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  • 51.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schepull, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons: A pilot study2015In: MLTJ Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 151-155Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported.

    Methods: in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order.

    Results: total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done.

    Conclusion: the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, viscoelastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods.

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  • 52.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology and Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exercise: A positive feature on functioning in daily life during cancer treatment – Experiences from the Phys-Can study2020In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Nursing, Vol. 44, article id 101713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Impaired functioning due to cancer treatment is a challenge for daily life. Exercise during treatment can improve functioning. However, research describing experiences of how exercise affects activities of daily life is limited. We aimed to explore how individuals with cancer receiving curative treatment and participating in an exercise intervention experienced their functioning in daily life.

    Methods

    Twenty-one participants were recruited from Phys-Can, an exercise intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after the intervention had finished, and data was analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results

    Two main themes evolved: “Striving to maintain a normal life in a new context” and “Struggling with impairments from side effects of cancer treatment”. The supervised group exercise proved popular, and participants reported positive effects on physical and psychological functioning, as well as social and informative support from other participants. Participants struggled with impaired cognitive and physical functioning and exhaustion. They strove to maintain a normal life by adjusting their activities.

    Conclusions

    Perceived physical and psychological benefits from exercise during cancer treatment suggest that exercise should be a part of cancer rehabilitation to facilitate activities and participation in daily life. Striving to maintain a normal life during cancer treatment is vital, and adjustments are needed to maintain activities and participation in daily life. Cancer nurses should motivate patients to engage in physical activity and encourage the introduction of exercise as part of their rehabilitation. They could also support patients in making adjustments to maintain functioning in daily life.

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  • 53.
    Backström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Sadi, Lin
    Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hosp, Sweden.
    Wladis, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden.
    Surgical Needs at the End of the Battle of Mosul: Results from Mosul General HospitalIn: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of the study was to analyze the surgical needs of patients seeking emergency care at the Mosul General Hospital in the final phase of the battle of Mosul in northern Iraq between an international military coalition and rebel forces. During the conflict, the International Red Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) supported the hospital with staff and resources. Ceasefire in the conflict was declared at the end of July 2017. Methods Routinely collected hospital data from the ICRC-supported Mosul General Hospital from June 6, 2017, to October 1, 2017 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. All patients with weapon-related injuries as well as all patients with other types of injuries or acute surgical illness were included. Results Some 265 patients were admitted during the study period. Non-weapon-related conditions were more common than weapon-related (55.1%). The most common non-weapon-related condition was appendicitis followed by hernia and soft tissue wounds. Blast/fragment was the most frequent weapon-related injury mechanism followed by gunshot. The most commonly injured body regions were chest and abdomen. Children accounted for 35.3% of all weapon-related injuries. Patients presented at the hospital with weapon-related injuries more than 2 months after the official declaration of ceasefire. A majority of the non-weapon-related, as well as the weapon-related conditions, needed surgery (88.1% and 87.6%, respectively). Few postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions The number of children affected by the fighting seems to be higher in this cohort compared to previous reports. Even several months after the fighting officially ceased, patients with weapon-related injuries were presenting. Everyday illnesses or non-weapon-related injuries dominated. This finding underlines the importance of providing victims of conflicts with surgery for life-threatening conditions, whether weapon related or not.

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  • 54.
    Bagge, Ebba
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Beiron, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Malander, Susanne
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Pattern of endocrine treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in the Southeast medical region of Sweden: a population-based study2019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: Endocrine treatment (ET) is an alternative as salvage therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) but the usage in routine care is unknown. We evaluated the treatment patterns and outcome of patients receiving ET for EOC in the Southeast medical region in Sweden.Method: Patients were identified through the population-based Southeast Quality Registry for gynaecological cancer. Inclusion criteria were: age 18 years, histologically verified EOC diagnosed 2000-2013, ET for 4 weeks. Coverage compared with the Swedish National Cancer Registry was 100%. Data extracted from medical records was collected by means of a study-specific Case Report Form. Last date of follow-up was February 1st, 2018. All statistics were descriptive.Results: Altogether 248 (18%) of 1414 patients were treated with ET. Most (49%) had received only one, and 34% two previous lines of chemotherapy. Time from last chemotherapy to ET was 4 months, range 0-55months. The reason for initiating ET was tumor progression (66%), chemotherapy related toxicity (29%) and maintenance (4%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 94% of cases. Best response was partial (amp;lt; 5%) and stable disease (50%). No patient had a complete response. 194 (78%) patients received subsequent chemotherapy, of these 27% had 3-7 lines of chemotherapy. Duration of ET was a median 4 months (range 1-80 months). Median time from ET to subsequent chemotherapy was 5 months (range 0-79). The median overall survival was 45 months (range 9-173).Conclusion: In the Southeast region of Sweden, endocrine treatment for EOC was prescribed inconsistently and in various settings, usually initiated by a rising CA-125 level. Poorer documentation and irregular tumor response assessment were observed for endocrine treatment compared to chemotherapy.

  • 55.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

  • 56.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tesi, Bianca
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjorg
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Friis, Lone Smidstrup
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dybedal, Ingunn
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Hovland, Randi
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Raaschou-Jensen, Klas
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ljungman, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rustad, Cecilie F.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Lautrup, Charlotte K.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Kilpivaara, Outi
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Kittang, Astrid Olsnes
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mette K.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Nordic Guidelines for Germline Predisposition to Myeloid Neoplasms in Adults: Recommendations for Genetic Diagnosis, Clinical Management and Follow-up2019In: HEMASPHERE, Vol. 3, no 6, article id UNSP e321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myeloid neoplasms (MNs) with germline predisposition have recently been recognized as novel entities in the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification for MNs. Individuals with MNs due to germline predisposition exhibit increased risk for the development of MNs, mainly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Setting the diagnosis of MN with germline predisposition is of crucial clinical significance since it may tailor therapy, dictate the selection of donor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), determine the conditioning regimen, enable relevant prophylactic measures and early intervention or contribute to avoid unnecessary or even harmful medication. Finally, it allows for genetic counseling and follow-up of at-risk family members. Identification of these patients in the clinical setting is challenging, as there is no consensus due to lack of evidence regarding the criteria defining the patients who should be tested for these conditions. In addition, even in cases with a strong suspicion of a MN with germline predisposition, no standard diagnostic algorithm is available. We present the first version of the Nordic recommendations for diagnostics, surveillance and management including considerations for allo-HSCT for patients and carriers of a germline mutation predisposing to the development of MNs.

  • 57.
    Ballester, Facundo
    et al.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Granero, Domingo
    Hospital Gen University, Spain.
    Haworth, Annette
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre, DE 19713 USA.
    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel
    CNEN SP, Brazil; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Zourari, Kyveli
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Papagiannis, Panagiotis
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Siebert, Frank-Andre
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Sloboda, Ron S.
    Cross Cancer Institute, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Smith, Ryan L.
    Alfred Hospital, Australia.
    Thomson, Rowan M.
    Carleton University, Canada.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; McGill University, Canada.
    Vijande, Javier
    University of Valencia, Spain; IFIC CSIC UV, Spain.
    Ma, Yunzhi
    CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Beaulieu, Luc
    CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    A generic high-dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism2015In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 3048-3062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic Ir-192 source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra (R) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision AcuRos (TM)]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and pENELopE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR Ir-192 source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then compared against dose calculated using TG-43 and MBDCA methods. Results: TG-43 and PSS datasets were generated for the generic source, the PSS data for use with the ACE algorithm. The dose-rate constant values obtained from seven MC simulations, performed independently using different codes, were in excellent agreement, yielding an average of 1.1109 +/- 0.0004 cGy/(h U) (k = 1, Type A uncertainty). MC calculated dose-rate distributions for the two plans were also found to be in excellent agreement, with differences within type A uncertainties. Differences between commercial MBDCA and MC results were test, position, and calculation parameter dependent. On average, however, these differences were within 1% for ACUROS and 2% for ACE at clinically relevant distances. Conclusions: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed and implemented in two commercially available TPSs employing different MBDCAs. Reference dose distributions for this source were benchmarked and used for the evaluation of MBDCA calculations employing a virtual, cubic water phantom in the form of a CT DICOM image series. The implementation of a generic source of identical design in all TPSs using MBDCAs is an important step toward supporting univocal commissioning procedures and direct comparisons between TPSs. (C) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  • 58.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 59.
    Beamish, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden; Swansea Bay Univ Hlth Board, Wales.
    Olbers, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Metabolic and bariatric surgery in adolescents2019In: Nature Reviews. Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 1759-5045, E-ISSN 1759-5053, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 585-587Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new study has added valuable outcome data from adolescents 5 years after undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. By comparing outcomes from adolescents and adults, the study adds to the existing evidence base, highlighting metabolic and bariatric surgery as an increasingly valuable tool in the multidisciplinary management of adolescents with severe obesity.

