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  • 51.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    New measures of masked text recognition in relation to speech-in-noise perception and their associations with age and cognitive abilities2012In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 194-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aimed to increase the analogy between text reception threshold (TRT) and speech reception threshold (SRT) and to examine the TRT's value in estimating cognitive abilities important for speech comprehension in noise.

    Method: We administered five TRT versions, SRT tests in stationary (SRTSTAT) and modulated (SRTMOD) noise, and two cognitive tests: a reading span (RSpan) test for working memory capacity, and a letter-digit-substitution test for information processing speed. Fifty-five normal hearing adults (18–78 years, mean = 44) participated. We examined mutual associations of the tests and their predictive value for the SRTs with correlation and linear regression analyses.

    Results: SRTs and TRTs were well associated, also when controlling for age. Correlations for the SRTSTAT were generally lower than for the SRTMOD. The cognitive tests were only correlated to the SRTs when age was not controlled for. Age and the TRTs were the only significant predictors of SRTMOD. SRTSTATwas predicted by level of education and some of the TRT versions.

    Conclusions: TRTs and SRTs are robustly associated, nearly independent of age. The association between SRTs and RSpan is largely age-dependent. The TRT test and the RSpan test measure different non-auditory components of linguistic processing relevant for speech perception in noise.

  • 52.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Recognition of masked text and speech in noise in association with age and cognitive abilities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Test Reception Threshold test revisited - strengthening associations with SRT and working memory2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold as a Measure for the Non-Auditory Components of Speech Understanding in Noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold (TRT) as a measure of the non-auditory component of speech comprehension in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Beukes, E. W.
    et al.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka, India.
    Valien, T. E.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Baguley, D. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Ropewalk House, The Ropewalk, Nottingham, UK; Otology and Hearing Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Allen, P. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross-sectional survey2018In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to gain insights related to positive experiences reported by adults with tinnitus living in the United Kingdom.

    Design

    A cross‐sectional survey design was used in a sample of adults with tinnitus who were interested in undertaking an Internet‐based intervention for tinnitus.

    Setting

    The study was UK wide and data collection was online.

    Participants

    Participants consisted of 240 adults (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years and average tinnitus duration of 11.52 years (SD: 11.88).

    Main outcome measures

    Tinnitus severity was measured by means of the Tinnitus Functional Index. To evaluate the secondary effects of tinnitus, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults‐Screening Version and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaires were administered. Positive experiences related to tinnitus were explored using an open‐ended question format.

    Results

    Around a third of participants (32.5%) reported positive experiences associated with tinnitus. The number of positive responses ranged from one to eight responses per participant, although there were fewer participants with more than one positive response. The predominant themes concerned for (i) coping; (ii) personal development; (iii) support, and to a lesser extent (iv) outlook. Younger participants, those with a lower hearing disability and those with fewer cognitive failures were more likely to report positive experiences associated with having tinnitus.

    Conclusions

    This study has identified that personal development and a positive outlook are possible despite experiencing tinnitus. Ways to facilitate positive experiences related to tinnitus should be promoted, as these may reduce the negative consequences associated with tinnitus. The most prevalent positive theme was the ability to cope with tinnitus. Positive experiences were also drawn from having clinical and other support networks. This highlights the importance of providing tinnitus interventions that can assist people in coping with tinnitus, particularly to those less likely to relate tinnitus to any positive experiences. Those most likely to be helped include those who are older with greater cognitive difficulties and a greater hearing disability.

