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  • 401.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlén, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    From guidelines to the sidelines: implementation of cardiovascular preparticipation evaluation in sports clubs is lagging.2019In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 402.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Decreased aerobic capacity 4 years after aortic valve replacement in male patients operated upon for chronic aortic regurgitation2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 167-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise testing is underutilized in patients with valve disease. We have previously found a low physical work capacity in patients with aortic regurgitation 6 months after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate aerobic capacity in patients 4 years after AVR, to study how their peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) had changed postoperatively over a longer period of time. Twenty-one patients (all men, 52 +/- 13 years) who had previously undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) pre- and 6 months postoperatively underwent maximal exercise testing 49 +/- 15 months postoperatively using an electrically braked bicycle ergometer. Breathing gases were analysed and the patients physical fitness levels categorized according to angstrom strands and Wassermans classifications. Mean peakVO2 was 22.8 +/- 5.1 ml x kg-1 x min-1 at the 49-month follow-up, which was lower than at the 6-month follow-up (25.6 +/- 5.8 ml x kg-1 x min-1, P = 0.001). All but one patient presented with a physical fitness level below average using angstrom strands classification, while 13 patients had a low physical capacity according to Wassermans classification. A significant decrease in peakVO2 was observed from six to 49 months postoperatively, and the decrease was larger than expected from the increased age of the patients. CPET could be helpful in timing aortic valve surgery and for the evaluation of need of physical activity as part of a rehabilitation programme.

  • 403.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Henriksson, J
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Female athlete's heart: Systolic and diastolic function related to circulatory dimensions2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 372-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are relatively few studies on female athletes examining cardiac size and function and how these measures relate to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). When determining sports eligibility, it is important to know what physiological adaptations and characteristics may be expected in female athletes, taking body and cardiac size into account. The purposes of this study were (a) to compare right and left heart dimensions and function in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in non-athletic female controls of similar age (CON); and (b) to explore how these measures related to VO2max . Forty-six ATH and 48 CON underwent a maximal bicycle exercise test and an echocardiographic examination at rest, including standard and color tissue Doppler investigation. All heart dimensions indexed for body size were larger in ATH (all P < 0.01). The diastolic mitral E/A ratio was 27% higher in ATH (P < 0.001) while systolic left and right atrio-ventricular longitudinal displacement was 7% (P = 0.002) and 15% (P < 0.001) larger in ATH, respectively. Half (50.3%) of the variability in VO2max could be explained by left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Our results could be useful in evaluating female endurance athletes with suspected cardiac disease and contribute to understanding differences between female athletes and non-athletes.

  • 404.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Cardiac systolic regional function and synchrony in endurance trained and untrained females2015In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 25, no 1, article id :e000015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Most studies on cardiac function in athletes describe overall heart function in predominately male participants. We aimed to compare segmental, regional and overall myocardial function and synchrony in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in age-matched sedentary females (CON).

    Methods In 46 ATH and 48 CON, echocardiography was used to measure peak longitudinal systolic strain and myocardial velocities in 12 left ventricular (LV) and 2 right ventricular (RV) segments. Regional and overall systolic function were calculated together with four indices of dyssynchrony.

    Results There were no differences in regional or overall LV systolic function between groups, or in any of the four dyssynchrony indices. Peak systolic velocity (s′) was higher in the RV of ATH than in CON (9.7±1.5 vs 8.7±1.5 cm/s, p=0.004), but not after indexing by cardiac length (p=0.331). Strain was similar in ATH and CON in 8 of 12 LV myocardial segments. In septum and anteroseptum, basal and mid-ventricular s′ was 6–7% and 17–19% higher in ATH than in CON (p<0.05), respectively, while s′ was 12% higher in CON in the basal LV lateral wall (p=0.013). After indexing by cardiac length, s′ was only higher in ATH in the mid-ventricular septum (p=0.041).

    Conclusions We found differences between trained and untrained females in segmental systolic myocardial function, but not in global measures of systolic function, including cardiac synchrony. These findings give new insights into cardiac adaptation to endurance training and could also be of use for sports cardiologists evaluating female athletes.

  • 405.
    Helin Forsberg,, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Preoperative Longitudinal Left Ventricular Function by Tissue Doppler Echocardiography at Rest and During Exercise Is Valuable in Timing of Aortic Valve Surgery in Male Aortic Regurgitation Patients2010In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate if left ventricular (LV) systolic function by tissue Doppler echocardiography at rest and during exercise preoperatively could predict postoperative LV function and thereby be useful in the timing of aortic valve surgery in patients with severe aortic regurgitation. Methods: In 29 patients (median age, 59 years; interquartile range, 39-64 years), echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, and radionuclide ventriculography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Results: Preoperative ejection fraction (EF) was 62%. Patients formed two groups, with basal LV peak systolic velocity (PSV) 5.9 cm/s preoperatively as the cutoff value between low and high PSV. Preoperatively, patients with low PSV had lower PSV during exercise (Pandlt;.005), EF during exercise (Pandlt;.05), and atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) at rest (Pandlt;.005) and during exercise (P andlt;.05) than those with high PSV. Postoperatively, patients with low PSV had smaller AVPD at rest (P andlt;.05), AVPD during exercise (Pandlt;.01), and PSV during exercise (Pandlt;.01). Conclusion: In patients with chronic aortic regurgitation with EFs and LV dimensions not fulfilling criteria for surgery according to guidelines, preoperative PSV and AVPD at rest and during exercise detected postoperative LV dysfunction.

  • 406.
    Hellström Angerud, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Symptoms and delay times during myocardial infarction in 694 patients with and without diabetes; an explorative cross-sectional study2016In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 16, no 108, article id 108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In myocardial infarction (MI) a short pre-hospital delay, prompt diagnosis and timely reperfusion treatment can improve the prognosis. Despite the importance of timely care seeking, many patients with MI symptoms delay seeking medical care. Previous research is inconclusive about differences in symptom presentation and pre-hospital delay between patients with and without diabetes during MI. The aim of this study was to describe symptoms and patient delay during MI in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: Swedish cross-sectional multicentre survey study enrolling MI patients in 5 centres within 24 h from admittance. Results: Chest pain was common in patients both with and without diabetes and did not differ after adjustment for age and sex. Patients with diabetes had higher risk for shoulder pain/discomfort, shortness of breath, and tiredness, but lower risk for cold sweat. The three most common symptoms reported by patients with diabetes were chest pain, pain in arms/hands and tiredness. In patients without diabetes the most common symptoms were chest pain, cold sweat and pain in arms/hands. Median patient delay time was 2 h, 24 min for patients with diabetes and 1 h, 15 min for patients without diabetes (p = 0.024). Conclusion: Chest pain was common both in patients with and without diabetes. There were more similarities than differences in MI symptoms between patients with and without diabetes but patients with diabetes had considerably longer delay. This knowledge is important not only for health care personnel meeting patients with suspected MI, but also for the education of people with diabetes.

  • 407.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå Universitet.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Norrbotten County Council, Department of Research, Luleå.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Differences in symptoms in relation to myocardial infarction.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In myocardial infarction (MI) rapid diagnosis and treatment is crucial for the prognosis. Previous research has found that symptom presentation influence pre hospital delay times but studies about differences in MI symptoms between patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. To enhance the understanding of symptom presentation in regard to MI type, we aimed to describe symptoms in relation to MI type and to find predictors of STEMI versus NSTEMI in patients with MI.

    Methods: Patients with MI (n=694) from the SymTime study were included. SymTime was a multicentre cross-sectional study of symptoms and actions in the prehospital phase of MI and data were collected using a previously validated questionnaire administered to MI patients within 24 h of admission to hospital.

    Results: Patients with STEMI were younger, more often men and smokers. Patients with NSTEMI were more likely to have a history of hypertension, MI and stroke. Chest pain was the most common symptom in both groups. Pain, discomfort, or pressure located in the jaw or teeth, vertigo/pre-syncope, cold sweat and nausea/vomiting were significantly more frequent in patients with STEMI (Table 1). In a multivariate logistic regression model patients with STEMI were more likely to present with cold sweat (OR 4.13, 95% CI 2.71–6.29) jaw pain (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.02–4.50), and nausea (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.20–3.33), and less likely to have a history of stroke (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.15–0.84), fluctuating symptoms (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.36–0.83) and anxiety (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32–0.92) compared to patients with NSTEMI.

    Conclusion: Patients with STEMI differed significantly from those with NSTEMI regarding symptom presentation. This knowledge is important for health care personnel to recognize symptoms alarming for STEMI when evaluating patients with MI symptoms.

  • 408. Hellström-Ängerud, K
    et al.
    Eriksson, M
    Isaksson, R-M
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptoms in MI in patients wit and without diabetes: a survey report from the SymTime study group.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 409.
    Hendriks, Jeroen M. L.
    et al.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Editorial Material: Sleep disordered breathing - A hidden co-morbidity in patients with atrial fibrillation? in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 13, issue 6, pp 480-4822014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 480-482Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 410.
    Henriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of endarterectomy in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in Sweden2008In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 95, no 6, p. 714-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Long-term health outcomes and costs are important when deciding whether a strategy of carotid endarterectomy in addition to best medical management should be recommended for patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of such a strategy compared with a strategy of best medical management alone.

    Methods: Based on data from the randomized Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST), a national vascular database and other published sources, expected costs and health outcomes in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of both treatment strategies were estimated using decision-analytical modelling. Cost-effectiveness was established for a Swedish setting from a societal perspective.

    Results: Base-case analysis showed that the incremental cost per QALY of a strategy with carotid endarterectomy for 65- and 75-year-old men (women) was 34 557 (311 133) and 58 930 (779 776) respectively. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the duration of the treatment effect after 5 years of follow-up in the ACST was important for the cost-effectiveness results.

    Conclusion: Carotid endarterectomy in addition to best medical management can be considered cost-effective in men aged 73 years or less but is less likely to be cost-effective in older men or in women.

