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  • 51.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 52.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Higher burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes early after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Early identification of patients who could benefit from early re-intervention after catheter ablation is highly warranted. Our aim was to investigate the association between post-procedural burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) and the risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence. Methods and results A total of 125 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF were included. Patients underwent 7-day Holter recordings immediately post-procedural. The number of SVEC in post-procedural Holter recordings was categorized into quartiles: 0-72, 73-212, 213-782 and amp;gt;= 783 SVEC/day. Long-term AF recurrence was defined as a combined endpoint of AF amp;gt;= 1 min during follow-up Holter recordings, cardioversion or hospitalization for AF after a 3-month blanking period and within 24 months of follow-up. High post-procedural supraventricular ectopy burden was associated with an increased risk of long-term AF recurrence in a dose-dependent manner (amp;gt;= 783 SVEC: HR 4.6 [1.9-11.5], P amp;lt; 0.001) irrespective of AF recurrence during the blanking period or other risk factors. In patients with early AF recurrence amp;lt; 90 days after catheter ablation ectopy burden was also highly predictive of long-term AF recurrence (SVEC amp;gt;= 213: HR 3.0 [1.3-6.7], P = 0.007). Correspondingly, patients with early AF recurrence but low ectopy burden remained at low risk of long-term AF recurrence after the blanking period. Conclusion Our results indicate that post-procedural ectopy burden is highly associated with long-term AF recurrence and could be a potent risk marker for selection of patients for early re-ablation. Development of future ablation risk stratification and strategies should include focus on post-procedural ectopy burden.

  • 53.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Antiarrhythmic medication is superior to catheter ablation in suppressing supraventricular ectopic complexes in patients with atrial fibrillation2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 244, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) originating in the pulmonary veins are known triggers of atrial fibrillation (AF) which led to the development of pulmonary vein isolation for AF. However, the long-term prevalence of SVEC after catheter ablation (CA) as compared to antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) is unknown. Our aims were to compare the prevalence of SVEC after AAD and CA and to estimate the association between baseline SVEC burden and AF burden during 24 months of follow-up. Methods: Patients with paroxysmal AF (N = 260) enrolled in the MANTRA PAF trial were treated with AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128). At baseline and 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months follow-up patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring to assess SVEC and AF burden. We compared SVEC burden between treatments with Wilcoxon sum rank test. Results: Patients treated with AAD had significantly lower daily SVEC burden during follow-up as compared to CA (AAD: 19 [6-58] versus CA: 39 [14-125], p = 0.003). SVEC burden increased post-procedurally followed by a decrease after CA whereas after AAD SVEC burden decreased and stabilized after 3 months of follow-up. Patients with low SVEC burden had low AF burden after both treatments albeit this was more pronounced after CA at 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: AAD was superior to CA in suppressing SVEC burden after treatment of paroxysmal AF. After CA SVEC burden increased immediately post-procedural followed by a decrease whereas after AAD an early decrease was observed. Lower SVEC burden was highly associated with lower AF burden during follow-up especially after CA. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 54.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstadf, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    The impact of supraventricular ectopic complexes in different age groups and risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation after antiarrhythmic medication or catheter ablation2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 250, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) are known risk factors of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the impact of SVEC in different age groups is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of AF recurrence with higher SVEC burden in patients +/- 57 years, respectively, after treatment with antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) or catheter ablation (CA). Methods: In total, 260 patients with LVEF amp;gt;40% and age amp;lt;= 70 years were randomized to AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal AF. All patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring at baseline, and after 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months and were categorized according to median age +/- 57 years. We used multi-variate Cox regression analyses and we defined high SVEC burden at 3 months of follow-up as the upper 75th percentile amp;gt;195 SVEC/day. AF recurrence was defined as AF amp;gt;= 1 min, AF-related cardioversion or hospitalization. Results: Age amp;gt;57 years were significantly associated with higher AF recurrence rate after CA (58% vs 36%, p = 0.02). After CA, we observed a higher SVEC burden during follow-up in patients amp;gt;57 years which was not observed in the younger age group treatedwith CA (p = 0.006). High SVEC burden at 3 months after CA was associated with AF recurrence in older patients but not in younger patients (amp;gt;57 years: HR 3.4 [1.4-7.9], p = 0.005). We did not find any age-related differences after AAD. Conclusion: We found that younger and older patients respond differently to CA and that SVEC burden was only associated with AF recurrence in older patients. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 55.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wierzbicka, Aneta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jorn
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Karedal, Monica
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Comprehensive proteome analysis of nasal lavage samples after controlled exposure to welding nanoparticles shows an induced acute phase and a nuclear receptor, LXR/RXR, activation that influence the status of the extracellular matrix2018In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that many welders experience respiratory symptoms. During the welding process a large number of airborne nanosized particles are generated, which might be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms behind observed symptoms is still partly lacking, although inflammation is suggested to play a central role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of welding fume particle exposure on the proteome expression level in welders suffering from respiratory symptoms, and changes in protein mediators in nasal lavage samples were analyzed. Such mediators will be helpful to clarify the pathomechanisms behind welding fume particle-induced effects. Methods: In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with work-related symptoms in the lower airways during the last month were exposed to mild-steel welding fume particles (1 mg/m(3)) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Nasal lavage samples were collected before, immediately after, and the day after exposure. The proteins in the nasal lavage were analyzed with two different mass spectrometry approaches, label-free discovery shotgun LC-MS/MS and a targeted selected reaction monitoring LC-MS/MS analyzing 130 proteins and four in vivo peptide degradation products. Results: The analysis revealed 30 significantly changed proteins that were associated with two main pathways; activation of acute phase response signaling and activation of LXR/RXR, which is a nuclear receptor family involved in lipid signaling. Connective tissue proteins and proteins controlling the degradation of such tissues, including two different matrix metalloprotease proteins, MMP8 and MMP9, were among the significantly changed enzymes and were identified as important key players in the pathways. Conclusion: Exposure to mild-steel welding fume particles causes measurable changes on the proteome level in nasal lavage matrix in exposed welders, although no clinical symptoms were manifested. The results suggested that the exposure causes an immediate effect on the proteome level involving acute phase proteins and mediators regulating lipid signaling Proteases involved in maintaining the balance between the formation and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins are important key proteins in the induced effects.

