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  • 401.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, USA.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Håkansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Monitoring of epitaxial graphene anodization2017In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 238, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anodization of a graphene monolayer on silicon carbide was monitored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Structural and functional changes of the material were observed by Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry. A 21 fold increase of the specific capacitance of graphene was observed during the anodization. An electrochemical kinetic study of the Fe(CN)(6)(3) (/4) redox couple showed a slow irreversible redox process at the pristine graphene, but after anodization the reaction rate increased by several orders of magnitude. On the other hand, the Ru(NH3) (3+/2+)(6) redox couple proved to be insensitive to the activation process. The results of the electron transfer kinetics correlate well with capacitance measurements. The Raman mapping results suggest that the increased specific capacitance of the anodized sample is likely due to a substantial increase of electron doping, induced by defect formation, in the monolayer upon anodization. The doping concentration increased from less than 1 x 10(13) of the pristine graphene to 4-8 x 10(13) of the anodized graphene. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 402.
    Wallin Herlöfsson, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Improvement and evaluation of the Integrated Biosensor Platform2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With a rising demand for low cost solutions to healthcare services, analysis, and toxicology, the Integrated Biosensor Platform developed by Acreo Swedish ICT and Linköping University, fills the gap where conventional sensors are not suitable. This report focuses the update of hardware and software in order to increase stability, introduce new sensors, and allow for wireless communication through NFC. Positive result and increased stability is presented, when measuring with a stable reference potential. The potential of NFC is shown in a breadboard setup and problems when printing an antenna is elaborated in terms of coil turns and size. An ethanol sensor is introduced to the platform and discussion manly focuses on characterization of the sensor. A potentiometric setup is also tested with low results and the problems of the current platform as a potentiometric sensor is discussed. From the collective results and a broader look at society is the justification of the platform existence evaluated. The need for the platform, especially as a mean to solve health problems in development countries, is argued to justify the environmental footprint of a disposable platform.

  • 403.
    Wang, Shenqi
    et al.
    Cranfield University.
    Ye, F
    NTU.
    Lang, X
    NTU.
    Fei, D
    De Monfort University.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ge, Yi
    Cranfield University.
    Detection of [Ca2+]i Changes in Sub-plasma Membrane Microdomains in a Single Living Cell by an Optical Fiber-based Nanobiosensor2014In: Austin Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology, ISSN 2381-8956, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 1022-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n optical fiber-based nanobiosensor, for advanced detection of [Ca2+]i (i.e. intracellular Ca2+ concentration) changes in sub–plasma membrane microdomains in a single living smooth muscle cell and a single living cardiomyocyte, was successfully prepared by coating silver and then immobilizing Calcium Green–1 Dextran, a calcium ion sensitive dye, on the distal end of the nanoprobe. The constructed nanobiosensor was capable of detecting ultra–low and local intracellular calcium ion concentration within the nanomolar range, which is around the physiological level of free cytosolic calcium ion in a single living cell. The response time was less than milliseconds enabling the detection of transient elementary calcium ion signaling events associated with calcium ion microdomains. The effects of stimulants such as high potassium buffer solution and norepinephrine solution were also investigated. The resulting system could thus greatly facilitate the development of an advanced nano–diagnostic platform for in vivo and real–time sensing/diagnosing of [Ca2+]i at the single cell level.