  • 411.
    Henriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Astra Zeneca Nordic-Baltic, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nikolic, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ohna, Audun
    Astra Zeneca Nordic-Baltic, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ticagrelor treatment in patients with acute coronary syndrome is cost-effective in Sweden and Denmark2014In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 138-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treating patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) for 12 months with ticagrelor compared with generic clopidogrel in Sweden and Denmark. Design. Decision-analytic model to estimate lifetime costs, life-expectancy, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) with ticagrelor and clopidogrel. Event rates, healthcare resource use, and health-related quality of life during 12 months of therapy were estimated from the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial. Beyond 12 months, quality-adjusted survival and costs were estimated conditional on events occurring during the 12 months of therapy. When available, country-specific data were employed in the analysis. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios are presented from a healthcare perspective and a broader societal perspective including costs falling outside the healthcare sector in 2010 local currency. Results. The cost per QALY with ticagrelor compared with generic clopidogrel was SEK 25 022 and DKK 26 892 for Sweden and Denmark, respectively, from a healthcare perspective. The cost per QALY from a broader societal perspective was SEK 24 290 and DKK 25 051 for Sweden and Denmark, respectively. Conclusion. The cost per QALY of treating ACS-patients with ticagrelor compared with generic clopidogrel is below the conventional thresholds of cost-effectiveness in Sweden and Denmark.

  • 412.
    Hildebrand, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sved, Catarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gottvall, Tomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Impact of a standardized training program on midwive’s ability to assess fetal heart anatomy by ultrasound2014In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 14, no 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies of prenatal detection of congenital heart disease (CDH) in the UK, Italy, and Norway indicate that it should be possible to improve the prenatal detection rate of CDH in Sweden. These studies have shown that training programs, visualization of the outflow tracts and color-Doppler all can help to speed up and improve the detection rate and accuracy. We aimed to introduce a more accurate standardized fetal cardiac ultrasound screening protocol in Sweden.

    Methods: A novel pedagogical model for training midwives in standardized cardiac imaging was developed, a model using a think-aloud analysis during a pre- and post-course test and a subsequent group reflection. The self-estimated difficulties and knowledge gaps of four midwives were identified. A two-day course with mixed lectures, demonstrations and handson sessions was followed by a feedback session one month later consisting of an interview and check-up. The long-term effects were tested two years later.

    Results: At the post-course test the self-assessed uncertainty was lower than at the pre-course test. The qualitative evaluation showed that the color Doppler images were difficult to interpret, but the training seems to have enhanced the familiarity with the new technique. The ability to perform the method remained at the new level at follow-up both three months and two years later.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that by implementing new imaging modalities and providing hands-on training, uncertainty can be reduced and time decreased, but they also show that continuous on-site training with clinical and technical back-up is important.

  • 413.
    Hjalmarsson, Clara
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Radegran, Goran
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kylhammar, David
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Rundqvist, Bengt
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Multing, Jonas
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Nisell, Magnus D.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Impact of age and comorbidity on risk stratification in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 51, no 5, article id 1702310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reports from worldwide pulmonary hypertension registries show a new demographic picture for patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), with an increasing prevalence among the elderly. We aimed to investigate the effects of age and comorbidity on risk stratification and outcome of patients with incident IPAH. The study population (n=264) was categorised into four age groups: 18-45, 46-64, 65-74 and amp;gt;= 75 years. Individual risk profiles were determined according to a risk assessment instrument, based on the European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society guidelines. The change in risk group from baseline to follow-up (median 5 months) and survival were compared across age groups. In the two youngest age groups, a significant number of patients improved (18-45 years, Z=-4.613, pamp;lt; 0.001; 46-64 years, Z=-2.125, p=0.034), but no significant improvement was found in the older patient groups. 5-year survival was highest in patients aged 18-45 years (88%), while the survival rates were 63%, 56% and 36% for patients in the groups 46-64, 65-74 and. 75 years, respectively (pamp;lt; 0.001). Ischaemic heart disease and kidney dysfunction independently predicted survival. These findings highlight the importance of age and specific comorbidities as prognostic markers of outcome in addition to established risk assessment algorithms.

  • 414.
    Hofmann, R.
    et al.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Tornvall, P.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Witt, N.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Svensson, L.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Supplemental oxygen therapy does not affect the systemic inflammatory response to acute myocardial infarction2018In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 334-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Oxygen therapy has been used routinely in normoxemic patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) despite limited evidence supporting a beneficial effect. AMI is associated with a systemic inflammation. Here, we hypothesized that the inflammatory response to AMI is potentiated by oxygen therapy. Methods. The DETermination of the role of Oxygen in suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction (DETO2X-AMI) multicentre trial randomized patients with suspected AMI to receive oxygen at 6 L min(-1) for 6-12 h or ambient air. For this prespecified subgroup analysis, we recruited patients with confirmed AMI from two sites for evaluation of inflammatory biomarkers at randomization and 5-7 h later. Ninety-two inflammatory biomarkers were analysed using proximity extension assay technology, to evaluate the effect of oxygen on the systemic inflammatory response to AMI. Results. Plasma from 144 AMI patients was analysed whereof 76 (53%) were randomized to oxygen and 68 (47%) to air. Eight biomarkers showed a significant increase, whereas 13 were decreased 5-7 h after randomization. The inflammatory response did not differ between the two treatment groups neither did plasma troponin T levels. After adjustment for increase in troponin T over time, age and sex, the release of inflammation-related biomarkers was still similar in the groups. Conclusions. In a randomized controlled setting of normoxemic patients with AMI, the use of supplemental oxygen did not have any significant impact on the early release of systemic inflammatory markers.

  • 415.
    Hofmann, Robin
    et al.
    Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Witt, Nils
    Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Frick, Mats
    Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kellerth, Thomas
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sparv, David
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Linder, Rickard
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekstrom, Mattias
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Lauermann, Jorg
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Haaga, Urban
    Karlstad Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Pernow, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ostlund, Ollie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Boras, Sweden.
    Svensson, Leif
    Södersjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Oxygen Therapy in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction2017In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 13, p. 1240-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND The clinical effect of routine oxygen therapy in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction who do not have hypoxemia at baseline is uncertain. METHODS In this registry-based randomized clinical trial, we used nationwide Swedish registries for patient enrollment and data collection. Patients with suspected myocardial infarction and an oxygen saturation of 90% or higher were randomly assigned to receive either supplemental oxygen (6 liters per minute for 6 to 12 hours, delivered through an open face mask) or ambient air. RESULTS A total of 6629 patients were enrolled. The median duration of oxygen therapy was 11.6 hours, and the median oxygen saturation at the end of the treatment period was 99% among patients assigned to oxygen and 97% among patients assigned to ambient air. Hypoxemia developed in 62 patients (1.9%) in the oxygen group, as compared with 254 patients (7.7%) in the ambient-air group. The median of the highest troponin level during hospitalization was 946.5 ng per liter in the oxygen group and 983.0 ng per liter in the ambient-air group. The primary end point of death from any cause within 1 year after randomization occurred in 5.0% of patients (166 of 3311) assigned to oxygen and in 5.1% of patients (168 of 3318) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.21; P = 0.80). Rehospitalization with myocardial infarction within 1 year occurred in 126 patients (3.8%) assigned to oxygen and in 111 patients (3.3%) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.46; P = 0.33). The results were consistent across all predefined subgroups. CONCLUSIONS Routine use of supplemental oxygen in patients with suspected myocardial infarction who did not have hypoxemia was not found to reduce 1-year all-cause mortality.

  • 416.
    Hofmann, Robin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Witt, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Linder, Rikard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Angeras, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kellerth, Thomas
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sparv, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lauermann, Jorg
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Barmano, Neshro
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Verouhis, Dinos
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ostlund, Ollie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Svensson, Leif
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Oxygen therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 29, p. 2730-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To determine whether supplemental oxygen in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) impacts on procedure-related and clinical outcomes. Methods and results The DETermination of the role of Oxygen in suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction (DETO2X-AMI) trial randomized patients with suspected myocardial infarction (MI) to receive oxygen at 6 L/min for 6-12 h or ambient air. In this pre-specified analysis, we included only STEMI patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In total, 2807 patients were included, 1361 assigned to receive oxygen, and 1446 assigned to ambient air. The pre-specified primary composite endpoint of all-cause death, rehospitalization with MI, cardiogenic shock, or stent thrombosis at 1 year occurred in 6.3% (86 of 1361) of patients allocated to oxygen compared to 7.5% (108 of 1446) allocated to ambient air [hazard ratio (HR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.64-1.13; P = 0.27]. There was no difference in the rate of death from any cause (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.61-1.22; P = 0.41), rate of rehospitalization for MI (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.57-1.48; P = 0.73), rehospitalization for cardiogenic shock (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.21-5.22; P = 0.95), or stent thrombosis (HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.46-3.51; P = 0.64). The primary composite endpoint was consistent across all subgroups, as well as at different time points, such as during hospital stay, at 30 days and the total duration of follow-up up to 1356 days. Conclusions Routine use of supplemental oxygen in normoxemic patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI did not significantly affect 1-year all-cause death, rehospitalization with MI, cardiogenic shock, or stent thrombosis.

  • 417.
    Holm, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Acute coronary syndrome: bleeding, platelets and gender2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Bleeding complications increase mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence, location, severity and prognostic impact is still controversial and not well investigated. In regard to this aspect the relevance of triple antithrombotic therapy (TAT) is questioned. There is an ongoing debate on the clinical implications of TAT and furthermore assumed that bleeding complications, except impact on outcome, also are associated with great influence on health economy.

    The main focus of this thesis was to further investigate the incidence and impact of bleeding complications in patients treated for ACS, with special reference to gender disparities, TAT and health economics. The thesis will highlight the importance of improved bleeding prevention strategies for both men and women.

    METHOD

    Paper I, II and III

    Observational studies from the SWEDEHEART register.

    In paper I we investigated patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction (MI) during 2006–2008. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    In paper II, all patients with MI, in the County of Östergötland, Sweden during 2010 were included and followed for one year. The patients' medical records were evaluated, in relation to short and long-term bleeding complications, bleeding location, withdrawal of platelet inhibiting drugs and nonfatal MI and death.

    Paper III included all patients discharged with (TAT) in the County of Östergötland 2009-2015. Information about bleeds and ischemic complications during one-year follow-up were retrieved from the medical records. Estimation of the health care costs associated with bleeding episodes were added to the evaluation.

    Paper IV

    Patients with MI, scheduled for coronary angiography were recruited. All patients received clopidogrel and aspirin. A subgroup of patients received GP IIb/IIIa-inhibitor. Outcomes were platelet aggregation assessed at several time points, using a Multiplate impedance aggregometer, measurement of P-selectin in plasma, evaluation of high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) and low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) respectively and incidence of bleeding complications. A comparison between women and men was performed.

    RESULTS

    Paper I

    A total number of 50.399 patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (OR 1.17, 95%, CI 1.01–1.37). The increased risk for women was found in STEMI (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10–1.94) and in those who underwent PCI (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45–2.24).