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  • 56.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen Marg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Svensson, Christian R
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Bo A G
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  • 57.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California Irvine, USA.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The links between chronic illness, psychological well-being, and social support have previously been established. Social isolation and loneliness have shown an increased mortality risk for those with heart failure (HF). Increasingly more people with HF are living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but only a few small-scale studies have focused on social support in this population.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore factors related to perceived social support in a large cohort of individuals with HF living with an ICD.

    METHODS: All eligible adult ICD recipients in the Swedish ICD registry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. For this analysis, those with HF and complete data on perceived social support were included (N = 1550; age, 67.3 (SD, 9.8) years; 19.5% female).

    RESULTS: Most reported a high level of social support, but 18% did not. In logistic regression, living alone was the greatest predictor of low/medium support. Lower social support for those living alone was associated with poorer perceived health status, having symptoms of depression, and experiencing low perceived control. For those living with someone, lower support was associated with female gender, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and less control. Heart failure status and perceived symptom severity were not related to the outcome.

    CONCLUSION: One in five participants reported low/medium social support. Our study underlines the complex relationships between perceived social support, psychological well-being and perceived control over the heart condition. Multiple aspects need to be taken into account when developing interventions to provide psychosocial support and optimize outcomes in this patient group.

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  • 58.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceptions of Information and Communication Technology as Support for Family Members of Persons With Heart Failure: Qualitative Study2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 7, article id e13521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) affects not only the person diagnosed with the syndrome but also family members, who often have the role of informal carers. The needs of these carers are not always met, and information and communications technology (ICT) could have the potential to support them in their everyday life. However, knowledge is lacking about how family members perceive ICT and see opportunities for this technology to support them. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of ICT solutions as supportive aids among family members of persons with HF. Methods: A qualitative design was applied. A total of 8 focus groups, comprising 23 family members of persons affected by HF, were conducted between March 2015 and January 2017. Participants were recruited from 1 hospital in Sweden. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to find family members of persons with symptomatic HF from diverse backgrounds. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed 4 categories and 9 subcategories. The first category, about how ICT could provide relevant support, included descriptions of how ICT could be used for communication with health care personnel, for information and communication retrieval, plus opportunities to interact with persons in similar life situations and to share support with peers and extended family. The second category, about how ICT could provide access, entailed how ICT could offer solutions not bound by time or place and how it could be both timely and adaptable to different life situations. ICT could also provide an arena for family members to which they might not otherwise have had access. The third category concerned how ICT could be too impersonal and how it could entail limited personal interaction and individualization, which could lead to concerns about usability. It was emphasized that ICT could not replace physical meetings. The fourth category considered how ICT could be out of scope, reflecting the fact that some family members were generally uninterested in ICT and had difficulties envisioning how it could be used for support. It was also discussed as more of a solution for the future. Conclusions: Family members described multiple uses for ICT and agreed that ICT could provide access to relevant sources of information from which family members could potentially exchange support. ICT was also considered to have its limitations and was out of scope for some but with expected use in the future. Even though some family members seemed hesitant about ICT solutions in general, this might not mean they are unreceptive to suggestions about their usage in, for example, health care. Thus, a variety of factors should be considered to facilitate future implementations of ICT tools in clinical practice.