  • 57.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; University of Nottingham, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus: Outcome of a Single-Group Open Trial2017In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 340-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managing chronic tinnitus is challenging, and innovative ways to address the resulting health-care burden are required. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for tinnitus shows promise as a cost-effective treatment option. The feasibility and effectiveness of iCBT in the United Kingdom are yet to be explored. Furthermore, it is not known if iCBT can be supported by an audiologist rather than a psychologist. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the feasibility of guided iCBT using audiological support on tinnitus distress and tinnitus-related comorbidities. Furthermore, it aimed to establish the feasibility of iCBT for tinnitus distress in the United Kingdom, by determining recruitment, attrition, and compliance rates. Finally, it aimed to identify which aspects of the protocol require refinement for subsequent clinical trials. Research Design: A single-group open trial design was implemented. This study would serve as a prerequisite study, to identify barriers, before undertaking effectiveness trials. Study Sample: Participants consisted of 37 adults (18 males, 19 females), with an age range of between 50 and 59 yr. The mean preintervention tinnitus severity rating was 56.15 (standard deviation = 18.35), which is categorized as "severe tinnitus" as measured by the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Five participants withdrew during the study, and 29 of the remaining participants completed the postintervention questionnaire. Intervention: The guided iCBT intervention ran over an eight-week period and consisted of 16 obligatory modules and five optional modules. The intervention was designed to be interactive, interesting, and stimulating. A key element was the provision of support from an audiologist throughout the program. Data Collection and Analysis: Online questionnaires were used throughout the study. These were administered at baseline and postintervention to determine attrition and compliance rates and to facilitate sample size estimates for further clinical trials. Outcome measures for tinnitus severity, hearing handicap, insomnia, cognitive functioning, hyperacusis, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction were used to investigate the effects of iCBT with audiological support. In addition, a weekly questionnaire was incorporated to monitor change in tinnitus distress while undertaking the intervention. Results: Feasibility was established using an audiologist to support this guided iCBT intervention, as a significant change postintervention was found for tinnitus severity, as measured by the TFI and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Screening version. The attrition rate was 22% and compliance was variable. Although these results were based on a small sample, they provide encouraging evidence for the feasibility of delivering iCBT treatment for tinnitus symptoms with audiology support in the United Kingdom. Conclusions: An Internet-based intervention of tinnitus appears to be feasible in the United Kingdom when using audiological support. Randomized controlled trials to further investigate the effectiveness of iCBT for tinnitus in the United Kingdom are required.

  • 58.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Audiologist-Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adults With Tinnitus in the United Kingdom: A Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Specialist tinnitus services are in high demand as a result of the negative effect tinnitus may have on quality of life. Additional clinically and cost-effective tinnitus management routes are needed. One potential route is providing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for tinnitus via the Internet (iCBT). This study aimed to determine the efficacy of guided iCBT, using audiological support, on tinnitus distress and tinnitus-related comorbidities, in the United Kingdom. A further aim was to establish the stability of intervention effects 2-months postintervention. The hypothesis was that iCBT for tinnitus would be more effective at reducing tinnitus distress than weekly monitoring. Design: A randomized, delayed intervention efficacy trial, with a 2-month follow-up was implemented to evaluate the efficacy of iCBT in the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 73) or weekly monitoring control group (n = 73) after being stratified for tinnitus severity and age. After the experimental group completed the 8-week long iCBT intervention, the control group undertook the same intervention. Intervention effects were, therefore, evaluated in two independent groups at two time points. The primary outcome was a change in tinnitus distress between the groups as assessed by the Tinnitus Functional Index. Secondary assessment measures were included for insomnia, anxiety, depression, hearing disability, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and satisfaction with life. These were completed at baseline, postintervention, and at a 2-month postintervention follow-up. Results: After undertaking the iCBT intervention, the experimental group had a greater reduction in tinnitus distress when compared with the control group. This reduction was statistically significant (Cohens d = 0.7) and was clinically significant for 51% of the experimental group and 5% of the control group. This reduction was evident 4 weeks after commencing the iCBT intervention. Furthermore, the experimental group had a greater reduction in insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and a greater improvement in quality of life, as evidenced by the significant differences in these assessment measures postintervention. Results were maintained 2 months postintervention. Conclusions: Guided (using audiological support) iCBT for tinnitus resulted in statistically significant reductions in tinnitus distress and comorbidities (insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures) and a significant increase in quality of life. These effects remained stable at 2-months postintervention. Further trials to determine the longer term efficacy of ICBT to investigate predictors of outcome and to compare iCBT with standard clinical care in the United Kingdom are required.

  • 59.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Nottingham Biomed Research Centre, England; University of Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Guided Internet-based versus face-to-face clinical care in the management of tinnitus: study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial2017In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Innovative strategies are required to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus interventions. A guided Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for tinnitus was therefore developed for a U.K. population. Initial clinical trials indicated efficacy of iCBT at reducing tinnitus severity and associated comorbidities such as insomnia and depression. The aim of this phase III randomised controlled trial is to compare this new iCBT intervention with an established intervention, namely face-to-face clinical care for tinnitus. Methods/design: This will be a multi-centre study undertaken across three hospitals in the East of England. The design is a randomised, two-arm, parallel-group, non-inferiority trial with a 2-month follow-up. The experimental group will receive the guided iCBT intervention, whereas the active control group will receive the usual face-to-face clinical care. An independent researcher will randomly assign participants, using a computer-generated randomisation schedule, after stratification for tinnitus severity. There will be 46 participants in each group. The primary assessment measure will be the Tinnitus Functional Index. Data analysis will establish whether non-inferiority is achieved using a pre-defined non-inferiority margin. Discussion: This protocol outlines phase III of a clinical trial comparing a new iCBT with established face-to-face care for tinnitus. If guided iCBT for tinnitus proves to be as effective as the usual tinnitus care, it may be a viable additional management route for individuals with tinnitus. This could increase access to evidence-based effective tinnitus care and reduce the pressures on existing health care systems.

