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  • 301.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Characterization and estimation of turbulence-related wall shear stress in patient-specific pulsatile blood flow2019In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 85, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed, turbulent-like blood flow promotes chaotic wall shear stress (WSS) environments, impairing essential endothelial functions and increasing the susceptibility and progression of vascular diseases. These flow characteristics are today frequently detected at various anatomical, lesion and intervention-related sites, while their role as a pathological determinant is less understood. To present-day, numerous WSS-based descriptors have been proposed to characterize the spatiotemporal nature of the WSS disturbances, however, without differentiation between physiological laminar oscillations and turbulence-related WSS (tWSS) fluctuations. Also, much attention has been focused on magnetic resonance (MR) WSS estimations, so far with limited success; promoting the need of a near-wall surrogate marker. In this study, a new approach is explored to characterize the tWSS, by taking advantage of the tensor characteristics of the fluctuating WSS correlations, providing both a magnitude and an anisotropy measure of the disturbances. These parameters were studied in two patient-specific coarctation models (sever and mild), using large eddy simulations, and correlated against near-wall reciprocal Reynolds stress parameters. Collectively, results showed distinct regions of differing tWSS characteristics, features which were sensitive to changes in flow conditions. Generally, the post-stenotic tWSS was governed by near axisymmetric fluctuations, findings that where not consistent with conventional WSS disturbance predictors. At the 2-3 mm wall-offset range, a strong linear correlation was found between tWSS magnitude and near-wall turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), in contrast to the anisotropy indices, suggesting that MR-measured TKE can be used to assess elevated tWSS regions while tWSS anisotropy estimates request well-resolved simulation methods. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 302.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Correction: Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation: Impact of Virtual Interventions (vol 6, pg 281, 2015)2015In: Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1869-408X, E-ISSN 1869-4098, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 577-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where the pre-stenotic hypoplastic segment may limit the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotem-poral maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the post-stenotic jet, showing a versatile response between the CoA dilatations. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre-and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  • 303.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Multidirectional WSS disturbances in stenotic turbulent flows: A pre- and post-intervention study in an aortic coarctation2017In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wall shear stress (WSS) disturbances are commonly expressed at sites of abnormal flow obstructions and may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In laminar flows these disturbances have recently been assessed by the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which accounts for the WSS multidirectionality. Site-specific estimations of WSS disturbances in pulsatile transitional and turbulent type of flows are more challenging due to continuous and unpredictable changes in WSS behavior. In these complex flow settings, the transWSS may serve as a more comprehensive descriptor for assessing WSS disturbances of general nature compared to commonly used parameters. In this study large eddy simulations (LES) were used to investigate the transWSS properties in flows subjected to different pathological turbulent flow conditions, governed by a patient-specific model of an aortic coarctation pre and post balloon angioplasty. Results showed that regions of strong near-wall turbulence were collocated with regions of elevated transWSS and turbulent WSS, while in more transitional-like near-wall flow regions a closer resemblance was found between transWSS and low, and oscillatory WSS. Within the frame of this study, the transWSS parameter demonstrated a more multi-featured picture of WSS disturbances when exposed to different types of flow regimes, characteristics which were not depicted by the other parameters alone. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 304.
    Andersson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jägervall, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wang, Chunliang
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    How to measure renal artery stenosis - a retrospective comparison of morphological measurement approaches in relation to hemodynamic significance2015In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 15, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although it is well known that renal artery stenosis may cause renovascular hypertension, it is unclear how the degree of stenosis should best be measured in morphological images. The aim of this study was to determine which morphological measures from Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) are best in predicting whether a renal artery stenosis is hemodynamically significant or not. Methods: Forty-seven patients with hypertension and a clinical suspicion of renovascular hypertension were examined with CTA, MRA, captopril-enhanced renography (CER) and captopril test (Ctest). CTA and MRA images of the renal arteries were analyzed by two readers using interactive vessel segmentation software. The measures included minimum diameter, minimum area, diameter reduction and area reduction. In addition, two radiologists visually judged the diameter reduction without automated segmentation. The results were then compared using limits of agreement and intra-class correlation, and correlated with the results from CER combined with Ctest (which were used as standard of reference) using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Results: A total of 68 kidneys had all three investigations (CTA, MRA and CER + Ctest), where 11 kidneys (16.2 %) got a positive result on the CER + Ctest. The greatest area under ROC curve (AUROC) was found for the area reduction on MRA, with a value of 0.91 (95 % confidence interval 0.82-0.99), excluding accessory renal arteries. As comparison, the AUROC for the radiologists visual assessments on CTA and MRA were 0.90 (0.82-0.98) and 0.91 (0.83-0.99) respectively. None of the differences were statistically significant. Conclusions: No significant differences were found between the morphological measures in their ability to predict hemodynamically significant stenosis, but a tendency of MRA having higher AUROC than CTA. There was no significant difference between measurements made by the radiologists and measurements made with fuzzy connectedness segmentation. Further studies are required to definitely identify the optimal measurement approach.

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  • 305.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Council Jonkoping, Dept Surg, Ryhov Cty Hosp, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Kolodziej, B.
    County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council Jonköping, Sweden.
    Randomized clinical trial of Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score-based management of patients with suspected appendicitis2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 1451-1461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe role of imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis is controversial. This prospective interventional study and nested randomized trial analysed the impact of implementing a risk stratification algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score, and compared routine imaging with selective imaging after clinical reassessment. MethodPatients presenting with suspicion of appendicitis between September 2009 and January 2012 from age 10years were included at 21 emergency surgical centres and from age 5years at three university paediatric centres. Registration of clinical characteristics, treatments and outcomes started during the baseline period. The AIR score-based algorithm was implemented during the intervention period. Intermediate-risk patients were randomized to routine imaging or selective imaging after clinical reassessment. ResultsThe baseline period included 1152 patients, and the intervention period 2639, of whom 1068 intermediate-risk patients were randomized. In low-risk patients, use of the AIR score-based algorithm resulted in less imaging (192 versus 345 per cent; Pamp;lt;0001), fewer admissions (295 versus 428 per cent; Pamp;lt;0001), and fewer negative explorations (16 versus 32 per cent; P=0030) and operations for non-perforated appendicitis (68 versus 97 per cent; P=0034). Intermediate-risk patients randomized to the imaging and observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendicectomies (64 versus 67 per cent respectively; P=0884), number of admissions, number of perforations and length of hospital stay, but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (534 versus 463 per cent; P=0020). ConclusionAIR score-based risk classification can safely reduce the use of diagnostic imaging and hospital admissions in patients with suspicion of appendicitis. Registration number: NCT00971438 ( ). Reduces imaging and admissions