  • 60.
    Beeckmans, Dorien
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Farre, Ricard
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Riethorst, Danny
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augustijns, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vanuytsel, Tim
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanheel, Hanne
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Tack, Jan
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal integrity in functional dyspepsia2020In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, article id e13788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a complex disorder, in which multiple mechanisms underlie symptom generation, including impaired duodenal barrier function. Moreover, an altered duodenal bile salt pool was recently discovered in patients with FD. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal permeability in FD. Methods Duodenal biopsies from patients with FD and healthy volunteers (HV) were mounted in Ussing chambers to measure mucosal resistance and bacterial passage in the absence and presence of fluorescein-conjugated Escherichia coli and glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) exposure. In parallel, duodenal fluid aspirates were collected from patients and bile salts were analyzed. Key results The transepithelial electrical resistance of duodenal biopsies from patients was lower compared with HV (21.4 +/- 1.3 omega.cm(2) vs. 24.4 +/- 1.2 omega.cm(2); P = .02; N = 21). The ratio of glyco-cholic and glyco-chenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) to tauro- and GUDCA correlated positively with transepithelial electrical resistance in patients. Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid slightly altered the mucosal resistance, resulting in similar values between patient and healthy biopsies (22.1 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2) vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2); P = .5). Bacterial passage after 120 minutes was lower for patient than for healthy biopsies (0.0 [0.0-681.8] vs. 1684.0 [0.0-4773.0] E coli units; P = .02). Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid increased bacterial passage in patient biopsies (102.1 [0.0-733.0] vs. 638.9 [280.6-2124.0] E coli units; P = .009). No correlation was found between mucosal resistance and bacterial passage. Conclusions amp; inferences Patients with FD displayed decreased duodenal mucosal resistance associated with bile salts, however, not associated with bacterial passage in vitro. In addition, the hydrophilic bile salt glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid abolished differences in mucosal resistance and bacterial passage between patient and control group.

  • 61.
    Behrens, Kira
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany; Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Medical Research, Australia.
    Maul, Katrin
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    Tekin, Nilguen
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany; Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    Kriebitzsch, Neele
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    Indenbirken, Daniela
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    Prassolov, Vladimir
    Engelhardt Institute Molecular Biol, Russia.
    Mueller, Ursula
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    Serve, Hubert
    Goethe University of Frankfurt, Germany.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Stocking, Carol
    Leibniz Institute Expt Virol, Germany.
    RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia2017In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, ISSN 0022-1007, E-ISSN 1540-9538, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 737-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is induced by the cooperative action of deregulated genes that perturb self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Internal tandem duplications (ITDs) in the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase are common mutations in AML, confer poor prognosis, and stimulate myeloproliferation. AML patient samples with FLT3-ITD express high levels of RUNX1, a transcription factor with known tumor-suppressor function. In this study, to understand this paradox, we investigated the impact of RUNX1 and FLT3-ITD coexpression. FLT3-ITD directly impacts on RUNX1 activity, whereby up-regulated and phosphorylated RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce AML. Inactivating RUNX1 in tumors releases the differentiation block and down-regulates genes controlling ribosome biogenesis. We identified Hhex as a direct target of RUNX1 and FLT3-ITD stimulation and confirmed high HHEX expression in FLT3-ITD AMLs. HHEX could replace RUNX1 in cooperating with FLT3-ITD to induce AML. These results establish and elucidate the unanticipated oncogenic function of RUNX1 in AML. We predict that blocking RUNX1 activity will greatly enhance current therapeutic approaches using FLT3 inhibitors.

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  • 62.
    Bergfelt, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kozlowski, Piotr
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Lucia
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Hulegardh, Erik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hagglund, Hans
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Markuszewska-Kuczymska, Alicja
    University of Umeå Hospital, Sweden.
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Smedmyr, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Astrom, Maria
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hallbook, Helene
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Satisfactory outcome after intensive chemotherapy with pragmatic use of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in older patients with Philadelphia-negative B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a Swedish registry-based study2015In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 135-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring, in the Swedish national guidelines for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, was evaluated in 35 patients aged 46-79 years (median 61), who were diagnosed from 2007 to 2011 and treated with high-intensity, block-based chemotherapy (ABCDV/VABA induction). Both a high complete remission rate (91 %) and acceptable overall survival (OS) rate (47 %) at 5 years were achieved. MRD by flow cytometry was measured in 73 % of the patients reaching complete remission after the first course, but was omitted by the clinicians for eight patients who were either over 70 years of age or already met conventional high-risk criteria. Factors negatively influencing OS were age over 65 years and WHO status greater than= 2. MRD less than 0.1 % after induction had positive impact on continuous complete remission but not on OS. Only five patients were allocated to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission, mainly due to conventional high risk factors. Thus, use of intensive remission induction therapy is effective in a selection of older patients. In a population for whom the possibilities of treatment escalation are limited, the optimal role of MRD monitoring remains to be determined.

  • 63.
    Bergfelt Lennmyr, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kozlowski, Piotr
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Lucia
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Bernell, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hulegardh, Erik
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Izarra, Antonio Santamaria
    Univ Hosp Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Åström, Maria
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hallbook, Helene
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Real-world data on first relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients > 55 years2018In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 2470-2473Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 64.
    Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Engvall, Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Garelius, Hege
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Bengt
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jadersten, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Prognostic scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population-based setting: a report from the Swedish MDS register2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, no 5, p. 614-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have highly variable outcomes and prognostic scoring systems are important tools for risk assessment and to guide therapeutic decisions. However, few population-based studies have compared the value of the different scoring systems. With data from the nationwide Swedish population-based MDS register we validated the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We also present population-based data on incidence, clinical characteristics including detailed cytogenetics and outcome from the register. The study encompassed 1329 patients reported to the register between 2009 and 2013, 14% of these had therapy-related MDS (t-MDS). Based on the MDS register, the yearly crude incidence of MDS in Sweden was 2amp;lt;boldamp;gt;amp;lt;/boldamp;gt;9 per 100000 inhabitants. IPSS-R had a significantly better prognostic power than IPSS (Pamp;lt;0amp;lt;boldamp;gt;amp;lt;/boldamp;gt;001). There was a trend for better prognostic power of IPSS-R compared to WPSS (P=0amp;lt;boldamp;gt;amp;lt;/boldamp;gt;05) and for WPSS compared to IPSS (P=0amp;lt;boldamp;gt;amp;lt;/boldamp;gt;07). IPSS-R was superior to both IPSS and WPSS for patients aged 70years. Patients with t-MDS had a worse outcome compared to de novo MDS (d-MDS), however, the validity of the prognostic scoring systems was comparable for d-MDS and t-MDS. In conclusion, population-based studies are important to validate prognostic scores in a real-world setting. In our nationwide cohort, the IPSS-R showed the best predictive power.

  • 65.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessment of microcirculation of the skin using Tissue Viability Imaging: A promising technique for detecting venous stasis in the skin2015In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 101, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: : Venous occlusion in the skin is difficult to detect by existing measurement techniques. Our aim was to find out whether Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) was better at detecting venous occlusion by comparing it with results of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) during graded arterial and venous stasis in human forearm skin. Methods: : Arterial and venous occlusions were simulated in 10 healthy volunteers by inflating a blood pressure cuff around the upper right arm. Changes in the concentration of red blood cells (RBC) were measured using TiVi, while skin perfusion and concentration of moving red blood cells (CMBC) were measured using static indices of LDF during exsanguination and subsequent arterial occlusion, postocclusive reactive hyperaemia, and graded increasing and decreasing venous stasis. Results: : During arterial occlusion there was a significant reduction in the mean concentration of RBC from baseline, as well as in perfusion and CMBC (p less than 0.008). Venous occlusion resulted in a significant 28% increase in the concentration of RBC (p = 0.002), but no significant change in perfusion (mean change -14%) while CMBC decreased significantly by 24% (p = 0.02). With stepwise increasing occlusion pressures there was a significant rise in the TiVi index and reduction in perfusion (p = 0.008), while the reverse was seen when venous flow was gradually restored. Conclusion: : The concentration of RBC measured with TiVi changes rapidly and consistently during both total and partial arterial and venous occlusions, while the changes in perfusion, measured by LDF, were less consistent This suggests that TiVi could be a more useful, non-invasive clinical monitoring tool for detecting venous stasis in the skin than LDF.