  • 60.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Cambridge University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the UK: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 9, p. e008241-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Tinnitus is one of the most distressing hearing-related symptoms. Innovative ways of managing tinnitus distress and the related healthcare burden of treating tinnitus are required. An internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention has been developed in Sweden to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus treatments. This study aims to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of iCBT in reducing the impact associated with tinnitus, in the UK. It, furthermore, aims to establish whether there are subgroups of tinnitus sufferers for whom this iCBT intervention may be more suitable. Methods and analysis: A two-armed randomised control trial-with a 1-year follow-up design-will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of iCBT on tinnitus distress. A delayed treatment design using a weekly check-in control group will be used. 70 participants will be randomly assigned to each group by an independent researcher by using a computer-generated randomisation schedule, and after being prestratified for age and tinnitus severity. They will undergo the iCBT e-health intervention online together with audiological therapeutic support. The main outcome measure is the Tinnitus Functional Index. Process evaluation of the intervention will also be conducted. Data analysis will be in accordance with Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been granted. If this intervention proves effective, it may be possible that at least some tinnitus sufferers can be managed though an iCBT e-learning treatment programme. This would be cost effective and potentially will free up services for those with more severe problems that need face-to-face treatment.

  • 61.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Terlizzi, Paige M.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Situationally influenced tinnitus coping strategies: a mixed methods approach2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 24, p. 2884-2894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to identify coping strategies used to manage problematic tinnitus situations. A secondary aim was to determine whether different approaches were related to the level of tinnitus distress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia experienced. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was implemented. The study sample was adults interested in undertaking an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus. Self-reported measures assessed the level of tinnitus distress, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. An open-ended question was used to obtain information about how problematic tinnitus situations were dealt with. Responses were investigated using qualitative content analysis to identify problematic situations. Further data analysis comprised of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results: There were 240 participants (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years (SD: 22.70). Qualitative content analysis identified eight problematic tinnitus situations. Participants had either habituated to their tinnitus (7.9%), used active (63.3%), or passive (28.8%) coping styles to manage these situations. Those who had habituated to tinnitus or used active coping strategies had lower levels of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions: The main problematic tinnitus situations for this cohort were identified. Both active and passive coping styles were applied to approach these situations. The coping strategies used most frequently and utilised in the widest range of problematic situations were using sound enrichment and diverting attention.

  • 62.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Process evaluation of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the context of a randomised control trial2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The research objective was to identify processes that could either facilitate or hinder clinical implementation of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus in the UK. This was done by exploring the research context, the intervention components and the factors that contributed to the outcomes obtained. Design: This study investigated eight processes including the recruitment strategies, reach, research context, treatment dose delivered and received, implementation fidelity, barriers to implementation and effectiveness of the intervention. Study sample: Of the 169 registered participants, 146 were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups (23 were excluded). The mean age was 55.57 years with an average tinnitus duration of 11.63 years. Results: The intended sample of people with distressing tinnitus who were underserved with evidence-based tinnitus interventions was reached. The full guided intervention was delivered. The recommended modules were read more than the optional modules. Intervention components such as the easily readable format and the benefits of the applied relaxation programme facilitated significant positive post-intervention outcomes. Barriers hampering the intervention application included time pressures and low self-motivation. Conclusions: Results of this process evaluation together with the outcome data can be used to facilitate translating this research into clinical practice.

  • 63.
    Beukes, Eldré W.
    et al.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom.
    Vlaescu, George
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom Audiology Department, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Development and technical functionality of an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus in the UK2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 6, p. 6-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Creative approaches to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus treatments are required. The purpose of this study was to develop an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention, for those experiencing tinnitus in the United Kingdom (UK). Furthermore, it aimed, through technical functionality testing, to identify specific aspects of the iCBT that require improving.

    Method

    An innovative iCBT intervention for treating tinnitus in the UK has been developed using a cognitive-behavioural theoretical framework. This iCBT was evaluated by two user groups during this developmental phase. Initially, five expert reviews evaluated the intervention, prior to evaluation by a group of 29 adults experiencing significant levels of tinnitus distress. Both groups evaluated iCBT in an independent measures design, using a specifically designed satisfaction outcome measure.

    Results

    Overall, similar ratings were given by the expert reviewers and adults with tinnitus, showing a high level of satisfaction regarding the content, suitability, presentation, usability and exercises provided in the intervention. The iCBT intervention has been refined following technical functionality testing.