    In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62–1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of oneyear mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04–1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72–1.31).

    Paper II

    In total 850 consecutive patients were included. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all in hospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no gender difference. Women had significantly more minor nonsurgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women also had more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p≤0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008).

    Paper III

    Among 272 identified patients, 156 bleeds occurred post-discharge, of which 28.8% were of gastrointestinal origin. In total 54.4% had at least one bleed during or after the index event and 40.1% bled post-discharge of whom 28.7% experienced a TIMI major or minor bleeding. Women discontinued TAT prematurely more often than men (52.9 vs 36.1%, p=0.01) and bled more (48.6 vs. 37.1%, p=0.09). One-year mean health care costs were EUR 575 and EUR 5787 in non-bleeding and bleeding patients, respectively.

    Paper IV

    We recruited 125 patients (37 women and 88 men). We observed significantly more inhospital bleeding events in women as compared to men (18.9% vs 6.8%, p=0.04). There were no differences in platelet aggregation using three different agonists, reflecting treatment of GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors, clopidogrel and aspirin, at four different time-points nor were there any differences in p-selectin in plasma 3 days after admission.

    CONCLUSION

    There is a remarkably high bleeding incidence among patients treated with DAPT and even more so if treated with TAT. Female gender is an independent risk factor of inhospital bleeding after myocardial infarction, this higher bleeding risk in women appears to be restricted to invasively treated patients and STEMI patients. Even if women had higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among those who bled. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men

    Women seem to experience more minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome.

    In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. There is a lack of differences between the genders concerning platelet aggregation. Our results do not support gender disparities in platelet reactivity and excess dosing as a major explanation for increased bleeding risk in women. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

    List of papers
    1. Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.
    2016 (English)In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 6, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding complications increase mortality in myocardial infarction patients. Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence and prognostic impact is still controversial.

    OBJECTIVES: Gender comparison regarding incidence and prognostic impact of bleeding in patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction during 2006-2008.

    METHODS: Observational study from the SWEDEHEART register. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    RESULTS: A total number of 50,399 myocardial infarction patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.37). The increased risk for women was found in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10-1.94) and in those who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45-2.24). In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of one-year mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72-1.31).

    CONCLUSIONS: Female gender is an independent risk factor of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction. A higher bleeding risk in women appeared to be restricted to invasively treated patients and ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Even though women have higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among bleeders. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2016
    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction; bleeding; gender; prognosis
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124287 (URN)10.1177/2048872615610884 (DOI)000385817800008 ()26450782 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-10
    2. Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess bleeding events, including severity, localisation and prognostic impact, in a real world population of men and women with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results: In total 850 consecutive patients were included during 2010 and followed for one year. Bleeding complications were identified by searching of each patients medical records and characterised according to the TIMI criteria. For this analysis, only the first event was calculated. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all inhospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no sex difference. Women had significantly more minor non-surgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women had also more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p=0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008). Conclusions: Almost one in four patients experienced a bleeding complication through 12 months follow-up after a myocardial infarction. Women experienced more non-surgery related minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome. In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction; Bleeding; Sex; Mortality
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149865 (URN)10.1016/j.thromres.2018.05.023 (DOI)000437845800027 ()29857272 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Ostergotland County Council [LIO610841]

    Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2019-04-12
  • 418.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Zolfagharian, Shima
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective2018In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess bleeding events, including severity, localisation and prognostic impact, in a real world population of men and women with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results: In total 850 consecutive patients were included during 2010 and followed for one year. Bleeding complications were identified by searching of each patients medical records and characterised according to the TIMI criteria. For this analysis, only the first event was calculated. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all inhospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no sex difference. Women had significantly more minor non-surgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women had also more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p=0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008). Conclusions: Almost one in four patients experienced a bleeding complication through 12 months follow-up after a myocardial infarction. Women experienced more non-surgery related minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome. In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

  • 419.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm-Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.2016In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 6, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding complications increase mortality in myocardial infarction patients. Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence and prognostic impact is still controversial.

    OBJECTIVES: Gender comparison regarding incidence and prognostic impact of bleeding in patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction during 2006-2008.

    METHODS: Observational study from the SWEDEHEART register. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    RESULTS: A total number of 50,399 myocardial infarction patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.37). The increased risk for women was found in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10-1.94) and in those who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45-2.24). In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of one-year mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72-1.31).

    CONCLUSIONS: Female gender is an independent risk factor of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction. A higher bleeding risk in women appeared to be restricted to invasively treated patients and ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Even though women have higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among bleeders. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men.

  • 420.
    Holm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Markers of hemodynamic state and heart failure as predictors for outcome in cardiac surgery: with special reference to mixed venous oxygen saturation and natriuretic peptides2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Postoperative heart failure or low cardiac output syndrome is the major cause for morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Unfortunately commonly used methods to assess hemodynamic state and heart failure are not well documented with regard to outcome. The aim for this dissertation was to study the predictive values of postoperative Mixed Venous Oxygen saturation (SvO2) and preoperative NT-proBNP for outcomes related to postoperative heart failure.

    SvO2 was studied retrospectively in two cohorts of patients, one cohort operated with isolated Aortic Valve Replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis, (n=396) and one operated with isolated Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG), (n=2755). SvO2 measured early after surgery, on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), predicted postoperative morbidity and mortality. Our results suggest that, on admission to ICU SvO2 < 55 - 60% after AVR and SvO2 < 60% after CABG merits increased attention.

    Preoperative NT-proBNP was studied in a cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing CABG with or without concomitant procedure. These patients (n=383) were included prospectively and evaluated with regard to mortality and severe circulatory failure postoperatively by an end-points committee blinded to NT-proBNP results. Preoperative NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L independently predicted increased risk for severe circulatory failure postoperatively in patients with ACS undergoing isolated CABG. Preoperative NT-proBNP provided additional prognostic information to EuroSCORE II in this cohort, particularly in patients at intermediate risk. Preoperative NT-proBNP appears to be markedly higher in patients having CABG with concomitant procedures than in patients undergoing isolated CABG. Further studies are warranted to identify preoperative NTproBNP risk thresholds for different heart conditions and surgery-specific cohorts.

    In conclusion this dissertation shows that:

    • Postoperative SvO2 on admission to ICU is a prognostic marker for morbidity and mortality after AVR and CABG.
    • Preoperative NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L independently predicts severe circulatory failure postoperatively in patients undergoing isolated CABG and provides additional prognostic information to EuroSCORE II.
    • The high negative predictive value of the identified cutoff levels for preoperative NTproBNP and postoperative SvO2 could be useful for pre and postoperative decisionmaking.
    List of papers
    1. Mixed venous oxygen saturation is a prognostic marker after surgery for aortic stenosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixed venous oxygen saturation is a prognostic marker after surgery for aortic stenosis
    2010 (English)In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 589-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Adequate monitoring of the hemodynamic state is essential after cardiac surgery and is vital for medical decision making, particularly concerning hemodynamic management. Unfortunately, commonly used methods to assess the hemodynamic state are not well documented with regard to outcome. Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) was therefore investigated after cardiac surgery. Methods Detailed data regarding mortality were available on all patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for isolated aortic stenosis during a 5-year period in the southeast region of Sweden (n=396). SvO(2) was routinely measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and registered in a database. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis of SvO(2) in relation to post-operative mortality related to cardiac failure and all-cause mortality within 30 days was performed. Results The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.97 (95% CI 0.96-1.00) for mortality related to cardiac failure (P=0.001) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.53-0.99) for all-cause mortality (P=0.011). The best cutoff for mortality related to cardiac failure was SvO(2) 53.7%, with a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.94. The negative predictive value was 100%. The best cutoff for all-cause mortality was SvO(2) 58.1%, with a sensitivity of 0.75 and a specificity of 0.84. The negative predictive value was 99.4%. Post-operative morbidity was also markedly increased in patients with a low SvO(2). Conclusion SvO(2), on admission to the ICU after surgery for aortic stenosis, demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for post-operative mortality related to cardiac failure and a fairly good AUC for all-cause mortality, with an excellent negative predictive value.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54873 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.02205.x (DOI)000276244700010 ()
    Available from: 2010-04-16 Created: 2010-04-16 Last updated: 2014-01-15Bibliographically approved
    2. Mixed venous oxygen saturation predicts short- and long-term outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: a retrospective cohort analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixed venous oxygen saturation predicts short- and long-term outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: a retrospective cohort analysis
    2011 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 344-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Complications of an inadequate haemodynamic state are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Unfortunately, commonly used methods to assess haemodynamic status are not well documented with respect to outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate SV(O2) as a prognostic marker for short-and long-term outcome in a large unselected coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) cohort and in subgroups with or without treatment for intraoperative heart failure. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty-five consecutive CABG patients and subgroups comprising 344 patients with and 2411 patients without intraoperative heart failure, respectively, were investigated. SV(O2) was routinely measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). The mean (SD) follow-up was 10.2 (1.5) yr. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. The best cut-off for 30 day mortality related to heart failure based on receiver-operating characteristic analysis was SV(O2) 60.1%. Patients with SV(O2) andlt;60% had higher 30 day mortality (5.4% vs 1.0%; P andlt; 0.0001) and lower 5 yr survival (81.4% vs 90.5%; P andlt; 0.0001). The incidences of perioperative myocardial infarction, renal failure, and stroke were also significantly higher, leading to a longer ICU stay. Similar prognostic information was obtained in the subgroups that were admitted to ICU with or without treatment for intraoperative heart failure. In patients admitted to ICU without treatment for intraoperative heart failure and SV(O2) andgt;= 60%, 30 day mortality was 0.5% and 5 yr survival 92.1%. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. SV(O2) andlt;60% on admission to ICU was related to worse short- and long-term outcome after CABG, regardless of whether the patients were admitted to ICU with or without treatment for intraoperative heart failure.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford University Press (OUP), 2011
    Keywords
    assessment, patient outcomes, coronary artery bypass grafting, patient monitoring, postoperative complications, survival rates
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70321 (URN)10.1093/bja/aer166 (DOI)000293910400008 ()
    Note
    Funding Agencies|Östergotlands Läns Landsting||Linköping University Hospital||Available from: 2011-09-02 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    3. Preoperative NT-proBNP independently predicts outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing CABG
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preoperative NT-proBNP independently predicts outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing CABG
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The predictive value of preoperative N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was evaluated in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Design. As a substudy to a clinical trial 383 patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing CABG were studied. 17 patients had a concomitant procedure. NT-proBNP was measured immediately preoperatively and evaluated with regard to in-hospital mortality, and severe circulatory failure postoperatively according to prespecified criteria. Follow-up was 3.2 +/- 0.9 years. Results. In patients with isolated CABG, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82 for in-hospital mortality and 0.87 for severe circulatory failure respectively with a best cut-off for preoperative NT-proBNP of 1028 ng/L. This cut-off level independently predicted severe circulatory failure. Patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1028 ng/L had significantly better long-term survival (p = 0.004). Preoperative NT-proBNP was higher in patients with concomitant procedure than isolated CABG (2146 +/- 1858 v 887 +/- 1635 ng/L; p = 0.0005). In patients with concomitant procedure ROC analysis showed an AUC of 0.93 for severe circulatory failure with a best cut-off for preoperative NT-proBNP of 3145 ng/L. Conclusions. Preoperative NT-proBNP predicted in-hospital mortality, severe circulatory failure postoperatively and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for acute coronary syndrome but a higher threshold was found in patients having concomitant procedures.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2013
    Keywords
    acute coronary syndrome, coronary artery bypass grafting, natriuretic peptides
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88661 (URN)10.3109/14017431.2012.731518 (DOI)000313678500004 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation|20030595|Capio Research Foundation|2005-10212006-1203|Linkoping University||Ostergotlands Lans Landsting||

