liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
45678 301 - 350 of 353
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Thylén, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Moser, Debra K
    University of Kentucky, USA; University of Ulster, UK.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dekker, Rebecca A
    University of Kentucky, USA.
    Chung, Misook L
    University of Kentucky, USA.
    Concerns about implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks mediate the relationship between actual shocks and psychological distress.2016In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 828-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Although most implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients cope well, fears about receiving ICD shocks have been identified as a major determinant of psychological distress. The relationships among ICD-related concerns, receipt of defibrillating shocks, and symptoms of anxiety and depression have not yet been investigated. Our objective was to examine whether the relationship between receipt of defibrillating shocks and psychological distress was mediated by patients' concerns related to their ICD.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: All Swedish ICD-recipients were invited to this cross-sectional correlational study; 3067 completing the survey (55% response rate). Their mean age was 66 ± 11 years, and 80% were male. One-third (35%) had received defibrillating shocks, and 26% had high ICD-related concerns. Regression analyses demonstrated that having received at least one shock significantly predicted symptoms of anxiety and depression [odds ratio (OR) 1.58 and OR 3.04, respectively]. The association between receipt of shocks and psychologically distress was mediated by high ICD-related concerns which explained 68% of the relationship between shocks and symptoms of anxiety, and 54% of the relationship between shocks and symptoms of depression.

    CONCLUSION: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator-related concerns have a bigger impact on psychological distress than receipt of an actual shock. Assessing ICD-related concerns in clinical practice can identify patients at risk for psychological distress. Further research on assessment of, and interventions targeting, ICD-related concerns is warranted.

  • 302.
    Thylén, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Moser, Debra
    Chung, M
    Concerns about implantible cardioverter defibrillator shocks mediate the relationship between shocks and psycological distress.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although most implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients cope well, fears about receiving ICD shocks have been identified as a major determinant of psychological distress. The relationships among ICD-related concerns, receipt of defibrillating shocks, and symptoms of anxiety and depression have not been investigated. Our objectives were to (1) describe ICD-related concerns, and (2) examine whether the relationships between receipt of defibrillating shocks and psychological distress were                        mediated by patients’ concerns related to their ICD.                    

    Methods and Results: All Swedish ICD-recipients were invited to this cross-sectional correlational study; 3,067 completing the survey (55% response). Their mean age was 66+11 years, and 80% were male. One third (35%) had received defibrillating shocks, and 26% had high ICD-related concerns. Regression analyses demonstrated that having received at least one shock significantly predicted symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR 1.58 and OR 3.04, respectively). The association between receipt of shocks and psychologically distress were mediated by high ICD-related concerns which explained 68% of the relationship between shocks and symptoms of anxiety,and 54% of the relationship between shocks and symptoms of depression, see Figure 1.                    

    Conclusion: Having high ICD-related concerns has a bigger impact on psychological distress than receipt of an actual shock. Screening                        for ICD-related concerns in clinical practice may identify patients at risk of psychological distress, which could provide                        a specific target for intervention. Interventions tailored to individual patients’ needs can - besides addressing device-related                        education and anxiety about shocks - also include relaxation and stress management, cognitive restructuring, social support                        and/or group discussions, and exercise programs.

  • 303.
    Thylén, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Moser, DK
    Octo-nonagenarians outlook on life and death when living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. A cross-sectional study.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Thylén, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fluur, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, Sweden .
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development and evaluation of the EOL-ICDQ as a measure of experiences, attitudes and knowledge in end-of-life in patients living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Due to extended indications and resynchronization therapy, many implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) recipients will experience progressive co-morbid conditions and will be more likely to die of causes other than cardiac death. It is therefore important to elucidate the ICD patients’ preferences when nearing end-of-life. Instead of avoiding the subject of end-of-life, a validated questionnaire may be helpful to explore patients’ experiences and attitudes about end-of-life concerns and to assess knowledge of the function of the ICD in end-of-life. Validated instruments assessing patients’ perspective concerning end-of-life issues are scarce.                    

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate respondent satisfaction and measurement properties of the ‘Experiences,  Attitudes and Knowledge of End-of-Life Issues in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients’ Questionnaire’ (EOL-ICDQ).                    

    Methods: The instrument was tested for validity, respondent satisfaction, and for homogeneity and stability in the Swedish language. An English version of the EOL-ICDQ was validated, but has not yet been pilot tested.                    

    Results: The final instrument contained three domains, which were clustered into 39 items measuring: experiences (10 items), attitudes (18 items), and knowledge (11 items) of end-of-life concerns in ICD patients. In addition, the questionnaire also contained items on socio-demographic background (six items) and ICD-specific background (eight items). The validity and reliability properties were considered sufficient.                    

    Conclusions: The EOL-ICDQ has the potential to be used in clinical practice and future research. Further studies are needed using this instrument in an Anglo-Saxon context with a sample of English-speaking ICD recipients.

    .