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  • 59.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Clinical Skills Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Berndtzon, Magnus
    Metodikum - Skill Centre of Medical Simulation Region County Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Carlzon, Liisa
    Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Research, Education and Development and Innovation, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Södersved Källestedt, Marie-Louise
    Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Confident but not theoretically grounded: experienced simulation educators perceptions of their own professional development2017In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 8, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature.

    Objectives: To explore changes in experienced simulation educators’ perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time.

    Methods: A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis.

    Results: Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor’s pedagogical development.

    Conclusion: Experienced simulation educators’ pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

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  • 60.
    Almeida, Nuno
    et al.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Papachristidis, Alexandros
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Pearson, Peter
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Imre Sarvari, Sebastian
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Edvardsen, Thor
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Monaghan, Mark
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Gerard, Olivier
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dhooge, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Left atrial volumetric assessment using a novel automated framework for 3D echocardiography: a multi-centre analysis2017In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1008-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This study aims at validating a software tool for automated segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D echocardiography. Methods and results The LA segmentation tool uses a dual-chamber model of the left side of the heart to automatically detect and track the atrio-ventricular plane and the LA endocardium in transthoracic 3D echocardiography. The tool was tested in a dataset of 121 ultrasound images from patients with several cardiovascular pathologies (in a multi-centre setting), and the resulting volumes were compared with those assessed manually by experts in a blinded analysis using conventional contouring. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the automated method and the manual references, with differences (mean +/- 1.96 SD) of 0.5 +/- 5.7 mL for LA minimum volume and -1.6 +/- 9.7 mL for LA maximum volume (comparable to the inter-observer variability of manual tracings). The automated tool required no user interaction in 93% of the recordings, while 4% required a single click and only 2% required contour adjustments, reducing considerably the amount of time and effort required for LA volumetric analysis. Conclusion The automated tool was validated in a multi-centre setting, providing quantification of the LA volume over the cardiac cycle with minimal user interaction. The results of the automated analysis were in agreement with those estimated manually by experts. This study shows that such approach has clinical utility for the assessment of the LA morphology and function, automating and facilitating the time-consuming task of analysing 3D echocardiographic recordings.

  • 61.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt Andersson
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

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  • 62.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis2017In: Recidivating thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Recurrent thrombocytopenia, renal failure and thymitis of unknown cause. A case report2017In: Vaskulär medicin, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 24-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 45-year old man was admitted to an intensive care unit with flank pain and thrombocytopenia. He was treated for a suspected septicaemia but turned out to have signs of an unknown collagenosis which responded to plasma exchange, thymectomi and corticosteroids. Kidney biopsy revealed an intense tubulointerstitial reaction with suspected microthrombotic lesions in the vessels. The condition reoccurred with thrombocytopenia a couple of months later but responded to plasma exchange, corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil. An unknown collagenosis with findings of autoimmune thymitis and tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most probable cause of the condition.