  • 404.
    Wannapob, Rodhichoti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functional Microparticles – “LEGO” for Printable Bioelectronics2017In: 26th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors (Biosensors), Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 27, p. 3-3Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 405.
    Wannapob, Rodtichoti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sichuan Agriculture University, Peoples R China.
    Thavarungkul, Panote
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Kanatharana, Proespichaya
    Prince Songkla University, Thailand.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Printable Heterostructured Bioelectronic Interfaces with Enhanced Electrode Reaction Kinetics by Intermicroparticle Network2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 38, p. 33368-33376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Printable organic bioelectronics provide a fast and cost-effective approach for the fabrication of novel biodevices, while the general challenge is to achieve optimized reaction kinetics at multiphase boundaries between biomolecules and electrodes. Here, we present an entirely new concept based on a modular approach for the construction of heterostructured bioelectronic interfaces by using tailored functional "biological microparticles" combined with "transducer micro particles" as modular building blocks. This approach offers high versatility for the design and fabrication of bioelectrodes with a variety of forms of interparticle spatial organization, from layered structures to more advance bulk heterostructured architectures. The heterostructured biocatalytic electrodes delivered twice the reaction rate and a six-fold increase in the effective diffusion kinetics in response to a catalytic model using glucose as the substrate, together with the advantage of shortened diffusion paths for reactants between multiple interparticle junctions and large active particle surface. The consequent benefits of this improved performance combined with the simple means of mass production are of major significance for the emerging printed electronics industry.

  • 406.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Advanced photometric nanolabels for biosensorsand bioassays2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 407.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Layer-by-Layer (LbL) thin film: From conventional to advanced biomedical and bioanalytical applications2012In: Biomedical Materials and Diagnostic Devices / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Murugan Ramalingam, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Anthony P. F. Turner, John Wiley & Sons ; Scrivener Pub., , 2012, p. 101-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "The functional materials with the most promising outlook have the ability to precisely adjust the biological phenomenon in a controlled mode. Engineering of advanced bio- materials has found striking applications in used for biomedical and diagnostic device applications, such as cell separation, stem-cell, drug delivery, hyperthermia, automated DNA extraction, gene targeting, resonance imaging, biosensors, tissue engineering and organ regeneration"--Provided by publisher. 

  • 408.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Smart capsules for biosensing: Capsule designand fabrication2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 409.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Wearable contact lens biosensors withnanoengineered biorecognition layers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 410.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Wearable contact lens biosensors withnanoengineered biorecognition layers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 411.
    Xiong, Kunli
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Emilsson, Gustav
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlin, Andreas
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Polymer Gates in Nanochannels2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 412.
    Xiong, Kunli
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Emilsson, Gustav
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Yang, Xinxin
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Shao, Lei
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlin, Andreas B.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Plasmonic Metasurfaces with Conjugated Polymers for Flexible Electronic Paper in Color2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 45, p. 9956-9960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A flexible electronic paper in full color is realized by plasmonic metasurfaces with conjugated polymers. An ultrathin large-area electrochromic material is presented which provides high polarization-independent reflection, strong contrast, fast response time, and long-term stability. This technology opens up for new electronic readers and posters with ultralow power consumption.

  • 413.
    Yadav, Raghvendra S.
    et al.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Singh, Ravindra P.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pandey, Avinash C.
    Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India.
    Smart Nanomaterials for Space and Energy Applications2012In: Intelligent Nanomaterials: processes, properties, and applications / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Ajay Kumar Mishra, Hisatoshi Kobayashi, Anthony P. F. Turner, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, p. 213-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last three decades have seen extraordinary advances in the generation of new materials based on both fundamental elements and composites, driven by advances in synthetic chemistry and often drawing inspiration from nature. The concept of an intelligent material envisions additional functionality built into the molecular structure, such that a desirable response occurs under defined conditions.

    Divided into 4 parts: Inorganic Materials; Organic Materials; Composite Materials; and Biomaterials, the 22 chapters cover the latest research and developments in the processing, properties, and applications of intelligent nanomaterials. Included are molecular device materials, biomimetic materials, hybrid-type functionalized polymers-composite materials, information-and energy-transfer materials, as well as environmentally friendly materials.

  • 414.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vasiliauskas, Remigijus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Progress in 3C-SiC growth and novel applications2012In: Materials Science Forum Vol 711, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2012, Vol. 711, p. 3-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research efforts in growth of 3C-SiC are reviewed. Sublimation growth is addressed with an emphasis on the enhanced understanding of polytype stability in relation to growth conditions, such as supersaturation and Si/C ratio. It is shown that at low temperature/supersaturation spiral 6H-SiC growth is favored, which prepares the surface for 3C-SiC nucleation. Provided the supersaturation is high enough, 3C-SiC nucleates as two-dimensional islands on terraces of the homoepitaxial 6H-SiC. Effect of different substrate surface preparations is considered. Typical extended defects and their electrical activity is discussed. Finally, possible novel applications are outlined.