  • 305.
    Ulander, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Franzén, K
    Strömberg, Anna
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Broström, Anders
    Validation of the SECI - a new tool for the measurement of side effects to CPAP treatment2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzen, K
    Kalmar University.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Johansson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    VALIDATION OF THE SIDE-EFFECTS TO CPAP TREATMENT INVENTORY - A NEW TOOL FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SIDE-EFFECTS TO CPAP TREATMENT2009In: In Sleep, Vol 32, 2009, Vol. 32, p. A227-A228Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 307.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzen, K
    School of Nursing, Kalmar.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stahlkrantz, A
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Albers, J
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Informational Needs to CPAP Treatment Inventory (INCI): a new tool for assessing subjective informational needs among CPAP-treated patients with OSAS2008In: JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH,ISSN 0962-1105: Volume 17, 2008, Vol. 17, p. 155-156Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 308.
    Ulander, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzen, K
    School of Nursing, Kalmar.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stahlkrantz, A
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Albers, J
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    The side-effects to CPAP treatment inventory (SECI): testing regarding validity and reliability of a new self-assessment inventory of side-effects to CPAP treatment2008In: JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH,ISSN 0962-1105: Volume 17, 2008, Vol. 17, p. 173-173Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 309.
    van der Wal, Martje
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mårtenson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. UCI Program in Nursing Science, University of California, Irvine. USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UCI Program in Nursing Science, University of California, Irvine, USA; Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Variables Related to Communication About Prognosis Between Nurses and Patients at Heart Failure Clinics in Sweden and the Netherlands2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E1-E6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In contrast to recommendations in recent guidelines, prognosis is not optimally discussed with patients with heart failure (HF). Reasons for not doing so can be related to both patient and provider characteristics.

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of the study was to explore which patient- and nurse-related variables influence discussing prognosis with patients at an HF clinic.

    METHOD:

    Data from a previous survey on attitudes and clinical practice of HF nurses on discussing prognosis that was conducted in Sweden and the Netherlands were combined with data from a registration on topics that nurses discussed with their patients during a prespecified week at the HF clinic. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess which variables are related to discussing prognosis.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 275 HF nurses (mean age, 49 years) and data of 1633 patients with HF (mean age, 71 years) were included in the study. Prognosis was discussed with 42% of all patients during the visit at the HF clinic. Patients with whom prognosis was discussed were more often in New York Heart Association classes III to IV (odds ratio [OR], 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-2.26). Nurses discussing prognosis reported more knowledge on the topic (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.36-2.16) and discussed more topics with the patient (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.21-1.32). Dutch HF nurses were more likely to discuss prognosis compared with their Swedish colleagues (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.43-2.33).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Discussing prognosis with patients with HF by nurses at the HF clinic is related to the characteristics of patients and HF nurses. Future interventions to improve communications about prognosis therefore should have a broad approach.

  • 310.
    van der Wal, Martje
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    van Veldhuisen, D. J.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic University, Australia.
    Heart failure patients future expectations and their association with disease severity, quality of life, depressive symptoms and clinical outcomes2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 469-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAlthough treatment of heart failure (HF) patients has improved, prognosis still remains poor. Current HF Guidelines recommend communication about prognosis with all patients. Little is known about HF patients awareness of their shortened life expectancy. AimTo explore HF patients future expectations and to examine whether these expectations are associated with disease severity, quality of life, depressive symptoms and clinical outcomes. MethodPatients randomised to the intervention groups of the COACH study, who were at the end of HF hospitalisation, were asked about their future expectations. Patients were divided into three groups: patients expecting improvement/stabilisation, patients expecting deterioration and those not knowing what to expect. Depressive symptoms were measured by CES-D and quality of life with the Ladder of Life and RAND-36. ResultsSix hundred and seventy eight patients (age 70 12; 41% female patients; LVEF 33% +/- 15) participated in the study. Most patients (56%, N = 380) expected improvement or stabilisation, 8% (N = 55) expected deterioration and 21% (N = 144) did not know what to expect for the future. Patients who expected to deteriorate were significantly older, experienced a lower quality of life and more depressive symptoms compared with patients in the other two groups. They also had a higher mortality rate, both after 18 and 36 months, and had more HF admissions. No association with severity of the disease (NYHA-class, LVEF, BNP levels) was found. ConclusionMany hospitalised HF patients are not aware of their poor prognosis. Depressive symptoms, poor quality of life, increased mortality and rehospitalisation were related to expected deterioration. Improvement of communication about prognosis with HF patients is needed in the future.

  • 311.
    Vellone, Ercole
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Fida, Roberta
    University of East Anglia, England.
    Ghezzi, Valerio
    Sapienza University, Italy.
    DAgostino, Fabio
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Biagioli, Valentina
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Paturzo, Marco
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alvaro, Rosaria
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patterns of Self-care in Adults With Heart Failure and Their Associations With Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics, Quality of Life, and Hospitalizations A Cluster Analysis2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 180-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-care is important in heart failure (HF) treatment, but patients may have difficulties and be inconsistent in its performance. Inconsistencies in self-care behaviors may mirror patterns of self-care in HF patients that are worth identifying to provide interventions tailored to patients. Objectives: The aims of this study are to identify clusters of HF patients in relation to self-care behaviors and to examine and compare the profile of each HF patient cluster considering the patients sociodemographics, clinical variables, quality of life, and hospitalizations. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional study in which we enrolled 1192 HF patients across Italy. A cluster analysis was used to identify clusters of patients based on the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale factor scores. Analysis of variance and x(2) test were used to examine the characteristics of each cluster. Results: Patients were 72.4 years old on average, and 58% were men. Four clusters of patients were identified: (1) high consistent adherence with high consulting behaviors, characterized by younger patients, with higher formal education and higher income, less clinically compromised, with the best physical and mental quality of life (QOL) and lowest hospitalization rates; (2) low consistent adherence with low consulting behaviors, characterized mainly by male patients, with lower formal education and lowest income, more clinically compromised, and worse mental QOL; (3) inconsistent adherence with low consulting behaviors, characterized by patients who were less likely to have a caregiver, with the longest illness duration, the highest number of prescribed medications, and the best mental QOL; (4) and inconsistent adherence with high consulting behaviors, characterized by patients who were mostly female, with lower formal education, worst cognitive impairment, worst physical and mental QOL, and higher hospitalization rates. Conclusion: The 4 clusters identified in this study and their associated characteristics could be used to tailor interventions aimed at improving self-care behaviors in HF patients.