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  • 66.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascular Occlusion in a Porcine Flap Model: Effects on Blood Cell Concentration and Oxygenation.2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e1531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venous congestion in skin flaps is difficult to detect. This study evaluated the ability of tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in the concentration of red blood cells (CRBC), oxygenation, and heterogeneity during vascular provocations in a porcine fasciocutaneous flap model.

    Methods: In 5 pigs, cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps were raised (8 flaps in 5 pigs). The arterial and venous blood flow was monitored with ultrasonic flow probes. CRBC, tissue oxygenation, and heterogeneity in the skin were monitored with TiVi during baseline, 50% and 100% venous occlusion, recovery, 100% arterial occlusion and final recovery, thereby simulating venous and arterial occlusion of a free fasciocutaneous flap. A laser Doppler probe was used as a reference for microvascular perfusion in the flap.

    Results: During partial and complete venous occlusion, increases in CRBC were seen in different regions of the flap. They were more pronounced in the distal part. During complete arterial occlusion, CRBC decreased in all but the most distal parts of the flap. There were also increases in tissue oxygenation and heterogeneity during venous occlusion.

    Conclusions: TiVi measures regional changes in CRBC in the skin of the flap during arterial and venous occlusion, as well as an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin during venous occlusion that may be the result of reduced metabolism and impaired delivery of oxygen to the tissue. TiVi may provide a promising method for measuring flap viability because it is hand-held, easy to-use, and provides spatial information on venous congestion.

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  • 67.
    Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Johansson, Markus
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Linton, Ludvig B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Berglund, Sofia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hyllienmark, Martin
    TLA Targeted Immunotherapies AB, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Christian
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Holmstrom, Benny
    Akad Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Karin
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Ostersund Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hansson, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alamdari, Farhood
    Vastmanland Hosp, Sweden.
    Huge, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Krantz, David
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zirakzadeh, A. Ali
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Marits, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sjoholm, Louise K.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Increased CD4(+) T cell lineage commitment determined by CpG methylation correlates with better prognosis in urinary bladder cancer patients2018In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 10, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. Environmental factors and chronic inflammation are correlated with the disease risk. Diagnosis is performed by transurethral resection of the bladder, and patients with muscle invasive disease preferably proceed to radical cystectomy, with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The anti-tumour immune responses, known to be initiated in the tumour and draining lymph nodes, may play a major role in future treatment strategies. Thus, increasing the knowledge of tumour-associated immunological processes is important. Activated CD4(+) T cells differentiate into four main separate lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg, and they are recognized by their effector molecules IFN-gamma, IL-13, IL-17A, and the transcription factor Foxp3, respectively. We have previously demonstrated signature CpG sites predictive for lineage commitment of these four major CD4(+ )T cell lineages. Here, we investigate the lineage commitment specifically in tumour, lymph nodes and blood and relate them to the disease stage and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Blood, tumour and regional lymph nodes were obtained from patients at time of transurethral resection of the bladder and at radical cystectomy. Tumour-infiltrating CD4(+ )lymphocytes were significantly hypomethylated in all four investigated lineage loci compared to CD4(+) lymphocytes in lymph nodes and blood (lymph nodes vs rumour-infiltrating lymphocytes: IFNG -4229 bp p amp;lt; 0.0001, IL13 -11 bp p amp;lt; 0.05, IL17A -122 bp p amp;lt; 0.01 and FOXP3 -77 bp pamp;gt; 0.05). Examination of individual lymph nodes displayed different methylation signatures, suggesting possible correlation with future survival. More advanced post-cystectomy tumour stages correlated significantly with increased methylation at the IFNG -4229 bp locus. Patients with complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy displayed significant hypomethylation in CD4(+ )T cells for all four investigated loci, most prominently in IFNG p amp;lt; 0.0001. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy seemed to result in a relocation of Th1-committed CD4(+) T cells from blood, presumably to the tumour, indicated by shifts in the methylation patterns, whereas no such shifts were seen for lineages corresponding to IL13, IL17A and FOXP3. Conclusion: Increased lineage commitment in CD4(+) T cells, as determined by demethylation in predictive CpG sites, is associated with lower post-cystectomy tumour stage, complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and overall better outcome, suggesting epigenetic profiling of CD4(+) T cell lineages as a useful readout for clinical staging.

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  • 68.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Abaloparatide versus teriparatide: a head to head comparison of effects on fracture healing in mouse models2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 674-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Teriparatide accelerates fracture healing in animals and probably in man. Abaloparatide is a new drug with similar although not identical effects on the teriparatide receptor. Given at 4 times the teriparatide dose in a human osteoporosis trial, abaloparatide increased bone density more than teriparatide, and both reduced fracture risk. We investigated in mice whether abaloparatide stimulates fracture healing, and if it does so with the suggested dose effect relation (4:1). Patients and methods - In a validated mouse model for metaphyseal healing (burr hole with screw pull-out), 96 mice were randomly allocated to 11 groups: control (saline), teriparatide or abaloparatide, where teriparatide and abaloparatide were given at 5 different doses each. In a femoral shaft osteotomy model, 24 mice were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (saline), teriparatide (15 mu g/kg) or abaloparatide (60 mu g/kg). Each treatment was given daily via subcutaneous injections. Results were evaluated by mechanical testing and microCT. Results - In the metaphyseal model, a dose-dependent increase in screw pull-out force could be seen. In a linear regression analysis (r = 0.78) each increase in ln(dose) by 1 (regardless of drug type) was associated with an increase in pull-out force by 1.50 N (SE 0.18) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Changing drug from teriparatide to abaloparatide increased the force by 1.41 N (SE 0.60; p = 0.02). In the diaphyseal model, the callus density was 23% (SD 10), 38% (SD 10), and 47% (SD 2) for control, for teriparatide and abaloparatide respectively. Both drugs were significantly different from controls (p = 0.001 and p = 0.008), but not from each other. Interpretation - Both drugs improve fracture healing, but in these mouse models, the potency per mu g of abaloparatide seems only 2.5 times that of teriparatide, rather than the 4:1 relation chosen in the clinical abaloparatide-teriparatide comparison trial.

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  • 69.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Fracture healing in the shaft is usually described as a sequence of events, starting with inflammation, which triggers mesenchymal tissue formation in successive steps. Most clinical fractures engage cancellous bone. We here describe fracture healing in cancellous bone, focusing on the timing of inflammatory and mesenchymal cell type appearance at the site of injury. Material and methods - Rats received a proximal tibial drill hole, A subgroup received clodronate-containing liposomes before or after surgery. The tibiae were analyzed with micro-CT and immunohistochemistry 1 to 7 days after injury. Results - Granulocytes (myeloperoxidase) appeared in moderate numbers within the hole at day 1 and then gradually disappeared. Macrophage expression (CD68) was seen on day 1, increased until day 3, and then decreased. Mesenchymal cells (vimentin) had already accumulated in the periphery of the hole on day 1. Mesenchymal cells dominated in the entire lesion on day 3, now producing extracellular matrix. A modest number of preosteoblasts (RUNX2) were seen on day 1 and peaked on day 4. Osteoid was seen on day 4 in the traumatized region, with a distinct border to the uninjured surrounding marrow. Clodronate liposomes given before the injury reduced the volume of bone formation at day 7, but no reduction in macrophage numbers could be detected. Interpretation - The typical sequence of events in shaft fractures was not seen. Mesenchymal cells appeared simultaneously with granulocyte and macrophage arrival. Clodronate liposomes, known to reduce macrophage numbers, seemed to be associated with the delineation of the volume of tissue to be replaced by bone.

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  • 70.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Depletion of cytotoxic (CD8+) T cells impairs implant fixation in rat cancellous bone2019In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 805-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As cytotoxic (CD8(+)) T cells seem to impair shaft fracture healing, we hypothesized that depletion of CD8(+) cells would instead improve healing of cancellous bone. Additionally, we also tested if CD8-depletion would influence the healing of ruptured Achilles tendons. Rats received a single injection of either anti-CD8 antibodies or saline and put through surgery 24 h later. Three different surgical interventions were performed as follows: (1) a drill hole in the proximal tibia with microCT (BV/TV) to assess bone formation; (2) a screw in the proximal tibia with mechanical evaluation (pull-out force) to assess fracture healing; (3) Achilles tendon transection with mechanical evaluation (force-at-failure) to assess tendon healing. Furthermore, CD8-depletion was confirmed with flow cytometry on peripheral blood. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed depletion of CD8(+) cells (p amp;lt; 0.001). Contrary to our hypothesis, depletion of CD8(+) cells reduced the implant pull-out force by 19% (p amp;lt; 0.05) and stiffness by 34% (p amp;lt; 0.01), although the bone formation in the drill holes was the same as in the controls. Tendon healing was unaffected by CD8-depletion. Our results suggest that CD8(+) cells have an important part in cancellous bone healing.

