice, heuristics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13635 (URN)10.1093/fampra/cmg503 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-03-29 Created: 2003-03-29 Last updated: 2018-09-01
    3. Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 880-886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis/antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden for 1 week in November 2000. As part of this study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections (n = 2899) in primary care were analyzed. Almost half of the patients were aged < 15 y and one-fifth of the patients consulted out of hours. Of all patients seeking primary care for upper respiratory tract infections, 56.0% were prescribed an antibiotic. Almost all patients who were given the diagnoses streptococcal tonsillitis, acute otitis media or acute sinusitis were prescribed antibiotics, compared to 10% of patients with common cold or acute pharyngitis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was penicillin V (79.2%) and this was even more pronounced out of hours, when the diagnoses otitis media and streptococcal tonsillitis were more frequently used. In patients with common cold and acute pharyngitis, the percentage who received antibiotics increased with increasing length of symptoms and increasing CRP levels. In patients with acute pharyngitis or streptococcal tonsillitis, antibiotics were prescribed less frequently provided streptococcal tests were performed. The management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections in general practice seems to be in good agreement with current Swedish guidelines. However, the study indicates some areas for improvement. The diagnosis of acute sinusitis seems to have been overestimated and used only to justify antibiotic treatment.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2002
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13636 (URN)10.1080/0036554021000026952 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-03-29 Created: 2003-03-29 Last updated: 2018-05-22
    4. The Use of CRP Tests in Patients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care in Sweden Can Be Questioned
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Use of CRP Tests in Patients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care in Sweden Can Be Questioned
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis-antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden during 1 week in November in 2000 and 2002 respectively. As a part of the study, the use and results of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests in relation to duration of symptoms and antibiotic prescribing in 6778 patients assigned a diagnosis of respiratory tract infections were analysed. In almost half (42%) of the patients, a CRP test was performed. The majority of CRP tests (69%) were performed in patients assigned diagnosis upper respiratory tract infection, where the test is not recommended. Overall, there was a minor decrease in antibiotic prescribing when CRP was used (41%), in comparison to 44% of the patients where no CRP was performed (p<0.01). Patients assigned diagnoses implying a bacterial aetiology were prescribed antibiotics irrespective of result of CRP or length of symptoms before consultation. For patients assigned viral diagnoses, antibiotic prescribing increased with increasing duration of symptoms and increasing value of CRP. The use of CRP decreased antibiotic prescribing in patients assigned to viral diagnoses and with longstanding symptoms (p<0.001). However, 59% of the patients assigned viral diagnoses with CRP≥25 received antibiotics, which seems to indicate a misinterpretation of CRP and a non-optimal use of antibiotics.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13637 (URN)10.1080/00365540410019372 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-03-29 Created: 2003-03-29 Last updated: 2018-10-08
    5. Management of urinary tract infections in primary care: A repeated 1-week diagnosis-prescribing study in five counties in Sweden in 2000 and 2002
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of urinary tract infections in primary care: A repeated 1-week diagnosis-prescribing study in five counties in Sweden in 2000 and 2002
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 134-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis-antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden during 1week in November in the y 2000 and 2002, respectively. As part of the study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients who received diagnoses of urinary tract infections (UTIs) (n=1564) in primary care, were analysed. 85% of the visits were by women, and 74% of all consultations were diagnosed as lower UTIs. One or more diagnostic tests were performed in 98% of the women with suspected lower or recurrent UTIs and 95% were prescribed an antibiotic. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics for lower UTIs were trimethoprim followed by pivmecillinam and a quinolone. The study indicated a change in antibiotic prescribing with improved adherence to the national recommendations. There was an increase of prescribed nitrofurantoin and a decrease of prescribed quinolones to women with lower UTIs between the studied y. Furthermore, 3-d treatment with trimethoprim increased although the prescribed duration was mostly 7 d. In contrast to the guidelines, few urine cultures were performed. The study highlights the necessity of updating the guidelines for the management of lower UTIs in general practice.

