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  • 301.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Developmental Psychology.
    Coming of age. Perspective setting in multi-pary problem formulations.1996In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 21, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Developmental Psychology.
    Co-narration and voice in family therapy. Voicing, devoicing and orchestration.1994In: Text - an interdisciplinary journal for the study of discourse, ISSN 0165-4888, Vol. 14, p. 345-370Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Face-work and participant statues in family therapy talk1991In: 4th Interantional Conference on Language and Social Psychology,1991, 1991Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Power and control in family therapy talk1990In: International Pragmatics Conference,1990, 1990Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

           

  • 305.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Samtalsmönster i familjeterapi. Om mikroanalys av flerpartssamtal1993In: Social Forskning, 1993, p. 10-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 306.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Barn och ungdomsvetenskap, Stockholms universitet.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Activity contracts and directives in everyday family politics2011In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In theorizing on family life, childrens agency is a feature of a modern type of family, marked by free choice and inter-generational negotiations rather than parental authority. A video ethnography of Swedish everyday family life documents directive sequences and inter-generational negotiations, including what is here called activity contracts: agreements that form a type of inter-generational account work around target activities (e.g. cleaning ones room). Within local family politics, contracts and revised contracts emerge as parts of such account work. The analyses focus on how contracts emerge within successive downgradings and upgradings of parental directives. Activity contracts regulate mutual rights and obligations, invoking family rule statements and local moral order, drawing on an array of verbal and nonverbal resources, ranging from parents mitigated requests and childrens time bargaining to nonverbal escape strategies and gentle shepherding.

  • 307.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholms universitet, Barn och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förhandlingar mellan föräldrar och barn2009In: Barn, barndom och föräldraskap, Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 136-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Pedagogic discourse and interaction orders1992In: Discourse and life-span development, London: Sage , 1992, p. 103-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Hundeide, Karsten
    Relational rationality and children's interview responses2002In: Human Development, ISSN 0018-716X, E-ISSN 1423-0054, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 174-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's interview responses are often read monologically, as mirror reflections of their spontaneous thinking. In contrast, analyses of alignments and collaboration imply a dialogical approach. We argue that in a dialogical analysis, children's interview responses should be read in terms of a relational rationality. Against the backdrop of such a rationality, 'immature' responses can be understood in terms of children's desire to please the interviewer, and by their rational desire to align themselves with their co-participants. In contrast to the scientific rationality of Grice's conversational maxims, relational rationality is instead discussed in terms of social relations. Copyright ⌐ 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 310.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Jönsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Language and Culture.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    The courtrooom hearing as a middle ground. Speech accommodation by lawyers and defendants.1987In: Journal of language and social psychology, ISSN 0261-927X, E-ISSN 1552-6526, Vol. 6, p. 99-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    On memory and the collaborative construction and deconstruction of custody case arguments.1990In: Human Communication Research, ISSN 0360-3989, E-ISSN 1468-2958, Vol. 17, p. 287-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Storytelling as collaborative reasoning. Co-narratives in incest case accounts.1992In: Explaining one's self to others. Reason-giving in a social context / [ed] Margaret L. McLaughlin, Michael J. Cody, Stephen J. Read, Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum Associates , 1992, p. 245-260Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers in that aspect of social psychology [studying communicated explanations], ordinarily referred to as attribution theory, have, historically, studied the process of explanation strictly as an intrapsychic phenomenon. . . . Similarly, researchers who have devoted themselves to the study of "accounts," a tradition found largely within the confines of sociology, organizational behavior, and communication studies, have, for the most part, examined only the discourse manifestations of explanation, without a concomitant interest in the fundamental processes of event comprehension. This volume is devoted to bridging the gap between the two traditions. The chapters in the first section, "The Nature of Social Explanation," examine general issues of social explanation, in particular, the cognitive processes and knowledge involved in the construction of accounts. In fact, several of the chapters present general models of the cognitive processes underlying account-giving. Many of these chapters also deal with general aspects of the social context that affect the kind of explanation people offer. However, they do not focus on the impact of concrete social contexts or on specific kinds of accounts (despite the use of concrete examples to illustrate their general concerns). In contrast, chapters in the second section of the book deal more concretely with accounts. They examine the role of accounts in specific kinds of settings, such as organizations, or the courts; or they deal with specific kinds of accounts, such as accounts of racism or accounts of relationship breakdowns.