  • 71.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Anti-RANKL treatment improves screw fixation in cancellous bone in rats2015In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 990-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphosphonates improve implant fixation in randomised clinical trials of knee prostheses, hip prostheses and dental implants. However, a limited amount of bone resorption is required for bisphosphonates to exert an effect. Anti-RANKL treatment does not have this limitation, and we therefore tested whether if they might be more effective for improvement of implant fixation. This is of interest, as anti-RANKL treatment with denosumab is now in common clinical use. Male SD rats received a stain-less steel screw in the right proximal tibia and a drill hole in the left (n = 42). They were randomised to subcutaneous injections of either alendronate (20 mu g/kg/day), alendronate (200 mu g/kg/day), osteoprotegerin with an Fc tag (OPG-Fc; 8 mg/kg, twice weekly), or saline control. After 4 weeks, the fixation of the steel screw was measured by pull-out test. The tibia with the drill hole was evaluated with mu CT. OPG-Fc increased the pull-out force compared to saline controls by 153% (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference between OPG-Fc and the alendronate groups. OPG-Fc increased the bone density (BV/TV) in the previous drill hole compared to controls 7-fold (p less than 0.001). This increase was higher than with any alendronate dose (p less than 0.001). OPG-Fc increased the bone density of the L5 vertebral body, but there was no significant difference between OPG-Fc and alendronate. Our results suggest that screw fixation in cancellous bone can be dramatically improved by an antiRANKL agent. The effect was comparable to very high bisphosphonate doses. Screw insertion in cancellous bone elicits a metaphyseal fracture healing response, and our findings might be relevant not only for implant fixation, but also for fracture healing in cancellous bone.

  • 72.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat Comparison of drill holes and implanted screws2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 745-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods - Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results - The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation - The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model.

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  • 73.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ressner, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Shining dead bone-cause for cautious interpretation of [F-18]NaF PET scans2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — [18F]Fluoride ([18F]NaF) PET scan is frequently used for estimation of bone healing rate and extent in cases of bone allografting and fracture healing. Some authors claim that [18F]NaF uptake is a measure of osteoblastic activity, calcium metabolism, or bone turnover. Based on the known affinity of fluoride to hydroxyapatite, we challenged this view.

    Methods — 10 male rats received crushed, frozen allogeneic cortical bone fragments in a pouch in the abdominal wall on the right side, and hydroxyapatite granules on left side. [18F]NaF was injected intravenously after 7 days. 60 minutes later, the rats were killed and [18F]NaF uptake was visualized in a PET/CT scanner. Specimens were retrieved for micro CT and histology.

    Results — MicroCT and histology showed no signs of new bone at the implant sites. Still, the implants showed a very high [18F]NaF uptake, on a par with the most actively growing and remodeling sites around the knee joint.

    Interpretation — [18F]NaF binds with high affinity to dead bone and calcium phosphate materials. Hence, an [18F]NaF PET/CT scan does not allow for sound conclusions about new bone ingrowth into bone allograft, healing activity in long bone shaft fractures with necrotic fragments, or remodeling around calcium phosphate coated prostheses

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  • 74.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

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  • 75.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Aaronson, Neil K.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Buffart, Laurien
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hellbom, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hojman, Pernille
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Igelstrom, Helena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pingel, Ronnie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Raastad, Truls
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Velikova, Galina
    University of Leeds, England.
    Asenlof, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Design of a randomized controlled trial of physical training and cancer ( Phys-Can) the impact of exercise intensity on cancer related fatigue, quality of life and disease outcome2017In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 17, article id 218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer-related fatigue is a common problem in persons with cancer, influencing health-related quality of life and causing a considerable challenge to society. Current evidence supports the beneficial effects of physical exercise in reducing fatigue, but the results across studies are not consistent, especially in terms of exercise intensity. It is also unclear whether use of behaviour change techniques can further increase exercise adherence and maintain physical activity behaviour. This study will investigate whether exercise intensity affects fatigue and health related quality of life in persons undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment. In addition, to examine effects of exercise intensity on mood disturbance, adherence to oncological treatment, adverse effects from treatment, activities of daily living after treatment completion and return to work, and behaviour change techniques effect on exercise adherence. We will also investigate whether exercise intensity influences inflammatory markers and cytokines, and whether gene expressions following training serve as mediators for the effects of exercise on fatigue and health related quality of life. Methods/design: Six hundred newly diagnosed persons with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy will be randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to following conditions; A) individually tailored low-to-moderate intensity exercise with or without behaviour change techniques or B) individually tailored high intensity exercise with or without behaviour change techniques. The training consists of both resistance and endurance exercise sessions under the guidance of trained coaches. The primary outcomes, fatigue and health related quality of life, are measured by self-reports. Secondary outcomes include fitness, mood disturbance, adherence to the cancer treatment, adverse effects, return to activities of daily living after completed treatment, return to work as well as inflammatory markers, cytokines and gene expression. Discussion: The study will contribute to our understanding of the value of exercise and exercise intensity in reducing fatigue and improving health related quality of life and, potentially, clinical outcomes. The value of behaviour change techniques in terms of adherence to and maintenance of physical exercise behaviour in persons with cancer will be evaluated.

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  • 76.
    Birgegard, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enevold, Christian
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ghanima, Waleed
    Ostfold Hosp, Norway.
    Hasselbalch, Hans
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Claus H.
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Knutsen, Havar
    Ulleval Hosp, Norway.
    Pedersen, Ole B.
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Sorensen, Anders
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Andreasson, Bjorn
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Inflammatory functional iron deficiency common in myelofibrosis, contributes to anaemia and impairs quality of life. From the Nordic MPN study Group2019In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study investigates the hypothesis that inflammation in myelofibrosis (MF) like in myeloma and lymphoma, may disturb iron distribution and contribute to anaemia. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 MF and 23 ET patients was performed. Results About 35% of anaemic MF patients had functional iron deficiency (FID) with transferrin saturation amp;lt;20 and normal or elevated S-ferritin (amp;lt;500 mu g/L). In ET, FID was rare. In MF patients with FID, 70.6% were anaemic, vs 29.4% in patients without FID (P = 0.03). Hepcidin was significantly higher in MF patients with anaemia, including transfusion-dependent patients, 50.6 vs 24.4 mu g/L (P = 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between Hb and inflammatory markers in all MF patients: IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, (P amp;lt; 0.01-0.03), LD (P = 0.004) and hepcidin (P = 0.03). These correlations were also seen in the subgroup of anaemic MF patients (Table ). Tsat correlated negatively with CRP (P amp;lt; 0.001). Symptom burden was heavier in MF patients with FID, and MPN-SAF quality of life scores correlated with IL-6 and CRP. Conclusions The inflammatory state of MF disturbs iron turnover, FID is common and contributes to anaemia development and impairment of QoL. Anaemic MF patients should be screened for FID.

  • 77.
    Bisgin, Atil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Cukurova Univ, Turkey.
    Meng, Wen-Jian
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Interaction of CD200 Overexpression on Tumor Cells with CD200R1 Overexpression on Stromal Cells: An Escape from the Host Immune Response in Rectal Cancer Patients2019In: Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1687-8450, E-ISSN 1687-8469, Vol. 2019, article id 5689464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CD200 imparts an immunoregulatory signal through its receptor, CD200R1, leading to the suppression of tumor specific immunity. The mechanism of CD200:CD200R1 signaling pathway is still uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the expression and localization of CD200 and its receptor CD200R1 and their clinical significance in rectal cancer patients. We examined the immunohistochemical expressions and localizations of CD200 and CD200R1 in 140 rectal cancer patients. Among the patients, 79 underwent the preoperative radiotherapy and the others were untreated prior to the surgery. In addition, 121 matched normal rectal mucosa samples were evaluated. The results of immunohistochemical analysis showed a strikingly high level of CD200 in tumor cells (p=0.001) and CD200R1 expression in normal mucosal epithelium and stromal cells. Importantly, CD200R1 was overexpressed in stromal cells of the metastatic cancer patients compared to patients without metastases (p=0.002). More than that, 87% of metastatic patients had a phenotype of upregulated CD200 in tumor cells accompanied by overexpressed CD200R1 in stromal cells. In addition, low levels of CD200 were correlated with improved overall survival in untreated patients. We showed that tumor-stroma communication through CD200 and its receptor interaction is selected in patients with high risk of relapse. High levels of these molecules support instigation of the far and local metastatic nest that provides solid ground for metastasis. Our current data also disclose a mechanism by which CD200:CD200R1 affects tumor progression and may strengthen the feasibility of targeting CD200 or CD200R1 as anticancer strategy.