    Available from: 2013-02-14 Created: 2013-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. EuroSCORE II and NT-proBNP for risk evaluation: an observational longitudinal study in patients undergoing CABG
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>EuroSCORE II and NT-proBNP for risk evaluation: an observational longitudinal study in patients undergoing CABG
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative heart failure remains the major cause of death after cardiac surgery. As NT-proBNP is a predictor for postoperative heart failure, the aim was to evaluate if preoperative NT-proBNP could provide additional prognostic information to the recently launched EuroSCORE II.

    METHODS: 365 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing isolated CABG were studied prospectively. Preoperative NT-proBNP and EuroSCORE II were evaluated with regard to severe circulatory failure postoperatively according to prespecified criteria. To assess what clinical outcomes are indicated by NT-proBNP levels in different risk categories, the patients were stratified according to EuroSCORE II. Based on Reciever Operating Chracateristics (ROC) analysis these cohorts were assessed with regard to preoperative NT-proBNP below or above 1028 ng/L. Follow-up time averaged 4.4 ± 0.7 years.

    RESULTS: Preoperative NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L (OR 9.9, 95%CI 1.01-98.9;p=0.049) and EuroSCORE II (OR 1.24, 95%CI 1.06-1.46;p=0.008) independently predicted severe circulatory failure postoperatively. In intermediate risk patients (EuroSCORE II 2.0 – 10.0) NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L was associated with a higher incidence of severe circulatory failure (6.6% vs 0%;p=0.007), renal failure (14.8% vs 5.4%;p=0.03), stroke (6.6 % vs 0.7 %;p=0.03) , longer ICU stay (37±35 vs 27±38 hours; p=0.002) and worse long-term survival.

    CONCLUSIONS: Combining EuroSCORE II and preoperative NT-proBNP appears to improve risk prediction with regard to severe circulatory failure after isolated CABG for ACS. NTproBNP may be particularly useful in patients at intermediate risk according to EuroSCORE II.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97334 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-09-10 Created: 2013-09-10 Last updated: 2013-09-10Bibliographically approved
  • 421.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkanson, R Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Mixed venous oxygen saturation is a prognostic marker after surgery for aortic stenosis2010In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 589-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Adequate monitoring of the hemodynamic state is essential after cardiac surgery and is vital for medical decision making, particularly concerning hemodynamic management. Unfortunately, commonly used methods to assess the hemodynamic state are not well documented with regard to outcome. Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) was therefore investigated after cardiac surgery. Methods Detailed data regarding mortality were available on all patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for isolated aortic stenosis during a 5-year period in the southeast region of Sweden (n=396). SvO(2) was routinely measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and registered in a database. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis of SvO(2) in relation to post-operative mortality related to cardiac failure and all-cause mortality within 30 days was performed. Results The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.97 (95% CI 0.96-1.00) for mortality related to cardiac failure (P=0.001) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.53-0.99) for all-cause mortality (P=0.011). The best cutoff for mortality related to cardiac failure was SvO(2) 53.7%, with a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.94. The negative predictive value was 100%. The best cutoff for all-cause mortality was SvO(2) 58.1%, with a sensitivity of 0.75 and a specificity of 0.84. The negative predictive value was 99.4%. Post-operative morbidity was also markedly increased in patients with a low SvO(2). Conclusion SvO(2), on admission to the ICU after surgery for aortic stenosis, demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for post-operative mortality related to cardiac failure and a fairly good AUC for all-cause mortality, with an excellent negative predictive value.

  • 422.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Copeptin Release in Cardiac Surgery: A New Biomarker to Identify Risk Patients?2018In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, E-ISSN 1532-8422, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 245-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the dynamics of copeptin in open cardiac surgery during the perioperative course.

    DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

    SETTING: Single tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty patients scheduled for open cardiac surgery procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    INTERVENTIONS: No intervention.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Copeptin concentrations were measured pre-, peri-, and postoperatively until day 6 after surgery. Patients were analyzed as a whole cohort (n = 20) and in a restricted "normal cohort" consisting of patients with normal preoperative copeptin concentration (<10 pmol/L) and perioperative uneventful course (n = 11). In the whole cohort, preoperative copeptin concentration was 7.0 pmol/L (interquartile range: 3.1-11 pmol/L). All patients had an early rise of copeptin, with 80% having peak copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Patients in the "normal cohort" had copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB of 194 pmol/L (98-275), postoperative day 1, 27 pmol/L (18-31); and day 3, 8.9 pmol/L (6.3-12).

    CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of cardiac surgical procedure and perioperative course, all patients had an early significant rise of copeptin concentrations, generally peaking at weaning from CBP or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Among patients with normal copeptin concentration preoperatively and uneventful course, the postoperative copeptin concentrations decreased to normal values within 3-to-4 days after cardiac surgery. Furthermore, the restricted "normal cohort" generally tended to display lower levels of copeptin concentration postoperatively. Further studies may evaluate whether copeptin can be a tool in identifying risk patients in cardiac surgery.

  • 423.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vidlund, M.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Friberg, O.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Håkanson, E.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    EuroSCORE II and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide for risk evaluation: an observational longitudinal study in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery2014In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 113, no 1, p. 75-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Postoperative heart failure remains the major cause of death after cardiac surgery. As N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a predictor for postoperative heart failure, the aim was to evaluate if preoperative NT-proBNP could provide additional prognostic information to the recently launched EuroSCORE II.

    METHODS:

    A total of 365 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were studied prospectively. Preoperative NT-proBNP and EuroSCORE II were evaluated with regard to severe circulatory failure after operation according to prespecified criteria. To assess what clinical outcomes are indicated by NT-proBNP levels in different risk categories, the patients were stratified according to EuroSCORE II. Based on receiver operating characteristics analysis, these cohorts were assessed with regard to preoperative NT-proBNP below or above 1028 ng litre(-1). The follow-up time averaged 4.4 (0.7) yr.

    RESULTS:

    Preoperative NT-proBNP≥1028 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 9.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-98.9; P=0.049] and EuroSCORE II (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46; P=0.008) independently predicted severe circulatory failure after operation. In intermediate-risk patients (EuroSCORE II 2.0-10.0), NT-proBNP≥1028 ng litre(-1) was associated with a higher incidence of severe circulatory failure (6.6% vs 0%; P=0.007), renal failure (14.8% vs 5.4%; P=0.03), stroke (6.6% vs 0.7%; P=0.03), longer intensive care unit stay [37 (35) vs 27 (38) h; P=0.002], and worse long-term survival.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Combining EuroSCORE II and preoperative NT-proBNP appears to improve risk prediction with regard to severe circulatory failure after isolated CABG for ACS. NT-proBNP may be particularly useful in patients at intermediate risk according to EuroSCORE II.

  • 424.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vidlund, Marten
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Friberg, Orjan
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Hakanson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Preoperative NT-proBNP independently predicts outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing CABG2013In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The predictive value of preoperative N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was evaluated in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Design. As a substudy to a clinical trial 383 patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing CABG were studied. 17 patients had a concomitant procedure. NT-proBNP was measured immediately preoperatively and evaluated with regard to in-hospital mortality, and severe circulatory failure postoperatively according to prespecified criteria. Follow-up was 3.2 +/- 0.9 years. Results. In patients with isolated CABG, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82 for in-hospital mortality and 0.87 for severe circulatory failure respectively with a best cut-off for preoperative NT-proBNP of 1028 ng/L. This cut-off level independently predicted severe circulatory failure. Patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1028 ng/L had significantly better long-term survival (p = 0.004). Preoperative NT-proBNP was higher in patients with concomitant procedure than isolated CABG (2146 +/- 1858 v 887 +/- 1635 ng/L; p = 0.0005). In patients with concomitant procedure ROC analysis showed an AUC of 0.93 for severe circulatory failure with a best cut-off for preoperative NT-proBNP of 3145 ng/L. Conclusions. Preoperative NT-proBNP predicted in-hospital mortality, severe circulatory failure postoperatively and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for acute coronary syndrome but a higher threshold was found in patients having concomitant procedures.

  • 425.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Håkanson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Does preoperative NT-proBNP provide additional prognostic information to EuroSCORE II in patients undfergoing CABG?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 426.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anaesthesia, Örebro University Hospital.
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anaesthesia, Örebro University Hospital.
    Håkanson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    EuroSCORE II and NT-proBNP for risk evaluation: an observational longitudinal study in patients undergoing CABGManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative heart failure remains the major cause of death after cardiac surgery. As NT-proBNP is a predictor for postoperative heart failure, the aim was to evaluate if preoperative NT-proBNP could provide additional prognostic information to the recently launched EuroSCORE II.

    METHODS: 365 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing isolated CABG were studied prospectively. Preoperative NT-proBNP and EuroSCORE II were evaluated with regard to severe circulatory failure postoperatively according to prespecified criteria. To assess what clinical outcomes are indicated by NT-proBNP levels in different risk categories, the patients were stratified according to EuroSCORE II. Based on Reciever Operating Chracateristics (ROC) analysis these cohorts were assessed with regard to preoperative NT-proBNP below or above 1028 ng/L. Follow-up time averaged 4.4 ± 0.7 years.