    Keywords
    Urinary Tract Infections, Primary Care
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13638 (URN)10.1080/00365540410019075 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-03-29 Created: 2003-03-29 Last updated: 2009-06-09
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  • 324.
    André, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Billstedt, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bengtsson, Calle
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hallstrom, Tore
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lissner, Lauren
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Skoog, Ingmar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sundh, Valter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Waern, Margda
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bjorkelund, Cecilia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Personality in women and associations with mortality: a 40-year follow-up in the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg2014In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 14, no 61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The question of whether personality traits influence health has long been a focus for research and discussion. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine possible associations between personality traits and mortality in women. Methods: A population-based sample of women aged 38, 46, 50 and 54 years at initial examination in 1968-69 was followed over the course of 40 years. At baseline, 589 women completed the Cesarec-Marke Personality Schedule (the Swedish version of the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule) and the Eysenck Personality Inventory. Associations between personality traits and mortality were tested using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: No linear associations between personality traits or factor indices and mortality were found. When comparing the lowest (Q1) and highest quartile (Q4) against the two middle quartiles (Q2 + Q3), the personality trait Succorance Q1 versus Q2 + Q3 showed hazard ratio (HR) = 1.37 (confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-1.74), and for the factor index Aggressive non-conformance, both the lowest and highest quartiles had a significantly higher risk of death compared to Q2 + Q3: for Q1 HR = 1.32 (CI = 1.03-1.68) and for Q4 HR = 1.36 (CI = 1.06-1.77). Neither Neuroticism nor Extraversion predicted total mortality. Conclusions: Personality traits did not influence long term mortality in this population sample of women followed for 40 years from mid- to late life. One explanation may be that personality in women becomes more circumscribed due to the social constraints generated by the role of women in society.

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  • 325. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their child is ill and needs medical care, irrespective of the child’s age, diagnosis or the severity of the illness. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, to care for their ill child, and to cope with the challenges they face.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate sleep, mood, cortisol response, and sense of coherence (SOC) in parents caring for children in need of medical care, and to identify factors that may influence parents’ sleep.

    This thesis includes four original studies; two of these are quantitative, prospective, descriptive and comparative studies including parents (n=82) accommodated in six pediatric wards with their ill child, using questionnaires and sleep logs to measure sleep, mood and SOC, and saliva cortisol to measure cortisol response. A follow-up was performed four weeks later at home, after hospital discharge. The other two studies are qualitative, inductive and explorative interview studies, including parents (n=12) staying overnight with their preterm and/or ill infant in three neonatal intensive care units, and parents (n=15) with a child receiving hospital-based home care in two pediatric outpatient clinics. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic method.

    Being together with one’s family seems beneficial for sleep and may decrease stress. The ability to stay with the child, in the hospital or at home, was highly appreciated by the parents. When caring for a child with illness, parents’ sleep quality was sufficient in the hospital; however, sleep quality improved further (p<0.05) at home after discharge. The parents reported frequent nocturnal awakenings in the hospital caused by the child, medical treatment and hospital staff. Concern and anxiety about the child’s health, and uncertainty about the future were stressors affecting the parents’ sleep and mood negatively. The parents had lower (p=0.01) morning awakening cortisol levels in the pediatric ward compared to at home, and parents accommodated for more than one night had lower (p<0.05) post-awakening cortisol levels compared to parents staying their first night.

    The findings of this thesis conclude that being together as a family is important for the parents’ sleep. The ability to be accommodated in the hospital and gather the family around the child may have given the parents time for relaxation and recovery, that in turn may lead to a less stressful hospital stay. When it is beneficial for the child, the whole family should be included in the pediatric care. Moreover, pediatric nurses must acknowledge parents’ sleep, in hospital and at home. Medical treatment and care at night should be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents in order to maintain health and well-being in the family.

    List of papers
    1. Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    Keywords
    family nursing; family-centred care; kangaroo mother care; neonatal intensive care; nursing; siblings; skin-to-skin care
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115549 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12654 (DOI)000350354700010 ()25041598 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    2015 (English)In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott-Ravn Publisher, 2015
    Keywords
    children, chronic illness, home care services, parents, qualitative research, sleep
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121085 (URN)10.1097/NNR.0000000000000108 (DOI)000361361000006 ()26325279 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Parents’ stress and sleep quality when their children need medical care
    Funder
    Östergötland County CouncilMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    adolescents, child, child nursing, children’s nurses, family nursing, family-centred care, hospitalised child, paediatrics, parent, sleep
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143585 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14092 (DOI)000425733600018 ()28960555 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037348121 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-159681]; Region of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2019-05-01Bibliographically approved
    4. The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155717 (URN)10.1002/nop2.245 (DOI)000461835600041 ()30918712 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062974527 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), FORSS‐159681
    Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2020-04-27Bibliographically approved
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    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
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  • 326.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parents' perception of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care services2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 327. Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Region Östergötland.
    Perceptions of sleep by parents of children in hospital organized home-care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 328. Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Perceptions of sleep quality and stress by parents of children enrolled in hospital organized home-care2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 329.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sahlén Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Olsson, Emma
    Department of Pediatrics and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents’ sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis A randomised intervention study with two arms—intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents’ gender.

    Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89–31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

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  • 330.
    Angelin, Bo
    et al.
    Karolinska University, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Kristensen, Jens D.
    Karo Bio AB, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Karolinska University, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Bo
    Karo Bio AB, Sweden.
    Klein, Irwin
    NYU, NY USA.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Stockholm Heart Centre, Sweden.
    Chester Ridgway, E.
    University of Colorado, CO USA.
    Ladenson, Paul W.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Reductions in serum levels of LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, triglycerides and lipoprotein(a) in hypercholesterolaemic patients treated with the liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist eprotirome2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 277, no 3, p. 331-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLiver-selective thyromimetic agents could provide a new approach for treating dyslipidaemia. MethodsWe performed a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of eprotirome, a liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist, in 98 patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. After previous drug wash-out and dietary run-in, patients received 100 or 200gday(-1) eprotirome or placebo for 12weeks. The primary end-point was change in serum LDL cholesterol; secondary end-points included changes in other lipid parameters and safety measures. ResultsEprotirome treatment at 100 and 200g daily reduced serum LDL cholesterol levels by 235% and 31 +/- 4%, respectively, compared with 2 +/- 6% for placebo (Pless than0.0001). Similar reductions were seen in non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B, whereas serum levels of HDL cholesterol and apo A-I were unchanged. There were also considerable reductions in serum triglycerides and lipoprotein(a), in particular in patients with elevated levels at baseline. There was no evidence of adverse effects on heart or bone and no changes in serum thyrotropin or triiodothyronine, although the thyroxine level decreased. Low-grade increases in liver enzymes were evident in most patients. ConclusionIn hypercholesterolaemic patients, the liver-selective thyromimetic eprotirome decreased serum levels of atherogenic lipoproteins without signs of extra-hepatic side effects. Selective stimulation of hepatic thyroid hormone receptors may be an attractive way to modulate lipid metabolism in hyperlipidaemia.

  • 331.
    Angelison, L.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Östra, Sweden.
    Karling, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, U.
    Västmanlands Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, J.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Thorn, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Björk, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hindorf, U.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Löfberg, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bajor, A.
    Södera Älvsborgs sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammarlund, P.
    Ängelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Grip, O.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Torp, J.
    Kristianstad Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Marsal, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hertervig, E.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Long-term outcome of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis: a Swedish multicentre study of 250 patients2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Real-life long-term data on infliximab treatment in ulcerative colitis are limited. Aim To study the long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in chronic active ulcerative colitis and possible predictors of colectomy and response were also examined. Methods A retrospective multi-centre study of infliximab treatment in 250 patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis with inclusion criteria: age 18 years, ambulatory treated, steroid-dependent or intolerant and/or immunomodulator refractory or intolerant. Results Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 123/250 patients (49.2%) at 12 months and in 126/250 patients at a median follow-up of 2.9 years (50.4%). Primary response at 3 months was achieved by 190/250 (76.0%) patients and associated with a high probability of response 168/190 (88.4%) at 12 months and 143/190 (75.3%) at follow-up. Long-term rate of colectomy in primary responders was 6/190 (3.2%) at 12 months and 27/190 (14.2%) at last follow-up. Failure to achieve response at 3 months was associated with a high risk of subsequent colectomy, 29/60 (48.3%) at 12 months and 41/60 (68.3%) at follow-up. Response at 12 months was associated with a low risk of subsequent colectomy, 14/181 (7.7%) compared with non-response 19/34 (55.9%) (P amp;lt; 0.0001). Non-response at 3 months was an independent predictor of subsequent colectomy (HR = 9.40, 95% CI = 5.10-17.35, P amp;lt; 0.001). Concomitant azathioprine therapy did not influence outcome in terms of colectomy. Conclusions Long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis is excellent especially in patients who respond to induction treatment. Conversely, non-response at 3 months predicts a poor outcome, with a high risk of subsequent colectomy.