  • 64.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exosomes in specific fractions of the boar ejaculate contain CD44: A marker for epididymosomes?2019In: Theriogenology, ISSN 0093-691X, E-ISSN 1879-3231, Vol. 140, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seminal plasma (SP) is a complex fluid containing proteins, peptides, enzymes, hormones as well as extracellular vesicles (EVs). The SP interacts with spermatozoa and the inner cell lining of the female genital tract, adsorbing proteins and exosomes that modulate sperm functions and female immune responsiveness. In the present study, boar sperm-free SP was studied using flow cytometry (FC) after membrane tetraspanins (CD9, CD63 and CD81) and membrane receptor CD44 marking of non-enriched (whole SP) or gradient fractions enriched through two-step discontinuous KBr-density-gradient ultracentrifugation, in whole ejaculate or in selected ejaculate fractions. The results, evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, confirmed the presence of exosomes in all fractions of the pig SP. Noteworthy, these pig SP-exosomes were CD44-bearing when analysed by FC, with bands detected by western blotting (WB) at the expected 85 kD size. The two-step discontinuous KBr-density-gradient ultracentrifugation enriched the population of exosomes in two specific gradient fractions, indicating exosomes (either prostasomes or epididymosomes) could be separated from low-density lipoprotein (LDL) but they co-sediment with the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bearing fraction. The findings pave for the selective isolation of exosomes in functional studies of their function when interacting with spermatozoa, the oocyte and/or the female genitalia, including hyaluronan-CD44 interplay. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • 65.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Berntorp, Karolina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Christiansen, Evald H.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjorg J.
    Univ Hosp Iceland, Iceland.
    Sandhall, Lennart
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Reitan, Christian
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gotberg, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Reclassification of Treatment Strategy With Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio and Fractional Flow Reserve A Substudy From the iFR-SWEDEHEART Trial2018In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1936-8798, E-ISSN 1876-7605, Vol. 11, no 20, p. 2084-2094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES The authors sought to compare reclassification of treatment strategy following instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) and fractional flow reserve (FFR). BACKGROUND iFR was noninferior to FFR in 2 large randomized controlled trials in guiding coronary revascularization. Reclassification of treatment strategy by FFR is well-studied, but similar reports on iFR are lacking. METHODS The iFR-SWEDEHEART (Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Versus Fractional Flow Reserve in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris or Acute Coronary Syndrome Trial) study randomized 2,037 participants with stable angina or acute coronary syndrome to treatment guided by iFR or FFR. Interventionalists entered the preferred treatment (optimal medical therapy [OMT], percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], or coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG]) on the basis of coronary angiograms, and the final treatment decision was mandated by the iFR/FFR measurements. RESULTS In the iFR/FFR (n = 1,009/n = 1,004) populations, angiogram-based treatment approaches were similar (p = 0.50) with respect to OMT (38%/35%), PCI of 1 (37%/39%), 2 (15%/16%), and 3 vessels (2%/2%) and CABG (8%/8%). iFR and FFR reclassified 40% and 41% of patients, respectively (p = 0.78). The majority of reclassifications were conversion of PCI to OMT in both the iFR/FFR groups (31.4%/29.0%). Reclassification increased with increasing number of lesions evaluated (odds ratio per evaluated lesion for FFR: 1.46 [95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 1.76] vs. iFR 1.37 [95% confidence interval: 1.18 to 1.59]). Reclassification rates for patients with 1, 2, and 3 assessed vessels were 36%, 52%, and 53% (p amp;lt; 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Reclassification of treatment strategy of intermediate lesions was common and occurred in 40% of patients with iFR or FFR. The most frequent reclassification was conversion from PCI to OMT regardless of physiology modality. Irrespective of the physiological index reclassification of angiogram-based treatment strategy increased with the number of lesions evaluated. (c) 2018 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 66.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Physiology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Phase-contrast MRI volume flow - a comparison of breath held and navigator based acquisitions2016In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 16, no 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 2D phase-contrast flow measurement has been regarded as the gold standard in blood flow measurements and can be performed with free breathing or breath held techniques. We hypothesized that the accuracy of flow measurements obtained with segmented phase-contrast during breath holding, and in particular higher number of k-space segments, would be non-inferior compared to navigator phase-contrast. Volumes obtained from anatomic segmentation of cine MRI and Doppler echocardiography were used for additional reference. Methods: Forty patients, five women and 35 men, mean age 65 years (range 53-80), were randomly selected and consented to the study. All underwent EKG-gated cardiac MRI including breath hold cine, navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast MRI and breath hold phase-contrast MRI using k-space segmentation factors 3 and 5, as well as transthoracic echocardiography within 2 days. Results: In navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast flow, mean stroke volume and cardiac output were 79.7 +/- 17.1 ml and 5071 +/- 1192 ml/min, respectively. The duration of the acquisition was 50 +/- 6 s. With k-space segmentation factor 3, the corresponding values were 77.7 ml +/- 17.5 ml and 4979 +/- 1211 ml/min (p = 0.15 vs navigator). The duration of the breath hold was 17 +/- 2 s. K-space segmentation factor 5 gave mean stroke volume 77.9 +/- 16.4 ml, cardiac output 5142 +/- 1197 ml/min (p = 0.33 vs navigator), and breath hold time 11 +/- 1 s. Anatomical segmentation of cine gave mean stroke volume and cardiac output 91.2 +/- 20.8 ml and 5963 +/- 1452 ml/min, respectively. Echocardiography was reliable in 20 of the 40 patients. The mean diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract was 20.7 +/- 1.5 mm, stroke volume 78.3 ml +/- 15.2 ml and cardiac output 5164 +/- 1249 ml/min. Conclusions: In forty consecutive patients with coronary heart disease, breath holding and segmented k-space sampling techniques for phase-contrast flow produced stroke volumes and cardiac outputs similar to those obtained with free-breathing navigator based phase-contrast MRI, using less time. The values obtained agreed fairly well with Doppler echocardiography while there was a larger difference when compared with anatomical volume determinations using SSFP (steady state free precession) cine MRI.