  • 313.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Trust and the Contestation of Blame Narratives: Veiled Stances in an Institutional Assessment Context2013In: Dialogical approaches to trust in communication / [ed] Per Linell, Ivana Markova, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing , 2013, 1, p. -267Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A volume in Advances in Cultural Psychology Series Editor: Jaan Valsiner, Clark University Trust has a constituent role in human societies. It has been treated as a scientific topic in many disciplines. Yet, despite the fact that trust and distrust come to life primarily in human communication and through language, it has seldom been analyzed from a communicative or linguistic perspective. This is the theme of this path-breaking volume. This volume contains 12 chapters, plus introduction and epilogue by the editors. They have been authored by leading specialists on trust in language and communication, coming from many disciplines and from different cultures and countries. Most of the authors share a conceptual basis in dialogical theories. This book is a follow-up volume to two previous volumes on trust within cultural psychology, Trust and Distrust (Marková & Gillespie, 2008) and Trust and Conflict (Marková & Gillespie, 2012). It will be of interest to anyone seriously interested in trust in societies, and in trust and distrust as displayed in communication and language.Show more Show less

  • 314.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Rundström, Bengt
    Cats, dogs, and sweets in the clinical negotiation of reality. On politeness and coherence in pediatric discourse.1989In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 18, p. 483-504Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Rundström, Bengt
    Child discourse and parental control in pediatric consultations.1988In: Text - an interdisciplinary journal for the study of discourse, ISSN 0165-4888, Vol. 8, p. 159-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The sun match boy and plant metaphors. A Swedish image of a 20th-century childhood.1996In: Images of childhood / [ed] C. Philip Hwang, Michael E. Lamb, Irving E. Sigel, Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates , 1996, p. 185-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Blurted talk in computer gaming. Co-participation and the display of involvement2006In: Games to Gaming,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 318.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Constructing Digital Divides in Intergenerational Interactions. A study of computer- and videogaming in Swedish family lives.2006In: The Virtual-a room without borders / [ed] Hernwall, Patrik, Stockholm: School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College , 2006, p. -239Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Beside the  keynote speakers, the conference will emphesise on four different sub-themes and round up with a panel dabate. Theme a and theme b will run parallell during Thursday afternoon and theme c and theme d will run parallell during Friday morning

  • 319.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Cyberspace and living room appropriations. Family gaming practices in everyday life.2005In: Modernita e vita quotidiana. Tra ordiario estraoridanario,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 320.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Gaming an territorial claims. Video- and computergames as resources in the appropriation of family space.2005In: Childhoods, International Conferece,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Literacies within family life2007In: 12th Biennal Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction EARLI,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 322.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Pratiche di gioco al computer e spazio sociale in famiglie sveedesi.2007In: Tra ordinario e straordinario: modernità e vita quotidiana, Rome: Carocci , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer gaming and social space in Swedish family life

  • 323.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Simonsen, Pål Aarsand
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Spel, familjeliv och virtuella rum.2007In: Virtuella lekar och digitala berättelser - Perspektiv på datorspel, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 324.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sätterlund-Larsson, Ullabeth
    Politeness strategies and doctor-patient communication. On the social choreography of collaborative thinking1987In: Journal of language and social psychology, ISSN 0261-927X, E-ISSN 1552-6526, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 325.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sätterlund-Larsson, Ullabeth
    Säljö, Roger
    Medical diagnosis and the micropolitics of care1995In: Representations of health, illness and handicap / [ed] Ivana Marková and Robert M. Farr, Chur: Harwood Academic , 1995, p. 131-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    "Ja, för jag är så jävla snygg!" Retsekvenser och informellt lärande i högstadiets grupparbeten.2007In: Det enkla är det sköna. En vänbok till Kjell Granström / [ed] Einarsson, C, Hammar Chiriac, E, Jedeskog, G, Lindberg, T & Samuelsson, M, Linköping: Skapande Vetande , 2007, p. 301-314Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Skolans grupparbete som social arena2004In: Pedagogik som vetenskap: en vänbok till Birgitta Qvarsell / [ed] Agnieszka Bron och Anders Gustavsson, Stockholms universitet: Pedagogiska institutionen , 2004, p. 294-317Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En vetenskaplig disciplins identitet är sammanvävd med dess historia. En samhällsvetenskaplig disciplins forskningsobjekt är emellertid i hög grad den samtida omvärlden och de frågor som står högt på dagordningen i samhällsdebatten. Men inom samhällsvetenskap sysslar man även med centrala och grundläggande frågor. Förhållningssättet till de grundläggande frågorna har dock stor betydelse för hur forskarna kommer att agera i de dagsaktuella frågorna