    Conclusions

    Rigorous testing of the developed iCBT intervention has been undertaken. These evaluations provide confidence that further clinical trials can commence in the UK, to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of this iCBT intervention for tinnitus.

  • 64.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Quality of life and acquired organ damage are intimately related to activity limitations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune multi-organ disease, characterized by episodes of disease flares and remissions over time, which may restrain affected patients ability to perform daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to characterize variation in activity limitations among well-defined SLE patients, and to describe disease phenotypes, acquired organ damage and their relations to activity limitation and self-reported health, respectively. Methods: The disease phenotypes were organized into 4 different clinical groups and logistic regression analyses were used to identify how an elevated health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score was related to disease variables such as phenotypes, disease activity and damage accrual. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between each group of variables - background variables, disease variables and self-reported measurements - and the degree of elevated HAQ. Results: We found a higher proportion of activity limitation in patients with skin and joint involvement compared to others. The presence of activity limitation, as detected by the HAQ instrument, was significantly associated with quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and accrual of organ damage using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/ACR damage index. Conclusions: The findings highlight the differing requirements of the multi-professional rehabilitation interventions for the various SLE phenotypes in order to optimize the clinical care of the patients.

  • 65.
    Blomberg, Rina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Soderlund, Goran B. W.
    Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Speech Processing Difficulties in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large body of research that forms the ease of language understanding (ELU) model emphasizes the important contribution of cognitive processes when listening to speech in adverse conditions; however, speech-in-noise (SIN) processing is yet to be thoroughly tested in populations with cognitive deficits. The purpose of the current study was to contribute to the field in this regard by assessing SIN performance in a sample of adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comparing results with age-matched controls. This population was chosen because core symptoms of ADHD include developmental deficits in cognitive control and working memory capacity and because these top-down processes are thought to reach maturity during adolescence in individuals with typical development. The study utilized natural language sentence materials under experimental conditions that manipulated the dependency on cognitive mechanisms in varying degrees. In addition, participants were tested on cognitive capacity measures of complex working memory-span, selective attention, and lexical access. Primary findings were in support of the ELU-model. Age was shown to significantly covary with SIN performance, and after controlling for age, ADHD participants demonstrated greater difficulty than controls with the experimental manipulations. In addition, overall SIN performance was strongly predicted by individual differences in cognitive capacity. Taken together, the results highlight the general disadvantage persons with deficient cognitive capacity have when attending to speech in typically noisy listening environments. Furthermore, the consistently poorer performance observed in the ADHD group suggests that auditory processing tasks designed to tax attention and working memory capacity may prove to be beneficial clinical instruments when diagnosing ADHD.

  • 66.
    Boenitz, Hanna
    et al.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Kopp, Bruno
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Buechner, Andreas
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany; Cluster Excellence Hearing4all, Germany.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Finke, Mareike
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany; Cluster Excellence Hearing4all, Germany.
    Event-related neuronal responses to acoustic novelty in single-sided deaf cochlear implant users: Initial findings2018In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A cochlear implant (CI) is an auditory prosthesis restoring profound hearing loss. However, CItransmitted sounds are degraded compared to normal acoustic hearing. We investigated cortical responses related to CI-degraded against acoustic listening. Methods: Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from eight single-sided deaf CI users who performed a three-stimulus oddball task, separatelywith their normal hearing ear and CI ear. The oddball tones were occasionally intermitted by novel sounds. ERP responses were compared between electric and acoustic listening for the auditory (N1) and auditory-cognitive (Novelty P3, Target-P3) ERP components. Results: CI-degraded listening was associated with attenuated sensory processing (N1) and with attenuated early cortical responses to acoustic novelty whereas the late cortical responses to acoustic novelty and the target-P3 did not differ between NH and CI ears. Conclusion: The present study replicates the CI-attenuation of Novelty-P3 amplitudes in a within-subject comparison. Further, we show that the CI-attenuation of Novelty-P3 amplitudes extends to early cortical responses to acoustic novelty, but not to late novelty responses. Significance: The dissociation into CI-attenuated P3 early Novelty-P3 amplitudes and CI-unaffected late Novelty-P3 amplitudes represents a cortical fingerprint of CI-degraded listening. It further contributes to general claims of distinct auditory Novelty-P3 sub-components. (C) 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 67.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M.
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Dowell, Richard C.
    University of Melbourne.
    Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To identify whether speech recognition outcomes are influenced by the choice of ear for cochlear implantation in adults with bilateral hearing loss who use a hearing aid in 1 ear but have long-term auditory deprivation in the other. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Retrospective matched cohort study. Speech recognition results were examined in 30 adults with monaural sound deprivation. Fifteen received the implant in the sound-deprived ear and 15 in the aided ear. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Tertiary referral centers with active cochlear implant programs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Adults with bilateral hearing loss and a minimum of 15 years of monaural sound deprivation who received a cochlear implant after meeting the traditional implantation criteria of the referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Cochlear implantation with devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure(s): Paired comparisons of postoperative monosyllabic word recognition scores obtained with the implant alone and in the usual listening condition (CI alone or bimodal). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: With the cochlear implant alone, individuals who received the implant in a sound-deprived ear obtained poorer scores than individuals who received the implant in the aided ear. There was no significant difference, however, in speech recognition results for the 2 groups when tested in their usual listening condition. In particular, poorer speech recognition scores were obtained with the cochlear implant alone by individuals using bimodal hearing. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Similar clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation can be achieved by adults with a long-term monaural sound deprivation when comparing the usual listening condition, irrespective of whether the implant is in the sound-deprived or in the aided ear.