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  • 78.
    Bjerrum, Ole Weis
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ghanima, Waleed
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Kauppila, Marjut
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Roskilde Hosp, Denmark.
    Thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms-Clinical practice among Nordic specialists2018In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 475-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have higher risks of developing thromboembolisms compared to the general population. International guidelines on the management of MPNs therefore include recommendations concerning thromboembolism prophylaxis. In clinical practice, strict adherence to guidelines may be challenging and dependent on factors such as physician experience, outpatient clinic setting, and access to therapy; however, no data exist on physician adherence or patient compliance to thromboembolism prophylaxis in MPNs. Objectives: The Nordic Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Study Group (NMPN) performed a survey among Nordic hematology specialists with the aim of documenting the implementation of international recommendations in a region of Northern Europe with similar healthcare systems. Results: The study showed that Nordic specialists managed their patients in accordance with international guidelines concerning medical intervention, but to a lesser degree regarding the management of additional cardiovascular risk factors. The survey also drew attention to the common clinical dilemma of combining antiaggregatory agents with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), or novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC), as well as phlebotomy limits in female polycythemia vera patients. Conclusions: The results of this study highlight the importance of considering all risk factors for thrombosis and an optimal collaboration with the primary healthcare sector.

  • 79.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Reg Canc Ctr West, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Floter-Radestad, Angelique
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    Visby Hosp, Sweden.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Reg Canc Ctr West, Sweden; Halland Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Primary treatment patterns and survival of cervical cancer in Sweden: A population-based Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group Study2019In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 155, no 2, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Survival in cervical cancer has improved little over the last decades. We aimed to elucidate primary treatment patterns and survival. Methods: Population-based study of patients included in the Swedish Quality Registry for Gynecologic Cancer diagnosed 2011-2015. Main outcome was 5-year relative survival (RS). Age-standardised RS (AS-RS) was estimated for the total cohort and for the pooled study population of squamous, adenosquamous-, adenocarcinoma. Results: Median follow-up time was 4.6 years. The study population consisted of 2141 patients; 97% of the 2212 patients in the total cohort and the 5-year AS-RS was 71% and 70%, respectively. RS stage IB1: surgery alone 95% vs. 72% for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT) (p amp;lt; 0.001). In stage IIA1 74% had CTRL, and 47% of operated patients received adjuvant (CT)-RT. RS stage IB2: surgically treated 81% (69% received adjuvant (CT)-RT) vs. 76% for (CT)-RT (p = 0.73). RS stage IIB: 77% for CT-RT + brachytherapy BT), 37% for RT + BT (p = 0.045) and 27% for RT-BT (p amp;lt; 0.001). Stages III-IVA; amp;lt;40% received CT-RT + BT, RS 45% vs. 18% for RT-BT (RR 4.1, p amp;lt; 0.001). RS stage IVB 7%. Conclusion: Primary treatment of cervical cancer in Sweden adhered to evidence-based standard of care. Areas of improvement include optimising treatment for stages III-IVA, and avoiding combining surgery and radiotherapy. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 80.
    Björn, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jakobsen, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Gréen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping.
    Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Treated with Gemcitabine and Carboplatin.2020In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 11, no 5, article id E549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatments that include gemcitabine and carboplatin induce dose-limiting myelosuppression. The understanding of how human bone marrow is affected on a transcriptional level leading to the development of myelosuppression is required for the implementation of personalized treatments in the future. In this study, we treated human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) harvested from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with gemcitabine/carboplatin. Thereafter, scRNA-seq was performed to distinguish transcriptional effects induced by gemcitabine/carboplatin. Gene expression was calculated and evaluated among cells within and between samples compared to untreated cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that the treatments effectively decrease cell proliferation, indicated by the proportion of cells in the G2M-phase dropping from 35% in untreated cells to 14.3% in treated cells. Clustering and t-SNE showed that cells within samples and between treated and untreated samples were affected differently. Enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes showed that the treatments influence KEGG pathways and Gene Ontologies related to myeloid cell proliferation/differentiation, immune response, cancer, and the cell cycle. The present study shows the feasibility of using scRNA-seq and chemotherapy-treated HSPCs to find genes, pathways, and biological processes affected among and between treated and untreated cells. This indicates the possible gains of using single-cell toxicity studies for personalized medicine.

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  • 81.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nitrite, a novel method to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat liver2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1775-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether nitrite administered prior to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) reduces liver injury.

    METHODS: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 3 groups, including sham operated (n = 8), 45-min segmental ischemia of the left liver lobe (IR, n = 14) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preceded by the administration of 480 nmol of nitrite (n = 14). Serum transaminases were measured after 4 h of reperfusion. Liver microdialysate (MD) was sampled in 30-min intervals and analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol as well as the total nitrite and nitrate (NOx). The NOx was measured in serum.

    RESULTS: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) at the end of reperfusion was higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (40 ± 6.8 μkat/L vs 22 ± 2.6 μkat/L, P = 0.022). Similarly, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was also higher in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (34 ± 6 μkat vs 14 ± 1.5 μkat, P = 0.0045). The NOx in MD was significantly higher in the nitrite group than in the I/R group (10.1 ± 2.9 μM vs 3.2 ± 0.9 μM, P = 0.031) after the administration of nitrite. During ischemia, the levels decreased in both groups and then increased again during reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, there was a tendency towards a higher NOx in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (11.6 ± 0.7 μM vs 9.2 ± 1.1 μM, P = 0.067). Lactate in MD was significantly higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (3.37 ± 0.18 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.12 mM, P = 0.01) during ischemia and the first 30 min of reperfusion. During the same period, glycerol was also higher in the IRI group than in the nitrite group (464 ± 38 μM vs 367 ± 31 μM, P = 0.049). With respect to histology, there were more signs of tissue damage in the I/R group than in the nitrite group, and 29% of the animals in the I/R group exhibited necrosis compared with none in the nitrite group. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription increased between early ischemia (t = 15) and the end of reperfusion in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: Nitrite administered before liver ischemia in the rat liver reduces anaerobic metabolism and cell necrosis, which could be important in the clinical setting.

  • 82.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Borrebaeck, Carl
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jornsten, Rebecka
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Jung Lee, Eun Jung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Li, Xinxiu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Dept Lab Med, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Schäfer, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden; Inst Clin Sci, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sysoev, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Digital twins to personalize medicine2019In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalized medicine requires the integration and processing of vast amounts of data. Here, we propose a solution to this challenge that is based on constructing Digital Twins. These are high-resolution models of individual patients that are computationally treated with thousands of drugs to find the drug that is optimal for the patient.

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  • 83.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Larsen, Peter Noergaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Urdzik, Jozef
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Carling, Ulrik
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Fallentin, Eva
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gilg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Segment 4 occlusion in portal vein embolization increase future liver remnant hypertrophy - A Scandinavian cohort study2020In: International Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1743-9191, E-ISSN 1743-9159, Vol. 75, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The additional value of including segment 4 (S4) portal branches in right portal vein embolization (rPVE) is debated. The aim of the study was to explore this in a large multicenter cohort. Material and methods: A retrospective cohort study consisting of all patients subjected to rPVE from August 2012 to May 2017 at six Scandinavian university hospitals. PVE technique was essentially the same in all centers, except for the selection of main embolizing agent (particles or glue). All centers used coils or particles to embolize S4 branches. A subgroup analysis was performed after excluding patients with parts of or whole S4 included in the future liver remnant (FLR). Results: 232 patients were included in the study, of which 36 received embolization of the portal branches to S4 in addition to rPVE. The two groups (rPVE vs rPVE + S4) were similar (gender, age, co-morbidity, diagnosis, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bilirubin levels prior to PVE and embolizing material), except for diabetes mellitus which was more frequent in the rPVE + S4 group (p = 0.02). Pre-PVE FLR was smaller in the S4 group (333 vs 380 ml, p = 0.01). rPVE + S4 resulted in a greater percentage increase of the FLR size compared to rPVE alone (47 vs 38%, p = 0.02). A subgroup analysis, excluding all patients with S4 included in the FLR, was done. There was no longer a difference in pre-PVE FLR between groups (333 vs 325 ml, p = 0.9), but still a greater percentage increase and also absolute increase of the FLR in the rPVE + S4 group (48 vs 38% and 155 vs 112 ml, p = 0.01 and 0.02). Conclusion: In this large multicenter cohort study, additional embolization of S4 did demonstrate superior growth of the FLR compared to standard right PVE.