    RESULTS: Preoperative NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L (OR 9.9, 95%CI 1.01-98.9;p=0.049) and EuroSCORE II (OR 1.24, 95%CI 1.06-1.46;p=0.008) independently predicted severe circulatory failure postoperatively. In intermediate risk patients (EuroSCORE II 2.0 – 10.0) NT-proBNP ≥ 1028 ng/L was associated with a higher incidence of severe circulatory failure (6.6% vs 0%;p=0.007), renal failure (14.8% vs 5.4%;p=0.03), stroke (6.6 % vs 0.7 %;p=0.03) , longer ICU stay (37±35 vs 27±38 hours; p=0.002) and worse long-term survival.

    CONCLUSIONS: Combining EuroSCORE II and preoperative NT-proBNP appears to improve risk prediction with regard to severe circulatory failure after isolated CABG for ACS. NTproBNP may be particularly useful in patients at intermediate risk according to EuroSCORE II.

  • 427.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    NT-proBNP provides additional prognostic information to Euroscoe II in patients undergoing CABG2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 428.
    Holmar, Jana
    et al.
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Fridolin, Ivo
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Luman, Merike
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia; North Estonian Medical Centre, Estonia.
    Estimation of dialysis patients survival through combined approach of small molecule uremic markers2014In: Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, ISSN 1736-6046, E-ISSN 1736-7530, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Survival rate of dialysis patients is still alarmingly low and various factors may have in it an important role. The purpose of this study was to observe the relationship between the survival of dialysis patients and the serum level of urea, creatinine, and uric acid (UA). Serum urea and creatinine concentrations may express patients nutritional status and muscle mass, and high UA value may refer to higher risk for cardiovascular events. The idea of combining the concentrations and removal of urea and UA into a single model for predicting the patients outcome is introduced. The study included 33 hemodialysis patients from Link ping, Sweden and 10 from Tallinn, Estonia. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival analysis. Logistic and Cox regression analysis was applied to create models for predicting patients three-year survival. It was observed that higher serum UA is significantly related to poor survival in dialysis patients (p = 0.026). A reverse effect was observed in case of urea (p = 0.095). The level of creatinine was not related to survival (p = 0.905). The best logistic regression model for predicting patients outcome included both UA and urea based parameters (Chi Square 21.0, p = 0.0001). Survival of dialysis patients seems to be determined by a set of causal factors and combined models may have a predictive relevance. A possibility for automatic online monitoring of small molecule uremic markers is proposed. Since the number of participating patients was small, larger studies including more patients and testing the models in independent validation cohort is the future goal.

  • 429.
    Holmar, Jana
    et al.
    Tallin University of Technology, Tallin, Estonia .
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Luman, Merike
    Tallin University of Technology, North Estonian Medical Centre, Tallin, Estonia.
    Jankowski, Joachim
    Aachen University , University Hospital Aachen, Germany .
    Fridolin, Ivo
    Tallin University of Technology, Tallin, Estonia.
    An Optical Method for Serum Calcium and Phosphorus Level Assessment during Hemodialysis2015In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 719-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Survival among hemodialysis patients is disturbingly low, partly because vascular calcification (VC) and cardiovascular disease are highly prevalent. Elevated serum phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca) levels play an essential role in the formation of VC events. The purpose of the current study was to reveal optical monitoring possibilities of serum P and Ca values during dialysis. Twenty-eight patients from Tallinn (Estonia) and Linköping (Sweden) were included in the study. The serum levels of Ca and P on the basis of optical information, i.e., absorbance and fluorescence of the spent dialysate (optical method) were assessed. Obtained levels were compared in means and SD. The mean serum level of Ca was 2.54 ± 0.21 and 2.53 ± 0.19 mmol/L; P levels varied between 1.08 ± 0.51 and 1.08 ± 0.48 mmol/L, measured in the laboratory and estimated by the optical method respectively. The levels achieved were not significantly different (p = 0.5). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement between the two methods varied from -0.19 to 0.19 for Ca and from -0.37 to 0.37 in the case of P. In conclusion, optical monitoring of the spent dialysate for assessing the serum levels of Ca and P during dialysis seems to be feasible and could offer valuable and continuous information to medical staff.

  • 430.
    Holmberg, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    More than 20 years' experience of left ventricular assist device implantation at a non-transplant Centre2017In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 293-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Over recent decades implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have increased the possibility of improved survival in patients with advanced heart failure who also benefit from a better quality of life. The aim of this retrospective survey was to review the clinical results of LVAD implantation at a low-volume non-transplant centre (Linköping, Sweden) between 1993 and 2016. Our aim was also to assess the mortality and morbidity rates associated with implantation of three LVAD versions at our centre, and to compare our results with those from transplant centres.

    DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was performed examining the medical records of patients who had a HeartMate(®) (HMI, HMII, HMIII) LVAD implanted as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT) or as destination therapy (DT) at the University Hospital, Linköping.

    RESULTS: Our main finding was a survival to heart transplantation rate of 82% among our BTT LVAD patients. The most common adverse event among our patients was infection. A higher frequency of temporary dialysis was seen in the HMII group compared to the HMI group, and the frequency of right ventricular failure was higher in our HMII material.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that patients requiring long-term LVAD support can safely have their device implanted and cared for at a non-transplant centre.

  • 431. Holmberg, M
    et al.
    Steins, K
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Does high ICU occupancy have adverse effects on patient outcomes? An observational multicentre study of the relationship between occupancy, length-of-stay and mortality2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 432.
    Holmberg, M
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Norrköping.
    Steins, Krisjanis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Does high ICU occupancy have adverse effects on patient outcomes? An obeservational multicentre study of the relationship between occupancy, length-of-stay and mortality2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 433.
    Holmer, Helene
    et al.
    Department Internal Med, Sweden .
    Svensson, Johan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Rylander, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Johannsson, Gudmundur
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Rosen, Thord
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bengtsson, Bengt-Ake
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Thoren, Marja
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Hoybye, Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Degerblad, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden .
    Bramnert, Margareta
    Skånes University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hagg, Erik
    University Hospital, Sweden .
    Eden Engstrom, Britt
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Erfurth, Eva-Marie
    Skånes University Hospital, Sweden .
    Psychosocial health and levels of employment in 851 hypopituitary Swedish patients on long-term GH therapy2013In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 842-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The psychosocial health and working capacity in hypopituitary patients receiving long-term growth hormone (GH) therapy are unknown. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: Psychosocial health and levels of employment were compared between GH deficient (GHD) patients on long-term replacement and the general population. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign and participants: In a Swedish nationwide study, 851 GHD patients [101 childhood onset (CO) and 750 adult onset (AO)] and 2622 population controls answered a questionnaire regarding current living, employment and educational level, alcohol consumption and smoking habits. The median time on GH therapy for both men and women with CO GHD was 9 years and for AO GHD 6 years, respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: As compared to the controls, the GHD patients were less often working full time, more often on sick leave/disability pension, and to a larger extent alcohol abstainers and never smokers (all; P andlt; 0.05). Predominantly CO GHD women and men, but to some extent also AO GHD women and men, lived less frequently with a partner and more often with their parents. Particularly AO GHD craniopharyngioma women used more antidepressants, while AO GHD men with a craniopharyngioma used more analgesics. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: A working capacity to the level of the general population was not achieved among hypopituitary patients, although receiving long-term GH therapy. Patients were less likely to use alcohol and tobacco. The CO GHD population lived a less independent life.