  • 68.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia; HEARing Cooperat Research Centre, Australia; SCIC Cochlear Implant Program, Australia.
    McMahon, Catherine M.
    Macquarie University, Australia; HEARing Cooperat Research Centre, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard C.
    HEARing Cooperat Research Centre, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia; Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Long-Term Asymmetric Hearing Affects Cochlear Implantation Outcomes Differently in Adults with Pre- and Postlingual Hearing Loss2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0129167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with post-lingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears.

  • 69.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Catherine M
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Monaural sound deprivation; opening a window on central processes underlying cochlear implantation outcomes2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When considering unilateral cochlear implantation, clinicians must decide which ear should be implanted. This decision process is made more complex in the case of long-term monaural sound-deprivation where a hearing aid is used in the non-deprived ear. Clinical recommendations are not uniform where some clinicians suggest implanting the sound-deprived ear, regardless of the length of deprivation, to preserve the remaining hearing of the non-deprived ear. Others recommend implanting the non-deprived ear, arguing that implanting a recently stimulated ear provides higher outcomes with the implant. The literature discussing implanting the “better” or “worse” ear is inconclusive and none have specifically compared outcomes of implantation in ears with long-term monaural sound-deprivation.The current study draws its findings from cochlear implant centres located in 3 countries. Comparative analyses of cochlear implantation outcomes obtained in adults with monaural sound-deprivation of durations ranging from 15 to 65 years and implanted in the non-deprived (n≈90) or sound-deprived ear (n≈100) have been conducted. The results show that similar functional outcomes can be achieved by both groups when comparing the everyday listening condition (cochlear implant alone or bimodal hearing [i.e. cochlear implant in one ear and hearing aid in the other]). Moreover, higher outcomes were obtained after cochlear implantation by individuals with a long-term monaural sound-deprivation compared to individuals with a long-term bilateral sound-deprivation (n≈15), irrespective of which ear was implanted. These results pave the way to a discussion about central processes underlying cochlear implantation outcomes.

  • 70.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cochlear implantation in parients with long-term monaural sound-deprivation: Does the choice of ear matter?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptation Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How the non-implanted ear influences outcomes of cochlear implantation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Contribution of the non-implanted ear to Cochlear implantation Outcomes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relationship between "duration of deafness" and functional outcomes of cochlear implantation in individuals with long-term unilateral sound deprivation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The limits of speech recognition tests when evaluating cochlear implant candidacies2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Multicenter Study of Cochlear Implantation Outcomes in Individuals with a Long Term Unilateral Sound Deprivation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76. Borch Petersen, E
    et al.
    Wöstmann, M
    Obleser, J
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Compensated hearing loss predicts generation of auditory evoked potentials.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study provides descriptive statistics of the Danish reading span (RS) test for hearing-impaired adults. The combined effect of hearing loss, RS score, and age on speech-in-noise performance in different spatial settings was evaluated in a subset of participants. Design: Data from published and unpublished studies were re-analysed. Data regarding speech-in-noise performance with co-located or spatially separated sound sources were available for a subset of participants. Study sample: RS scores from 283 hearing-impaired participants were extracted from past studies, and 239 of these participants had completed a speech-in-noise test. Results: RS scores (mean = 41.91%, standard deviation = 11.29%) were related to age (p <0.01), but not pure-tone average (PTA) (p = 0.29). Speech-in-noise performance for co-located sound sources was related to PTA and RS score (both p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.226). Performance for spatially separated sounds was related to PTA (p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.10) but not RS score (p = 0.484). We found no differences between the standardized coefficients of the two regression models. Conclusions: The distribution of RS scores indicated a high test difficulty. We found that age should be controlled when RS scores are compared across populations. The experimental setup of the speech-in-noise test may influence the relationship between performance and RS score.