  • 312.
    Vellone, Ercole
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Fida, Roberta
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy .
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rocco, Gennaro
    Centre Excellence Nursing Scholarship, Italy .
    Cocchieri, Antonello
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Alvaro, Rosaria
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    The European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale: New insights into factorial structure, reliability, precision and scoring procedure2014In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate a new factorial structure of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale 9-item version (EHFScBS-9), and to test its reliability, floor and ceiling effect, and precision. To propose a new 0-100 score with a higher score meaning better self-care. Methods: A sample of 1192 Heart Failure (HF) patients (mean age 72 years, 58% male) was enrolled. Psychometric properties of the EHFScBS-9 were tested with confirmative factor analysis, factor score determinacy, determining the floor and ceiling effect, and evaluating the precision with the standard error of measurement (SEM) and the smallest real difference (SRD). Results: We identified three well-fitting factors: consulting behaviour, autonomy-based adherence, and provider-based adherence (comparative fit index = 0.96). Reliability ranged from 0.77 to 0.95. The EHFScBS-9 showed no floor and ceiling effect except for the provider-based adherence which had an expected ceiling effect. The SEM and the SRD indicated good precision of the EHFScBS-9. Conclusion: The new factorial structure of the EHFScBS-9 showed supportive psychometric properties. Practice implications: The EHFScBS-9 can be used to compute a total and specific scores for each identified factor. This may allow more detailed assessment and tailored interventions to improve self-care. The new score makes interpretation of the EHFScBS-9 easier.

  • 313.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moons, Philip
    Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium .
    Norekvål, Tone M
    Haukeland University Hospital, Norway .
    Smith, Karen
    Ninewells Hospital, UK .
    Martensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Thompson, David R
    Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia .
    De Geest, Sabina
    Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium .
    Lenzen, Mattie
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Anaemia and iron deficiency in cardiac patients: what do nurses and allied professionals know?2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11 Suppl 1, p. S90-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac nurses and allied professionals often take care of patients who also have anaemia or iron deficiency. To deliver optimal care, professionals should be knowledgeable about the prevalence, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic management of these conditions. We therefore set out a survey to get a first impression on the current knowledge of nurses and allied professionals on anaemia and iron deficiency.

    METHOD: A questionnaire was designed for this study by the Undertaking Nursing Interventions Throughout Europe (UNITE) Study Group. Data were collected from 125 cardiovascular nurses and allied professionals visiting the 11th Annual Spring Meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals of the European Society of Cardiology.

    RESULTS: Most respondents had general knowledge on the definition of anaemia and iron deficiency and 54% of the respondents rated anaemia and iron deficiency as important when evaluating a cardiac patient. Specific knowledge regarding anaemia and more prominently of iron deficiency was not optimal.

    CONCLUSION: Although cardiac nurses and allied professionals have basic knowledge of anaemia and iron deficiency, they would benefit from additional knowledge and skills to optimally deliver patient care.

  • 314.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. University of Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Exergaming Through the Eyes of Patients with Heart Failure: A Qualitative Content Analysis Study2017In: Games for Health Journal, ISSN 2161-783X, E-ISSN 2161-7856, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Exergaming appears to be a promising tool to increase exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Therefore, it is important to obtain more in-depth knowledge about preferences, attitudes, use, and abilities in regard to exergaming. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of patients with HF when using an exergame platform at home. Materials and Methods: A qualitative descriptive study using content analysis was conducted on interviews with 14 patients with HF (6 women, ages ranging between 56 and 81 years). The patients were recruited from three centers in Sweden included in a randomized controlled study. These patients had access to an exergame platform at home and were advised to exergame for 30 minutes per day. Results: The analysis resulted in three categories describing patients experience of exergaming: (1) making exergaming work, (2) added value of exergaming, and (3) low appeal of exergaming. Conclusion: This is the first study that explores how patients with HF experience using an exergame platform at home. The study provided important information on what aspects to discuss when initiating an exergame platform at home and following patients who may want to use an exergame platform at home. The results also revealed that this technology may be suitable for some patients, while others prefer other kinds of physical activity.