  • 332.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research in Sörmland, Sörmland County Council, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Child physical abuse: factors influencing the associations between self-reported exposure and self-reported health problems: a cross-sectional study2018In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 12, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Child physical abuse (CPA) is an extensive public health problem because of its associations with poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine which of the background factors of CPA committed by a parent or other caregiver relates to self-reported poor health among girls and boys (13; 15 and 17 years old): perpetrator, last year exposure; severity and frequency; socioeconomic load and foreign background.

    Methods

    In a cross-sectional study in a Swedish county (n = 8024) a path analysis was performed to evaluate a model where all background variables were put as predictors of three health-status variables: mental; physical and general health problems. In a second step a log linear analysis was performed to examine how the distribution over the health-status categories was different for different combinations of background factors.

    Results

    Children exposed to CPA reported poor health to a much higher extent than those who were not exposed. In the path analysis it was found that frequency and severity of abuse (boys only) and having experienced CPA during the last year, was significantly associated with poor health as well as socioeconomic load in the families. Foreign background was significantly negatively associated with all three health indicators especially for girls. Neither mother nor father as perpetrator remained significant in the path analysis, while the results from the log linear analyses showed that mother-abuse did in fact relate to poor general health and mental as well as physical health problems among boys and girls. Father-abuse was associated with poor mental health if severe abuse was reported. Poor mental health was also associated with mild father-abuse if exposure during the last year was reported.

    Conclusion

    Despite the limitations that cross-sectional studies imply, this study provides new knowledge about factors associated with poor health among physically abused children. It describes details of CPA that have significant associations to different aspects of poor health and thus what needs to be addressed by professionals within mental health providers and social services. Understanding how different factors may contribute to different health outcomes for exposed children is important in future research and needs further studies.

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  • 333.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, and Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polymorphism of FGFR4 in cancer development and sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation in head and neck cancer2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition of the FGFR4 Gly/Arg polymorphism for development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and, furthermore, to examine if the FGFR4 Arg(388) allele can be associated with resistance to chemo-and radiotherapy.

    When analysing 110 tumour biopsies a significant 1.7-fold increased risk to develop HNSCC in individuals carrying the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.026) was found. Moreover a 2-fold increased risk for mates harbouring the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.031) to develop HNSCC was detected. In 39 HNSCC cell lines the role of the Arg(388) allele for radiation and cisplatin sensitivity was investigated. Our results show no rote of the Arg(388) allele for the radiosensitivity (p = 0.996) but indicate a tendency to increased cisplatin sensitivity (p = 0.141). When screening the transmembrane and kinase domains in the FGFR4 gene a novel mutation, probably generating a truncated protein lacking exons 14-18, was found in six of eight selected cell lines.

    Taken together, we have here identified a marker that predicts the risk to develop HNSCC and possibly the sensitivity to cisplatin as well as a novel. mutation in the FGFR4 gene.

  • 334.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Epidermal growth factor is a biomarker for poor cetuximab response in tongue cancer cells2016In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target for treatment in tongue cancer. Here, EGFR ligands were evaluated for their potential uses as predictive biomarkers of cetuximab treatment response.

    Methods: In three tongue cancer cell lines the influences of epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPR) on tumour cell proliferation and cetuximab response were evaluated by the addition of recombinant human (rh) proteins or the siRNA-mediated downregulation of endogenous ligand production.

    Results: EGF or AR downregulation suppressed the proliferation of all investigated cell lines. Furthermore, all cell lines displayed increased cetuximab resistance upon the addition of rhEGF, whereas EGF silencing resulted in an improved cetuximab response in one cell line.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that EGF and AR are critical components of the EGFR signalling network required for full proliferative potential. Moreover, EGF is a potential predictive biomarker of poor cetuximab response and a possible treatment target.

  • 335.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grafström, Roland
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Grénman, Reidar
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -13 expression associate to cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer cell lines.2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 866-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is a common treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cisplatin is the backbone of chemotherapy regimens used to treat HNSCC. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify predictive markers for cisplatin treatment outcome in HNSCC. The intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) was determined in a panel of tumour cell lines. From this panel, one sensitive and two resistant cell lines were selected for comparative transcript profiling using microarray analysis. The enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO) categories in sensitive versus resistant cell lines were assessed using the Gene Ontology Tree Machine bioinformatics tool. In total, 781 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed and 11 GO categories were enriched. Transcripts contributing to this enrichment were further analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) for identification of key regulator genes. IPA recognized 20 key regulator genes of which five were differentially expressed in sensitive versus resistant cell lines. The mRNA level of these five genes was further assessed in a panel of 25 HNSCC cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. Among these key regulators, MMP-7 and MMP-13 are implicated as potential biomarkers of ICS. Taken together, genome-wide transcriptional analysis identified single genes, GO categories as well as molecular networks that are differentially expressed in HNSCC cell lines with different ICS. Furthermore, two novel predictive biomarkers for cisplatin resistance, MMP-7 and MMP-13, were identified.