  • 328.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Thorell, Mia
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Family politics in children's play directives1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 329.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Thorell, Mia
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Voice and collusion in play dialogues. Towards an architecture of intersubjectivity2002In: Talking to adults: the contribution of multiparty discourse to language acquisition / [ed] Shoshana Blum-Kulka, Catherine Snow, Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum , 2002, p. 277-293Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume provides a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of the contribution of multiparty intergenerational talk in a variety of cultures to the development of children's communicative capacities. The book focuses on the complexity of the cultural and interactional contexts in which pragmatic learning occurs and re-examines certain assumptions implicit in research on language socialization to date, such as primacy of dyadic interactions in the early ages and the presupposition of a monolingual social matrix. One of the aims of the book is to demonstrate the degree of cultural diversity in paths of pragmatic development. Individual chapters present empirically grounded analyses of talk with children of all ages, in different participation structures and in a variety of cultures. In pursuing this theme the volume is meant to further enrich cross-cultural perspectives on language socialization by providing in each of its chapters an empirically grounded analysis of the development of one specific dimension of discursive skill. The nine invited chapters comprise new empirical work on the development of specific discourse dimensions. Authors have been asked also to adopt a reflexive stand on their line of research and to incorporate in the chapter a comprehensive and critical perspective on former work on the discursive dimension investigated. The discourse dimensions represented in the volume include narratives, explanations, the language of control in intergenerational and intragenerational talk, the language of humor and affect, and bilingual conversations. The volume offers a rich spectrum of cultural variety in pragmatic development, including studies of American, Greek, Japanese, Mayan, Norwegian, and Swedish children and families.

  • 330.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Thunqvist Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Getting things done in family life. Directive trajectories and moral order2007In: 10th International Pragmatics Conferece,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Thunqvist Cekaite, AstaLinköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Skämt, lek och språkövningar. Om deltagande och andraspråkslärande i en förberedelseklass.2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 332. Arrelöv, Britt
    et al.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Ljungberg, Dan
    Hur en reformering av socialförsäkringen påverkar läkares sjukskrivningsmönster1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 333.
    Arsenie, Irina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borén, Hans
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Allard, Bert
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of Gamma Irradiation on an Aquatic Fulvic Acid1991In: Humic substances in the aquatic and terrestrial environment : proceedings of an international symposium, Linköping, Sweden, August 21-23, 1989 / [ed] B. Allard, H. Borén and A. Grimvall, Berlin Heidelberg New York: Springer, 1991, p. 233-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An aquatic fulvic acid was irradiated with gamma radiation from a 60Co-source (dose range 0-48 Mrad), as part of a larger study of the transformation and decomposition of humic substances in natura! aquatic systems. Experiments were performed at two concentrations (1000 mg/l and 100 mg/l) and at various pH-values (2-10). The fulvic acid transformation was studied by monitoring optical density (UV-spectroscopy ), molecular weight distribution (GPC-technique) and total dissolved organic carbon (TOC). A general decrease in TOC with increasing radiation dose was observed: the initial G-value of about 5 decreased with the increasing dose to a minimum value of 0.2-0.3. A simultaneous increase in molecular weight (Mn rose from approximately 2000 to a maximum of about 4000) was observed in the acidic samples (pH 2-4) at a dose below 10 Mrad. Natural background radiation can significantly contribute to the degradation of dissolved humic substances in deep groundwaters, considering the observed G-value for low doses (about 5) and the otherwise high chemical stability of the fulvic acid fraction even after long residence times (103-104 y) in the ground.

  • 334.
    Artman, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fördelade kunskapsprocesser i ledningscentraler vid nödsituationer: Koordination och situationsmedvetenhet1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes to an understanding of how people work in co-ordination centres for controlling dynamic environments. It examines several theoretical perspectives that have been used to analyse cognition, co-operation and technology within dynamic decision-making. The author finds that all these perspectives contribute to specific parts of the puzzle, but that no theoretical approach alone seems to give a thorough and coherent understanding of how the parts hang together. From this stance the perspective of distributed cognition is examined, as it seems to be a promising approach for such aspects. The distributed cognition approach has been constructed in order to explain and describe how cognition is distributed over artefacts and people and how each part contributes to the system's functionality. This approach is examined from its explicit theoretical constituent parts, but is also developed in regard to the concepts of co-ordination and situation awareness.

    The notion of co-ordination is analysed as the way in which agents relate to each other, in terms of institutional organisation as well as in terms of the contribution of technical means and co-operation practices.

    Situation awareness is a theoretical construct developed from a cognitive psychology perspective that has mainly been used in aviation research to explain people's awareness of environmental factors and future developments in the environment. The limited notion of situation awareness that cognitive psychology offers is criticized, but is then developed in order to include system characteristics such as information access, procedures to investigate the environment, representational artefacts and communication between different actors.

    The empirical material used consist of video-recordings from a full-scale simulated military command and control unit, an authentic emergency co-ordination centre as well as two experiments with computer-aided microworlds. These microworlds have been used as a means of further investigating hypotheses that have been constructed from analyzing real-world co-ordination centres. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses have been carried out.

    Field studies and microworld studies complement each other. Microworlds are not as constrained as traditional laboratory experiments are, but at the same time they are not as variable as real-world situations. Studies within microworlds also have the advantage that several aspects of environments that are both costly and dangerous can be examined safely and economically.