  • 315.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Exergaming in older adults: A scoping review and implementation potential for patients with heart failure2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 388-398Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Physical activity can improve exercise capacity, quality of life and reduce mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure (HF). Adherence to exercise recommendations in patients with HF is low. The use of exercise games (exergames) might be a way to encourage patients with HF to exercise especially those who may be reluctant to more traditional forms of exercise. No studies have been conducted on patients with HF and exergames.

    Aim:

    This scoping review focuses on the feasibility and influence of exergames on physical activity in older adults, aiming to target certain characteristics that are important for patients with HF to become more physically active.

    Methods:

    A literature search was undertaken in August 2012 in the databases PsychInfo, PUBMED, Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL. Included studies evaluated the influence of exergaming on physical activity in older adults. Articles were excluded if they focused on rehabilitation of specific limbs, improving specific tasks or describing no intervention. Fifty articles were found, 11 were included in the analysis.

    Results:

    Exergaming was described as safe and feasible, and resulted in more energy expenditure compared to rest. Participants experienced improved balance and reported improved cognitive function after exergaming. Participants enjoyed playing the exergames, their depressive symptoms decreased, and they reported improved quality of life and empowerment. Exergames made them feel more connected with their family members, especially their grandchildren.

    Conclusion:

    Although this research field is small and under development, exergaming might be promising in order to enhance physical activity in patients with HF. However, further testing is needed.

  • 316.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Self-efficacy Mediates the Relationship Between Motivation and Physical Activity Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation is necessary in patients with heart failure (HF) who are attempting to become more physically active but may not be sufficient to initiate physical activity. Self-efficacy might explain the relationship between motivation and physical activity. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the role of exercise self-efficacy in the relationship between exercise motivation and physical activity in patients with HF. Methods: A total of 100 stable patients with HF (88% in New York Heart Association class IVIII; mean age, 67 +/- 13 years; 62% men) were studied. Self-efficacy was measured with the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale; motivation, with the Exercise Motivation Index; and physical activity, with a self-report questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were made to examine the mediation effect of exercise self-efficacy on the relationship between exercise motivation and physical activity. Result: Forty-two percent of the 100 patients reported engaging in less than 60 minutes per week of physical activity. Motivation predicted physical activity (b = 0.58, P amp;lt; .05), but after controlling for self-efficacy, the relationship between motivation and physical activity was no longer significant (b = 0.76, P = .06), indicating full mediation. Conclusion: Motivation to be physically active is important but not sufficient. In addition to a high level of motivation to be physically active, it is important that patients with HF have a high degree of self-efficacy.

  • 317.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Are virtual reality applications feasible to increase physical activity in heart failure patients? A systematic review2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Design of a study using a virtual reality application to improve physical activity in heart failure patients2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Turolla, Andrea
    Fondazione Ospedale San Camillo – I.R.C.C.S., Venice, Italy.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Using a game computer to stimulate activity at home in heart failure patients - The study design2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 320.
    Wagenaar, Kim P.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Broekhuizen, Berna D. L.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Rutten, Frans H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    van Stel, Henk F.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Hoes, Arno W.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Interpretability of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour scale2017In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 11, p. 1841-1848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour scale (EHFScBs) is a valid patient-reported questionnaire to measure self-care behavior of heart failure (HF) patients. We assessed the interpretability of the EHFScBs. Methods: We used data of 1,023 HF patients. Interpretability refers to the clinical meaning of the score and its changes over time. We operationalized interpretability by evaluating distributions of EHFScBs scores across relevant HF subgroups by eyeballing, by testing the risk on hospitalizations and mortality of a plausible threshold, and by determining a clinically relevant minimal important change (MIC). The scale score ranged from 0 to 100, with a higher score meaning better self-care. A threshold of amp;gt;= 70 was defined as adequate and amp;lt; 70 as inadequate self-care. Results: The EHFScBs scores were similarly normally distributed among the subgroups with a mean between 57.8 (SD 19.4) and 72.0 (SD 18.0). The 464 HF patients with adequate self-care had significantly less all-cause hospitalizations than the 559 patients with inadequate self-care. Conclusion: The degree of self-care showed to be independent of relevant HF subgroups. A single threshold of 70 accurately discriminated between patients with adequate and inadequate self-care.

  • 321.
    Wagenaar, Kim P.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Rutten, Frans H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bhana, Yusuf
    TranslateMedia, England.
    Sieverink, Floor
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland.
    Seferovic, Petar M.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Lainscak, Mitja
    Gen Hospital Celje, Slovenia.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    Guglielmo da Saliceto Polichirurg Hospital AUSL Piace, Italy.
    Broekhuizen, Berna D. L.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoes, Arno W.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    heartfailurematters.org, an educational website for patients and carers from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology: objectives, use and future directions2017In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 1447-1454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims In 2007, the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) launched the information website heartfailurematters.org (HFM site) with the aim of creating a practical tool through which to provide advice and guidelines for living with heart failure to patients, their carers, health care professionals and the general public worldwide. The website is managed by the ESC at the European Heart House and is currently available in nine languages. The aim of this study is to describe the background, objectives, use, lessons learned and future directions of the HFM site. Methods and results Data on the number of visitor sessions on the site as measured by Google Analytics were used to explore use of the HFM site from 2010 to 2015. Worldwide, the annual number of sessions increased from 416 345 in 2010 to 1 636 368 in 2015. Most users (72-75%) found the site by using a search engine. Desktops and, more recently, smartphones were used to visit the website, accounting for 50% and 38%, respectively, of visits to the site in 2015. Conclusions Although its use has increased, the HFM site has not yet reached its full potential: fewer than 2 million users have visited the website, whereas the number of people living with heart failure worldwide is estimated to be 23 million. Uptake and use could be further improved by a continuous process of qualitative assessment of users preferences, and the provision of professional helpdesk facilities, comprehensive information technology, and promotional support.