  • 78.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Normative Reading Span Data from 283 Hearing Aid Users and the Relationship to Performance in Speech-in-Noise Test2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Borch-Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Obleser, Jonas
    Frauenhaufer Institute.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measuring cognitive load during listening: Changes in the EEG with noise level2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80. Borg, E
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Neovius, L
    Orebro Med Ctr Hosp, Ahlsen Res Inst, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Hitech Dev AB Aldermansvagen, S-17148 Solna, Sweden.
    Vibratory-coded directional analysis: Evaluation of a three-microphone/four-vibrator DSP system2001In: Journal of rehabilitation research and development, ISSN 0748-7711, E-ISSN 1938-1352, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 257-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sound localization aid based on eyeglasses with three microphones and four vibrators was tested in a sound-treated acoustic test room and in an ordinary office. A digital signal-processing algorithm provided a determination of the source angle, which was transformed into eight vibrator codes each corresponding to a 45 degrees sector. The instrument was tested on nine deaf and three deaf-blind individuals. The results show an average hit rate of about 80% in a sound-treated room with 100% for the front 135 degrees sector. The results in a realistic communication situation in an ordinary office room were 70% correct based on single presentations and 95% correct when more realistic criteria for an adequate reaction were used. Ten of the twelve subjects were interested in participating in field tests using a planned miniaturized version.

  • 81.
    Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Universitetssjukhuset Örebro.
    Risberg, Arne
    Talöverföring och musikakustik, Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Gullaksen, AnnChristine
    Malmö högskola.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hörselvårdens vetenskapliga grund: Språngbräda mot framtiden2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Bostrom, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Natterlund, Birgitta Sjöquist
    Örebro University .
    Ahlstrom, Gerd
    Örebro University.
    Sickness impact in people with muscular dystrophy: a longitudinal study over 10 years2005In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 686-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe changes of function in terms of sickness impact over 10 years in adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. Design: Patients with muscular dystrophy answered the Sickness Impact Profile and Self-report ADL questionnaires in 1991 and 2001. Setting: The study population was identified in a comprehensive prevalence study in the county of Orebro, Sweden. Subjects: The study group comprised 44 people grouped according to whether they had myotonic dystrophy or muscular dystrophy with proximal or distal muscles affected. Main measures: Comparison was made between assessments of sickness impact in terms of function at the two time points. Results: Most obvious deterioration over time was in activities of daily living that require finger and arm strength. Ambulation was significantly decreased in myotonic dystrophy and proximal muscular dystrophy. Those walking without assistive devices decreased from 91% to 52%, and the number with a disability pension increased from 36 to 55%. There was a relatively small influence with regard to psychosocial dysfunction assessed by the Sickness Impact Profile. Conclusions: This longitudinal study shows the deteriorating functions reported by patients with muscular dystrophy. This knowledge could be used to formulate new interventions in order to offer appropriate support and treatment to this patient group.

  • 83. Bremin, Sofia
    et al.
    Hu, Hongzhan
    Karlsson, Johanna
    Prytz Lillkull, Anna
    Wester, Martin
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stymne, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Methods for human evaluation of machine translation2010In: Proceedings of the Swedish Language Technology Conference (SLTC2010), 2010, p. 47-48Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Brännström, Jonas K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dept of clinical science, Section of Logopedics, Phoiatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

  • 85.
    Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Clinical Sciences Lund, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Health behaviour change in hearing healthcare: A discussion paper2012In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health behavior change (HBC) refers to facilitating changes to habits and/or behavior related to health. In healthcare practice, it is quite common that the interactions between practitioner and patient involve conversations related to HBC. This could be mainly in relation to the practitioner trying to directly persuade the patients to make some changes in their health behavior. However, the patients may not be motivated to do so as they do not see this change as important. For this reason, direct persuasion may result in a breakdown of communication. In such instances, alternative approaches and means of indirect persuasion, such as empowering the patient and their family members, could be helpful. Furthermore, there are several models and/or theories proposed which explain the health behavior and also provide a structured framework for health behavior change. Many such models/approaches have been proven effective in facilitating HBC and health promotion in areas such as cessation of smoking, weight loss and so on. This paper provides an overview of main models/theories related to HBC and some insights into how these models/approaches could be adapted to facilitate behavior change in hearing healthcare, mainly in relation to: i) hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake; and ii) hearing conservation in relation to music-induced hearing loss (MIHL). In addition, elements of current research related to this area and future directions are highlighted.