  • 306.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Diao, Xingxing
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Wohlfarth, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NIDA, MD 21224 USA; National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Scheidweiler, Karl B.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Huestis, Marilyn A.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Metabolic profiling of new synthetic cannabinoids AMB and 5F-AMB by human hepatocyte and liver microsome incubations and high-resolution mass spectrometry2016In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1067-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleAMB (methyl (1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carbonyl)-L-valinate)) and its fluoro analog 5F-AMB (methyl (1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carbonyl)-L-valinate) are two new synthetic cannabinoids that are structural analogs of AB-PINACA and 5F-AB-PINACA, respectively. 5F-AMB is scheduled as an illicit drug in China, Germany, Singapore and Japan, and no metabolism data are currently available for either drug. The aim of the present work was to investigate the metabolism of AMB and 5F-AMB and propose appropriate markers to identify their intake in clinical or forensic cases. MethodsAMB and 5F-AMB were incubated in human hepatocytes (10 mol/L) to generate phase I and II metabolites, which were identified with a TripleTOF 5600(+) high-resolution mass spectrometer. AMB and 5F-AMB metabolic stability studies also were performed with human liver microsomes (HLM) to evaluate metabolic clearances, and to adequately design the human hepatocyte experiment. ResultsAMB and 5F-AMB were quickly metabolized in HLM with a 1.1 0.1 and 1.0 +/- 0.2min T-1/2, respectively. The predominant metabolic pathway for AMB and 5F-AMB in hepatocytes was ester hydrolysis, and further oxidation and/or glucuronidation. In total, 19 metabolites were identified for AMB and 17 for 5F-AMB. We describe metabolites to differentiate AMB from 5F-AMB, and metabolites that are common to both analytes due to oxidative defluorination of 5F-AMB. ConclusionsFor the first time, AMB and 5F-AMB metabolism profiles were characterized, providing valuable data for identifying these two novel psychoactive substances. The difficulties of differentiating AMB and 5F-AMB from AB-PINACA/5F-AB-PINACA metabolites also were examined. These data improve the interpretation of urinary markers after AMB and 5F-AMB intake. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA

  • 307.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holmbom, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Delay of appropriate antibiotic treatment is associated with high mortality in patients with community-onset sepsis in a Swedish setting2019In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1223-1234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial in patients with sepsis and septic shock. Studies often focus on time to first dose of appropriate antibiotics, but subsequent dosing is equally important. Our aim was to investigate the impact of fulfillment of early treatment, with focus on appropriate administration of first and second doses of antibiotics, on 28-day mortality in patients with community-onset severe sepsis and septic shock. A retrospective study on adult patients admitted to the emergency department with community-onset sepsis and septic shock was conducted 2012-2013. The criterion early appropriate antibiotic treatment was defined as administration of the first dose of adequate antibiotics within 1h, and the second dose given with less than 25% delay after the recommended dose interval. A high-risk patient was defined as a septic patient with either shock within 24h after arrival or red triage level on admittance according to the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System Adult. Primary endpoint was 28-day mortality. Of 90 patients, less than one in four (20/87) received early appropriate antibiotic treatment, and only one in three (15/44) of the high-risk patients. The univariate analysis showed a more than threefold higher mortality among high-risk patients not receiving early appropriate antibiotic treatment. Multivariable analysis identified early non-appropriate antibiotic treatment as an independent predictor of mortality with an odds ratio for mortality of 10.4. Despite that the importance of early antibiotic treatment has been established for decades, adherence to this principle was very poor.

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  • 308.
    Andersson, Marine L
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kockum, Henrik
    3Department of.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    High Prevalence of Drug-Drug Interactions in Primary Health Care is Caused by Prescriptions from other Healthcare Units.2018In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 512-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug-drug interactions are increasingly common, as patients are getting older and the number of drugs per patient is increasing. In this study, we investigated to which extent potential drug-drug interactions originated from single or multiple prescribers. All patients attending any of 20 primary healthcare centres were included in a retrospective observational cohort study. Data on all prescriptions to these patients, irrespectively of the prescriber, were collected for two 4-month periods. Potential drug interactions were identified using the drug-drug interaction database SFINX. Interactions were classified with respect to the workplace of the prescriber, and the prevalence of interactions according to origin was analysed. We found that the drug interactions were significantly more common when the drugs were prescribed from different healthcare centres, compared with drugs prescribed from the patients' primary healthcare centre only. One explanation for this increased risk of drug interactions could be that the prescribers at different primary healthcare centres do not share the same information concerning the total medication list of the patient.

  • 309.
    Andersson, Martin O.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Bergvall, Ulrika A.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Chirico, Jan
    National Vet Institute SVA, Sweden.
    Christensson, Madeleine
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Nordstrom, Jonas
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden; Dalarna County Adm Board, Sweden.
    Kjellander, Petter
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus2016In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 9, no 221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The epidemiology of the zoonotic tick-transmitted parasite Babesia spp. and its occurrence in wild reservoir hosts in Sweden is unclear. In European deer, several parasite species, including Babesia capreoli and the zoonotic B. venatorum and B. divergens has been reported previously. The European roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, is an important and common part of the indigenous fauna in Europe, as well as an important host for Ixodes ricinus ticks, the vector of several Babesia spp. in Europe. Here, we aimed to investigate the occurrence of Babesia spp. in roe deer in Sweden. Findings: Roe deer (n = 77) were caught and sampled for blood. Babesia spp. was detected with a PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of Babesia spp. was 52 %, and two species were detected; B. capreoli and B. venatorum in 44 and 7.8 % of the individuals, respectively. Infection occurred both in summer and winter. Conclusions: We showed that roe deer in Sweden, close to the edge of their northern inland distributional range, are infected with Babesia spp. The occurrence of B. venatorum in roe deer imply that it is established in Sweden and the zoonotic implication of this finding should be regarded to a greater extent in future.