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  • 67.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Characterization and estimation of turbulence-related wall shear stress in patient-specific pulsatile blood flow2019In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 85, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed, turbulent-like blood flow promotes chaotic wall shear stress (WSS) environments, impairing essential endothelial functions and increasing the susceptibility and progression of vascular diseases. These flow characteristics are today frequently detected at various anatomical, lesion and intervention-related sites, while their role as a pathological determinant is less understood. To present-day, numerous WSS-based descriptors have been proposed to characterize the spatiotemporal nature of the WSS disturbances, however, without differentiation between physiological laminar oscillations and turbulence-related WSS (tWSS) fluctuations. Also, much attention has been focused on magnetic resonance (MR) WSS estimations, so far with limited success; promoting the need of a near-wall surrogate marker. In this study, a new approach is explored to characterize the tWSS, by taking advantage of the tensor characteristics of the fluctuating WSS correlations, providing both a magnitude and an anisotropy measure of the disturbances. These parameters were studied in two patient-specific coarctation models (sever and mild), using large eddy simulations, and correlated against near-wall reciprocal Reynolds stress parameters. Collectively, results showed distinct regions of differing tWSS characteristics, features which were sensitive to changes in flow conditions. Generally, the post-stenotic tWSS was governed by near axisymmetric fluctuations, findings that where not consistent with conventional WSS disturbance predictors. At the 2-3 mm wall-offset range, a strong linear correlation was found between tWSS magnitude and near-wall turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), in contrast to the anisotropy indices, suggesting that MR-measured TKE can be used to assess elevated tWSS regions while tWSS anisotropy estimates request well-resolved simulation methods. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 68.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Correction: Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation: Impact of Virtual Interventions (vol 6, pg 281, 2015)2015In: Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1869-408X, E-ISSN 1869-4098, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 577-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where the pre-stenotic hypoplastic segment may limit the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotem-poral maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the post-stenotic jet, showing a versatile response between the CoA dilatations. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre-and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  • 69.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Multidirectional WSS disturbances in stenotic turbulent flows: A pre- and post-intervention study in an aortic coarctation2017In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wall shear stress (WSS) disturbances are commonly expressed at sites of abnormal flow obstructions and may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In laminar flows these disturbances have recently been assessed by the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which accounts for the WSS multidirectionality. Site-specific estimations of WSS disturbances in pulsatile transitional and turbulent type of flows are more challenging due to continuous and unpredictable changes in WSS behavior. In these complex flow settings, the transWSS may serve as a more comprehensive descriptor for assessing WSS disturbances of general nature compared to commonly used parameters. In this study large eddy simulations (LES) were used to investigate the transWSS properties in flows subjected to different pathological turbulent flow conditions, governed by a patient-specific model of an aortic coarctation pre and post balloon angioplasty. Results showed that regions of strong near-wall turbulence were collocated with regions of elevated transWSS and turbulent WSS, while in more transitional-like near-wall flow regions a closer resemblance was found between transWSS and low, and oscillatory WSS. Within the frame of this study, the transWSS parameter demonstrated a more multi-featured picture of WSS disturbances when exposed to different types of flow regimes, characteristics which were not depicted by the other parameters alone. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 70.
    Andersson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jägervall, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wang, Chunliang
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    How to measure renal artery stenosis - a retrospective comparison of morphological measurement approaches in relation to hemodynamic significance2015In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 15, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although it is well known that renal artery stenosis may cause renovascular hypertension, it is unclear how the degree of stenosis should best be measured in morphological images. The aim of this study was to determine which morphological measures from Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) are best in predicting whether a renal artery stenosis is hemodynamically significant or not. Methods: Forty-seven patients with hypertension and a clinical suspicion of renovascular hypertension were examined with CTA, MRA, captopril-enhanced renography (CER) and captopril test (Ctest). CTA and MRA images of the renal arteries were analyzed by two readers using interactive vessel segmentation software. The measures included minimum diameter, minimum area, diameter reduction and area reduction. In addition, two radiologists visually judged the diameter reduction without automated segmentation. The results were then compared using limits of agreement and intra-class correlation, and correlated with the results from CER combined with Ctest (which were used as standard of reference) using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Results: A total of 68 kidneys had all three investigations (CTA, MRA and CER + Ctest), where 11 kidneys (16.2 %) got a positive result on the CER + Ctest. The greatest area under ROC curve (AUROC) was found for the area reduction on MRA, with a value of 0.91 (95 % confidence interval 0.82-0.99), excluding accessory renal arteries. As comparison, the AUROC for the radiologists visual assessments on CTA and MRA were 0.90 (0.82-0.98) and 0.91 (0.83-0.99) respectively. None of the differences were statistically significant. Conclusions: No significant differences were found between the morphological measures in their ability to predict hemodynamically significant stenosis, but a tendency of MRA having higher AUROC than CTA. There was no significant difference between measurements made by the radiologists and measurements made with fuzzy connectedness segmentation. Further studies are required to definitely identify the optimal measurement approach.