  • 87.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stages of change in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aidsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate health behaviour change characteristics based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale.

    Design: The study employed a cross-sectional design.

    Study Sample: The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 pre-clinical participants completed URICA as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance and also provided some demographic details online.

    Results: As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. This was in contrast to a previous study, which included participants attending audiology clinic, where most participants (about 80%) were in the action stage (Laplante-Lévesque et al., 2013). In addition, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of readiness to change composite and committed action composite between the study samples in the current and the previous study.

    Conclusions: Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 88.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Staphens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Models to represent communication partners within the social networks of people with hearing impairment2011In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: People with hearing impairment have relatively smaller social networks than their normally hearing peers, and may experience more feelings of loneliness. The effects on the person with hearing impairment (PHI) can also impact on their communication partners (CPs). This report discusses the currently available model representing the CPs within the social network context of the PHI and proposes a new model. Study design: The ‘Communication Rings’ proposed and developed by the Ida Institute is discussed. We believe that this model is too simple to represent the complexity and dynamic nature of the CP's role in the life of the PHI and highlights the need for a new model. Results: We suggest that the model ‘Communication World’ based on the analogy of the solar system, may help overcome some of the problems identified. Clinical examples of how to apply this model and its usefulness in rehabilitation are presented. Conclusions: The expanded model could provide novel information, and provision of a visual representation will help CPs understand the problems of the PHI.

  • 89.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    The Patient journey: Living with acquired hearing impairment2011In: Journal of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, Vol. 44, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Zhao, Fei
    Bristol University, UK.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    The role of communication partners in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of a person with hearing impairment: An overview2012In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Hearing impairment is known to have various effects upon both the person with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, CPs are reported to play an important role in making the decision to seek a consultation and the acceptance of intervention by the PHI. The overall aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI keeping clinical practice in focus. Method: A literature review was conducted using a number of resources including electronic databases, books and websites. Results: An overview of the literature was presented in the following sections: 1) Factors influencing the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI; 2) Effect of the PHI's hearing impairment on their CPs; 3) CPs’ influence on their PHI's audiological enablement/rehabilitation; 4) Positive experiences reported by CPs of the PHI; 5) Models to represent CPs within the social network context of the PHI; and 6) CP involvement in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation. This paper also identifies gaps in the literature and provides recommendations for further research. Conclusion: It is clear that involvement of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation can result in mutual advantages for both the PHI and their CPs.

  • 91.
    Campbell, Ruth
    et al.
    University College London.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive Hearing Science: The view from hearing impairment and deafness.: Editorial in Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, vol 50, issue 5, pp 367-3692009In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 367-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 92. Cardin, V
    et al.
    Lynnes, R
    Orfanidou, E
    Capek, C
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Woll, B
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Heschl's gyrus responses to visual language in deaf individuals are driven by auditory deprivation, and not by language modality2014In: Society for the Neurobiology of Language, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London.
    Orfanidou, E
    University College London, University of Crete.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Capek, C
    University of Manchester.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, B
    University College London.
    Dissociating linguistic and sensory neural plasticity in human superior temporal cortex2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of brain function in deaf individuals provides a unique opportunity not only to understand language independently of speech and hearing, but also to dissociate plastic changes related to adaptive sensory mechanisms from those associated with cognitive processes.In congenitally deaf individuals, sign language[1] and simple visual stimuli[2] reliably elicit activation in the superior temporal cortex (STC), a region usually associated with the processing of auditory input, including speech. However, it is not clear if this plasticity is driven by perceptual or cognitive mechanisms, and disentangling these effects is fundamental for establishing the relationship between the function of cortical regions, and the type of plastic changes that this functional specialisation allows.Here, we show that plastic effects in the STC have a sensory origin, whereas differential activations due to sign language experience are specific to the processing of linguistic stimuli. We dissociated between these two components by characterising the fMRI BOLD response to sign language stimuli in individuals deaf from infancy who were either early and proficient users of a sign language or had no knowledge of a sign language. There was no difference in the level of activation across groups in the right STC, indicating that plasticity in this region is mainly due to sensory deprivation. In contrast, further activations were observed in the group of signers in the left ventral STC, underpinning the role of this region in processing language. None of these activations were observed in a control group of hearing non-signers.These results show that linguistic and sensory factors cause plasticity in anatomically and functionally distinguishable substrates. Furthermore, they demonstrate that functionally distinct cortical areas preserve their perceptual and cognitive roles, but adapt their processing to deal with input from a different modality.1. Nishimura, H. et al. Sign language ‘heard’ in the auditory cortex. Nature 397, 116 (1999).2. Finney, E. M., Fine, I. & Dobkins, K.R. Visual stimuli activate auditory cortex in the deaf. Nature Neurosci 4, 1171-1173 (2001).

  • 94.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M.
    University of Manchester.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Non-signs compared to signs from an unknown sign language differentially engage the parietal cortex of deaf native signers2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M.
    University of Manchester.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signs that violate phonological rules differentitally activate parietal areas in deaf native signers2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M
    University of Manchester.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of different sublexical components of sign language2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Crete.
    Kästner, Lena
    Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institute of Philosophy.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Bencie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Capek, Cheryl
    University of Manchester,.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Monitoring Different Phonological Parameters of Sign Language Engages the Same Cortical Language Network but Distinctive Perceptual Ones2016In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of signed languages allows the dissociation of sensorimotor and cognitive neural components of the language signal. Here we investigated the neurocognitive processes underlying the monitoring of two phonological parameters of sign languages: handshape and location. Our goal was to determine if brain regions processing sensorimotor characteristics of different phonological parameters of sign languages were also involved in phonological processing, with their activity being modulated by the linguistic content of manual actions. We conducted an fMRI experiment using manual actions varying in phonological structure and semantics: (1) signs of a familiar sign language (British Sign Language), (2) signs of an unfamiliar sign language (Swedish Sign Language), and (3) invented nonsigns that violate the phonological rules of British Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language or consist of nonoccurring combinations of phonological parameters. Three groups of participants were tested: deaf native signers, deaf nonsigners, and hearing nonsigners. Results show that the linguistic processing of different phonological parameters of sign language is independent of the sensorimotor characteristics of the language signal. Handshape and location were processed by different perceptual and task-related brain networks but recruited the same language areas. The semantic content of the stimuli did not influence this process, but phonological structure did, with nonsigns being associated with longer RTs and stronger activations in an action observation network in all participants and in the supramarginal gyrus exclusively in deaf signers. These results suggest higher processing demands for stimuli that contravene the phonological rules of a signed language, independently of previous knowledge of signed languages. We suggest that the phonological characteristics of a language may arise as a consequence of more efficient neural processing for its perception and production.

  • 98.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University College London, UK and University of Crete, Greece.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, UK.
    Dissociating cognitive and sensory neural plasticity in human superior temporal cortex2013In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disentangling the effects of sensory and cognitive factors on neural reorganization is fundamental for establishing the relationship between plasticity and functional specialization. Auditory deprivation in humans provides a unique insight into this problem, because the origin of the anatomical and functional changes observed in deaf individuals is not only sensory, but also cognitive, owing to the implementation of visual communication strategies such as sign language and speechreading. Here, we describe a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of individuals with different auditory deprivation and sign language experience. We find that sensory and cognitive experience cause plasticity in anatomically and functionally distinguishable substrates. This suggests that after plastic reorganization, cortical regions adapt to process a different type of input signal, but preserve the nature of the computation they perform, both at a sensory and cognitive level.

  • 99.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    De Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working memory and crossmodal plasticity in congenitally deaf individuals2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. UCL, England; Univ East Anglia, England.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    De Oliveira, Rita F.
    London South Bank Univ, England.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Su, Merina T.
    UCL GOS Inst Child Hlth, England.
    Beese, Lilli
    UCL, England.
    Woll, Bencie
    UCL, England.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The Organization of Working Memory Networks is Shaped by Early Sensory Experience2018In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 3540-3554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early deafness results in crossmodal reorganization of the superior temporal cortex (STC). Here, we investigated the effect of deafness on cognitive processing. Specifically, we studied the reorganization, due to deafness and sign language (SL) knowledge, of linguistic and nonlinguistic visual working memory (WM). We conducted an fMRI experiment in groups that differed in their hearing status and SL knowledge: deaf native signers, and hearing native signers, hearing nonsigners. Participants performed a 2-back WM task and a control task. Stimuli were signs from British Sign Language (BSL) or moving nonsense objects in the form of point-light displays. We found characteristic WM activations in fronto-parietal regions in all groups. However, deaf participants also recruited bilateral posterior STC during the WM task, independently of the linguistic content of the stimuli, and showed less activation in fronto-parietal regions. Resting-state connectivity analysis showed increased connectivity between frontal regions and STC in deaf compared to hearing individuals. WM for signs did not elicit differential activations, suggesting that SL WM does not rely on modality-specific linguistic processing. These findings suggest that WM networks are reorganized due to early deafness, and that the organization of cognitive networks is shaped by the nature of the sensory inputs available during development.

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