  • 84.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early endoscopic treatment of blunt traumatic pancreatic injury2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1435-1443Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is a rare and challenging situation. In many cases, there are other associated injuries that mandate urgent operative treatment. Morbidity and mortality rates are high and complications after acute pancreatic resections are common. The diagnosis of pancreatic injuries can be difficult and often requires multimodal approach including Computed Tomography scans, Magnetic resonance imaging and Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). The objective of this paper is to review the application of endoprothesis in the settings of pancreatic injury. A review of the English literature available was conducted and the experience of our centre described. While the classical recommended treatment of Grade III pancreatic injury (transection of the gland and the pancreatic duct in the body/tail) is surgical resection this approach carries high morbidity. ERCP was first reported as a diagnostic tool in the settings of pancreatic injury but has in recent years been used increasingly as a treatment option with promising results. This article reviews the literature on ERCP as treatment option for pancreatic injury and adds further to the limited number of cases reported that have been treated early after the trauma.

  • 85.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, C.
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Comparison of the duration of hospital stay after laparoscopic or open distal pancreatectomy: randomized controlled trial2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss and recovery. Only one randomized study is available, which showed enhanced functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP. Methods Consecutive patients evaluated at a multidisciplinary tumour board and planned for standard distal pancreatectomy were randomized prospectively to LDP or ODP in an unblinded, parallel-group, single-centre superiority trial. The primary outcome was postoperative hospital stay. Results Of 105 screened patients, 60 were randomized and 58 (24 women, 41 per cent) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis; there were 29 patients of mean age 68 years in the LDP group and 29 of mean age 63 years in the ODP group. The main indication was cystic pancreatic lesions, followed by neuroendocrine tumours. The median postoperative hospital stay was 5 (i.q.r. 4-5) days in the laparoscopic group versus 6 (5-7) days in the open group (P = 0 center dot 002). Functional recovery was attained after a median of 4 (i.q.r. 2-6) versus 6 (4-7) days respectively (P = 0 center dot 007), and duration of surgery was 120 min in both groups (P = 0 center dot 482). Blood loss was less with laparoscopic surgery: median 50 (i.q.r. 25-150) ml versus 100 (100-300) ml in the open group (P = 0 center dot 018). No difference was found in the complication rates (Clavien-Dindo grade III or above: 4 versus 8 patients respectively). The rate of delayed gastric emptying and clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula did not differ between the groups. Conclusion LDP is associated with shorter hospital stay than ODP, with shorter time to functional recovery and less bleeding. Registration number: ISRCTN26912858 ( ).

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  • 86.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lundgren, L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A Personal Computer Freeware as a Tool for Surgeons to Plan Liver Resections.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 153-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in liver surgery and the proportion of resections done on the margin to postoperative liver failure make preoperative calculations regarding liver volume important. Earlier studies have shown good correlation between calculations done with ImageJ and specimen weight as well as volume calculations done with more robust systems. The correlation to actual volumes of resected liver tissue has not been investigated, and this was the aim of this study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 30 patients undergoing well-defined liver resections were included in this study. Volumes calculated with ImageJ were compared to volume measurements done after the retrieval of resected liver tissue.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A strong correlation between calculated and measured liver volume was found with sample concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) = 0.9950. The knowledge on the nature of liver resections sets liver surgeons in a unique position to be able to accurately predict the volumes to be resected and, therefore, also the volume that will remain after surgery. This becomes increasingly important with the evolvement of methods to extend the boundaries of liver surgery. ImageJ is a reliable tool to preoperatively assess liver volume.

  • 87.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Detailed reporting is of utmost importance when a controversial treatment is being evaluated2019In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1250-1250Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 88.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Increasing evidence for minimally invasive approach to distal pancreatectomy2019In: Laparoscopic Surgery, E-ISSN 2616-4221, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, Claes
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy (LAPOP): study protocol for a single center, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial2019In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 20, article id 356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEarlier nonrandomized studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss, and recovery. Only one randomized study has been conducted showing reduced time to functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP.MethodsLAPOP is a prospective randomized, nonblinded, parallel-group, single-center superiority trial. Sixty patients with lesions in the pancreatic body or tail that are found by a multidisciplinary tumor board to need surgical resection will be randomized to receive LDP or ODP. The primary outcome variable is postoperative hospital stay, and secondary outcomes include functional recovery (defined as no need for intravenous medications or fluids and as the ability of an ambulatory patient to perform activities of daily life), perioperative bleeding, complications, need for pain medication, and quality of life comparison.DiscussionThe LAPOP trial will test the hypothesis that LDP reduces postoperative hospital stay compared with ODP.Trial registrationISRCTN, 26912858. Registered on 28 September 2015.

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  • 90.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Primary Hepatobiliary Malignancies and Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 158-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy may increase the possibility of radical resection in the case of liver malignancy. Concerns have been raised about the high morbidity and mortality associated with the procedure, particularly when applied for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases. The aim of this study was to analyze the initial experience with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in cases of non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies in Scandinavia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedures performed at two Swedish university hospitals for non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies was performed. The primary focus was on the safety of the procedure. Results and Conclusion: Ten patients were included: four had hepatocellular cancer, three had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, one had a Klatskin tumor, one had ocular melanoma metastasis, and one had a metastasis from a Wilms tumor. All patients completed both operations, and the highest grade of complication (according to the Clavien-Dindo classification) was 3A, which was observed in one patient. No 90-day mortality was observed. Radical resection (R0) was achieved in nine patients, while the resection was R2 in one patient. The low morbidity and mortality observed in this cohort compared with those of earlier reports on associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases may be related to the selection of patients with limited comorbidity. In addition, procedures other than associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy had been avoided in most of the patients. In conclusion, associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy can be applied to primary hepatobiliary malignancies and non-colorectal liver metastases with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality.

  • 91.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosok, B.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Pomianowska, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjornbeth, B. A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver metastases - Intermediate oncological results2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 531-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) not amenable for resection have grave prognosis. One limiting factor for surgery is a small future liver remnant (FLR). Early data suggests that associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) effectively increases the volume of the FLR allowing for resection in a larger fraction of patients than conventional two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) with portal vein occlusion (PVO). Oncological results of the treatment are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the intermediate oncological outcomes after ALPPS in patients with CRLM. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with CRLM operated with ALPPS at the participating centres between December 2012 and May 2014. Results: Twenty-three patients (16 male, 7 female), age 67 years (28-80) were operated for 6.5 (1-38) metastases of which the largest was 40 nun (14-130). Six (27.3%) patients had extra-hepatic metastases, 16 (72.7%) synchronous presentation. All patients received chemotherapy, 6 cycles (3-25) preoperatively and 16 (70%) postoperatively. Ten patients (43%) were rescue ALPPS after failed PVO. Severe complications occurred in 13.6% and one (4.5%) patient died within 90 days of surgery. After a median follow-up of 22.5 months from surgery and 33.5 months from diagnosis of liver metastases estimated 2 year overall survival was 59% (from surgery) and 73% (from diagnosis). Liver only recurrences (n = 8), were treated with reresection/ablation (n = 7) while lung recurrences were treated with chemotherapy. Conclusion: The overall survival, rate of severe complications and perioperative mortality associated with ALPPS for patients with CRLM is comparable to TSH. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 92.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Specific exercises for subacromial pain: Good results maintained for 5 years2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 600-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — We have previously shown that specific exercises reduced the need for surgery in subacromial painpatients at 1-year follow-up. We have now investigated whetherthis result was maintained after 5 years and compared the outcomesof surgery and non-surgical treatment.Patients and methods — 97 patients were included in the previouslyreported randomized study of patients on a waiting list forsurgery. These patients were randomized to specifi c or unspecifi cexercises. After 3 months of exercises the patients were asked ifthey still wanted surgery and this was also assessed at the present5-year follow-up. The 1-year assessment included Constant–Murley score, DASH, VAS at night, rest and activity, EQ-5D, andEQ-VAS. All these outcome assessments were repeated after 5years in 91 of the patients.Results — At the 5-year follow-up more patients in the specifi cexercise group had declined surgery, 33 of 47 as compared with16 of 44 (p = 0.001) in the unspecifi c exercise group. The meanConstant–Murley score continued to improve between the 1- and5-year follow-ups in both surgically and non-surgically treatedgroups. On a group level there was no clinically relevant changebetween 1 and 5 years in any of the other outcome measuresregardless of treatment.Interpretation — This 5-year follow-up of a previously publishedrandomized controlled trial found that specifi c exercisesreduced the need for surgery in patients with subacromial pain.Patients not responding to specifi c exercises may achieve similargood results with surgery. These fi ndings emphasize that a specifi cexercise program may serve as a selection tool for surgery.