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  • 71.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holmbom, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Delay of appropriate antibiotic treatment is associated with high mortality in patients with community-onset sepsis in a Swedish setting2019In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1223-1234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial in patients with sepsis and septic shock. Studies often focus on time to first dose of appropriate antibiotics, but subsequent dosing is equally important. Our aim was to investigate the impact of fulfillment of early treatment, with focus on appropriate administration of first and second doses of antibiotics, on 28-day mortality in patients with community-onset severe sepsis and septic shock. A retrospective study on adult patients admitted to the emergency department with community-onset sepsis and septic shock was conducted 2012-2013. The criterion early appropriate antibiotic treatment was defined as administration of the first dose of adequate antibiotics within 1h, and the second dose given with less than 25% delay after the recommended dose interval. A high-risk patient was defined as a septic patient with either shock within 24h after arrival or red triage level on admittance according to the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System Adult. Primary endpoint was 28-day mortality. Of 90 patients, less than one in four (20/87) received early appropriate antibiotic treatment, and only one in three (15/44) of the high-risk patients. The univariate analysis showed a more than threefold higher mortality among high-risk patients not receiving early appropriate antibiotic treatment. Multivariable analysis identified early non-appropriate antibiotic treatment as an independent predictor of mortality with an odds ratio for mortality of 10.4. Despite that the importance of early antibiotic treatment has been established for decades, adherence to this principle was very poor.

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  • 72.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Internal Med, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction contacting primary healthcare before hospitalisation: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The characteristics of patients with on-going myocardial infarction (MI) contacting the primary healthcare (PHC) centre before hospitalisation are not well known. Prompt diagnosis is crucial in patients with MI, but many patients delay seeking medical care. The aims of this study was to 1) describe background characteristics, symptoms, actions and delay times in patients contacting the PHC before hospitalisation when falling ill with an acute MI, 2) compare those patients with acute MI patients not contacting the PHC, and 3) explore factors associated with a PHC contact in acute MI patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicentre study, enrolling consecutive patients with MI within 24 hours of admission to hospital from Nov 2012 until Feb 2014. Results: A total of 688 patients with MI, 519 men and 169 women, were included; the mean age was 66 +/- 11 years. One in five people contacted PHC instead of the recommended emergency medical services (EMS), and 94% of these patients experienced cardinal symptoms of an acute MI; i.e., chest pain, and/or radiating pain in the arms, and/or cold sweat. Median delay time from symptom-onset-to-decision-to-seek-care was 2:15 hours in PHC patients and 0:40 hours in non-PHC patients (pamp;lt;0.01). The probability of utilising the PHC before hospitalisation was associated with fluctuating symptoms (OR 1.74), pain intensity (OR 0.90) symptoms during off-hours (OR 0.42), study hospital (OR 3.49 and 2.52, respectively, for two of the county hospitals) and a final STEMI diagnosis (OR 0.58). Conclusions: Ambulance services are still underutilized in acute MI patients. A substantial part of the patients contacts their primary healthcare centre before they are diagnosed with MI, although experiencing cardinal symptoms such as chest pain. There is need for better knowledge in the population about symptoms of MI and adequate pathways to qualified care. Knowledge and awareness amongst primary healthcare professionals on the occurrence of MI patients is imperative.

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  • 73.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

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  • 74.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Res Sect, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

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  • 75.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Sweden Lorraine Evangelista, RN, Prof, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The associations between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure – a prospective observational study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite both play a crucial role for health outcomes and quality of life in patients with heart failure. Nevertheless, both of these key functions are frequently decreased in patients with heart failure. Whilst most attention focuses independently on the physical activity levels, the associations with appetite has been insufficiently investigated. The aim was therefore to explore the associations between physical activity and appetite in community dwelling heart failure patients.

    Methods: This prospective observational study consisted of 186 patients with symptomatic heart failure of whom 56 (30%) were women and 130 (70%) were men. Mean age was 70.7 (SD=11 years), the majority had NYHA-class II, 114 (63%). Objective and subjective methods were used to measure physical activity include a wearable actigraph (SenceWear) for 4 days and six minutes’ walk test. The actigraph calculate total energy expenditure, active energy expenditure, number of steps and METs daily average index. Patients also stated their physical activity level on a numeric rating scale. A self-reported questionnaire, the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess appetite. Simple linear regression was conducted to explore the associations between physical activity and appetite at baseline and at 18-month follow-up.

    Results: In general, the levels of physical activity in this sample was low and appetite was poor. There was a significant association between objective physical activity measures and appetite at baseline ranging between (p=<0.001-0.041). The number of steps and walking distance had the strongest association, each explaining 6% and 7% of the total variance in appetite. At the 18-month follow-up, all objective and subjective physical activity measures were associated with appetite (p=0.001-0.035) with the number of steps being most strongly associated (p=<0.001) explaining 14% of the total variation in appetite.

    Conclusions: Patients with heart failure who are more physically active experiences better appetite. These findings underscore the importance of placing greater attention on both physical activity and appetite in clinical practice as these factors has implications for patient’s health outcomes. Further longitudinally oriented studies are needed to determine whether there is a causal relationship between physical activity and appetite in heart failure populations.