    Results include the following points: (i) co-ordination is dependent upon what material resources the actors have and use, as well as on each individual's knowledge and the goals of the system (ii) situation awareness should be regarded as a constructive process (iii) situation awareness and co-ordination practices should be regarded as interdependent (iv) situation awareness is dependent upon information processing procedures and information representation.

  • 335.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Granlund, Rego
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Team situation awareness using graphical or textual databases in dynamic decision making1999In: Proceedings of the 9th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics / [ed] T. R. G. Green, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this experiment we explore the effects of using a graphical and textual database for sharing information within a team that are to control a dynamic system. The task involves fighting a simulated fire. Four people are to cooperate in a layered organisation, with one layer being the operative and the second layer the supervisory. The operative layer involves two fire chiefswho are commanding two fire units each. The supervisory unit consists of two persons that are to co-ordinate the fire chiefs. The supervisory unit receives all information from the fire chiefs but has to construct an overall picture, a so-called situation awareness, of the development of the whole area. The supervisory unit constructs this situation awareness which is meant to be supported by the graphical and textual databases respectively. We hypothesised that the graphical condition would be more successful than the textual database in registering the current situation, since the graphical database allows direct mapping. On the other hand, we hypothesised that the textual condition might be better in supporting the future planning and prediction of system dynamics. We analyse 18 quartets, 72 subjects by both performance measures and a questionnaire. There were no significant performance differences between conditions, but there is a major learning effect, especially for the textual condition. In accordance with our hypothesis we found that participants in the graphical condition did better mapping the map with the "real" world, at least in the first session. More successful groups worked more ahead of the fire than did less successful groups. From the questionnaire it seems that the subjects learn more about co-ordination and trusting their fellow team members than about the internal dynamics of the simulated fire. In fact, the teams learn things about system dynamics that are wrong. We therefore suggest that team SA might be more of a co-ordination problem than a problem of acquiring knowledge about system dynamics.

  • 336.
    Arvidsson, Maria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    När arbetet blev farligt: arbetarskyddet och det medicinska tänkandet 1884-19192002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the end of the1940's Occupational Medicine was institutionalised in Sweden. Health hazilards in the work place was not a new field for the Swedish physicians. They had been preocrcupied with these problems for a long time.

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse and describe how health hazards in the work placees, ecpecially in the factories, were perceived and described by Swedish physicians at the turn of the 20t century. The aim is also to clarify the physicians' role m shaping, developing and supervising the Occupational Safety and Health Acts. The city of Norrköping is used as anexample in discussing how physicians at a local level paid attention to health and safety issues in the work place.

    According to the physicians, there were a number of harmful factors in the factory work that could endanger health, but these were also seen to be dependent on the worker. Workers ldisplayed different kinds of vulnerability to the harmful factors. Sex, heredity, age, health, physique, habits and behaviour were understood as determining components. The preventive measures not only contained guidelines for the factories. They also included advises on how '!the workers should organise and live their lives outside work.

    The life style and behaviour the physicians would like to encourage were aligned with the !cultural values of the bourgeoisie at the tum of the 20th century. It is vital to recognise the cultural lens through which the physicians perceived and spoke of the workers' situation, their way of life and their behaviour inside as well as outside the factory.

  • 337.
    Arwidsson, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Digital kompetens, från osäkerhet till förtrogenhet: En studie av lärares kunskaper och svårigheter i arbetet med interaktiva skrivtavlor i grundskolans senare år2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Att integrera IKT-verktyg i skolans verksamhet, och då specifikt interaktiva skrivtavlor, har blivit en allt vanligare företeelse för att främja elevers digitala kompetens. En kommun som har gjort en storskalig satsning på att integrera dessa interaktiva skrivtavlor är Linköpings och i dagsläget är varje klassrum i samtliga av deras grundskolor utrustade med en. Denna studie syftar till att ge en inblick i hur den satsningen har påverkat undervisningen ur ett lärarperspektiv, och då specifikt lärare i de naturvetenskapligt orienterande ämnena.

    Genom semistrukturerade intervjuer ämnar studien att sammanställa de förhållningssätt och erfarenheter lärare ger uttryck för gentemot de interaktiva skrivtavlorna. Studien avser att ge en uppfattning om vad lärare anser som betydelsefulla faktorer då en skola genomgår en satsning på interaktiva skrivtavlor i utbildningssyfte. Fokus ligger på begreppen möjligheter, svårigheter samt kunskaper och andra faktorer.

    Resultaten av denna studie visar att lärarna upplever de interaktiva skrivtavlorna som ett verktyg med potential till att ge positiva effekter i undervisningen, och på flera sätt också har det. Att de interaktiva skrivtavlorna möjliggör projektorfunktion och internetuppkoppling på ett snabbt och smidigt sätt är en av de största fördelarna som lärarna i denna studie ger uttryck för. Däremot framkommer även svårigheter med verktyget, och flera av dem är sådana hinder att användningen på ett eller annat sätt begränsas. De hinder som tydligast framträder är tekniska svårigheter, både vad gäller support, mjuk- och hårdvara, fortbildning samt tid. Att lärarna i studien önskar stöttning i sitt arbete med att bekanta sig med verktyget och involvera det i undervisningen är tydligt.