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  • 310.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

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  • 311.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Internal Med, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction contacting primary healthcare before hospitalisation: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The characteristics of patients with on-going myocardial infarction (MI) contacting the primary healthcare (PHC) centre before hospitalisation are not well known. Prompt diagnosis is crucial in patients with MI, but many patients delay seeking medical care. The aims of this study was to 1) describe background characteristics, symptoms, actions and delay times in patients contacting the PHC before hospitalisation when falling ill with an acute MI, 2) compare those patients with acute MI patients not contacting the PHC, and 3) explore factors associated with a PHC contact in acute MI patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicentre study, enrolling consecutive patients with MI within 24 hours of admission to hospital from Nov 2012 until Feb 2014. Results: A total of 688 patients with MI, 519 men and 169 women, were included; the mean age was 66 +/- 11 years. One in five people contacted PHC instead of the recommended emergency medical services (EMS), and 94% of these patients experienced cardinal symptoms of an acute MI; i.e., chest pain, and/or radiating pain in the arms, and/or cold sweat. Median delay time from symptom-onset-to-decision-to-seek-care was 2:15 hours in PHC patients and 0:40 hours in non-PHC patients (pamp;lt;0.01). The probability of utilising the PHC before hospitalisation was associated with fluctuating symptoms (OR 1.74), pain intensity (OR 0.90) symptoms during off-hours (OR 0.42), study hospital (OR 3.49 and 2.52, respectively, for two of the county hospitals) and a final STEMI diagnosis (OR 0.58). Conclusions: Ambulance services are still underutilized in acute MI patients. A substantial part of the patients contacts their primary healthcare centre before they are diagnosed with MI, although experiencing cardinal symptoms such as chest pain. There is need for better knowledge in the population about symptoms of MI and adequate pathways to qualified care. Knowledge and awareness amongst primary healthcare professionals on the occurrence of MI patients is imperative.

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  • 312.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Muhrbeck, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Veen, Harald
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    Osman, Zaher
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    von Schreeb, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hospital Workload for Weapon-Wounded Females Treated by the International Committee of the Red Cross: More Work Needed than for Males2018In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civilians constitute 33-51% of victims in armed conflicts. Several reports on civilian injuries exist, but few have focused on injuries afflicting females. We analyzed routinely collected data on weapon-related injuries from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) hospital in northwestern Pakistan in order to define injury patterns and types of surgical treatment for females. A total of 3028 patient files (376 females) from consecutively admitted patients to the ICRC-hospital in Peshawar from February 2009 to May 2012 were included. Information regarding injury-mechanism, time since injury, vital parameters at admission, type of injury, treatment and basic outcome was extracted from the files and analyzed. Comparisons between gender and age-groups were done by cross-table analyses or nonparametric tests. Females were younger than males (20 vs. 25 years), arrived sooner after injury (24 vs. 48 h) (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both) and were victims of bombs and missiles more frequently (64.4 vs. 54.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Vital parameters such as systolic blood pressure (110 vs. 113 mmHg) and pulse rate (100 vs. 86) were more affected at admission (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Females were subjected to surgery (83.0 vs. 77.4%) (p amp;lt; 0.05) and were given blood transfusions more often (18.8 vs. 13.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.01). No differences in amputations or in-hospital mortality were found. Females treated at the ICRC-hospital in northwestern Pakistan are markedly affected by indiscriminate weapons such as bombs and missiles. Their average consumption of surgery is greater than for males, and this might be relevant in planning for staffing and facility needs in similar contexts.

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  • 313.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Does Delay of Diagnosis and Treatment in Appendicitis Cause Perforation? in WORLD JOURNAL OF SURGERY, vol 40, issue 6, pp 1315-13172016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 1315-1317Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 314.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Less invasive pilonidal sinus surgical procedures2019In: Colo-Proctology, ISSN 0174-2442, E-ISSN 1615-6730, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilonidal disease can be treated by less invasive methods such as simple mechanical cleansing of the sinus and cavity of hairs and granulation tissue eventually supplemented by filling the space with an antiseptic or sclerosing agent like phenol (forbidden in Germany due to its toxicity) or space-holding fibrin glue. Minimal excision or debridement of the sinus and/or cavity through amidline or aseparate paramedial excision can also be performed, leaving the wounds open or closed. These methods are simple and cost-efficient, and associated with low pain, rapid healing, and arapid return to normal activity. Adisadvantage is the higher recurrence rate; however, these methods can be used repeatedly for recurrences. Whereas the evidence for treatment with phenol or fibrine glue is weak, there are numerous reports supporting the safety and efficiency of the minimally invasive surgical methods. Because of the associated low risk for complications and morbidity, these procedures are suitable for first-line treatment in the majority of pilonidal disease patients.

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  • 315.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    May fibrine glue play aroleasanadjunct?2019In: Colo-Proctology, ISSN 0174-2442, E-ISSN 1615-6730, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 212-212Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 316.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    RIFT study and management of suspected appendicitis2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 317.
    Andersson, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Doll, Dietrich
    Department of Surgery, St Marienhospital Vechta, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Medical School Hannover, Vechta, Germany.
    Stauffer, Verena K
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sonnenhofspital, Lindenhofgruppe, Bern, Switzerland.
    Vogt, Andreas P
    Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Boggs, Steven D
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
    Luedi, Markus M.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Interdisciplinary Dialogue Is Needed When Defining Perioperative Recommendations: Conflicting Guidelines for Anesthetizing Patients for Pilonidal Surgery2018In: AandA practice, ISSN 2575-3126, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 227-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National or international guidelines can help surgeons and anesthesiologists make treatment decisions, but the existence of conflicting recommendations can hinder treatment rather than helping. A case in point is the treatment of pilonidal sinus disease, a chronic subcutaneous infection located in the sacrococcygeal area. Its incidence is rising, reaching almost 100/100,000 inhabitants. Three surgical societies have proposed guidelines for treating the disease, but these guidelines vary greatly in their approach to anesthesia. Who should provide input into guidelines? And how can medical disciplines successfully collaborate? Anesthesiologists must be involved in defining perioperative recommendations not only in patients with pilonidal sinus disease.

  • 318.
    Andersson, Siv Folkhammar
    et al.
    Unit of Rehabilitation, Kalmar County Council, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henriksson Welin, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Divison of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Arthritis management in primary care: A study of physiotherapists current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines2017In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis‐related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence‐based care.

    Methods

    Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire.

    Results

    Sixty‐four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p < 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p < 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA.

    Conclusions

    PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care.

  • 319.
    Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces, V Frölunda, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lars
    Försvarsmakten, Centrum för Försvarsmedicin, Sweden;Borås University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Borås University, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 70-77Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The results after pre-deployment traing can be categorised as 1) learning about military medicine and 2) taking care of the casualty. The results after an international mission can be categorised as 1) collaborating with others 2) providing general health care and 3) improving competence in military medicine. The results indicate that the training should be developed in order to optimise pre-deployment training for physicians and nurses. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimising suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 320.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 321.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Kristin
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsén, Monika Fagevik
    Department of Surgery and Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 37, article id 25886536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

    METHODS: This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay.