  • 415.
    Yarman, Aysu
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Germany and Potsdam University, Germany.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scheller, Frieder
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Germany and Potsdam University, Germany.
    Electropolymers for(nano-) imprinted biomimetic sensors2014In: Nanosensors for chemical and biological applications: sensing with nanotubes, nanowires and nanoparticles / [ed] Kevin C Honeychurch, Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 125-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Part one reviews the range electrochemical nanosensors, including the use of carbon nanotubes, glucose nanosensors, chemiresistor sensors using metal oxides and nanoparticles. Part two discusses spectrographic nanosensors such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensors

  • 416.
    Yarman, Aysu
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT, Potsdam, Germany.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scheller, Frieder
    Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT, Potsdam, Germany.
    Synergy between Enzymes and MIPs2013In: Nano-scaled arrangements of proteins, aptamers, and other nucleic acid structures – and their potential applications, COST Thematic Workshop, Leipzig: Helmholtz Zentrum für Umweltforschung , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 417.
    Zaidon, Nuradawiyah
    et al.
    Int Islamic University of Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Nurashikin Nordin, Anis
    Int Islamic University of Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Faris Ismail, Ahmad
    Int Islamic University of Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Serpentine Microfluidic Structures for Concentration Gradient Generators2016In: Symposium on Design, Test, Integration and Packaging of MEMS/MOEMS (DTIP), 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents microfluidic concentration gradient generator having tree-like structures with implementation of laminar flow concept and small-scale mixing through diffusion inside its microchannel. The microchannels aim for constant flow rate at each outlet and is achieved by optimizing the channel lengths. The generation of concentration gradients is achieved at the outlet by simply tuning the flow rate and geometries of the microfluidics network. Variations in channel dimension and geometry demonstrates possible combinations of the microfluidics network is simulated using circuit simulator, PSpice and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis software, Fluent 14.5. Next, PDMS-based microfluidic chips are fabricated by using soft lithography technique. The simulation and experimental results showed that the prominent mixing behaviour can be obtained inside the serpentine channels with constant flow rate at each outlet.

  • 418.
    Zairov, Rustem
    et al.
    Russian Academic Science, Russia; Kazan Volga Regional Federal University, Russia.
    Mustafina, Asiya
    Russian Academic Science, Russia; Kazan Volga Regional Federal University, Russia.
    Shamsutdinova, Nataliya
    Russian Academic Science, Russia; Kazan Volga Regional Federal University, Russia.
    Nizameev, Irek
    Russian Academic Science, Russia; Kazan National Research Technology University, Russia.
    Moreira, Beatriz
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sudakova, Svetlana
    Russian Academic Science, Russia.
    Podyachev, Sergey
    Russian Academic Science, Russia.
    Fattakhova, Alfia
    Kazan Volga Regional Federal University, Russia.
    Safina, Gulnara
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gubaidullin, Aidar
    Russian Academic Science, Russia.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    High performance magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles assembled from terbium and gadolinium 1,3-diketones2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 40486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyelectrolyte-coated nanoparticles consisting of terbium and gadolinium complexes with calix[ 4] arene tetra-diketone ligand were first synthesized. The antenna effect of the ligand on Tb(III) green luminescence and the presence of water molecules in the coordination sphere of Gd(III) bring strong luminescent and magnetic performance to the core-shell nanoparticles. The size and the core-shell morphology of the colloids were studied using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The correlation between photophysical and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and their core composition was highlighted. The core composition was optimized for the longitudinal relaxivity to be greater than that of the commercial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents together with high level of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. The tuning of both magnetic and luminescent output of nanoparticles is obtained via the simple variation of lanthanide chelates concentrations in the initial synthetic solution. The exposure of the pheochromocytoma 12 (PC 12) tumor cells and periphery human blood lymphocytes to nanoparticles results in negligible effect on cell viability, decreased platelet aggregation and bright coloring, indicating the nanoparticles as promising candidates for dual magneto-fluorescent bioimaging.