    Utifrån lärarnas berättelser föreslår studien att ge ökade möjligheter till tid och fortbildning, utveckla den tekniska supporten och öka lärarnas möjligheter till kollegiala samtal för att minska dessa svårigheter och den känsla av oro som de skapar för att utöka användningen och verktygets effekter. Lokala strategier, och deras förankring i verksamheten, har också visats ha en mycket betydande roll i detta, då de kan verka stöttande och styrande i och med ett uttalat syfte, mål och tillvägagångssätt.

    Att skolornas användning av IKT-verktyg behöver stöttas har även påpekats utifrån av bland annat Skolverket, och det senaste förslaget är att Sverige utarbetar en nationell IT-strategi. Studiens resultat visar på att detta förslag har potential att ge goda effekter på undervisningen.

  • 338.
    Arzuk Kocadere, Deniz
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Milliyet Cocuk and the Making of Childrens Literary Culture in Turkey in the 1970s2019In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 62-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a systematic content analysis of Milliyet Cocuk, a childrens magazine published by a left-leaning publishing house in the politically polarised context of Turkey in the late 1970s. It outlines the socio-political and cultural context, defines Milliyet Cocuks position in the structure of the publishing field and questions how a non-majority group made space for themselves in a nations childrens literature. The archival material used in this article has been collected for the course New Perspectives in Cultural History, taught by Prof. Cengiz Kirli. My research is funded by the Swedish Institute.

  • 339.
    Asgedom, Aster
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Combating Desertification in Tigray, Ethiopia: Field study on the implementation of the UNCCD in the rural region of Tigray2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a field study on the implementation of the United Nations Convention on Combating Desertification (UNCCD) in Tigray, Ethiopia has been carried out. The objective of this thesis is to study in general the implementa-tion of the UNCCD in Ethiopia. This thesis consequently focuses on how these issues are executed in practice at different levels, thus national, regional, district and community levels. However the focus is on some of the highly prioritised action programs that are presumed to facilitate the implementation of the UNCCD, which are the Action Programs for promoting awareness and participation, Action programs to improve institutional organisation and ca-pacity as well as Action program for empowerment of women. These action programs are studied in how they are presented at the National Action Plan (NAP) and Regional Action Plan (RAP) as well as how they are executed at different levels, i.e. at the Federal, Regional, district and Community levels. For this purpose the region of Tigray is chosen.

    The result of this study shows that the vast majority of the respondents in the study areas indicated an awareness of desertification in regard to land degradation. The implementation of NAP at this stage, hasn’t reach all the regions around the country however, three regions in Ethiopia, thus the Afar, Tigray and Amhara regions have been chosen as pilot projects in attempt to implement the NAP at regional level and preparation are made to implement the con-vention at different community levels. Officially these regions have been chosen to launch pilot projects since they are situated in the dryland areas and they match the definition of the UNCCD for severely affected areas. At the re-gional level several pilot projects mainly conservation activities that involved the community members are launched in different parts of Tigray. Many opportunities to increase awareness of the land degradation and empower people are created in order to combat desertification, however the success of these activities varies from district to district and community to community and is dependent on the authorities’ intention, ambition, determination and interest as well as the relation they posses with the community members in the society.

  • 340.
    Asplund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borén, Hans
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Soil Peroxidase-Mediated Chlorination of Fulvic Acid1991In: Humic substances in the aquatic and terrestrial environment : proceedings of an international symposium, Linköping, Sweden, August 21-23, 1989 / [ed] B. Allard, H. Borén and A. Grimvall, Berlin Heidelberg New York: Springer, 1991, p. 474-483Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humic matter has recently been shown to contain considerable quantities of naturally produced organohalogens. The present study investigated the possibility of a non-specific, enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter in soil. The results showed that, in the presence of chloride and hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme chloroperox1dase (CPO) from the fungus Caldariomyces fumago catalyzes chlorination of fulvic acid. At pH 2.5 - 6.0, the chlorine to fulvic acid ratio in the tested sample was elevated from 12 mg/g to approximately 40-50 mg/g. It was also shown that this reaction can take place at chloride and hydrogen peroxide concentrations found in the environment. An extract from spruce forest soil was shown to have a measurable chlorinating capacity. The activity of an extract of 0.5 kg soil corresponded to approximately 0.3 enzyme units, measured as CPO activity. Enzymatically mediated halogenation of humic substances may be one of the mechanisms explaining the w1despread occurrence of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in soil and water.