    RESULTS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

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  • 322.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Dept. of C4ISR, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping, Sweden, .
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Geodesic registration for interactive atlas-based segmentation using learned multi-scale anatomical manifolds2018In: Pattern Recognition Letters, ISSN 0167-8655, E-ISSN 1872-7344, Vol. 112, p. 340-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atlas-based segmentation is often used to segment medical image regions. For intensity-normalized data, the quality of these segmentations is highly dependent on the similarity between the atlas and the target under the used registration method. We propose a geodesic registration method for interactive atlas-based segmentation using empirical multi-scale anatomical manifolds. The method utilizes unlabeled images together with the labeled atlases to learn empirical anatomical manifolds. These manifolds are defined on distinct scales and regions and are used to propagate the labeling information from the atlases to the target along anatomical geodesics. The resulting competing segmentations from the different manifolds are then ranked according to an image-based similarity measure. We used image volumes acquired using magnetic resonance imaging from 36 subjects. The performance of the method was evaluated using a liver segmentation task. The result was then compared to the corresponding performance of direct segmentation using Dice Index statistics. The method shows a significant improvement in liver segmentation performance between the proposed method and direct segmentation. Furthermore, the standard deviation in performance decreased significantly. Using competing complementary manifolds defined over a hierarchy of region of interests gives an additional improvement in segmentation performance compared to the single manifold segmentation.

  • 323.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

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  • 324.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hermann, Julia M.
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, ZIBMT, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany, German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München‐Neuherberg, Germany.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Paediatric Department, CPH‐Direct, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Skrivarhaug, Torild
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Froehlich-Reiterer, Elke
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Maahs, David M.
    Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Stanford Diabetes Research Center, Stanford, California, USA.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Kapellen, Thomas
    University Children's Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Fritsch, Maria
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Birkebaek, Niels H.
    Department of Paediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Drivvoll, Ann K.
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Miller, Kellee
    Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, Florida, USA.
    Stephenson, Terence
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hofer, Sabine E.
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Fredheim, Siri
    Paediatric Department, CPH‐Direct, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Kummernes, Siv J.
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Foster, Nicole
    Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, Florida, USA.
    Amin, Rakesh
    Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Hilgard, Doerte
    Pediatric Practice, Witten, Germany.
    Rami-Merhar, Birgit
    Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Dahl-Jorgensen, Knut
    Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Clements, Mark
    Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, USA University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, USA University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.
    Hanas, Ragnar
    Department of Paediatrics, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden and the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holl, Reinhard W.
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, ZIBMT, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München‐Neuherberg, Germany.
    Warner, Justin T.
    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    International benchmarking in type 1 diabetes: Large difference in childhood HbA1c between eight high-income countries but similar rise during adolescence-A quality registry study2020In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To identify differences and similarities in HbA1c levels and patterns regarding age and gender in eight high-income countries. Subjects 66 071 children and adolescents below18 years of age with type 1 diabetes for at least 3 months and at least one HbA1c measurement during the study period. Methods Pediatric Diabetes Quality Registry data from Austria, Denmark, England, Germany, Norway, Sweden, the United States, and Wales were collected between 2013 and 2014. HbA1c, gender, age, and duration were used in the analysis. Results Distribution of gender and age groups was similar in the eight participating countries. The mean HbA1c varied from 60 to 73 mmol/mol (7.6%-8.8%) between the countries. The increase in HbA1c between the youngest (0-9 years) to the oldest (15-17 years) age group was close to 8 mmol/mol (0.7%) in all countries (P &lt; .001). Females had a 1 mmol/mol (0.1%) higher mean HbA1c than boys (P &lt; .001) in seven out of eight countries. Conclusions In spite of large differences in the mean HbA1c between countries, a remarkable similarity in the increase of HbA1c from childhood to adolescence was found.

  • 325.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Futurum, Australia; Jonköping Academic Improvement Health and Welf, Germany.
    Teenagers with poor metabolic control already have a higher risk of microvascular complications as young adults2016In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 533-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate how HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes affects microvascular complications in young adults. Methods: All individuals registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry (SWEDIABKIDS) 13-18 years of age, and as adults registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry (NDR) in both the years 2011 and 2012 were included, in total 4250 individuals. Results: Of the individuals with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS 83.4% had retinopathy, 15.8% had microalbuminuria and 4.9% had macroalbuminuria in NDR. The logistic regression analysis showed that the OR to develop macroalbuminuria as a young adult was significantly higher in the group with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS (p &lt; 0.05). Among the patients with mean HbA1c above 78 mmol/mol in both registries there was a significantly higher proportion that had retinopathy, microalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.001) and/or macroalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.01) compared to the group with HbA1c below 57 mmol/mol in both registries. Only 6.5% of the persons in this study were over 30 years of age. Conclusions: Paediatric diabetes teams working with teenagers must be aware of the impact of good metabolic control during adolescence, and should intensify the care during this vulnerable period of life to reduce the risk of microvascular complications in young adults.

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  • 326.
    Andolf, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Möller, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prior placental bed disorders and later dementia: a retrospective Swedish register-based cohort study2020In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the association between a history of placental bed disorders and later dementia. Design Retrospective population-based cohort study. Setting Sweden. Sample All women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 (1 128 709). Methods Women with and without placental bed disorders (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy including pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, spontaneous preterm labour and birth, preterm premature rupture of membranes, abruptio placenta, late miscarriages) and other pregnancy complications were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register. International classification of disease was used. Data were linked to other National Registers. Participants were followed up until 2013. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios for women with and without pregnancy complications and were adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of vascular dementia and non-vascular dementia. Results Adjusted for cardiovascular disease and socio-demographic factors, an increased risk of vascular dementia was shown in women with previous pregnancy-induced hypertension (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.88, 95% CI 1.32-2.69), pre-eclampsia (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.23-2.16), spontaneous preterm labour and birth (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.12-2.42) or preterm premature rupture of membranes (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.08-2.37). No statistically significant increased risk was seen for other pregnancy complications or non-vascular dementia even though many of the point estimates indicated increased risks. Conclusions Women with placental bed disorders have a higher risk for vascular disease. Mechanisms behind the abnormal placentation remain elusive, although maternal constitutional factors, abnormal implantation as well as impaired angiogenesis have been suggested. Tweetable abstract Placental bed syndromes associated with vascular dementia even after adjusting for cardiovascular disease.