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  • 93.
    Blimark, Cecilie Hveding
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Turesson, Ingemar
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund-Malmö, Sweden.
    Genell, Anna
    Western Sweden Hlth Care Reg, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Lucia
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Björkstrand, Bo
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Carlson, Kristina
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Linder, Olle
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Boras Hosp, Sweden.
    Nahi, Hareth
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Iceland, Iceland; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Outcome and survival of myeloma patients diagnosed 2008-2015. Real-world data on 4904 patients from the Swedish Myeloma Registry2018In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 506-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiology and outcome of myeloma are mainly reported from large university centers and collaborative groups, and do not represent real-world patients. The Swedish Myeloma Registry is a prospective population-based registry documenting characteristics, treatment and outcome in newly diagnosed myeloma, including asymptomatic and localized forms, with the purpose of improving disease management and outcome. This report presents information on patients diagnosed between 2008 and 2015, including data on first-line treatment in patients diagnosed up to 2014, with a follow up until December 2016. We present age-adjusted incidence, patients characteristics at baseline, treatment, response, and survival. Baseline data were available with a 97% coverage in 4904 patients (median age 71 years, males 70 years, females 73 years; 72% were 65 years or older), and at 1-year follow up in 3558 patients with symptomatic disease (92% of patients initially reported). The age-adjusted incidence was 6.8 myeloma cases per 100,000 inhabi-ants per year. Among initially symptomatic patients (n= 3988), 77% had osteolytic lesions or compression fractures, 49% had anemia, 18% impaired kidney function, and 13% hypercalcemia. High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation was given to 77% of patients aged up to 66 years, and to 22% of patients aged 66-70 years. In the study period, 68% received bortezomib, thalidomide, and/or lenalidomide as part of the first-line treatment, rising from 31% in 2008 to 81% in 2014. In active myeloma, the median relative survival of patients aged 65 years or under was 7.7 years, and 3.4 years in patients aged 66 years and over. Patients diagnosed with myeloma in more recent years were associated with significantly higher rates of complete or very good partial remission (Pamp;lt;0.05), and with a significantly higher survival, with a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92; Pamp;lt;0.05). There was a small, but significant survival benefit in patients treated at university hospitals (HR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-0.99; Pamp;lt;0.05). We report here on a near complete real-world population of myeloma patients during an 8-year period; a period in which newer drugs were implemented into standard practice. The overall incidence and median age were both higher than in most previous studies, indicating a more complete coverage of older patients. Myeloma survival in Sweden is comparable to other large registry studies, and responses and survival improved during the study period.

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  • 94.
    Block, Keith I.
    et al.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Gyllenhaal, Charlotte
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA; National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Lowe, Leroy
    Getting Know Canc, Canada; University of Lancaster, England.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Ruhul Amin, A. R. M.
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Amin, Amr
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Aquilano, Katia
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Arbiser, Jack
    Atlanta Vet Adm Medical Centre, GA USA; Emory University, GA USA.
    Arreola, Alexandra
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Arzumanyan, Alla
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Salman Ashraf, S.
    Temple University, PA 19122 USA.
    Azmi, Asfar S.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Benencia, Fabian
    Wayne State University, MI USA.
    Bhakta, Dipita
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Bilsland, Alan
    SASTRA University, India.
    Bishayeen, Anupam
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Blain, Stacy W.
    Larkin Health Science Institute, FL USA.
    Block, Penny B.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Boosani, Chandra S.
    Suny Downstate Medical Centre, NY USA.
    Carey, Thomas E.
    Creighton University, NE 68178 USA.
    Carnero, Amancio
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Carotenuto, Marianeve
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Casey, Stephanie C.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Chaturvedi, Rupesh
    University of S Carolina, SC USA.
    Zhuo Chen, Georgia
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Chenx, Helen
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Chen, Sophie
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Charlie Chen, Yi
    Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Research Lab, England; Alderson Broaddus University, PA USA.
    Choi, Beom K.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Rosa Ciriolo, Maria
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Coley, Helen M.
    University of Surrey, England.
    Collins, Andrew R.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Connell, Marisa
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Crawford, Sarah
    So Connecticut State University, CT 06515 USA.
    Curran, Colleen S.
    University of Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Damia, Giovanna
    Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Italy.
    Dasgupta, Santanu
    University of Texas Health Science Centre Tyler, TX USA.
    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.
    University of Texas SW Medical Centre Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Decker, William K.
    Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Dhawan, Punita
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Diehl, Anna Mae E.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Dong, Jin-Tang
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Ping Dou, Q.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Drew, Janice E.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Elkord, Eyad
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    El-Rayes, Bassel
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Feitelson, Mark A.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Felsher, Dean W.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Ferguson, Lynnette R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Fimognari, Carmela
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Firestone, Gary L.
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Frezza, Christian
    University of Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Fujii, Hiromasa
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fuster, Mark M.
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Generali, Daniele
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Georgakilas, Alexandros G.
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Gieseler, Frank
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Gilbertson, Michael
    National Technical University of Athens, Greece.
    Green, Michelle F.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Grue, Brendan
    Getting Know Canc, Canada.
    Guha, Gunjan
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Halicka, Dorota
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Helferich, William G.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Heneberg, Petr
    New York Medical Coll, NY 10595 USA.
    Hentosh, Patricia
    University of Illinois, IL 61820 USA.
    Hirschey, Matthew D.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Hofseth, Lorne J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Holcombe, Randall F.
    Old Domin University, VA USA.
    Honoki, Kanya
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara, Japan.
    Hsu, Hsue-Yin
    University of S Carolina, SC 29208 USA.
    Huang, Gloria S.
    Mt Sinai School Med, NY USA.
    Jensen, Lasse D.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jiang, Wen G.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Jones, Lee W.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Karpowicz, Phillip A.
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Nicol Keith, W.
    SASTRA University, India.
    Kerkar, Sid P.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Khan, Gazala N.
    Henry Ford Hospital, MI 48202 USA.
    Khatami, Mahin
    National Institute Heatlh, MD USA.
    Ko, Young H.
    University of Maryland BioPark, MD USA.
    Kucuk, Omer
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Kulathinal, Rob J.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Kumar, Nagi B.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Kwon, Byoung S.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea; Tulane University, LA 70118 USA.
    Le, Anne
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Lea, Michael A.
    Rutgers State University, NJ USA.
    Lee, Ho-Young
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Lichtor, Terry
    Rush University, IL 60612 USA.
    Lin, Liang-Tzung
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Locasale, Jason W.
    Cornell University, NY 14853 USA.
    Lokeshwar, Bal L.
    Georgia Regents University, GA USA.
    Longo, Valter D.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Lyssiotis, Costas A.
    University of Michigan, MI USA; University of Michigan, MI USA.
    MacKenzie, Karen L.
    Childrens Cancer Institute Australia, Australia.
    Malhotra, Meenakshi
    McGill University, Canada.
    Marino, Maria
    University of Rome Tre, Italy.
    Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.
    Technology Pk Bizkaia, Spain.
    Matheu, Ander
    Biodonostia Institute, Spain.
    Maxwell, Christopher
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    McDonnell, Eoin
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Meeker, Alan K.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Mehrmohamadi, Mahya
    Cornell University, NY USA.
    Mehta, Kapil
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Michelotti, Gregory A.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Mohammad, Ramzi M.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Mohammed, Sulma I.
    Purdue University, IN 47907 USA.
    James Morre, D.
    Mor NuCo Inc, IN USA.
    Muqbil, Irfana
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Muralidhar, Vinayak
    Harvard University, MA USA; MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Murphy, Michael P.
    MRC Mitochondrial Biol Unit, England.
    Purnachandra Nagaraju, Ganji
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Nahta, Rita
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Niccolai, Elena
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Nowsheen, Somaira
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Panis, Carolina
    State University of West Parana, Brazil.
    Pantano, Francesco
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Parslow, Virginia R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Pawelec, Graham
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Pedersen, Peter L.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poore, Brad
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poudyal, Deepak
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Prakash, Satya
    McGill University, Canada.
    Prince, Mark
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Raffaghello, Lizzia
    Ist Giannina Gaslini, Italy.
    Rathmell, Jeffrey C.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Kimryn Rathmell, W.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Ray, Swapan K.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Reichrath, Joerg
    Saarland University Hospital, Germany.
    Rezazadeh, Sarallah
    University of Rochester, NY 14627 USA.
    Ribatti, Domenico
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Ricciardiello, Luigi
    National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Italy.
    Brooks Robey, R.
    University of Bologna, Italy; White River Junct Vet Affairs Medical Centre, VT USA.
    Rodier, Francis
    Geisel School Medical Dartmouth, NH USA; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Vasantha Rupasinghe, H. P.
    Institute Cancer Montreal, Canada.
    Luigi Russo, Gian
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Ryan, Elizabeth P.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Samadi, Abbas K.
    Sanus Biosciences, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro
    CNR, Italy.
    Sanders, Andrew J.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Santini, Daniele
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Sarkar, Malancha
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Sasada, Tetsuro
    Department of Immunology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Saxena, Neeraj K.
    University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Shackelford, Rodney E.
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Sharma, Dipali
    Kurume University, Japan.
    Shin, Dong M.
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Sidransky, David
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    David Siegelin, Markus
    Louisiana State University, LA 71105 USA.
    Signori, Emanuela
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA; Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Singh, Neetu
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; King Georges Medical University, India.
    Sivanand, Sharanya
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Sliva, Daniel
    Institute Translat Pharmacol, Italy; Purdue Research Pk, IN USA.
    Smythe, Carl
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Spagnuolo, Carmela
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Stafforini, Diana M.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Stagg, John
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Subbarayan, Pochi R.
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Sundin, Tabetha
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Talib, Wamidh H.
    Sentara Healthcare, VA USA.
    Thompson, Sarah K.
    Appl Science University, Jordan.
    Tran, Phuoc T.
    Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Ungefroren, Hendrik
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.
    MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Venkateswaran, Vasundara
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Vinay, Dass S.
    Tulane University, LA USA.
    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; New York University, NY USA.
    Wang, Zongwei
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; Harvard University, MA USA.
    Wellendx, Kathryn E.
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Whelan, Richard L.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Yang, Eddy S.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL USA.
    Yang, Huanjie
    Harbin Institute Technology, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Xujuan
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Yaswen, Paul
    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, CA USA.
    Yedjou, Clement
    Jackson State University, MS USA.
    Yin, Xin
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Zhu, Jiyue
    Washington State University, WA USA.
    Zollo, Massimo
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Designing a broad-spectrum integrative approach for cancer prevention and treatment2015In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 35, p. S276-S304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broadspectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested, many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to be relatively inexpensive, it should help us address stages and types of cancer that lack conventional treatment, and it may reduce relapse risks. A proposed agenda for future research is offered. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 95.
    Blockhuys, S.
    et al.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Celauro, E.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Feizi, A.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fierro-González, J.C.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wittung-Stafshede, P.
    Department Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Defining the human copper proteome and analysis of its expression variation in cancers.2017In: Metallomics : integrated biometal science, ISSN 1756-591X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 112-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Copper (Cu) is essential for living organisms, and acts as a cofactor in many metabolic enzymes. To avoid the toxicity of free Cu, organisms have specific transport systems that 'chaperone' the metal to targets. Cancer progression is associated with increased cellular Cu concentrations, whereby proliferative immortality, angiogenesis and metastasis are cancer hallmarks with defined requirements for Cu. The aim of this study is to gather all known Cu-binding proteins and reveal their putative involvement in cancers using the available database resources of RNA transcript levels. Using the database along with manual curation, we identified a total of 54 Cu-binding proteins (named the human Cu proteome). Next, we retrieved RNA expression levels in cancer versus normal tissues from the TCGA database for the human Cu proteome in 18 cancer types, and noted an intricate pattern of up- and downregulation of the genes in different cancers. Hierarchical clustering in combination with bioinformatics and functional genomics analyses allowed for the prediction of cancer-related Cu-binding proteins; these were specifically inspected for the breast cancer data. Finally, for the Cu chaperone ATOX1, which is the only Cu-binding protein proposed to have transcription factor activities, we validated its predicted over-expression in patient breast cancer tissue at the protein level. This collection of Cu-binding proteins, with RNA expression patterns in different cancers, will serve as an excellent resource for mechanistic-molecular studies of Cu-dependent processes in cancer.