  • 341.
    Asplund, Stina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    The Biogas Production Plant at Umeå Dairy — Evaluation of Design and Start-up2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of a large project at Norrmejerier, a biogas production plant has been constructed at Umeå Dairy. In this plant wastewater, residual milk and whey are decomposed and biogas is produced. The biogas is burned in a steam boiler. The biogas plant is designed as an anaerobic contact process, with sludge separation and recirculation by a clarifier. The fat in the substrate is treated in a separate reactor.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the design and start-up of this biogas production plant. Further, the interaction with the contractor responsible for construction and start-up is evaluated.

    The plant is generally well designed, the process conditions are suitable and the objectives are realistic. However, the seed sludge is unsuitable and the time plan is too optimistic.

    At the end of the period of this study, the plant was running and all central components are performing as intended. Still, the objectives have not been reached. This is mainly attributed to the poor quality of the seed sludge.

    The management of the plant and the interaction with the contractor has generally been good. Most problems that arose were of typical start-up nature. Others were due to insufficient planning or lack of communication. Further, several design flaws were identified during start-up.

    Washout of sludge has been one of the most significant drawbacks during start-up. This inconvenience seems to be the result of improper seed sludge and a too hasty increase of the organic loading rate.

  • 342.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Climate change frames and frame formation: An analysis of climate change communication in the Swedish agricultural sector2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions and mainstream media representations, this thesis offers an audience-specific departure point by analysing climate change frames and frame formation in Swedish agriculture. The empirical material consists of Swedish farm magazines’ reporting on climate change, as well as eight focus group discussions among Swedish farmers on the topic of climate change and climate change information. The analysis demonstrates that while Swedish farm magazines frame climate change in terms of conflict, scientific uncertainty, and economic burden, farmers in the focus groups tended to concentrate on whether climate change was a natural or human-induced phenomenon, and viewed climate change communication as an issue of credibility. It was found that farm magazines use metaphorical representations of war and games to form the overall frames of climate change. In contrast, the farmers’  frames of natural versus human-induced climate change were formed primarily using experience-based and non-experience-based arguments, both supported with analogies, distinctions, keywords, metaphors, and prototypical examples. Furthermore, discussions of what constitutes credible climate information centred on conflict-versus consensus-oriented frames of climate change communication along with different views of the extent to which knowledge of climate change is and should be practically or analytically based. This analysis of climate change communication in the Swedish agricultural sector proposes that the sense-making processes of climate change are complex, involving associative thinking and experience-based knowledge that form interpretations of climate change and climate change information.

    List of papers
    1. Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines
    2013 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 117, no 1-2, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a fundamental challenge for which agriculture is sensitive and   vulnerable. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified relevant information as key to enabling appropriate climate adaptation and mitigation action. Information specifically directed to farmers can be found, for example, in specialized farming magazines.

    While recent studies examine how national news media frame climate change, less —if any —studies have addressed climate framings and coverage in specialized media. Media framings are storylines that provide meaning by communicating how and why an issue should be seen as a problem, how it should be handled, and who is responsible for it. This paper analyses the framings and coverage of climate change in two Swedish specialized farming magazines from 2000 to 2009. It examines the extent of the climate change coverage, the content of the media items, and the dominant framings underlying their climate change coverage. The study identifies: increased coverage of climate change starting in 2007; frequent coverage of agriculture 's contribution to climate change, climate change impacts on agriculture, and consequences of climate politics for agriculture; and four prominent frames: conflict, scientific certainty, economic burden, and action. The paper concludes that climate change communicators addressing farmers and agricultural extension officers should pay attention to how these frames may be interpreted by different target audiences. Research is needed on how specialized media reports on climate-related issues and how science-based climate information is understood  by different groups of farmers and which other factors influence farmers’ engagement in climate mitigation and adaptation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013
    Keywords
    climate change, media representation, media frames, farming magazines, communication; specialized media
    National Category
    Media Studies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80851 (URN)10.1007/s10584-012-0535-0 (DOI)000316128700014 ()
    Projects
    Ett konkurrenskraftigt jordbruk-kommunikation kring klimatförändringar och nya möjligheter (SLF)Baltic Challenges and Chances for local and regional development generated by Climate Change (BalticClimate)
    Available from: 2012-08-31 Created: 2012-08-31 Last updated: 2019-09-01
    2. Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines
    2011 (English)In: JCOM - Journal of Science Communication, ISSN 1824-2049, E-ISSN 1824-2049, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines communicative aspects of climate change, identifying and analysing metaphors used in specialized media reports on climate change, and discussing the aspects of climate change these metaphors emphasize and neglect. Through a critical discourse analysis of the two largest Swedish farm magazines over the 2000–2009 period, this study finds that greenhouse, war, and game metaphors were the most frequently used metaphors in the material. The analysis indicates that greenhouse metaphors are used to ascribe certain natural science characteristics to climate change, game metaphors to address positive impacts of climate change, and war metaphors to highlight negative impacts of climate change. The paper concludes by discussing the contrasting and complementary metaphorical representations farm magazines use to conventionalize climate change.