  • 322.
    Waldreus, Nana
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Med Serv, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Measure Patients Experiences of Health Care in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Outpatient Clinics2019In: Heart, Lung and Circulation, ISSN 1443-9506, E-ISSN 1444-2892, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1074-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Measuring the patients experience of care at an outpatient clinic can provide feedback about the quality of health care and if needed, can be support for quality improvements. To date, there is no patient reported experience measurement (PREM) developed targeting patients at the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) outpatient clinics. Therefore, the aim was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a PREM scale to be used for patients at PAH-outpatient clinics. Methods The development and psychometric evaluation of the PREM for patients at PAH outpatient clinics followed two stages: (I) development of the PAH Clinic PREM (PAHC-PREM) scale based on interviews with patients; and (II) psychometric evaluation of the PAHC-PREM scale including data quality, factor structure (construct validity), criterion validity and internal consistency. Results A sample of 156 patients at PAH outpatient clinics completed the PAHC-PREM scale (median age 69 years, 57% women). Unidimensionality of the PAHC-PREM scale was supported by parallel analysis. A single factor explained 67% of the variance. Inter-item and item-total correlations were satisfactory (0.46-0.88 and 0.64-0.91, respectively). Internal consistency reliability with ordinal coefficient alpha was good (0.93). Conclusions The PAHC-PREM scale was demonstrated to have good psychometric properties and is now ready to be used to measure quality of health care experience from patients at PAH-outpatient clinics.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-10 07:57
  • 323.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Franzén Årested, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    ASTA a new validated questionnaire for arrhythmia patients2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 324.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden; Ersta Hospital, Sweden.
    Development and Validation of an Arrhythmia-Specific Scale in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia With Focus on Health-Related Quality of Life2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 98-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrhythmias can cause a profoundly negative impact on a persons daily life, leading to impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Assessment of HRQOL can provide valuable information before, during, and after healthcare interventions for arrhythmias. Objective: The aim was to develop and validate a disease-specific scale evaluating HRQOL in patients with different forms of arrhythmia. Methods: The Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA HRQOL) was developed from a literature review, patient interviews, and expert panel evaluations. This version was then psychometrically evaluated in patients treated with radiofrequency catheter ablation because of different forms of arrhythmias and patients who sought emergency care because of atrial fibrillation. Construct validity was evaluated with item-total correlations, confirmatory factor analyses, and convergent and discriminant validity. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbachs alpha. Results: All items reached the expected level of item-total correlations of greater than 0.3 for the total scale. The content validity index was sufficient for all items, as was the total scale (0.86-1.0). The 2-factor confirmatory factor analysis model that included the physical and mental factors showed a better fit between model and data than the 1-factor model did (P less than .001). Convergent and discriminant validities were evaluated in the correlation analyses between the ASTA HRQOL subscales and SF-36 physical and mental dimensions. A strong correlation was found between the hypothesized physical and mental scales. Internal consistency was satisfactory with a lower bound confidence interval (95%) for Cronbachs alpha .70 or greater for all the ASTA HRQOL scales. Conclusions: The ASTA HRQOL questionnaire can be a valuable contribution to HRQOL assessments in patients with different forms of arrhythmia. Until there is more evidence regarding validity and reliability, using both the total and subscale scores is recommended.

  • 325.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmia in a Swedish population: consequences on health-related quality of life2007In: European Society of Cardiology 2007,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Number: 85989   

  • 326.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Atrioventricular Nodal Re-Entry Tachycardia in a Swedish Population: Consequences on Health-Related Quality of Life2009In: Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, ISSN 0147-8389, E-ISSN 1540-8159, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1299-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Living with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia affects a patient's whole life situation, but few studies have addressed health-related quality of life (HRQOL) aspects in these patients. The aim was therefore to describe HRQOL in patients with atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia (AVNRT) or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, referred for radiofrequency ablation (RF-ablation), compared to age- and gender-matched Swedish reference groups.

    Methods: HRQOL was assessed with SF-36 and EuroQol (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the patients were asked disease-specific questions.

    Results: The 97 patients with AVNRT [53 ± 16 years of age/65 women] and 79 patients with WPW [42 ± 15 years of age/26 women] exhibited significantly lower HRQOL scores in SF-36 in the same seven of the eight scales: Physical functioning (PF), role-physical (RP), social functioning (SF), role-emotional (RE), general health (GH), vitality (VT), and mental health (MH) while there was no difference in bodily pain (BP) compared to their respective age- and gender matched Swedish reference group. HRQOL scores were lower for patients with AVNRT compared to WPW in the areas of PF (P < 0.001), BP (P < 0.05), and GH (P < 0.01) in SF-36, and the same was found in EQ-VAS (64.8 vs. 71.2, P < 0.05). Occurrence of episodes of tachycardia more often than once a month compared to less frequently than once a month was associated with significantly lower HRQOL in all eight scales in SF-36 (GH, RE, MH: P < 0.01 and PF, RP, BP, VT, SF: P < 0.001) and EQ-5D index (P < 0.001) and EQ-VAS (P < 0.05) Arrhythmia duration longer than one hour compared to patients with shorter duration of the tachycardia-affected GH in SF-36 negatively (P < 0.05). Patients who experienced symptoms not only during activity but also at rest scored lower in SF-36 GH (P < 0.01) and SF (P < 0.05).