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  • 96.
    Blockhuys, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Chalmers, Sweden.
    Liu, Na
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rani Agarwal, Nisha
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Enejder, Annika
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Loitto, Vesa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    X-radiation enhances the collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of colon cancer cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 71390-71399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer treatment still fails with local and distant relapses of the disease. It is hypothesized that radiotherapy could stimulate cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of X-radiation on collagen type I strap formation potential, i.e. matrix remodeling associated with mesenchymal cell migration, and behaviors of SW480, SW620, HCT116 p53(+/+) and HCT116 p53(-/-) colon cancer cells. We determined a radiation-induced increase in collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of SW480 and HCT116 p53(+/+). Further studies with HCT116 p53(+/+), indicated that after X-radiation strap forming cells have an increased motility. More, we detected a decrease in adhesion potential and mature integrin beta 1 expression, but no change in non-muscle myosin II expression for HCT116 p53(+/+) after X-radiation. Integrin beta 1 neutralization resulted in a decreased cell adhesion and collagen type I strap formation in both sham and X-radiated conditions. Our study indicates collagen type I strap formation as a potential mechanism of colon cancer cells with increased migration potential after X-radiation, and suggests that other molecules than integrin beta 1 and non-muscle myosin II are responsible for the radiation-induced collagen type I strap formation potential of colon cancer cells. This work encourages further molecular investigation of radiation-induced migration to improve rectal cancer treatment outcome.

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  • 97.
    Blockhuys, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rani Agarwal, Nisha
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; McMaster University, Canada; McMaster University, Canada.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Jarlsfelt, Ingvar
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy2017In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 22, no 10, article id 106006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  • 98.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 29824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and T-reg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and T-reg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the T-reg cell fraction was lower (p amp;lt; 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more T-reg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger.

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  • 99.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Cox-2 inhibition and the composition of inflammatory cell populations during early and mid-time tendon healing2017In: Muscles, ligaments and Tendons journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During early tendon healing, the cells within the regenerating tissue are, to a large part, inflammatory leukocytes (CD45+). In a rat Achilles tendon healing model, the inflammation resolves between 5 and 10 days. In the same model, Cox inhibitors (NSAIDs) impair healing when given during the first 5 days, but have a positive effect if given later. We tested the hypothesis that a Cox inhibitor would exert these effects by influencing inflammation, and thereby the composition of the inflammatory cell subpopulations.Methods: Achilles tendon transection was performed in 44 animals. Animals were randomized to either parecoxib or saline injections. Healing was evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 after surgery and by flow cytometry day 3 and 10.Results: Cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness were reduced by parecoxib 31, 33, and 25% respectively (p=0.005, p=0.002, and p=0.005). By flow cytometry, there was a strong effect of time (p<0.001) on virtually all inflammatory cell subpopulations (CD45, CD11b, CD68, CCR7, CD163, CD206, CD3, CD4), but no significant effect of parecoxib at any time point.Conclusion: The results suggest that the negative effects of Cox inhibitors on tendon healing might be exerted mainly via mechanisms not directly related to inflammatory cells.

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  • 100.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Systemic corticosteroids improve tendon healing when given after the early inflammatory phase2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 12468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation initiates tendon healing and then normally resolves more or less completely. Unresolved inflammation might disturb the remodeling process. We hypothesized that suppression of inflammation during the early remodeling phase by systemic dexamethasone treatment can improve healing. 36 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection and were randomized to dexamethasone or saline on days 0-4 after surgery (early inflammatory phase), and euthanasia day 7. Another 54 rats received injections days 5-9 (early remodeling phase) and were euthanized day 12 for mechanical, histological and flow cytometric evaluation. Dexamethasone treatment days 0-4 reduced the cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness by day 7 to less than half (p amp;lt; 0.001 for all), while material properties (peak stress and elastic modulus) were not significantly affected. In contrast, dexamethasone treatment days 5-9 increased peak force by 39% (p = 0.002) and stiffness by 58% (p amp;lt; 0.001). The cross-sectional area was reduced by 42% (p amp;lt; 0.001). Peak stress and elastic modulus were more than doubled (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Semi-quantitative histology at day 12 showed that late dexamethasone treatment improved collagen alignment, and flow cytometry revealed reduced numbers of CD8a(+) cytotoxic T cells in the tendon callus. These results suggest that downregulation of lingering inflammation during the early remodeling phase can improve healing.

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