    Keywords
    climate change, media, metaphors, farm magazine, climate change communication
    National Category
    Media and Communications
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71870 (URN)
    Projects
    Grant from the Swedish Farmers’ Foundation for Agricultural Research as part of the research program “Competitively strengthened agriculture: communication about climate change and new possibilities”.
    Available from: 2011-11-08 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2019-09-01
    3. “Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has shifted from being regarded as an exclusively physical phenomenon to being a social phenomenon as well, entailing many interpretations and multidimensional frames. This shift calls for an understanding of how various audiences and segments of the public understand climate change. This paper analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape and construct their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change impact. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that: 1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experience, and 2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understandings of climate change, and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

    Keywords
    Agriculture, climate change communication, climate perceptions, focus groups, frame analysis
    National Category
    Media Studies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105995 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-04-16 Created: 2014-04-16 Last updated: 2019-09-01Bibliographically approved
    4. Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information
    2018 (English)In: The International Journal of Climate Change, ISSN 1835-7156, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the climate change communication literature, the concept of framing is increasingly used to discuss various understandings of climate change. This paper addresses the under-researched question of how specific audiences perceive the adequacy of various climate change frames, by exploring how Swedish farmers make sense of climate change information. Based on focus group discussions with farmers, the paper explores what communicators, or frame articulators, Swedish farmers perceive as central and how farmers judge the credibility of potential frame articulators in climate change communication. The paper discusses 1) the credibility of frame articulators as a matter of perceived independence and impartiality, 2) empirical credibility—whether farmers were able to verify the claims underlying climate change frames—as a matter of practical experience versus analytical reasoning, and 3) frame consistency, i.e. whether climate change frames correspond to audience beliefs and claims.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Common Ground Publishing, 2018
    Keywords
    Climate Change Communication; Frame Analysis; Frame Credibility; Agriculture; Focus Groups
    National Category
    Media Studies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105996 (URN)10.18848/1835-7156/CGP/v10i01/23-38 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-04-16 Created: 2014-04-16 Last updated: 2019-09-01Bibliographically approved
  • 343.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Climate change in Swedish farm magazines2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The profitability of agricultural production depends on weather conditions and decisions on the basis of expected weather conditions. As climate change is changing the conditions for farmers, information about climate change to individual farmers is important for the productivity in the agricultural sector. An analysis of the two largest Swedish agricultural magazines over the period 2000-2008 has been conducted with the aim to examine to what extent Swedish farm magazines report on climate change and to identify drivers for farm magazine coverage of climate change. The study identifies 1) an increased reporting on climate change in 2007 and 2) editorials and bottom-up engagement are aspects that have influenced the frequency and content of farm magazine coverage. The paper ends with a discussion of how the results of this study may relate to a wider climate science and policy context.

  • 344.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information2018In: The International Journal of Climate Change, ISSN 1835-7156, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the climate change communication literature, the concept of framing is increasingly used to discuss various understandings of climate change. This paper addresses the under-researched question of how specific audiences perceive the adequacy of various climate change frames, by exploring how Swedish farmers make sense of climate change information. Based on focus group discussions with farmers, the paper explores what communicators, or frame articulators, Swedish farmers perceive as central and how farmers judge the credibility of potential frame articulators in climate change communication. The paper discusses 1) the credibility of frame articulators as a matter of perceived independence and impartiality, 2) empirical credibility—whether farmers were able to verify the claims underlying climate change frames—as a matter of practical experience versus analytical reasoning, and 3) frame consistency, i.e. whether climate change frames correspond to audience beliefs and claims.

  • 345.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    “Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has shifted from being regarded as an exclusively physical phenomenon to being a social phenomenon as well, entailing many interpretations and multidimensional frames. This shift calls for an understanding of how various audiences and segments of the public understand climate change. This paper analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape and construct their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change impact. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that: 1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experience, and 2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understandings of climate change, and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 346.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Fantastiskt eller vidrigt?: Uppfattningar om genmodifierad mat2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Med genteknik är det möjligt att ändra gensammansättningen i våra livsmedel och applikationen har väckt stort intresse, inte minst bland allmänheten. Genmodifierade (GM) livsmedel har varit föremål för diskussion sedan 1970-talet. Syftet med denna uppsats är att studera olika uppfattningar och representationer om genmodifierade livsmedel. Enligt teorin om sociala representationer har representationer dubbla funktioner. Den ena är att konventionalisera objekt och den andra innebär att representationerna intar en förutbestämd form. För att analysera uppfattningar och representationer har jag använt mig av en tematisk innehållsanalys samt en analys av kommunikativa strategier av samtal i fyra fokusgrupper. Analysen av fokusgruppsdatan visar att diskussionerna cirkulerar kring tre teman: risker, möjligheter och mervärden med genmodifierade livsmedel. De risker som associeras med GM livsmedel diskuteras främst utifrån begreppsparet naturligt/antropogent och utgår ofta från ett grundläggande antagande om att naturen har ett positivt värde. De möjligheter som associeras med GM livsmedel diskuteras utifrån begreppsparet Nord/Syd och utgår ofta från antagandet att GM livsmedel först och främst gör nytta i utvecklingsländer. Antagandet om naturens positiva värde samt uppfattningen om GM livsmedlens frånvaro av fördelar för konsumenter i industrialiserade länder resulterar i att deltagarna inte ser några eller få konsumentfördelar med GM livsmedel. Representationerna kring GM livsmedel kan genom ett gemensamt meningsskapande ses både ha en konventionaliserande funktion där GM livsmedel förankras och förstås samt en preskriptiv funktion där representationerna leder till ett visst sätt att tänka.