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  • 327.
    Andolf, Ellika G.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown University, RI 02908 USA.
    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and later dementia: a Swedish National Register Study2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Our aim was to investigate the rate of vascular dementia and dementia in women with previous hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, since white matter lesions of the brain and cardiovascular disease are linked both to dementia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Material and methods. Prospective population-based registry study on all women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1975 (284 598). Women with and without hypertensive disorders in pregnancy were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register and linked to the National Patient Register, where data on somatic disease later in life were obtained. International classification of disease was used. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios for both groups and adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures were in-hospital diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and dementia. Results. No increased risks were seen for vascular dementia or dementia after any hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. If broken down in specific diagnoses for hypertensive disease in pregnancy, adjusted risks for vascular dementia after hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy the hazard ratio was 6.27 (95% CI 1.65-27.44). Higher risks for cardiovascular disease were confirmed. Conclusions. Because of the very low absolute risk, the wide confidence interval and risk of misclassification, our results on vascular dementia could be questioned. Considering the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, the findings of brain lesions and the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the possibly increased risk for all kinds of dementia must be investigated in larger and more well-defined cohorts.

  • 328.
    Andrade, Renato
    et al.
    FIFA Med Ctr Excellence, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal; Dom Henrique Res Ctr, Portugal.
    Pereira, Rogerio
    FIFA Med Ctr Excellence, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal; Dom Henrique Res Ctr, Portugal; Fernando Pessoa Univ, Portugal.
    Weir, Adam
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands; Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Med Hosp, Qatar.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Espregueira-Mendes, Joao
    FIFA Med Ctr Excellence, Portugal; Dom Henrique Res Ctr, Portugal; Minho Univ, Portugal; Univ Minho, Portugal; ICVS 3Bs PT Govt Associate Lab, Portugal.
    Zombie reviews taking over the PROSPERO systematic review registry. Its time to fight back!2019In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 15, p. 919-921Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 329. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Appetite in patients with heart failure: Assessment, prevalence and related factors2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Appetite is an important component in nutrition for maintaining the food intake needed by the body. Decreased appetite is a common clinical problem in patients with heart failure. It has a negative impact on food intake and possibly on malnutrition and health outcomes. There is a lack of evidence on how to assess appetite in heart failure. Furthermore, there are knowledge gaps about factors associated with appetite and which role appetite plays for health status in heart failure.  

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate appetite in patients with heart failure. Four studies were conducted with the goal to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) (I) and to explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and related factors associated with appetite in patients with heart failure (II-IV).  

    Methods: A multicenter study was conducted in three outpatient heart failure clinics in the center of Sweden during 2009-2012. Data were collected through a baseline measurement (I-IV) and an 18-month follow-up (IV). The first study was a psychometric evaluation study (I), while the other studies had an observational cross-sectional design (II-III) and an observational prospective design (IV). One hundred and eighty-six patients diagnosed with heart failure and experiencing heart failure symptoms participated at baseline. At the 18-month follow-up study (IV), one hundred and sixteen participants from the baseline participated. Data were collected from medical records (pharmacological treatment, comorbidity, left ventricle ejection fraction, time of diagnosis), self-reported questionnaires (demographic background data, appetite, symptoms of depression, health status, sleep, self-reported physical activity), objective measurements (anthropometric assessment of body size, blood samples, six minutes’ walk test, and physical activity measured with an actigraph) and clinical assessment (New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification, and cognitive assessment). The main outcome variables included appetite (I, II and IV) and health status (III). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the studies (I-IV).  

    Results: The majority of the participants had moderate heart failure symptoms, i.e., NYHA class II (n=114, 61%). Most of the participants were men (n=130, 70%). Mean age was 70,7 years, (SD=11,0), and mean BMI was 28.7 (SD=5.3). The CNAQ showed acceptable psychometric properties for assessing appetite in patients with heart failure (I). This thesis shows that 38% of the participants experienced an appetite level that put them at risk of weight loss (I). It was shown that factors such as biological, medical, psychological (II) and physical activity/exercise capacity (IV) are associated with appetite. Also, appetite was associated with impaired health status. However, this association was found to be moderated by symptoms of depression (III). Neither appetite nor physical activity changed during the 18-month follow-up (IV).  

    Conclusion: Decreased appetite is a serious phenomenon that needs attention in the care of patients with heart failure. Health care professionals can now use a validated and simple appetite instrument to assess appetite in heart failure. In addition, attention should be paid to elderly patients and those who have symptoms of depression, sleep problems, impaired cognitive function and impaired physical activity, as well as to patients on suboptimal medical treatment. Higher appetite was shown to contribute to a better health status, but this was only evident in patients without symptoms of depression. Therefore, special attention should be paid to symptoms of depression, as this risk factor affected the association between appetite and health status. This thesis enhances the understanding of the magnitude of the problem with decreased appetite in heart failure both in numbers and factors. New priorities in nutrition care and new ideas can be established, both in practice and in research, in order to improve a nutrition care that is vital for patients with heart failure.  

    List of papers
    1. Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE INC MEDICAL PUBLISHERS, 2015
    Keywords
    Appetite; heart failure; outpatient; psychometrics
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123773 (URN)10.1016/j.cardfail.2015.10.006 (DOI)000366230900004 ()26497759 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Center for Clinical Research and Sormland County Council, Sweden; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemason Foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-03-14
    2. Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    Keywords
    age; appetite; cognitive function; depression; heart failure; insomnia; outpatient; pharmacological treatment
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128929 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13220 (DOI)000375866200022 ()26879764 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Centre for Clinical Research Sormland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemason Foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-03-14
    3. Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2018
    Keywords
    appetite, association, depression, health status, heart failure, nutritional status
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139105 (URN)10.1097/JCN.0000000000000428 (DOI)000440241700003 ()28574973 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020167287 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-07-01 Created: 2017-07-01 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
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    Appetite in patients with heart failure: Assessment, prevalence and related factors
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  • 330.
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in heart failure – A cross sectional study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity and appetite are important for maintaining physical health. Yet, sedentary lifestyle and poor appetite are frequently observed in the heart failure (HF) population. However, the relationships between these phenomena are not yet clearly understood. 

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with stable HF.