    Conclusion: Measuring HRQOL in patients with WPW or AVNRT is an important way to evaluate and describe these patients' life situation. These conditions were found to have a pronounced negative impact on HRQOL. The frequency of arrhythmia occurrence is one important factor to consider when setting priorities for treatment with RF-ablation.

  • 327.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development and validation of a new Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA) with focus on symptom burden2012In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 10, no 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Arrhythmias can appear with a variety of symptoms, all from vague to pronounced and handicapping symptoms. Therefore, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) concerning symptom burden are important to assess and take into consideration in the care and treatment of patients with arrhythmias. The main purpose was to develop and validate a disease-specific questionnaire evaluating symptom burden in patients with different forms of arrhythmias.

    Methods: A literature review was conducted and arrhythmia patients were interviewed. Identified symptoms were evaluated by an expert panel consisting of cardiologists and nurses working daily with arrhythmia patients. SF-36 and Symptoms Checklist (SCL) were used in the validation of the new questionnaire Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA). Homogeneity was evaluated with Spearman's correlations and Cronbach's alpha coefficient (alpha) was used to evaluate internal consistency. Construct validity was evaluated using item-total correlations and convergent and discriminant validity. For this, Spearman's correlations were calculated between the ASTA symptom scale, SCL and SF-36. Concurrent validity was validated by Spearman's correlations between the ASTA symptom scale and SCL.

    Results: The correlations between the different items in the ASTA symptom scale showed generally sufficient homogeneity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be satisfactory (alpha = 0.80; lower bound 95 % CI for alpha = 0.76). Construct validity was supported by item-total correlations where all items in the symptom scale were sufficiently correlated ([greater than or equal to]0.3). Convergent and discriminant validity was supported by the higher correlations to the arrhythmia-specific SCL compared to the generic SF-36. Concurrent validity was evaluated and there were sufficiently, but not extremely strong correlations found between the ASTA symptom scale and SCL.

    Conclusions: The nine items of the ASTA symptom scale were found to have good psychometric properties in patients with different forms of arrhythmias. Arrhythmia patients suffer from both frequent and disabling symptoms. The validated ASTA questionnaire can be an important contribution to PROs regarding symptom burden in arrhythmia patients.

  • 328.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development and validation of an Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA) with focus on Health-Related Quality of LifeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) assesses patients’ subjective experiences of illness and treatment and provides valuable information for quality assurance of health care interventions. The purpose was to develop and validate a disease-specific questionnaire evaluating HRQOL in patients with different forms of arrhythmias.

    Methods: The Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA) HRQOL scale was developed from a literature review and patient interviews. An expert group of cardiologist, nurses and patients was involved in the development. For the validation data was also collected with SF-36. Construct validity was evaluated with item-total correlations and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) suggesting a physical and mental subscale. Convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated using multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) with Spearman’s correlations. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach´s alpha.

    Results: Data on ASTA HRQOL scale and SF-36 were collected from 270 patients, 66% men with a mean age of 59 years (SD ± 12.9). All items reached the expected level of item-total correlations ≥0.30. The CFA demonstrated satisfactory high factor loadings, both for the total scale and the physical and mental subscales. After error variances were allowed to correlate a good fit was reached between model and data.

    Convergent validity was confirmed with strongest correlations between ASTA’s physical subscale and SF-36’s physical component summary (PCS) and for ASTA’s mental subscale and SF-36 mental component summary (MCS). Discriminant validity was supported with lower correlations between  ASTA’s physical scale and SF-36 MCS and between ASTA’s mental scale and SF-36 PCS. Internal consistency and lower bound confidence intervals were >0.70 for all of the ASTA HRQOL scales.

    Conclusions: The validated ASTA HRQOL scales were found to have good psychometric properties and can be a valuable contribution for HRQOL evaluations in patients with different forms of arrhythmias

  • 329.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Health related quality of life in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia completely restored one year after RF-ablation Evaluation Topic2008In: ESC,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Number: 82332

  • 330.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Impact of radiofrequency ablation on health-related quality of life in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia compared with a norm population one year after treatment2010In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the impact of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT).

    METHODS: HRQOL was assessed with the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and EuroQol (EQ)-5D at baseline and 3 and 12 months after RFA. At 12 months, the patients were compared with an age- and gender-matched reference group.

    RESULTS: Patients showed a marked improvement in all the SF-36's scales at 3 months after treatment compared with baseline. Patients scored higher in all scales in the SF-36 but not in the EQ-5D's index at 12 months compared with baseline. No further improvements were detected from 3 to 12 months follow-up. Twelve months after treatment, patients scored equal to the reference group in the SF-36 and EQ-5D index, indicating a complete restoration of the HRQOL after RFA.