  • 336.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dementia in the age of migration: cross-cultural perspectives2017In: Living with dementia: relations, responses and agency in everyday life / [ed] Lars-Christer Hydén, Eleonor Antelius, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, Vol. Sidorna 29-48, p. 29-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 338.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet.
    Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy: theoretical modelling for H&N tumours2015In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 639-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments.

  • 339.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Emely
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bassler, Niels
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Furusawa, Yoshiya
    National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes2014In: Journal of radiation research, ISSN 0449-3060, E-ISSN 1349-9157, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 902-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required  for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution.

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  • 340.
    Antonsen, Sofie L
    et al.
    Gynecological Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salvesen, Helga B
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Auranen, Annika
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Salvarsdottir, Anna
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Høgdall, Claus
    Gynecological Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Subspecialist training in surgical gynecologic oncology in the Nordic countries.2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 8, p. 917-920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries, we developed an online questionnaire in co-operation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian gynecological centers in charge of surgical treatment of cancer patients. Twenty (91%) centers participated. Four centers reported to be accredited European subspecialty training centers, a further six were interested in being accredited, and 11 centers were accredited by the respective National Board. Fourteen (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecologic oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange of fellows between Nordic countries.

  • 341.
    Apellaniz-Ruiz, Maria
    et al.
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Sanchez-Barroso, Lara
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Gutierrez-Gutierrez, Gerardo
    Hospital University of Infanta Sofia, Spain.
    Sereno, Maria
    Hospital University of Infanta Sofia, Spain.
    Garcia-Donas, Jesus
    CIOCC, Spain.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Brosen, Kim
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Bergmann, Troels K.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre CNIO, Spain; ISCIII Centre Biomed Research Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain.
    Letter: Replication of Genetic Polymorphisms Reported to Be Associated with Taxane-Related Sensory Neuropathy in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Paclitaxel-Letter in CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH, vol 21, issue 13, pp 3092-30932015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 13, p. 3092-3093Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 342.
    Apellániz-Ruiz, Maria
    et al.
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Tejero, Héctor
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Inglada-Pérez, Lucía
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain.
    Sánchez-Barroso, Lara
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Gerardo
    Neurology Section, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Calvo, Isabel
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Montepríncipe, Madrid, Spain. Medical Oncology Department, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Castelo, Beatriz
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    Redondo, Andrés
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    García-Donás, Jesus
    Gynecological and Genitourinary Tumors Programme, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Romero-Laorden, Nuria
    Gynecological and Genitourinary Tumors Programme, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain.
    Sereno, Maria
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Merino, María
    Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, Madrid, Spain.
    Currás-Freixes, Maria
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Montero-Conde, Cristina
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Mancikova, Veronika
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Al-Shahrour, Fatima
    Translational Bioinformatics Unit, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.
    Cascon, Alberto
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain.
    Robledo, Mercedes
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain .
    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina
    Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain.ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain .
    Targeted sequencing reveals low-frequency variants in EPHA genes as markers of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.2017In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1227-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Neuropathy is the dose limiting toxicity of paclitaxel and a major cause for decreased quality of life. Genetic factors have been shown to contribute to paclitaxel neuropathy susceptibility; however, the major causes for inter-individual differences remain unexplained. In this study we identified genetic markers associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy through massive sequencing of candidate genes.

    EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We sequenced the coding region of 4 EPHA genes, 5 genes involved in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and 30 Charcot-Marie-Tooth genes, in 228 cancer patients with no/low neuropathy or high grade neuropathy during paclitaxel treatment. An independent validation series included 202 paclitaxel-treated patients. Variation-/ gene-based analyses were used to compare variant frequencies among neuropathy groups and Cox regression models were used to analyze neuropathy evolution along treatment.

    RESULTS: Gene-based analysis identified EPHA6 as the gene most significantly associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Low frequency non-synonymous variants in EPHA6 were present exclusively in patients with high neuropathy and all affected the ligand binding domain. Accumulated dose analysis in the discovery series showed a significantly higher neuropathy risk for EPHA5/6/8 low-frequency non-synonymous variant carriers (HR=14.60, 95%CI=2.33-91.62, P=0.0042) and an independent cohort confirmed an increased neuropathy risk (HR=2.07, 95%CI=1.14-3.77, P=0.017). Combining the series gave an estimated 2.50-fold higher risk of neuropathy (95%CI=1.46-4.31; P=9.1x10(-4)).

    CONCLUSION: This first study sequencing EPHA genes revealed that low frequency variants in EPHA6, EPHA5 and EPHA8 contribute to the susceptibility to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Furthermore, EPHAs neuronal injury repair function suggests that these genes might constitute important neuropathy markers for many neurotoxic drugs.

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  • 343.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Knopf, Jasmin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Bilyy, Rostyslav
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany; Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Vovk, Volodymyr
    Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Sundgren, Pia C.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Munoz, Luis E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Herrmann, Martin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Höög, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Active NET formation in Libman-Sacks endocarditis without antiphospholipid antibodies: A dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus2018In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 310-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been highlighted in several systemic inflammatory diseases, their clinical correlates and potential pathological role remain obscure. Herein, we describe a dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with clear-cut pathogenic implications for neutrophils and NET formation in a young woman with cardiac (Libman-Sacks endocarditis) and central nervous system (psychosis and seizures) involvement. Despite extensive search, circulating antiphospholipid autoantibodies, a hallmark of Libman-Sacks endocarditis, could not be detected. Instead, we observed active NET formation in the tissue of the mitral valve, as well as in the circulation. Levels of NET remnants were significantly higher in serially obtained sera from the patient compared with sex-matched blood donors (p=.0011), and showed a non-significant but substantial correlation with blood neutrophil counts (r=0.65, p=.16). The specific neutrophil elastase activity measured in serum seemed to be modulated by the provided immunosuppressive treatment. In addition, we found anti-Ro60/SSA antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient but not NET remnants or increased elastase activity. This case illustrates that different disease mechanisms mediated via autoantibodies can occur simultaneously in SLE. NET formation with release of cytotoxic NET remnants is a candidate player in the pathogenesis of this non-canonical form of Libman-Sacks endocarditis occurring in the absence of traditional antiphospholipid autoantibodies. The case description includes longitudinal results with clinical follow-up data and a discussion of the potential roles of NETs in SLE.

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  • 344.
    Appelqvist, Frida
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Yhr, Maria
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Erlandson, Anna
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Tommy
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Deletion of the MGMT gene in familial melanoma2014In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 703-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA repair gene MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is important for maintaining normal cell physiology and genomic stability. Alterations in MGMT play a critical role in the development of several types of cancer, including glioblastoma, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the function of genetic alterations in MGMT and their connection with familial melanoma (FM). Using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified a deletion that included the MGMT gene in one of 64 families with a melanoma predisposition living in western Sweden. The mutation segregated with the disease as a heterozygous deletion in blood-derived DNA, but a homozygous deletion including the promoter region and exon 1 was seen in tumor tissue based on Affymetrix 500K and 6.0 arrays. By sequence analysis of the MGMT gene in the other 63 families with FM from western Sweden, we identified four common polymorphisms, nonfunctional, as predominantly described in previous studies. We conclude that inherited alterations in the MGMT gene might be a rare cause of FM, and we suggest that MGMT contributes to melanoma predisposition.

  • 345.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hals Berglund, Maria
    University Hospital Norrland, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Transient Ischemic Attack2017In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the absence of active management, the stroke risk after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) may be high. Almost 10 years ago, the results of the EXPRESS and SOS-TIA studies called for a more rapid management of TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the other stroke risks in the longer term, after the implementation of a more active approach to TIA. We also wanted to assess the predictive value of the ABCD2 score in this context. Methods: Riksstroke is the national stroke registry in Sweden. Data from Riksstrokes TIA module, and the national cause-of-death register, for the years 2011 and 2012 were used in this study. Stroke occurrence was monitored via Riksstroke. Coxs regression was used for risk evaluation. The predictive value of the ABCD2 score was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. Results: A total of 15,068 TIA episodes occurred in 14,102 patients. The follow-up time varied between 0 and 819 days, with an average of 417 days. The mortality for all TIA patients during the follow-up time was 7.1%. Of the unique patients, 545 had one or more strokes (3.9%), corresponding to 34 events per 1,000 person years. Significant risk factors for stroke were: age, previous TIA, atrial fibrillation (AF), oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment, hypertension treatment, and the ABCD2 items speech impairment, unilateral weakness, and diabetes mellitus. The ABCD2 score correlated with a subsequent stroke, but its predictive value was low. Conclusion: The risk of stroke is low after the acute phase of a TIA, probably lower than in previous studies. This may be due to better secondary prevention in recent years. Several risk factors predict stroke, notably hypertensive treatment, which may be inadequate; and AF, where OACs may be under-used. It is difficult to identify the role of the ABCD2 score in clinical practice. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 346.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kopeć, Mariusz
    University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland.
    Gudowska, Irena
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Modelling of a proton spot scanning system using MCNP62017In: INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE 2016, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2017, Vol. 860, article id 012025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to model the characteristics of a clinical proton spot scanning beam using Monte Carlo simulations with the code MCNP6. The proton beam was defined using parameters obtained from beam commissioning at the Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden. Simulations were evaluated against measurements for proton energies between 60 and 226 MeV with regard to range in water, lateral spot sizes in air and absorbed dose depth profiles in water. The model was also used to evaluate the experimental impact of lateral signal losses in an ionization chamber through simulations using different detector radii. Simulated and measured distal ranges agreed within 0.1 mm for R90 and R80, and within 0.2 mm for R50. The average absolute difference of all spot sizes was 0.1 mm. The average agreement of absorbed dose integrals and Bragg-peak heights was 0.9%. Lateral signal losses increased with incident proton energy with a maximum signal loss of 7% for 226 MeV protons. The good agreement between simulations and measurements supports the assumptions and parameters employed in the presented Monte Carlo model. The characteristics of the proton spot scanning beam were accurately reproduced and the model will prove useful in future studies on secondary neutrons.

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  • 347.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gudowska, Irena
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Flejmer, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    The Skandion Clinic, Sweden.
    Impact of irradiation setup in proton spot scanning brain therapy on organ doses from secondary radiation2018In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 180, no 1-4, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Monte Carlo model of a proton spot scanning pencil beam was used to simulate organ doses from secondary radiation produced from brain tumour treatments delivered with either a lateral field or a vertex field to one adult and one paediatric patient. Absorbed doses from secondary neutrons, photons and protons and neutron equivalent doses were higher for the vertex field in both patients, but the differences were low in absolute terms. Absorbed doses ranged between 0.1 and 43 μGy.Gy−1 in both patients with the paediatric patient receiving higher doses. The neutron equivalent doses to the organs ranged between 0.5 and 141 μSv.Gy−1 for the paediatric patient and between 0.2 and 134 μSv.Gy−1 for the adult. The highest neutron equivalent dose from the entire treatment was 7 mSv regardless of field setup and patient size. The results indicate that different field setups do not introduce large absolute variations in out-of-field doses produced in patients undergoing proton pencil beam scanning of centrally located brain tumours.

  • 348.
    Ardenfors, Oscar
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Stockholm University.
    Josefsson, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Are IMRT treatments in the head and neck region increasing the risk of secondary cancers?2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1041-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been increasingly employed for treating head and neck (H&N) tumours due to its ability to produce isodoses suitable for the complex anatomy of the region. The aim of this study was to assess possible differences between IMRT and conformal radiation therapy (CRT) with regard to risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancies for H&N tumours.

    Material and Methods: IMRT and CRT plans were made for 10 H&N adult patients and the resulting treatment planning data were used to calculate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies in four different tissues. Three risk models with biologically relevant parameters were used for calculations. The influence of scatter radiation and repeated imaging sessions has also been investigated.

    Results: The results showed that the total lifetime risks of developing radiation-induced secondary malignancies from the two treatment techniques, CRT and IMRT, were comparable and in the interval 0.9-2.5%. The risk contributions from the primary beam and scatter radiation were comparable, whereas the contribution from repeated diagnostic imaging was considerably smaller.

    Conclusion: The results indicated that the redistribution of the dose characteristic to IMRT leads to a redistribution of the risks in individual tissues. However, the total levels of risk were similar between the two irradiation techniques considered.

  • 349.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Editorial Material: Systematic review hacks for the sports and exercise clinician: five essential methodological elements in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 8, pp 447-4492016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 447-449Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 350.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    Bahr, Roald
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway.
    Editorial Material: It is time for consensus on return to play after injury: five key questions in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 9, pp 506-5082016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 506-508Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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