    Keywords: Appetite, Heart Failure, Physical activity

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    The associations between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure – a prospective observational study
  • 76.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 77.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Lennie, Terry
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Depressive symptoms as a moderator and mediator of the relationship between physical activity, appetite and perceived health among patients with heart failure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Depressive symptoms have been shown to directly influence perceived health among persons with heart failure (HF). Decreased physical activity and appetite may also be predictive of poor perceived health.The purposes of this study were to determine whether appetite and physical activity predicted perceived health, and to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated their relationship with perceived health.

    Methods: A total of 184 patients with mild to severe HF were included. Appetite, depressive symptoms and perceived health were measured by self-report questionnaires (Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire and EuroQol 5D index). Physical activity was measured by SenceWearTM for 6 days. A separate series of multiple linear regression analyses were run to determine whether depressive symptoms mediated or moderated the relationship between physical activity and perceived health, and between appetite and perceived health.

    Results: Higher physical activity predicted better perceived health (ß=0.202, p=.006) but the strength of the association decreased (ß=0.13, p=.048) when depressive symptoms were included in the model. There was a significant mediation effect for depressive symptoms on perceived health (sobel=2.03, p=.041) (Fig 1). Appetite was a significant predictor of perceived health. Examination of this association among those with and without depressive symptoms, however showed positive association between appetite and perceived health remained only for patients without depressive symptoms demonstrating a moderating effect (p<.001) (Fig 2).

    Conclusion: Identifying and treating depression simultaneously while addressing appetite and physical activity may be key to improving perceived health among persons with HF.

  • 78.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Centre Health Evaluat and Outcome Science, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Correction: Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure (vol 21, pg 954, 2015)2016In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 245-245Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 79.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western University, Canada; Providence Health Care Research Institute, Canada.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 80.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

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  • 81.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine L
    Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California, Irvine, CA,.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Physical activity and appetite in patients with stable heart failure – A cross sectional study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California, Irvine, CA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with poor appetite in patients with heart failure.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Andreassen, A. K.
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Andersson, B.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, F.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Eiskjaer, H.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Radegran, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Gude, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Solbu, D.
    Novartis Norge AS, Norway.
    Karason, K.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Arora, S.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Dellgren, G.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gullestad, L.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Everolimus Initiation With Early Calcineurin Inhibitor Withdrawal in De Novo Heart Transplant Recipients: Three-Year Results From the Randomized SCHEDULE Study2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1238-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a randomized, open-label trial, de novo heart transplant recipients were randomized to everolimus (3-6ng/mL) with reduced-exposure calcineurin inhibitor (CNI; cyclosporine) to weeks 7-11 after transplant, followed by increased everolimus exposure (target 6-10ng/mL) with cyclosporine withdrawal or standard-exposure cyclosporine. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. A total of 110 of 115 patients completed the 12-month study, and 102 attended a follow-up visit at month 36. Mean measured GFR (mGFR) at month 36 was 77.4mL/min (standard deviation [SD] 20.2mL/min) versus 59.2mL/min (SD 17.4mL/min) in the everolimus and CNI groups, respectively, a difference of 18.3mL/min (95% CI 11.1-25.6mL/min; p &lt; 0.001) in the intention to treat population. Multivariate analysis showed treatment to be an independent determinant of mGFR at month 36. Coronary intravascular ultrasound at 36 months revealed significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy in the everolimus group compared with the CNI group. Biopsy-proven acute rejection grade 2R occurred in 10.2% and 5.9% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively, during months 12-36. Serious adverse events occurred in 37.3% and 19.6% of everolimus- and CNI-treated patients, respectively (p=0.078). These results suggest that early CNI withdrawal after heart transplantation supported by everolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids with lymphocyte-depleting induction is safe at intermediate follow-up. This regimen, used selectively, may offer adequate immunosuppressive potency with a sustained renal advantage. A follow-up study of the SCHEDULE trial, which randomized de novo heart transplant recipients to everolimus with cyclosporine discontinuation or to standard-exposure cyclosporine, shows that measured glomerular filtration rate remains significantly higher in the everolimus group at three years posttransplant, with significantly reduced progression of allograft vasculopathy compared to cyclosporine therapy.

  • 84.
    Andreasson, Frida
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Aidemark, Jan
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hanson, Elizabeth Jane
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr, Sweden.
    Lifeworld in co-designing with informal carers2019In: JOURNAL OF ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 2398-6263, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on carers’ experiences of being involved in the development of a web-based support programme for carers of people with heart failure (CPwHF), and discuss the challenges related to their involvement in the development process. The focus was on the different phases in the project as well as the methodological challenges and opportunities that occurred in the user group sessions conducted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research adopt an explorative design studying a co-design process to develop an information and communication technology based support programme for and with CPwHF. Habermas’ concepts of lifeworld and system are used as a theoretical framework to analyse the co-design process employed in the study.