    CONCLUSION: PSVT is a condition with a pronounced impact on HRQOL. At 12 months follow-up after RFA, patients' HRQOL scores were similar to those of the age- and gender-matched reference group.

  • 331. Westlake, Cheryl
    et al.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ter-Galstanyan, Alvina
    Vazirani, Sondra
    Dracup, Kathleen
    Evaluation of a Web-Based Education and Counselling Pilot for Older Heart Failure Patients2007In: Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-7204, E-ISSN 1751-7117, Vol. 22, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 332.
    Ågren, S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heart failure in the family - design and methodology of a randomised study evaluating education and psychosocial support to patients and their caregivers.2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Psychoeducational support to post cardiac surgery heart failure patients and their partners: A randomised pilot study2015In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 10-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Postoperative heart failure is a serious complication that changes the lives of both the person who is critically ill and family in many ways. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an intervention in postoperative heart failure patient-partner dyads regarding health, symptoms of depression and perceived control.

    RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: Pilot study with a randomised controlled design evaluating psychosocial support and education from an interdisciplinary team.

    SETTING: Patients with postoperative heart failure and their partners.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Control at baseline, 3 and 12 months.

    RESULTS: A total of 42 patient-partner completed baseline assessment. Partners in the intervention group increased health in the role emotional and mental health dimensions and patients increased health in vitality, social function and mental health dimensions compared with the control group. Patients' perceived control improved significantly in the intervention group over time.

    CONCLUSION: Psychoeducational support to post cardiac surgery heart failure dyads improved health in both patients and partners at short term follow-up and improved patients' perceived control at both short and long-term follow-up. Psychoeducational support appears to be a promising intervention but the results need to be confirmed in larger studies.

  • 334.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A comparative study addressing health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge in patients with heart failure and their partners.2009In: Esc congress, Barcelona, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Caregiver burden experienced by partners to heart failure patients.2009In: Heart Failure, Nice, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    University of California Los Angeles.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dyads affected by chronic heart failure, a randomised study evaluating the effects of education and psychosocial support in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 945-9462010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 945-946Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 337.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control and self-estimated knowledge in patient-partner dyads dealing with chronic heart failure.2009In: 9th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, CCNAP, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Heart failure in patient-partner dyads - a comparison of the partner group and an age-and-gender-matched reference population in HRQL.2009In: Heart Failure Congress, Nice., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Informal caregiving of heart failure in patient-partner dyads - a comparative study addressing health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge.2009In: ESC Congress Barcelona., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    The influence of heart failure in patient-partner dyads - a comparative study addressing health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge.2009In: Heart Failure, Nice., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing University of California Los Angeles USA.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    The influence of chronic heart failure in patient-partner dyads: a comparative study addressing issues of health-related quality of life2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and their partners face many challenges associated with heart disease. High social support in a close relationship has been found to improve survival in patients with HF. However, caring for a patient with HF may have negative effects on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the partner responsible for the care. The main focus in health care is still on improving the patients’ HRQOL, but the awareness of partners’ and families’ role and situation is increasing. Therefore further studies are needed to clarify these issues and the importance of partners in relation to HRQOL of patients with HF.

    Objectives: To describe and compare HRQOL, quality-adjusted life year (QALY) weights, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge in patients with chronic HF and their partners and to compare HRQOL and QALY weights in the partners with an age- and gender-matched group.

    Methods: Data was collected from 135 patient-partner dyads at two Swedish hospitals. Data on the reference group was collected from the same region.

    Results: Patients had lower HRQOL in all dimensions (p < 0.001) except in the mental health domain and lower QALY weights compared to their partners (p < 0.001). Mental health scores were lower in partners compared to the age and gender-matched references (p < 0.001). All other HRQOL scores and the QALY weights were comparable between partners and reference group. Patients had more depressive symptoms than their partners (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the level of perceived control or knowledge about chronic HF between patients and partners.

    Conclusion: Being a partner to a patient with chronic HF markedly affects the mental aspect of HRQOL. Interventions focusing on education and psychosocial support may potentially promote effective coping in partners and enhance their ability to support the patient.

  • 342.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Davidsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    The influence of chronic heart failure in patient-partner dyads - a comparative study addressing issues of health-related quality of life2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and their partners face many challenges associated with heart disease. High social support in a close relationship has been found to improve survival in patients with HF. However, caring for a patient with HF may have negative effects on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the partner responsible for the care. The main focus in health care is still on improving the patients’ HRQOL, but the awareness of partners’ and families’ role and situation is increasing. Therefore further studies are needed to clarify these issues and the importance of partners in relation to HRQOL of patients with HF.

    Objectives: To describe and compare HRQOL, quality-adjusted life year (QALY) weights, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge in patients with chronic HF and their partners and to compare HRQOL and QALY weights in the partners with an age- and gender-matched group.

    Methods: Data was collected from 135 patient-partner dyads at two Swedish hospitals. Data on the reference group was collected from the same region.