  • 347.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How Socially Responsible Investment Is Defined: An analysis of how SRI investment management firms put ethical criteria into practice2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Several organisations have called for clarifications on sustainable investment. The aim of this study is to map and compare the ethical criteria used by Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) funds in their assessment of companies. My attention is also to seek for clarifications on the definition on SRI. A theoretical framework has been used to identify core issues of socially responsible investment. The areas of interest are charitable giving, environmental technologies, negative and positive screening and shareholder activism. The empirical material consisted of qualitative interviews with 4 fund managers from 5 investment management firms in addition to written documents on the funds’ ethical criteria. The conclusions are that all of the funds use negative criteria in their assessment of companies, with similarities in what may be considered as unethical activity and differences in the extent. Most of the funds also seek to identify better-managed companies through an assessment of how companies comply with international agreements. Differences occur in the choices of international agreements as well as the minimum criteria for investing. Most of the investment management firms engage in shareholder activism with the aim to influence the companies’ corporate behaviour, thus with different levels of engagement. Some have dialogue with whom they invest in, some favour the idea of communicate with companies they do not invest in as well. Furthermore, the results of this study show that investments in environmental technologies are rare since these companies are too small. When it comes to charitable giving, donations to charity may be seen as SRI or may not be seen as SRI depending on if the concept refers to investment criteria.

  • 348.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines2011In: JCOM - Journal of Science Communication, ISSN 1824-2049, E-ISSN 1824-2049, Vol. 10, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines communicative aspects of climate change, identifying and analysing metaphors used in specialized media reports on climate change, and discussing the aspects of climate change these metaphors emphasize and neglect. Through a critical discourse analysis of the two largest Swedish farm magazines over the 2000–2009 period, this study finds that greenhouse, war, and game metaphors were the most frequently used metaphors in the material. The analysis indicates that greenhouse metaphors are used to ascribe certain natural science characteristics to climate change, game metaphors to address positive impacts of climate change, and war metaphors to highlight negative impacts of climate change. The paper concludes by discussing the contrasting and complementary metaphorical representations farm magazines use to conventionalize climate change.

  • 349.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Natural versus anthropogenic climate change: Swedish farmers joint construction of climate perceptions2016In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 560-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions, this study offers an audience-specific departure point. This article analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that (1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experiences, (2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic and (3) various communication tools contribute to the formation of natural and anthropogenic climate change frames. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understanding of climate change and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 350.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research .
    Social representations of climate change: Analyses of focus groups discussions with Swedish farmers2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In everyday life scientific knowledge often poses a challenge to understanding. It is argued that scientific knowledge is often hard for non-scientists to understand and in the need of translation to be relevant. The circulation of knowledge from experts into the wider public and different decision-makers in various contexts thus involves the transformation of abstract and conceptual ideas into more accessible and concrete knowledge. Communicative tools, e.g. analogies, distinctions and metaphors, are often used to conventionalize complex phenomena, hence rendering them more concrete and easy to grasp.

    In order to analyze how abstract scientific knowledge is transformed into more accessible and concrete knowledge, I have selected the case of climate change. Climate change is an issue often described as invisible, with long term effects and with many embedded uncertainties. Furthermore, information is often identified as a crucial component of the ability of a system (natural or human) to adapt to climate change. In contrast to earlier studies, which are more focused on the content of perceptions of climate change, the aim of this paper is to analyze how climate perceptions are formed and withheld, and what underlying value premises they rest upon.

    In this paper, I present results from Swedish focus group discussions with farmers. Although climate change affects all sectors, the agricultural sector is among the most vulnerable and sensitive ones as changes in temperature and precipitation patterns will have a direct influence on the quantity and quality of agricultural production and the daily life of farmers. The aim is to analyse how participants talk about a complex issue like climate change. I will address questions such as: What communicative strategies do focus groups participants use in their conversations? What implicit value premises are embedded in these strategies?

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