  • 434.
    Holmes, Michael V.
    et al.
    UCL, England .
    Simon, Tabassome
    Hop St Antoine, France .
    J Exeter, Holly
    UCL, England .
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Guardiola, Montse
    University of Rovira and Virgili, Spain .
    Cooper, Jackie A.
    UCL, England .
    Palmen, Jutta
    UCL, England .
    Hubacek, Jaroslav A.
    Institute Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic .
    Carruthers, Kathryn F.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland .
    Horne, Benjamin D.
    Intermt Medical Centre, UT USA .
    Brunisholz, Kimberly D.
    Intermt Medical Centre, UT USA .
    Mega, Jessica L.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA .
    Van Iperen, Erik P A
    Durrer Centre Cardiogenet Research, Netherlands .
    Li, Mingyao
    University of Penn School Med, PA USA .
    Leusink, Maarten
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden University of Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Verschuren, Jeffrey J W.
    Leiden University of Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Kees Hovingh, G
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands .
    Nelson, Christopher P.
    University of Leicester, England .
    Kotti, Salma
    Hop St Antoine, France .
    Danchin, Nicolas
    University of Ulm, Germany .
    Scholz, Markus
    University of Leipzig, Germany .
    Haase L., Christiane
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark .
    Rothenbacher, Dietrich
    University of Ulm, Germany .
    Swerdlow, Daniel I.
    UCL, England .
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Staines-Urias, Eleonora
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Goel, Anuj
    University of Oxford, England .
    van t Hooft, Ferdinand
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gertow, Karl
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Panayiotou, Andrie G.
    Cyprus Cardiovasc Educ and Research Trust, Cyprus .
    Tremoli, Elena
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Baldassarre, Damiano
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Veglia, Fabrizio
    IRCCS, Italy .
    Holdt, Lesca M.
    University of Leipzig, Germany .
    Beutner, Frank
    University of Leipzig, Germany .
    Gansevoort, Ron T.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Navis, Gerjan J.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Mateo Leach, Irene
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Breitling, Lutz P.
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany .
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany .
    Thiery, Joachim
    University of Leipzig, Germany .
    Dallmeier, Dhayana
    University of Ulm Medical Centre, Germany .
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Boer, Jolanda M A.
    National Institute Public Health and Environm, Netherlands .
    Stephens, Jeffrey W.
    Swansea University, Wales .
    Hofker, Marten H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Tedgui, Alain
    INSERM, France .
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands .
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands .
    Adamkova, Vera
    Institute Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic .
    Pitha, Jan
    Institute Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic .
    Onland-Moret, Charlotte N.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Cramer, Maarten J.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Nathoe, Hendrik M.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Spiering, Wilko
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Klungel, Olaf H.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Kumari, Meena
    UCL, England .
    Whincup, Peter H.
    University of London, England .
    Morrow, David A.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA .
    Braund, Peter S.
    University of Leicester, England .
    Hall, Alistair S.
    University of Leeds, England .
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Stockholm Heart Centre, Sweden .
    Doevendans, Pieter A.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Trip, Mieke D.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Tobin, Martin D.
    University of Leicester, England .
    Hamsten, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Watkins, Hugh
    University of Oxford, England .
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    University of Ulm Medical Centre, Germany .
    Nicolaides, Andrew N.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England .
    Teupser, Daniel
    University of Leipzig, Germany .
    Day, Ian N M
    Hop St Antoine, France .
    F Carlquist, John
    Intermt Medical Centre, UT USA .
    Gaunt, Tom R.
    University of Bristol, England .
    Ford, Ian
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Sattar, Naveed
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Tsimikas, Sotirios
    University of Calif San Diego, CA USA .
    Schwartz, Gregory G.
    VA Medical Centre, CO USA .
    Lawlor, Debbie A.
    University of Bristol, England .
    Morris, Richard W.
    UCL, England .
    Sandhu, Manjinder S.
    VA Medical Centre, CO USA .
    Poledne, Rudolf
    Institute Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic .
    Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Keating, Brendan J.
    Childrens Hospital Philadelphia, PA USA .
    van der Harst, Pim
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Price, Jackie F.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland .
    Mehta, Shamir R.
    McMaster University, Canada .
    Yusuf, Salim
    McMaster University, Canada .
    Witteman, Jaqueline C M
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands .
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands .
    Jukema, Wouter J.
    Durrer Centre Cardiogenet Research, Netherlands .
    de Knijff, Peter
    Leiden University of Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark .
    Rader, Daniel J.
    Penn Heart and Vasc Centre, PA USA .
    Farrall, Martin
    University of Oxford, England .
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    University of Leicester, England .
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, England .
    Fox, Keith A A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland .
    Humphries, Steve E.
    UCL, England .
    Anderson, Jeffrey L.
    Intermt Medical Centre, UT USA .
    Boekholdt, Matthijs S.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Palmer, Tom M.
    University of Warwick, England .
    Eriksson, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Pare, Guillaume
    McMaster University, Canada .
    Hingorani, Aroon D.
    UCL, England .
    Sabatine, Marc S.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA .
    Mallat, Ziad
    INSERM, France .
    Casas, Juan P.
    UCL, England .
    Talmud, Philippa J.
    UCL, England .
    Secretory Phospholipase A(2)-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease2013In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 62, no 21, p. 1966-1976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2))-IIA in cardiovascular disease. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground Higher circulating levels of sPLA(2)-IIA mass or sPLA(2) enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clear if this association is causal. A recent phase III clinical trial of an sPLA(2) inhibitor (varespladib) was stopped prematurely for lack of efficacy. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods We conducted a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis of 19 general population studies (8,021 incident, 7,513 prevalent major vascular events [MVE] in 74,683 individuals) and 10 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cohorts (2,520 recurrent MVE in 18,355 individuals) using rs11573156, a variant in PLA2G2A encoding the sPLA(2)-IIA isoenzyme, as an instrumental variable. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults PLA2G2A rs11573156 C allele associated with lower circulating sPLA(2)-IIA mass (38% to 44%) and sPLA(2) enzyme activity (3% to 23%) per C allele. The odds ratio (OR) for MVE per rs11573156 C allele was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 to 1.06) in general populations and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.90 to 1.03) in ACS cohorts. In the general population studies, the OR derived from the genetic instrumental variable analysis for MVE for a 1-log unit lower sPLA(2)-IIA mass was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.13), and differed from the non-genetic observational estimate (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.79). In the ACS cohorts, both the genetic instrumental variable and observational ORs showed a null association with MVE. Instrumental variable analysis failed to show associations between sPLA2 enzyme activity and MVE. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Reducing sPLA(2)-IIA mass is unlikely to be a useful therapeutic goal for preventing cardiovascular events.

  • 435.
    Holmqvist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kesek, Milos
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Englund, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Lars O.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kenneback, Goran
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Univ Hosp Orebro, Sweden.
    Samo-Ayou, Romeo
    Skaraborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Sigurjonsdottir, Runa
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ringborn, Michael
    Blekinge Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Herczku, Csaba
    Norra Alvsborg Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Carlson, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Univ Hosp Orebro, Sweden.
    Tabrizi, Fariborz
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Niklas
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lonnerholm, Stefan
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Insulander, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    A decade of catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias in Sweden: ablation practices and outcomes2019In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 820-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Catheter ablation is considered the treatment of choice for many tachyarrhythmias, but convincing real-world data on efficacy and safety are lacking. Using Swedish national registry data, the ablation spectrum, procedural characteristics, as well as ablation efficacy and reported adverse events are reported. Methods and Results Consecutive patients (18years of age) undergoing catheter ablation in Sweden between 01 January 2006 and 31 December 2015 were included in the study. Follow-up (repeat ablation and vital status) was collected through 31 December 2016. A total of 26642 patients (5715years, 62% men), undergoing a total of 34428 ablation procedures were included in the study. In total, 4034 accessory pathway/Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (12%), 7358 AV-nodal re-entrant tachycardia (21%), 1813 atrial tachycardia (5.2%), 5481 typical atrial flutter (16%), 11916 atrial fibrillation (AF, 35%), 2415 AV-nodal (7.0%), 581 premature ventricular contraction (PVC, 1.7%), and 964 ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablations (2.8%) were performed. Median follow-up time was 4.7years (interquartile range 2.7-7.0). The spectrum of treated arrhythmias changed over time, with a gradual increase in AF, VT, and PVC ablation (Pamp;lt;0.001). Decreasing procedural times and utilization of fluoroscopy with time, were seen for all arrhythmia types. The rates of repeat ablation differed between ablation types, with the highest repeat ablation seen in AF (41% within 3years). The rate of reported adverse events was low (n=595, 1.7%). Death in the immediate period following ablation was rare (n=116, 0.34%). Conclusion Catheter ablations have shifted towards more complex procedures over the past decade. Fluoroscopy time has markedly decreased and the efficacy of catheter ablation seems to improve for AF.

  • 436.
    Holmström, Alexandra
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sigurjonsdottir, Runa
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Åsa
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Fu, Michael
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Increased comorbidities in heart failure patients ≥ 85 years but declined from > 90 years: Data from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 167, no 6, p. 2747-2752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Epidemiological studies of elderly heart failure (HF) patients (>= 85 years) are limited with inconsistent findings. Our objective is to confirm and extend epidemiological study in elderly (>= 85 years) patients using the Swedish Heart Failure Registry database. Methods: This retrospective study included 8,347 HF patients aged <= 65 years and 15,889 HF patients aged >= 85 years. Elderly population was further divided into two subgroups: 11,412 patients were 85-90 years and 4,477 patients were >90 years. Results: The >= 85 year group was characterized by more women, higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), lower body-mass index (BMI), more than twice as many HF with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (HFNEF), higher incidence of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidities and less use of proven therapeutics compared with the <= 65 year group. Compared with the 85-90 year subgroup, the >90 year subgroup had a decline in cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidities except renal insufficiency and anaemia which continued to increase with ageing (p<0.01). Tendency was the same regardless of gender but slightly different between systolic HF (SHF) and HFNEF. In the group with HFNEF, there were more women, higher SBP, lower N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels, less ischaemic heart disease, more hypertension and left bundle branch block regardless of age. Atrial fibrillation was more frequent in patients with HFNEF than with SHF in the elderly group (p<0.01). Patients with HFNEF in the >90 year subgroup had increasing incidence of ischaemic heart disease compared to 85-90 year group (p<0.01). Conclusions: HF patients >= 85 years had increased cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidities but with a decline from >90 years.

  • 437.
    Homeyer, Andre
    et al.
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Engel, Christiane
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kost, Henning
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Weiss, Nick
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Palmer, Tim
    University of Leeds, England.
    Karl Hahn, Horst
    Fraunhofer MEVIS, Germany.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Leeds, England; Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated quantification of steatosis: agreement with stereological point counting2017In: Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 1746-1596, E-ISSN 1746-1596, Vol. 12, article id 80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Steatosis is routinely assessed histologically in clinical practice and research. Automated image analysis can reduce the effort of quantifying steatosis. Since reproducibility is essential for practical use, we have evaluated different analysis methods in terms of their agreement with stereological point counting (SPC) performed by a hepatologist. Methods: The evaluation was based on a large and representative data set of 970 histological images from human patients with different liver diseases. Three of the evaluated methods were built on previously published approaches. One method incorporated a new approach to improve the robustness to image variability. Results: The new method showed the strongest agreement with the expert. At 20x resolution, it reproduced steatosis area fractions with a mean absolute error of 0.011 for absent or mild steatosis and 0.036 for moderate or severe steatosis. At 10x resolution, it was more accurate than and twice as fast as all other methods at 20x resolution. When compared with SPC performed by two additional human observers, its error was substantially lower than one and only slightly above the other observer. Conclusions: The results suggest that the new method can be a suitable automated replacement for SPC. Before further improvements can be verified, it is necessary to thoroughly assess the variability of SPC between human observers.

  • 438.
    Honek, Jennifer
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Iwamoto, Hideki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Fischer, Carina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Li, Jingrong
    Simcere Pharmaceut Research and Dev, Peoples R China.
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    University of Leicester, England; Glenfield Hospital, England.
    Zang, Jingwu
    Simcere Pharmaceut Research and Dev, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Leicester, England.
    Modulation of age-related insulin sensitivity by VEGF-dependent vascular plasticity in adipose tissues2014In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, no 41, p. 14906-14911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms underlying age-related obesity and insulin resistance are generally unknown. Here, we report age-related adipose vascular changes markedly modulated fat mass, adipocyte functions, blood lipid composition, and insulin sensitivity. Notably, VEGF expression levels in various white adipose tissues (WATs) underwent changes uninterruptedly in different age populations. Anti-VEGF and anti-VEGF receptor 2 treatment in different age populations showed marked variations of vascular regression, with midaged mice exhibiting modest sensitivity. Interestingly, anti-VEGF treatment produced opposing effects on WAT adipocyte sizes in different age populations and affected vascular density and adipocyte sizes in brown adipose tissue. Consistent with changes of vasculatures and adipocyte sizes, anti-VEGF treatment increased insulin sensitivity in young and old mice but had no effects in the midaged group. Surprisingly, anti-VEGF treatment significantly improved insulin sensitivity in midaged obese mice fed a high-fat diet. Our findings demonstrate that adipose vasculatures show differential responses to anti-VEGF treatment in various age populations and have therapeutic implications for treatment of obesity and diabetes with anti-VEGF-based antiangiogenic drugs.

  • 439.
    Hope, Michael D.
    et al.
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Thoracic Aorta Disease: Flow Evaluation by MR2013In: MRI and CT of the Cardiovascular System / [ed] Charles B Higgins; Albert de Roos, Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013, 3, p. -676Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leave no disease undetected with MRI and CT of the Cardiovascular System, your definitive guide to magnetic resonance and computed tomography for cardiovascular health. Authored by a collaboration of international experts, this vivid, four-color third edition imparts the latest technologies in a rapidly advancing field. With topics that range from anatomy, to MR in infants and children, to risk assessment in ischemic heart disease  this text includes seven new chapters to reflect the rising tide of technological discovery as it pertains to cardiology.  Thanks to its expert analysis, procedural guide to implementation, and profound understanding of the recent advances in cardiovascular imagining, MRI and CT of the Cardiovascular System gives you all the tools necessary for powerful screening, diagnosis, and  cardiovascular care. Features:

    --New chapters reflecting  technological discoveries in cardiology  --Color illustrations for heightened clarity --Companion website with fully searchable text --Units organized by pathology and disease detection --Fully updated information on application of MR and CT--Up-to-date analysis of emerging multi-detector CT

  • 440.
    Hope, Michael D.
    et al.
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Sedlic, Tony
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Cardiothoracic Magnetic Resonance Flow Imaging2013In: Journal of thoracic imaging, ISSN 0883-5993, E-ISSN 1536-0237, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 217-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidimensional blood flow imaging with magnetic resonance has rapidly evolved over the last decade. The technique, often referred to as 4-dimensional (4D) flow, can now reliably image the heart and principal vessels of the chest in ≤15 minutes. In addition to dynamic 3D flow visualization, a range of unique quantitative hemodynamic markers can be calculated from 4D flow data. In this review article, we describe some of the more promising of these hemodynamic markers, including pulse wave velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy, wall shear stress, and flow eccentricity. Evaluation of a range of cardiothoracic disorders has been explored with 4D flow, and many applications have been proposed. We also review the potential clinical applications of 4D flow in 4 broad contexts: the aorta, the pulmonary artery, acquired heart disease, and complex congenital heart disease. Promising preliminary results will be highlighted, including the use of abnormal systolic blood flow to risk-stratify patients for progressive valve-related aortic disease, turbulent kinetic energy to directly assess the hemodynamic impact of a stenotic lesion, and altered intracardiac flow to identify early heart failure. We discuss ongoing research efforts in the context of the larger clinical goals of 4D flow: the use of unique hemodynamic markers to (1) identify cardiovascular disease processes early in their course before clinical manifestation so that preemptive treatment can be undertaken; (2) refine the assessment of cardiovascular disease so as to better identify optimal medical or surgical therapies; and (3) enhance the evaluation and monitoring of the hemodynamic impact of different treatment options.

  • 441.
    Hope, Michael D.
    et al.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Sigovan, Monica
    University of Lyon, France.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Letter by Hope et al Regarding Article, "Bicuspid Aortic Cusp Fusion Morphology Alters Aortic Three-Dimensional Outflow Patterns, Wall Shear Stress, and Expression of Aortopathy"2014In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 130, no 19, p. E170-E170Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 442.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Xiaojuan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Feng, Ninghan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Xue, Yuan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Larsson, Ola
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ohhashi, Toshio
    Shinshu University, Japan .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Tumour PDGF-BB expression levels determine dual effects of anti-PDGF drugs on vascular remodelling and metastasis2013In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, no 2129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anti-platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) drugs are routinely used in front-line therapy for the treatment of various cancers, but the molecular mechanism underlying their dose-dependent impact on vascular remodelling remains poorly understood. Here we show that anti-PDGF drugs significantly inhibit tumour growth and metastasis in high PDGF-BB-producing tumours by preventing pericyte loss and vascular permeability, whereas they promote tumour cell dissemination and metastasis in PDGF-BB-low-producing or PDGF-BB-negative tumours by ablating pericytes from tumour vessels. We show that this opposing effect is due to PDGF-beta signalling in pericytes. Persistent exposure of pericytes to PDGF-BB markedly downregulates PDGF-beta and inactivation of the PDGF-beta signalling decreases integrin alpha 1 beta 1 levels, which impairs pericyte adhesion to extracellular matrix components in blood vessels. Our data suggest that tumour PDGF-BB levels may serve as a biomarker for selection of tumour-bearing hosts for anti-PDGF therapy and unsupervised use of anti-PDGF drugs could potentially promote tumour invasion and metastasis.

  • 443.
    Hovland, Anders
    et al.
    Nordland Hospital, Norway; University of Tromso, Norway.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Garred, Peter
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Yndestad, Arne
    National Hospital Norway, Norway; National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Aukrust, Pal
    National Hospital Norway, Norway; National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Lappegard, Knut T.
    Nordland Hospital, Norway; University of Tromso, Norway.
    Espevik, Terje
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Department Cancer Research and Molecular Med, Norway.
    Mollnes, Tom E.
    University of Tromso, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Department Cancer Research and Molecular Med, Norway; Nordland Hospital, Norway; National Hospital Norway, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Tromso, Norway.
    The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis2015In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 241, no 2, p. 480-494Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  • 444.
    Hu, Zhiwei
    et al.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA; Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Brooks, Samira A.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Dormoy, Valerian
    University of Strasbourg, France; University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Hsu, Chia-Wen
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Hsu, Hsue-Yin
    Tzu Chi University, Taiwan.
    Lin, Liang-Tzung
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Massfelder, Thierry
    University of Strasbourg, France.
    Rathmell, W. Kimryn
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Xia, Menghang
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Al-Mulla, Fahd
    Tzu Chi University, Taiwan.
    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah
    Kuwait University, Kuwait.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    University of Firenze, Italy.
    Brown, Dustin G.
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Prudhomme, Kalan R.
    Oregon State University, OR 97331 USA.
    Colacci, Annamaria
    Environm Protect and Health Prevent Agency, Italy.
    Hamid, Roslida A.
    University of Putra Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Mondello, Chiara
    CNR, Italy.
    Raju, Jayadev
    Health Canada, Canada.
    Ryan, Elizabeth P.
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Woodrick, Jordan
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Scovassi, A. Ivana
    CNR, Italy.
    Singh, Neetu
    King Georges Medical University, India.
    Vaccari, Monica
    Environm Protect and Health Prevent Agency, Italy.
    Roy, Rabindra
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Forte, Stefano
    Mediterranean Institute Oncol, Italy.
    Memeo, Lorenzo
    Mediterranean Institute Oncol, Italy.
    Salem, Hosni K.
    Cairo University, Egypt.
    Lowe, Leroy
    Getting Know Canc, Canada.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bisson, William H.
    Oregon State University, OR 97331 USA.
    Kleinstreuer, Nicole
    Integrated Lab Syst Inc, NC 27709 USA.
    Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis2015In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 36, p. S184-S202Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis is an important hallmark of cancer. We reviewed the various pathways controlling angiogenesis, summarized the possible role of specific environmental chemicals disrupting these pathways and listed assays for assessing the effects of low-dose exposures to chemicals in promoting tumor angiogenesis.One of the important hallmarks of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential.

  • 445.
    Hubbert, Laila
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Delshad, Baz
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Left atrial pressure monitoring with an implantable wireless pressure sensor following implantation of a left ventricular assist device2017In: ASAIO journal (1992), ISSN 1058-2916, E-ISSN 1538-943X, Vol. 63, no 5, p. E60-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following implantation of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD), left atrial pressure (LAP) monitoring allows for precise management of intravascular volume, inotropic therapy and pump speed. In this case series of 4 LVAD recipients we report the first clinical use of this wireless pressure sensor for long-term monitoring of LAP during LVAD support. A wireless microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensor, (Titan™, ISS Inc., Ypsilanti, MI, USA) was placed in the left atrium in four patients at the time of LVAD implantation. Titan sensor LAP was measured in all 4 patients on the ICU and in 3 patients at home. Ramped speed tests were performed using LAP and echocardiography in 3 patients. The left ventricular end diastolic diameter (cm), flow (L/min), power consumption (W) and blood pressure (mmHg) were measured at each step.Measurements were performed over 36, 84, 137, and 180 days, respectively. The three discharged patients had equipment at home and were able to perform daily recordings. There were significant correlations between sensor pressure and pump speed, LV and LA size and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, respectively (r= 0.92-0.99, p < 0.05). There was no device failure and there were no adverse consequences of its use.

  • 446.
    Hubbert, Laila
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sundbom, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Loebe, Matthias
    Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Houston, TX, USA.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Acoustic Analysis of a Mechanical Circulatory Support2014In: Artificial Organs, ISSN 0160-564X, E-ISSN 1525-1594, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 593-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanical circulatory support technology is continually improving. However, adverse complications do occur with devastating consequences, for example, pump thrombosis that may develop in several parts of the pump system. The aim of this study was to design an experimental clot/thrombosis model to register and analyze acoustic signals from the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) and detect changes in sound signals correlating to clots in the inflow, outflow, and pump housing. Using modern telecom techniques, it was possible to register and analyze the HMII pump-specific acoustic fingerprint in an experimental model of LVAD support using a mock loop. Increase in pump speed significantly (P less than 0.005) changed the acoustic fingerprint at certain frequency (0-23 000 Hz) intervals (regions: R1-3 and peaks: P1,3-4). When the ball valves connected to the tubing were narrowed sequentially by similar to 50% of the inner diameter (to mimic clot in the out-and inflow tubing), the frequency spectrum changed significantly (P less than 0.005) in P1 and P2 and R1 when the outflow tubing was narrowed. This change was not seen to the same extent when the lumen of the ball valve connected to the inflow tube was narrowed by similar to 50%. More significant (P less than 0.005) acoustic changes were detected in P1 and P2 and R1 and R3, with the largest dB figs. in the lower frequency ranges in R1 and P2, when artificial clots and blood clots passed through the pump system. At higher frequencies, a significant change in dB figs. in R3 and P4 was detected when clots passed through the pump system. Acoustic monitoring of pump sounds may become a valuable tool in LVAD surveillance.

  • 447.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Implications of myocardial dysfunction before and after aortic valve intervention2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Postoperative heart failure in the setting of aortic valve surgery results in poor long-term survival. We hypothesized that there could be a myocardial factor that is not addressed by risk scores currently available. We speculated that this myocardial factor could be diastolic dysfunction. By evaluating postoperative heart failure, the EuroSCORE, the NT-proBNP level, and diastolic function, we might achieve a deeper understanding of the outcome for individuals with postoperative heart failure.

    METHODS

    This research project was built upon four cohort studies. The first two studies (I and II) were retrospective in nature, and studies III and IV were prospective, observational, and longitudinal. All work was based on data from clinical and national databases. In Study I, we compared the outcome of patients with or without postoperative heart failure, evaluated according to the preoperative risk score. In Study II, we explored the effect of underlying heart disease on the preoperative level of NT-proBNP and the relationships between NT-proBNP and severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality. In Study III, we described the dynamics

    of NT-proBNP, from a preoperative evaluation to a six-month follow-up, in patients that underwent one of two different procedures: a surgical aortic valve replacement and a transcatheter implantation. We related both pre- and postprocedural NT-proBNP levels to one-year mortality. In Study IV, we evaluated diastolic function in patients that underwent surgical aortic valve replacement and its influence on outcome. We also evaluated NT-proBNP levels and postoperative heart failure as predictors of long-term mortality.

    RESULTS

    Study I

    This study included 397 patients that underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacements. Of these, 45 patients (11%) were treated for postoperative heart failure. With an average follow-up of 8.1 years (range 5.2-11.2), among patients at low risk (EuroSCORE≤7), the crude five-year survival rates were 58% in patients with postoperative heart failure and 89% in those without postoperative heart failure (p<0.001). Among patients with postoperative heart failure, those classified as low risk had the same poor long-term prognosis as those classified as high risk (EuroSCORE>7). In the high risk group, survival rates were similar between patients with or without postoperative heart failure (57% vs. 64%; p=0.60).

    Study II

    This study included a cohort of 2978 patients with coronary artery disease, aortic stenosis, and mitral regurgitation. Preoperative NTproBNP levels were found to be 1.7-fold higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in patients with coronary artery disease and 1.4-fold higher in patients with mitral regurgitation than in patients with coronary disease. The power of preoperative NT-proBNP for predicting severe postoperative heart conditions was good among patients with coronary heart disease and patients with mitral regurgitation, but not as good among patients with aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP also showed good discriminating power for short-term mortality among patients with coronary artery disease. Moreover, NT-proBNP was found to be an independent predictor for both severe postoperative heart failure and short-term mortality in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Study III

    This study included 462 patients that underwent preoperative evaluations for aortic valve disease. Aortic valve interventions elicited a rise in NT-proBNP that was more pronounced in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement compared to patients undergoing transcatheter valve implantation. No deterioration in NT-proBNP was observed during the waiting time before the intervention, despite a median duration of four months. At six months after the intervention, NT-proBNP levels had decreased to or below the preoperative levels in all groups. Among patients that received surgical aortic valve replacements, pre-and early postoperative NT-proBNP levels showed good discriminatory power for oneyear mortality. This discriminatory power was not observed among patients that had undergone a transcatheter procedure; those patients had higher levels of both pre- and postoperative NT-proBNP compared to patients that had undergone surgery.

    Study IV

    We evaluated 273 patients that underwent aortic valve surgery. High left ventricular filling pressure was present in 22% (n=54) of patients at the time of surgery. At six months after surgery, diastolic function deteriorated in 24/193 (12%) patients and improved in 27/54 (50%) patients. Diastolic dysfunction was not found to be associated with long-term mortality. However, both postoperative heart failure and preoperative NTproBNP levels were associated with increases in long-term mortality. In a multivariable Cox analysis, NT-proBNP remained predictive of long-term mortality.

    CONCLUSION

    Postoperative heart failure contributed to long-term mortality, even in patients considered to be at low risk preoperatively. Our results suggested that pressure overload, followed by a volume overload led to a NTproBNP response that was more pronounced than the ischemia response. Elevated levels of NT-proBNP were associated with both short- and long-term mortality. In these studies, we could not corroborate the notion that high left ventricular filling pressure was associated with long-term mortality.

    List of papers
    1. The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The combined impact of postoperative heart failure and euroScore on long-term outcome after surgery for aortic stenosis
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 633-638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY:

    Although the EuroSCORE was developed for predicting operative mortality after cardiac surgery, it has also been shown to predict long-term mortality. It has been reported that postoperative heart failure (PHF) in association with surgery, albeit comparatively benign in the short term, has a profound impact on five-year survival after surgery for aortic stenosis (AS). The study aim was to determine the combined impact of EuroSCORE and PHF on long-term survival after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AS.

    METHODS:

    A total of 397 patients (48% females; average age 70 +/- 10 years) who underwent AVR for AS at the authors' institution between 1995 and 2000 was studied. The cohort was subdivided according to the additive EuroSCORE into a high-risk group (EuroSCORE >7) and a low-risk group (EuroSCORE < or = 7), and further analyzed in relation to PHF.

    RESULTS:

    The average follow up was 8.1 years (range: 5.2-11.2 years). Forty-five patients (11%) were treated for procedure-associated PHF. Patients with or without PHF and a high-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 57% and 64%, respectively (p = 0.6), whereas those with or without PHF but with a low-risk EuroSCORE had crude five-year survivals of 58% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.0003).

    CONCLUSION:

    Both PHF and a high EuroSCORE were associated with poor long-term survival. The role of PHF per se for the long-term prognosis was illustrated by the fact that the negative impact on long-term survival was almost as profound in patients of the low-risk group as of the high-risk group.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73431 (URN)000306675200005 ()22655493 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-03 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of underlying heart disease per se on the utility of preoperative NT-proBNP in adult cardiac surgery
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The primary aim was to investigate the role of underlying heart disease on preoperative NT-proBNP levels in patients admitted for adult cardiac surgery, after adjusting for the known confounders age, gender, obesity and renal function. The second aim was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative NT-proBNP with regard to severe postoperative heart failure (SPHF) and postoperative mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort study based on preoperative NT-proBNP measurements in an unselected cohort including all patients undergoing first time surgery for coronary artery disease (CAD; n = 2226), aortic stenosis (AS; n = 406) or mitral regurgitation (MR; n = 346) from April 2010 to August 2016 in the southeast region of Sweden (n = 2978). Concomitant procedures were not included, with the exception of Maze or tricuspid valve procedures. Results Preoperative NT-proBNP was 1.67 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) and 1.41 times (pamp;lt;0.0001) higher in patients with AS or MR respectively, than in patients with CAD after adjusting for confounders. NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to SPHF in CAD (AUC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.73 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001), MR (AUC = 0.80, 95% CI 0.72 +/- 0.87, pamp;lt;0.0001) and AS (AUC = 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 +/- 0.81, p = 0.047). In CAD patients NT-proBNP demonstrated significant discrimination with regard to postoperative 30-day or in-hospital mortality (AUC = 0.78; 95% CI 0.71 +/- 0.85, pamp;lt;0.0001). The number of deaths was too few in the AS and MR group to permit analysis. Elevated NT-proBNP emerged as an independent risk factor for SPHF, and postoperative mortality in CAD. Conclusions Patients with AS or MR have higher preoperative NT-proBNP than CAD patients even after adjusting for confounders. The predictive value of NT-proBNP with regard to SPHF was confirmed in CAD and MR patients but was less convincing in AS patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145771 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0192503 (DOI)000424517900085 ()29420603 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland [LIO-443891]

    Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2019-10-29
    3. Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.
    2018 (English)In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the dynamics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from preoperative evaluation to 6-month follow-up in patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, and to evaluate NT-proBNP with regard to 1-year mortality.

    Methods: At preoperative evaluation, we prospectively included 462 patients accepted for aortic valve intervention. The median time to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR; n=336) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI; n=126) was 4 months. NT-proBNP was measured at enrolment for preoperative evaluation, on the day of surgery, postoperatively on day 1, day 3 and at the 6-month follow-up. Subgroups of patients undergoing SAVR with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis with and without coronary artery bypass were also analysed.

    Results: NT-proBNP remained stable in all subgroups during the preoperative waiting period, but displayed a substantial transient early postoperative increase with a peak on day 3 except in the TAVI group, which peaked on day 1. At the 6-month follow-up, NT-proBNP had decreased to or below the preoperative level in all groups. In the SAVR group, NT-proBNP preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 and 3 revealed significant discriminatory power with regard to 1-year mortality (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79, P=0.0001; AUC=0.71, P=0.03; and AUC=0.79, P=0.002, respectively). This was not found in the TAVI group, which had higher levels of NT-proBNP both preoperatively and at the 6-month follow-up compared with the SAVR group.

    Conclusions: The dynamic profile of NT-proBNP differed between patients undergoing TAVI and SAVR. NT-proBNP in the perioperative course was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality in SAVR but not in TAVI.

    Keywords
    aortic valve disease, heart failure, surgery-valve
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149013 (URN)10.1136/openhrt-2017-000739 (DOI)29632678 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2019-05-13
  • 448.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Holm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rise and fall of NT-proBNP in aortic valve intervention.2018In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the dynamics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from preoperative evaluation to 6-month follow-up in patients undergoing aortic valve intervention, and to evaluate NT-proBNP with regard to 1-year mortality.

    Methods: At preoperative evaluation, we prospectively included 462 patients accepted for aortic valve intervention. The median time to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR; n=336) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI; n=126) was 4 months. NT-proBNP was measured at enrolment for preoperative evaluation, on the day of surgery, postoperatively on day 1, day 3 and at the 6-month follow-up. Subgroups of patients undergoing SAVR with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis with and without coronary artery bypass were also analysed.

    Results: NT-proBNP remained stable in all subgroups during the preoperative waiting period, but displayed a substantial transient early postoperative increase with a peak on day 3 except in the TAVI group, which peaked on day 1. At the 6-month follow-up, NT-proBNP had decreased to or below the preoperative level in all groups. In the SAVR group, NT-proBNP preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 and 3 revealed significant discriminatory power with regard to 1-year mortality (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79, P=0.0001; AUC=0.71, P=0.03; and AUC=0.79, P=0.002, respectively). This was not found in the TAVI group, which had higher levels of NT-proBNP both preoperatively and at the 6-month follow-up compared with the SAVR group.

    Conclusions: The dynamic profile of NT-proBNP differed between patients undergoing TAVI and SAVR. NT-proBNP in the perioperative course was associated with increased risk of 1-year mortality in SAVR but not in TAVI.

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