  • 419.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinh, Xuan thang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

  • 420.
    Zhang, Juankun
    et al.
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Wu, Yan
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Binbin
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Li, Min
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Jia, Shiru
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Jiang, Shuhai
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Hao
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Yi
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Chaozheng
    Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    LABEL-FREE ELECTROCHEMICAL DETECTION OF TETRACYCLINE BY AN APTAMER NANO-BIOSENSOR2012In: Analytical Letters, ISSN 0003-2719, E-ISSN 1532-236X, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 986-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel aptamer nano-porous silicon (PS) biosensor was investigated for the rapid determination of tetracyclines. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the behavior of the sensor. The specific binding of tetracycline to the aptamer biosensor led to a decrease in impedance. The corresponding impedance spectra (Nyquist plots) were obtained when serial concentrations of tetracycline were added into the system. An equivalent electrical circuit was used to fit the impedance data. The linear range of the sensor was 2.1-62.4 nM.

  • 421.
    Zhong, Yong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundemo, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Development of dry state on-chip microactuators based on polypyrrole2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a microfabrication process to fabricate on-chip microactuators that can operate outside of a liquid electrolyte. The on-chip microactuators were fabricated using standard photolithographic techniques and wet etching, combined with special design processing to micropattern polypyrrole. By immobilizing a UV-patternable gel containing a liquid electrolyte on top of the electroactive polypyrrole layer, actuation in air is achieved. The result shows the possibility to fabricate complex microsystems such as microrobotics and micromanipulators based on these dry state on-chip microactuators.

  • 422.
    Zhong, Yong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundemo, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabrication of polypyrrole based dry state on-chip microactuators2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a microfabrication process to fabricate on-chip microactuators that can work in open air. The on-chip microactuators were fabricated using standard photolithographic techniques and wet etching, combined with special design processing to micropattern polypyrrole. By patterning a UV-polymerizable gel containing a liquid electrolyte on top of the electroactive polypyrrole layer, actuation in air is achieved. The resulting microactuators were able to move, although with reduced movement which we contribute to poor ionic conductivity. Further optimization of the processing is currently on-going. The result shows the possibility to fabricate complex microsystems such as microrobotics and micromanipulators based on these dry state on-chip microactuators.

  • 423.
    Zhybak, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dempsey, Eithne
    Centre for Research in Electroanalytical Technologies, Department of Science, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vagin, Mikhail Y
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Korpan, Yaroslav
    Laboratory of Biomolecular Electronics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Copper/Nafion/PANI Nanocomposite as an electrochemical transducer for creatinine and urea enzymatic biosensing2014In: 24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 2014, Elsevier, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic Kidney diseases (CKD) affect, to different degrees, ca. 25 million Americans and 19 million Europeans. Monitoring of creatinine and urea levels is of great importance for a correct evaluation of the status of patients and for their treatment. In this paper, we present the development of creatinine and urea enzymatic biosensors, based on a novel ammonium ion-specific Copper/Nafion/Polyanyline (PANI) nanocomposite electrode (Fig. 1A), and suitable for PoC and decentralised diagnostic applications. . Studies on the nanocomposite electrode revealed its high sensitivity and specificity towards ammonium, in respect to amino acids, creatinine and urea, with response range between 5 and 75 μM (Fig. 1B) and with a detection limit of 1 μM. To demonstrate its suitability as transducer in biosensors, creatinine and urea biosensors were fabricated by immobilising creatinine deiminase or urease, respectively, on the nanocomposite surface. Optimisation of the enzyme immobilisation demonstrated that the incorporation of lactitol markedly improved the stability of the biosensors. The response range of the creatinine biosensor was 2 to 100 μM, which fits well with the normal levels of creatinine in healthy people (30-150 µM).

    The urea biosensor had a response range of 5 to 100 µM. A limit of quantification of 1 µM was achieved for both the biosensors.

    Evaluation of the performance of the biosensors in real sample matrices and cross reactivity studies are currently on-going. We envisage that the proposed design will be particularly compatible with fully-printed systems thus offering a viable route to the mass production of inexpensive sensors for mobile health.

     

     

  • 424.
    Zhybak, Mikael T
    et al.
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Fayura, L.Y.
    Institute of Cell Biology, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Boretsky, Yu R
    Institute of Cell Biology, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Dempsey, Eithne
    Centre for Research in Electroanalytical Technologies, Ireland.
    Gonchar, M.V.
    Institute of Cell Biology, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Sibirny, A.A.
    Institute of Cell Biology, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Korpan, Yaroslav
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NAS of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Novel L-arginine amperometric assay based on recombinant arginine deiminase and Nafion/PANi composite2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 425.
    Zhybak, M.T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Laboratory of Biomolecular Electronics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dempsey, Eithne
    Centre for Research in Electroanalytical Technologies, Department of Science, ITT Dublin, Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Korpan, Y
    Laboratory of Biomolecular Electronics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine,Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Creatinine and urea biosensors based on a novel ammonium ion-selective copper-polyaniline nano-composite2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 77, p. 505-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of a novel ammonium ion-specific copper-polyaniline nano-composite as transducer for hydrolase-based biosensors is proposed. In this work, a combination of creatinine deaminase and urease has been chosen as a model system to demonstrate the construction of urea and creatinine biosensors to illustrate the principle. Immobilisation of enzymes was shown to be a crucial step in the development of the biosensors; the use of glycerol and lactitol as stabilisers resulted in a significant improvement, especially in the case of the creatinine, of the operational stability of the biosensors (from few hours to at least 3 days). The developed biosensors exhibited high selectivity towards creatinine and urea. The sensitivity was found to be 85±3.4 mA M−1 cm−2 for the creatinine biosensor and 112±3.36 mA M−1 cm−2 for the urea biosensor, with apparent Michaelis–Menten constants (KM,app), obtained from the creatinine and urea calibration curves, of 0.163 mM for creatinine deaminase and 0.139 mM for urease, respectively. The biosensors responded linearly over the concentration range 1–125 µM, with a limit of detection of 0.5 µM and a response time of 15 s.

    The performance of the biosensors in a real sample matrix, serum, was evaluated and a good correlation with standard spectrophotometric clinical laboratory techniques was found.

  • 426.
    Zhybak, Mykhailo T.
    et al.
    National Academic Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Fayura, Lyubov Y.
    NAS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Boretsky, Yuriy R.
    Lviv State University of Phys Culture, Ukraine.
    Gonchar, Mykhailo V.
    NAS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Sibirny, Andriy A.
    NAS Ukraine, Ukraine; Rzeszow University, Poland.
    Dempsey, Eithne
    ITT Dublin, Ireland.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Korpan, Yaroslav I.
    National Academic Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Amperometric L-arginine biosensor based on a novel recombinant arginine deiminase2017In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 184, no 8, p. 2679-2686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors describe an amperometric biosensor for the amino acid L-arginine (L-Arg). It is based on the use of a Nafion/Polyaniline (PANi) composite on a platinum screen-printed electrode (Pt-SPE) using a novel recombinant arginine deiminase isolated from Mycoplasma hominis. The protein was over-expressed, purified and employed as a biorecognition element of the sensor. Enzymatic hydrolysis of L-Arg leads to the formation of ammonium ions which diffuse into the Nafion/PANi layer and induce the electroreduction of PANi at a potential of -0.35 V (vs Ag/AgCl). L-Arg sensitivity is 684 +/- 32 A.M-1.m(-2), and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant K-M(app)) is 0.31 +/- 0.05 mM. The calibration plot is linear over the range 3-200 mu M L-Arg, the limit of detection is 1 mu M, and the response time (for 90% of the total signal change to occur) is 15 s. The sensor is selective and exhibits good storage stability (amp;gt; 1 month without loss in signal). The biosensor was applied to the analysis of L-Arg in pharmaceutical samples and of ammonium and L-Arg in spiked human plasma obtained from blood of healthy volunteers and those with a hepatic disorder. Data generated were found to be in good agreement with a reference fluorometric enzymatic assay.