    Results: Patients had lower HRQOL in all dimensions (p < 0.001) except in the mental health domain and lower QALY weights compared to their partners (p < 0.001). Mental health scores were lower in partners compared to the age and gender-matched references (p < 0.001). All other HRQOL scores and the QALY weights were comparable between partners and reference group. Patients had more depressive symptoms than their partners (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the level of perceived control or knowledge about chronic HF between patients and partners.

    Conclusion: Being a partner to a patient with chronic HF markedly affects the mental aspect of HRQOL. Interventions focusing on education and psychosocial support may potentially promote effective coping in partners and enhance their ability to support the patient.

  • 343.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    University of California Los Angeles .
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyada affected by chronic heart failure - a randomised study evaluating effects of education and psychosocial support on patients and their partners.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 344.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyads affected by chronic heart failure - a randomised study evaluating effects of education and psychosocial support on patients and their partners.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing University of California Los Angeles USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dyads affected by chronic heart failure: a randomised study evaluating effects of education and psychosocial support to patients and their partners2012In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 359-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic heart failure (HF) may cause great suffering for both patients and their partners. High marital quality with sufficient emotional support has been found to influence long-term survival in patients with chronic HF. However, emotional reactions of burden, stress and depression have been found to be associated with the partner’s new role. Psychosocial support, and patients-partner education is usually not included in standard chronic HF care despite recommendations in international guidelines.

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of an integrated dyad care programme with education and psychosocial support to patients with chronic HF and their partners during a post-discharge period of 3 months after acute deterioration of chronic HF.

    Methods: A randomised, controlled design with a follow up assessment after 3 months was used. The dyads in the control group received care as usual. The experimental group participated in an integrated care intervention, delivered in three modules through nurse-led face-to-face counselling, a computer-based CD-ROM program and other written teaching materials.

    Results: The intervention improved perceived control (P<0.05) in patients, but not in the partners. There were no other significant differences between the groups with regard to the dyads’ health related quality of life and depressive symptoms, patients’ self-care behaviour and partners’ experiences of caregiver burden.

    Conclusion: This is the first major randomised study evaluating a programme focusing on the development of problem solving skills to assist the dyads in managing heart failure. The intervention significantly improved the level of perceived control in the patient group.

  • 346.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    UC Irvine Program Nursing Science, CA USA .
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led education and psychosocial programme for patients with chronic heart failure and their partners2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 15-16, p. 2347-2353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives.  This randomised controlled trial was conducted to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led education and psychosocial support programme for patients with heart failure (HF) and their partners.

    Background.  There are few studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of interventions among HF patient–partner dyads.

    Methods.  Dyads randomised to the experimental group received nurse-led counselling, computer-based education and written materials aimed at developing problem-solving skills at two, six and 12 weeks after hospitalisation with HF exacerbation. The dyads in the control group received usual care. A cost-effectiveness analysis that included costs associated with staff time to deliver the intervention and travel costs was conducted at 12 months. Quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) weights for patients and partners were estimated by SF-6D.

    Results.  A total of 155 dyads were included. The intervention cost was €223 per patient. Participants in both groups showed improvements in QALY weights after 12 months. However, no significant difference in QALY weights was found between the patients in the two groups, nor among their partners.

    Conclusion.  The intervention was not proven cost-effective, neither for patients nor for partners. The intervention, however, had trends (but not significant) effects on the patient–partner dyads, and by analysing the QALY gained from the dyad, a reasonable mean cost-effectiveness ratio was achieved.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  The study shows trends of a cost-effective education and psychosocial care of HF patient–partner dyads.

  • 347.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Do partners of patients with chronic heart failure experience caregiver burden?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing University of California Los Angeles USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Do partners of patients with chronic heart failure experience caregiver burden?2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 254-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the levels and identify independent predictors of caregiver burden in partners of patients with heart failure.

    Background: Care and support from a partner are important for the well-being of patients with heart failure and may potentially delay disease progression. However, caregiving may be associated with burden and stress and it is therefore important to understand which factors that influence caregiver burden. Theoretical models of caregiving describe the concept of burden as an outcome variable, including decreased well-being and health.

    Methods: Data for this descriptive cross sectional study were collected between January 2005 and September 2008. The dependent variable consisted of the Caregiver Burden Scale total score index. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control, and knowledge on heart failure were included in a regression analysis to determine independent predictors of caregiver burden.

    Results: The 135 partners had a mean-age of 69 years and 75% were females. Caregiver burden was perceived as medium in 30% of the partners. The patients’ Physical component score of SF-36 (p< 0.001), partners’ Mental component score of SF-36 (p< 0.001) and perceived control (p<0.01) accounted for 39% of the variance in caregiver burden.

    Conclusion: Caregiver burden was lower when the mental health of the partner and the physical health of the patient were better and the partner experienced higher control over the heart disease. A partner-centered approach to educate and support partners of patients with heart failure is essential to improve the life situation for patient-partner dyads.

  • 349.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dyads affected by chronic heart failure: a randomised study evaluating effects of education and psychosocial support to patients and their partners2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 350.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Addressing spouses unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure2009In: HEART and LUNG, ISSN 0147-9563, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.

    METHODS: Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.

    RESULTS: During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.

    CONCLUSIONS: By identifying spouses needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses needs are important because they are vital to the patients recovery.

45678 301 - 350 of 353
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf