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  • 51.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenology of excorporation, bodily alienation and resistance: rethinking sexed and racialized embodiment2013In: Hypatia, ISSN 0887-5367, E-ISSN 1527-2001, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 69-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how some culturally shared and corporeally enacted beliefs and norms about sexed and racialized embodiment can form embodied agency, and this with the aid of the concepts of incorporation and excorporation. It discusses how the phenomenological concept of excorporation can help us examine painful experiences of how one's lived body breaks in the encounter with others. The article also examines how a continuous excorporation can result in bodily alienation, and what embodied resistance can mean when one has undergone or undergoes excorporation. Elaborating on the work of, among others, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Martin Heidegger, Drew Leder, and Sarah Ahmed, I discuss incorporation and excorporation of beliefs and norms regarding sexual difference, such as beliefs and norms regarding female and male embodiment, through a reading of Jeffrey Eugenides' novel Middlesex. I also suggest that it is useful to understand the postcolonial scholar Frantz Fanon's narrative of how he could not but attend to his own skin color while living in France in the 1940s and 1950s, in terms of excorporation. Whereas these are different narratives in many ways, I regard them as helpful for clarifying what excorporation implies and what analytic work this concept can enable.

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  • 52.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A philosophical defense of the idea that we can hold each other in personhood: intercorporeal personhood in dementia care2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since John Locke, regnant conceptions of personhood in Western philosophy have focused onindividual capabilities for complex forms of consciousness that involve cognition such as thecapability to remember past events and one’s own past actions, to think about and identify oneself asoneself, and/or to reason. Conceptions of personhood such as this one qualify as cognition-oriented,and they often fail to acknowledge the role of embodiment for personhood. This article offers analternative conception of personhood from within the tradition of phenomenology of the body. Thearticle presents a phenomenological analysis of joint musical activity in dementia care and outlines anintercorporeal conception of personhood based on this analysis. It also provides a philosophical basisfor the idea that others can hold us in personhood and it questions a strict one-body-one-person logicthat has pertained in much personhood debate.

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  • 53.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics (vol 13, pg 225, 2010) in MEDICINE HEALTH CARE AND PHILOSOPHY vol 17, Issue 2, pg 3212014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 1p. 321-321Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 54.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ethical frameworks have dominated the discussion of organ donation for long: that of property rights and that of gift-giving. However, recent years have seen a drastic rise in the number of philosophical analyses of the meaning of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in ethical debates on organ donation and in critical sociological, anthropological and ethnological work on the gift metaphor in this context. In order to capture the flourishing of this field, this article distinguishes between four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine: those of property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. These frameworks represent four different ways of making sense of donation of organs as well as tissue, gametes and blood, draw on different conceptions of the relations between the self and the other, and bring out different ethical issues as core ones. The article presents these frameworks, argues that all of them run into difficulties when trying to make sense of reciprocity and relational interdependence in donation, and shows how the three gift-giving frameworks (of heroism, sacrifice and aporia) hang together in a critical discussion about what is at stake in organ donation. It also presents and argues in favour of an alternative intercorporeal framework of giving-through-sharing that more thoroughly explicates the gift metaphor in the context of donation, and offers tools for making sense of relational dimensions of live and post mortem donations.

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  • 55.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Special Section on Sex and Surgery: Doing sex and feminist theory2013In: Feminist Theory, ISSN 1464-7001, E-ISSN 1741-2773, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 56.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Malmquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lesbian Shared Biological Motherhood: The Ethics of IVF with Reception of Oocytes from Partner2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IVF with ROPA (Reception of Oocytes from Partners) allows lesbian mothers to share biological motherhood. The gestational mother receives an egg from her partner who becomes the genetic mother. This article examines the ethics of IVF with ROPA with a focus on the welfare of the woman and the resulting child, on whether ROPA qualifies as a "legitimate" medical therapy that falls within the goals of medicine, and on the meaning and value attributed to a biologically shared bond between parents and child. We also contrast IVF with ROPA with egg donor IVF for heterosexual couples and intrafamilial live uterus transplantation with IVF, and show how Swedish legislation makes certain ways of sharing biological bonds out of place. In Sweden, IVF with ROPA is illegal, egg donor IVF for heterosexual couples is allowed and practiced as is sperm donor IVF for lesbians, and live uterus transplantation is performed within a research project (though not allowed in regular health care). But is ROPA really ethically more problematic than these other cases? The article argues that IVF with ROPA gives rise to fewer ethical questions than does live uterus transplantation with IVF and, in some cases, egg donor IVF.

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