  • 427.
    Zhybak, Mykhailo T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, 03680, Ukraine .
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    ACREO Swedish ICT, -601 74, Norrköping, SE, Sweden .
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dempsey, Eithne
    Centre for Research in Electroanalytical Technologies, Department of Science, Institute of Technology Tallaght, Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland .
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Korpan, Yaroslav I.
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, 03680, Ukraine .
    Direct detection of ammonium ion by means of oxygen electrocatalysis at a copper-polyaniline composite on a screen-printed electrode.2016In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 183, no 6, p. 1981-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel electrocatalytic material for oxygen reduction, based on polyaniline in combinationwith copper, was developed and utilised for the direct voltammetric quantification of ammonium ions. Consecutive electrode modification by electrodeposited copper, a Nafion membrane and electropolymerised polyaniline resulted in an electrocatalytic composite material which the retained conductivity at neutral pH. Ammonia complex formation with Cu (I) caused the appearance of oxygen electrocatalysis, which was observed as an increase in cathodic current. This Faradaic phenomenon offered the advantage of direct voltammetric detection and was utilised for ammonium electroanalysis. The developed quantification protocol was applied for ammonium assay in human serum and compared with the routine approach for clinical analysis.

  • 428.
    Özgür, Erdogan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Bioinspired design of a polymer-based biohybrid sensor interface2017In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 251, p. 674-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key step in the construction of efficient and selective analytical separations or sensors is the design of the recognition interface. Biomimicry of the recognition features typically found in biological molecules, using amino acids, peptides and nucleic acids, provides plausible opportunities to integrate biological molecules or their active sites into a synthetic polymeric backbone. Given the basic role of functional amino acids in biorecognition, we focused on the synthesis of polymerizable amino acid derivatives and their incorporation into a polymer-based biohybrid interface to construct generic bioinspired analytical tools. We also utilized polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a sacrificial polymer to adjust the porosity of these biohybrid interfaces. The surface morphologies of the interfaces on gold electrodes were characterized by using scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopies. The electrochemical behavior of the polymeric films was systematically investigated using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) to demonstrate the high affinity of the biohybrid interfaces for Cu(II) ions. The presence of macropores also significantly improved the recognition performance of the interfaces while enhancing interactions between the target [Cu(II) ions] and the functional groups. As a final step, we showed the applicability of the proposed analytical platform to create a Cu(II) ion-mediated supramolecular self-assembly on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) electrode surface in real time. (C) 2017 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.

  • 429.
    Özgür, Erdogan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey.
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Porous functional nanofilms for designing bioinspired sensor surfaces2015In: Proceeding of Advanced Materials World Congress / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, Linköping, Sweden: VBRI Press , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-mimicking of recognition features typical of biological molecules such as aminoacids, peptides, nucleic acid etc. is leading to the design and development of novel functional (artificial) materials for chemical/biochemical sensing applications. The insertion of biological molecules or their active sites into the backbone of synthetic polymers is one of the possible ways to achieve this. Herein, we synthesised a polymerisable derivative of an amino acid (L-histidine) through a set of reactions with 1-(1Hbenzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)-2-methylprop-2-en-1-one (MA-Bt), since amino acid residues are the origin for the functional properties and highly selective substrate-binding ability of many extended biological structures. We obtained a functional monomer methacryloylamidohistidine (MAH), which was polymerised with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate in presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) on a gold surface. The aim of using PVA was to obtain highly porous polymeric structure. For control purpose, polymers without MAH and PVA were also synthesised. The morphology of the polymeric film on gold surface was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained polymer showed significant affinity for Cu2+. The electrochemical behaviour of the polymeric films was systematically investigated with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The presence of pores was shown to significantly improve the recognition performance of the film.

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