    Methods: In this cross sectional study, a consecutive sample of 186 patients with confirmed HF with NYHA class II-IV (median age 72y, 70% men, NYHA class II 61%) participated in the study. Patients were recruited from three HF outpatient clinics in central Sweden. Physical activity measures included total energy expenditure (TEE), active energy expenditure (AEE) above 3 METs, average daily METs and number of steps per day during four days using a validated multi-sensor wearable armband (SenseWear®, Body Monitoring System). Patients also self-reported their physical activity on a ten point numeric rating scale, from extremely low (1) to extremely high (10). Self-reported appetite was measured by Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ), an 8-item instrument (score range 8-40) where CNAQ ≤28 indicate poor appetite. Associations between physical activity and appetite were analyzed by Spearman correlation while differences in physical activity between poor vs good appetite were analyzed using Mann Whitney U test.

    Results: There was a significant positive relationship between physical activity and appetite assessed by TEE (rs=.184, p=.012), AEE of moderate intensity >3 METs (rs=.262, p=.000), number of steps (rs=.292, p=.000), average METs intensity (rs=.249, p=.001), and self- reported physical activity (rs=.191, p =.009). Levels of physical activity in the low appetite group differed significantly from the group with better appetite, this was seen in all physical dimensions, TEE (U=3225, z=-2.26, p=.024), AEE (U=2902, z=-3.178, p=.001), number of steps (U=2706, z=-3.734, p=.000), average METs intensity (U=3128, z=-2.541, p=.011), levels of self-reported physical activity (U=3185, z=-2.47, p=.013).

    Conclusion: This study shows that physical activity is associated with appetite and that levels of physical activity differs between patients with poor and good appetite. These findings has implications for both research and practice and underlines the importance in monitoring both physical activity and appetite. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting physical activity also improve appetite and vice versa in the HF population.

  • 331.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Res Sect, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

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  • 332.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Sweden Lorraine Evangelista, RN, Prof, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The associations between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure – a prospective observational study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite both play a crucial role for health outcomes and quality of life in patients with heart failure. Nevertheless, both of these key functions are frequently decreased in patients with heart failure. Whilst most attention focuses independently on the physical activity levels, the associations with appetite has been insufficiently investigated. The aim was therefore to explore the associations between physical activity and appetite in community dwelling heart failure patients.

    Methods: This prospective observational study consisted of 186 patients with symptomatic heart failure of whom 56 (30%) were women and 130 (70%) were men. Mean age was 70.7 (SD=11 years), the majority had NYHA-class II, 114 (63%). Objective and subjective methods were used to measure physical activity include a wearable actigraph (SenceWear) for 4 days and six minutes’ walk test. The actigraph calculate total energy expenditure, active energy expenditure, number of steps and METs daily average index. Patients also stated their physical activity level on a numeric rating scale. A self-reported questionnaire, the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess appetite. Simple linear regression was conducted to explore the associations between physical activity and appetite at baseline and at 18-month follow-up.

    Results: In general, the levels of physical activity in this sample was low and appetite was poor. There was a significant association between objective physical activity measures and appetite at baseline ranging between (p=<0.001-0.041). The number of steps and walking distance had the strongest association, each explaining 6% and 7% of the total variance in appetite. At the 18-month follow-up, all objective and subjective physical activity measures were associated with appetite (p=0.001-0.035) with the number of steps being most strongly associated (p=<0.001) explaining 14% of the total variation in appetite.

    Conclusions: Patients with heart failure who are more physically active experiences better appetite. These findings underscore the importance of placing greater attention on both physical activity and appetite in clinical practice as these factors has implications for patient’s health outcomes. Further longitudinally oriented studies are needed to determine whether there is a causal relationship between physical activity and appetite in heart failure populations.

    Keywords: Appetite, Heart Failure, Physical activity

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    The associations between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure – a prospective observational study
  • 333.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 334.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Lennie, Terry
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Depressive symptoms as a moderator and mediator of the relationship between physical activity, appetite and perceived health among patients with heart failure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Depressive symptoms have been shown to directly influence perceived health among persons with heart failure (HF). Decreased physical activity and appetite may also be predictive of poor perceived health.The purposes of this study were to determine whether appetite and physical activity predicted perceived health, and to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated their relationship with perceived health.

    Methods: A total of 184 patients with mild to severe HF were included. Appetite, depressive symptoms and perceived health were measured by self-report questionnaires (Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire and EuroQol 5D index). Physical activity was measured by SenceWearTM for 6 days. A separate series of multiple linear regression analyses were run to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated the relationship between physical activity and perceived health, and between appetite and perceived health.

    Results: Higher physical activity predicted better perceived health (ß=0.202, p=.006) but the strength of the association decreased (ß=0.13, p=.048) when depressive symptoms were included in the model. There was a significant mediation effect for depressive symptoms on perceived health (sobel=2.03, p=.041) (Fig 1). Appetite was a significant predictor of perceived health. Examination of this association among those with and without depressive symptoms, however showed positive association between appetite and perceived health remained only for patients without depressive symptoms demonstrating a moderating effect (p<.001) (Fig 2).

    Conclusion: Identifying and treating depression simultaneously while addressing appetite and physical activity may be key to improving perceived health among persons with HF.

  • 335.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Centre Health Evaluat and Outcome Science, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Correction: Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure (vol 21, pg 954, 2015)2016In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 245-245Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 336.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Providence Health Care Research Institute, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 337.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

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  • 338.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine L
    Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California, Irvine, CA,.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Physical activity and appetite in patients with stable heart failure – A cross sectional study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California, Irvine, CA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with poor appetite in patients with heart failure.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Andreassen, A. K.
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Andersson, B.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, F.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Eiskjaer, H.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Radegran, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Gude, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Solbu, D.
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway.
    Karason, K.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Arora, S.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Dellgren, G.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gullestad, L.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Everolimus Initiation With Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal in De Novo Heart Transplant Recipients: Three-Year Results From the Randomized SCHEDULE Study2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1238-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a randomized, open-label trial, de novo heart transplant recipients were randomized to everolimus (3-6ng/mL) with reduced-exposure calcineurin inhibitor (CNI; cyclosporine) to weeks 7-11 after transplant, followed by increased everolimus exposure (target 6-10ng/mL) with cyclosporine withdrawal or standard-exposure cyclosporine. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. A total of 110 of 115 patients completed the 12-month study, and 102 attended a follow-up visit at month 36. Mean measured GFR (mGFR) at month 36 was 77.4mL/min (standard deviation [SD] 20.2mL/min) versus 59.2mL/min (SD 17.4mL/min) in the everolimus and CNI groups, respectively, a difference of 18.3mL/min (95% CI 11.1-25.6mL/min; p &lt; 0.001) in the intention to treat population. Multivariate analysis showed treatment to be an independent determinant of mGFR at month 36. Coronary intravascular ultrasound at 36 months revealed significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy in the everolimus group compared with the CNI group. Biopsy-proven acute rejection grade 2R occurred in 10.2% and 5.9% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively, during months 12-36. Serious adverse events occurred in 37.3% and 19.6% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively (p=0.078). These results suggest that early CNI withdrawal after heart transplantation supported by everolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids with lymphocyte-depleting induction is safe at intermediate follow-up. This regimen, used selectively, may offer adequate immunosuppressive potency with a sustained renal advantage. A follow-up study of the SCHEDULE trial, which randomized de novo heart transplant recipients to everolimus with cyclosporine discontinuation or to standard-exposure cyclosporine, shows that measured glomerular filtration rate remains significantly higher in the everolimus group at three years posttransplant, with significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy compared to cyclosporine therapy.

  • 341.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boman, I-L
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital Support for Persons with Cognitive Impairment2017In: Harnessing the Power of Technology to Improve Lives / [ed] Cudd P.,de Witte L., IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 242, p. 5-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive impairment may cause difficulties in planning and initiating daily activities, as well as remembering to do what is scheduled. This study investigates the effectiveness of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar that sends text messages to the users mobile phone as support in everyday life, for persons with cognitive impairment due to neurological injury/diagnoses. The study has a randomised controlled trail design with data collection at baseline and at follow-up sessions after two and four months. Data collection started in August 2016 and continues until December 2017. The interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar may give the needed support to remind the person and thus increase the ability to perform activities and to be independence in everyday life. Preliminary results will be presented regarding what effect the interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar have for the participants performance of everyday life activities as well as perceived quality of life.

  • 342.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessing occupational performance in special housing in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 428-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assessing occupational performance is commonly done by occupational therapists[OT] working in special housing in municipal elder care. Assessments should be relevant and evidence-based. Even so, we know little about how assessment of occupational performance is conducted in special housing.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to identify OTs’ use and perceptions of different methods to assess occupational performance for elderly clients living in special housing.  

    Method: An email questionnaire was sent to OTs working in special housing in Sweden. Data was analyzed using descriptive and parametric statistics.

    Results: The findings, based on data from 660 respondents, showed that OTs regularly assessed occupational performance but did not use standardized assessment instruments or structured methods to any great extent. In general, OTs reported that they were not pleased with their ability to assess their clients; however, OTs with higher education and with responsibility for fewer clients were more pleased with their assessments and stated that they had more knowledge about assessment methods. Conclusion: To support OTs in using structured assessments of occupational performance in everyday practice, organization as well as structures in the work environment and educational development need to be taken into consideration.

  • 343.
    Andreasson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sigurdsson, Gudmundur V
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pegenius, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hallbook, Tove
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cortical excitability measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation in children with epilepsy before and after antiepileptic drugs2020In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To evaluate cortical excitability with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in children with new-onset epilepsy before and after antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Method Fifty-five drug-naive patients (29 females, 26 males; 3-18y), with new-onset epilepsy were recruited from 1st May 2014 to 31st October 2017 at the Child Neurology Department, Queen Silvias Childrens Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. We performed TMS in 48 children (23 females, 25 males; mean [SD] age 10y [3y], range 4-15y) with epilepsy (27 generalized and 21 focal) before and after the introduction of AEDs. We used single- and paired-pulse TMS. We used single-pulse TMS to record resting motor thresholds (RMTs), stimulus-response curves, and cortical silent periods (CSPs). We used paired-pulse TMS to record intracortical inhibition and facilitation at short, long, and intermediate intervals. Results There were no differences in cortical excitability between children with generalized and focal epilepsy at baseline. After AED treatment, RMTs increased (p=0.001), especially in children receiving sodium valproate (p=0.005). CSPs decreased after sodium valproate was administered (p=0.050). As in previous studies, we noted a negative correlation between RMT and age in our study cohort. Paired-pulse TMS could not be performed in most children because high RMTs made suprathreshold stimulation impossible. Interpretation Cortical excitability as measured with RMT decreased after the introduction of AEDs. This was seen in children with both generalized and focal epilepsy who were treated with sodium valproate, although it was most prominent in children with generalized epilepsy. We suggest that TMS might be used as a prognostic tool to predict AED efficacy.

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  • 344.
    Andreasson, Frida
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Aidemark, Jan
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hanson, Elizabeth Jane
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Lifeworld in co-designing with informal carers2019In: JOURNAL OF ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 2398-6263, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on carers’ experiences of being involved in the development of a web-based support programme for carers of people with heart failure (CPwHF), and discuss the challenges related to their involvement in the development process. The focus was on the different phases in the project as well as the methodological challenges and opportunities that occurred in the user group sessions conducted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research adopt an explorative design studying a co-design process to develop an information and communication technology based support programme for and with CPwHF. Habermas’ concepts of lifeworld and system are used as a theoretical framework to analyse the co-design process employed in the study.

    Findings

    Reflecting on the co-design approach adopted, the findings highlight the methodological challenges that arise with carer involvement and the possible tensions that occur between researchers’ ambitions to include users in the design process, and the goal of developing a product or service, in the different phases of the design process.

    Originality/value

    Findings highlight that there is a tension between the system and lifeworld in the co-design process which are not totally compatible. The paper highlights that there is a need to develop flexible and reflexive human-centred design methodologies, able to meet carers’ needs and ideas, and at the same time balance this with proposed research outcomes.

  • 345.
    André, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Public Health and Caring Science, Sweden.
    Grondal, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva-Lena
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Council, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Annika
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne Reg, Sweden.
    Hedin, Katarina
    Lund University, Sweden; Kronoberg County Council, Sweden.
    Uncertainty in clinical practice - an interview study with Swedish GPs on patients with sore throat2016In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 17, no 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Uncertainty is inevitable in clinical practice in primary care and tolerance for uncertainty and concern for bad outcomes has been shown to vary between physicians. Uncertainty is a factor for inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Evidence-based guidelines as well as near-patient tests are suggested tools to decrease uncertainty in the management of patients with respiratory tract infections. The aim of this paper was to describe strategies for coping with uncertainty in patients with pharyngotonsillitis in relation to guidelines. Methods: An interview study was conducted among a strategic sample of 25 general practitioners (GPs). Results: All GPs mentioned potential dangerous differential diagnoses and complications. Four strategies for coping with uncertainty were identified, one of which was compliant with guidelines, "Adherence to guidelines", and three were idiosyncratic: "Clinical picture and C-reactive protein (CRP)", "Expanded control", and "Unstructured". The residual uncertainty differed for the different strategies: in the strategy "Adherence to guidelines" and " Clinical picture and CRP" uncertainty was avoided, based either on adherence to guidelines or on the clinical picture and near-patient CRP; in the strategy " Expanded control" uncertainty was balanced based on expanded control; and in the strategy "Unstructured" uncertainty prevailed in spite of redundant examination and anamnesis. Conclusion: The majority of the GPs avoided uncertainty and deemed they had no problems. Their strategies either adhered to guidelines or comprised excessive use of tests. Thus use of guidelines as well as use of more near-patient tests seemed associated to reduced uncertainty, although the later strategy at the expense of compliance to guidelines. A few GPs did not manage to cope with uncertainty or had to put in excessive work to control uncertainty.

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  • 346. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their child is ill and needs medical care, irrespective of the child’s age, diagnosis or the severity of the illness. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, to care for their ill child, and to cope with the challenges they face.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate sleep, mood, cortisol response, and sense of coherence (SOC) in parents caring for children in need of medical care, and to identify factors that may influence parents’ sleep.

    This thesis includes four original studies; two of these are quantitative, prospective, descriptive and comparative studies including parents (n=82) accommodated in six pediatric wards with their ill child, using questionnaires and sleep logs to measure sleep, mood and SOC, and saliva cortisol to measure cortisol response. A follow-up was performed four weeks later at home, after hospital discharge. The other two studies are qualitative, inductive and explorative interview studies, including parents (n=12) staying overnight with their preterm and/or ill infant in three neonatal intensive care units, and parents (n=15) with a child receiving hospital-based home care in two pediatric outpatient clinics. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic method.

    Being together with one’s family seems beneficial for sleep and may decrease stress. The ability to stay with the child, in the hospital or at home, was highly appreciated by the parents. When caring for a child with illness, parents’ sleep quality was sufficient in the hospital; however, sleep quality improved further (p<0.05) at home after discharge. The parents reported frequent nocturnal awakenings in the hospital caused by the child, medical treatment and hospital staff. Concern and anxiety about the child’s health, and uncertainty about the future were stressors affecting the parents’ sleep and mood negatively. The parents had lower (p=0.01) morning awakening cortisol levels in the pediatric ward compared to at home, and parents accommodated for more than one night had lower (p<0.05) post-awakening cortisol levels compared to parents staying their first night.

    The findings of this thesis conclude that being together as a family is important for the parents’ sleep. The ability to be accommodated in the hospital and gather the family around the child may have given the parents time for relaxation and recovery, that in turn may lead to a less stressful hospital stay. When it is beneficial for the child, the whole family should be included in the pediatric care. Moreover, pediatric nurses must acknowledge parents’ sleep, in hospital and at home. Medical treatment and care at night should be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents in order to maintain health and well-being in the family.

    List of papers
    1. Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    Keywords
    family nursing; family-centred care; kangaroo mother care; neonatal intensive care; nursing; siblings; skin-to-skin care
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115549 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12654 (DOI)000350354700010 ()25041598 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    2015 (English)In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott-Ravn Publisher, 2015
    Keywords
    children, chronic illness, home care services, parents, qualitative research, sleep
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121085 (URN)10.1097/NNR.0000000000000108 (DOI)000361361000006 ()26325279 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Parents’ stress and sleep quality when their children need medical care
    Funder
    Östergötland County CouncilMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    adolescents, child, child nursing, children’s nurses, family nursing, family-centred care, hospitalised child, paediatrics, parent, sleep
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143585 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14092 (DOI)000425733600018 ()28960555 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037348121 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-159681]; Region of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2019-05-01Bibliographically approved
    4. The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155717 (URN)10.1002/nop2.245 (DOI)000461835600041 ()30918712 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062974527 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), FORSS‐159681
    Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2020-04-27Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
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  • 347.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Askenteg, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Wikner, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    "To Cope with Everyday Life, I Need to Sleep" - A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Sleep Loss in Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. E59-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The whole family is affected when a child has atopic dermatitis (AD), and parents experience sleep disruption related to the child's condition leading to physical and mental exhaustion, mood swings, loss of concentration and lower job performance. This study aimed to explore and describe perceptions of sleep in parents of children <2 years old with AD, consequences of parental sleep loss, and what strategies the parents used to manage sleep loss and to improve sleep.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This qualitative interview study had an inductive and descriptive design. Twelve parents (eleven mothers and one father) participated in the study. Data analysis was performed using a phenomenographic approach.

    RESULTS: Three categories of description were found: Acceptance and normalization of parental sleep loss; Changed routines and behavior to compensate for sleep loss; and Support is needed to gain sleep and manage daily life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep loss due to the child's AD affected the parents' emotional state, mood, well-being, cognitive function, ability to concentrate and take initiative, and sensitivity to stress and sound negatively. The parents managed their sleep loss mainly by changing their behavior and creating new routines, by taking me-time and through support from partners.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Pediatric nurses should acknowledge sleep loss in parents of small children with AD in time to prevent negative consequences, which affect the well-being of the entire family. Advice on how to improve sleep should be given early to increase the parents' understanding, make them feel safer and strengthen them in their parenthood.

  • 348.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 349.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child

    Objective

    to describe mood in parents, staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Methodology

    A descriptive design, including 75 parents staying overnight at hospital with their sick child, was used. The parents filled out Mood-scale the morning after staying overnight at the hospital. The Mood-scale is a validated and reliable self-administered instrument measuring six dimensions of mood; control, calmness, social orientation, pleasantness, activation, and extraversion (Sjöberg L, 1979). The study is a part of a larger project, with focus on mood, stress and sleep in parents staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Results

    The result will describe how parents report their total mood and how they report the different dimensions when they stay with their sick children overnight at the hospital. A comparison will be made between the parent´s mood and gender and the child´s age. Data is under analysis and will be presented as preliminary data.

     

    Conclusion

    According to UNICEF Convention on the Rights of the Child, children in hospital have the right to have their parents with them at all times and parents should be offered accommodation and be encouraged to stay. However, the hospital environment, in combination with having a sick child, might affect the parent´s mood, which in turn might affect the ability to handle the situation and the child´s care. Therefore it is of importance to study parental mood and find ways to help the families during their hospital stay.

  • 350.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parents' perception of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care services2015Conference paper (Other academic)
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