    Findings

    Reflecting on the co-design approach adopted, the findings highlight the methodological challenges that arise with carer involvement and the possible tensions that occur between researchers’ ambitions to include users in the design process, and the goal of developing a product or service, in the different phases of the design process.

    Originality/value

    Findings highlight that there is a tension between the system and lifeworld in the co-design process which are not totally compatible. The paper highlights that there is a need to develop flexible and reflexive human-centred design methodologies, able to meet carers’ needs and ideas, and at the same time balance this with proposed research outcomes.

  • 85.
    Angelin, Bo
    et al.
    Karolinska University, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Kristensen, Jens D.
    Karo Bio AB, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Karolinska University, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Bo
    Karo Bio AB, Sweden.
    Klein, Irwin
    NYU, NY USA.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Stockholm Heart Centre, Sweden.
    Chester Ridgway, E.
    University of Colorado, CO USA.
    Ladenson, Paul W.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Reductions in serum levels of LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, triglycerides and lipoprotein(a) in hypercholesterolaemic patients treated with the liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist eprotirome2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 277, no 3, p. 331-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLiver-selective thyromimetic agents could provide a new approach for treating dyslipidaemia. MethodsWe performed a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of eprotirome, a liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist, in 98 patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. After previous drug wash-out and dietary run-in, patients received 100 or 200gday(-1) eprotirome or placebo for 12weeks. The primary end-point was change in serum LDL cholesterol; secondary end-points included changes in other lipid parameters and safety measures. ResultsEprotirome treatment at 100 and 200g daily reduced serum LDL cholesterol levels by 235% and 31 +/- 4%, respectively, compared with 2 +/- 6% for placebo (Pless than0.0001). Similar reductions were seen in non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B, whereas serum levels of HDL cholesterol and apo A-I were unchanged. There were also considerable reductions in serum triglycerides and lipoprotein(a), in particular in patients with elevated levels at baseline. There was no evidence of adverse effects on heart or bone and no changes in serum thyrotropin or triiodothyronine, although the thyroxine level decreased. Low-grade increases in liver enzymes were evident in most patients. ConclusionIn hypercholesterolaemic patients, the liver-selective thyromimetic eprotirome decreased serum levels of atherogenic lipoproteins without signs of extra-hepatic side effects. Selective stimulation of hepatic thyroid hormone receptors may be an attractive way to modulate lipid metabolism in hyperlipidaemia.

  • 86.
    Angelison, L.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Östra, Sweden.
    Karling, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, U.
    Västmanlands Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, J.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Thorn, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Björk, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hindorf, U.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Löfberg, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bajor, A.
    Södera Älvsborgs sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammarlund, P.
    Ängelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Grip, O.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Torp, J.
    Kristianstad Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Marsal, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hertervig, E.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Long-term outcome of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis: a Swedish multicentre study of 250 patients2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Real-life long-term data on infliximab treatment in ulcerative colitis are limited. Aim To study the long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in chronic active ulcerative colitis and possible predictors of colectomy and response were also examined. Methods A retrospective multi-centre study of infliximab treatment in 250 patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis with inclusion criteria: age 18 years, ambulatory treated, steroid-dependent or intolerant and/or immunomodulator refractory or intolerant. Results Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 123/250 patients (49.2%) at 12 months and in 126/250 patients at a median follow-up of 2.9 years (50.4%). Primary response at 3 months was achieved by 190/250 (76.0%) patients and associated with a high probability of response 168/190 (88.4%) at 12 months and 143/190 (75.3%) at follow-up. Long-term rate of colectomy in primary responders was 6/190 (3.2%) at 12 months and 27/190 (14.2%) at last follow-up. Failure to achieve response at 3 months was associated with a high risk of subsequent colectomy, 29/60 (48.3%) at 12 months and 41/60 (68.3%) at follow-up. Response at 12 months was associated with a low risk of subsequent colectomy, 14/181 (7.7%) compared with non-response 19/34 (55.9%) (P amp;lt; 0.0001). Non-response at 3 months was an independent predictor of subsequent colectomy (HR = 9.40, 95% CI = 5.10-17.35, P amp;lt; 0.001). Concomitant azathioprine therapy did not influence outcome in terms of colectomy. Conclusions Long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis is excellent especially in patients who respond to induction treatment. Conversely, non-response at 3 months predicts a poor outcome, with a high risk of subsequent colectomy.

  • 87.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Knopf, Jasmin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Bilyy, Rostyslav
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany; Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Vovk, Volodymyr
    Danylo Halytsky Lviv Natl Med Univ, Ukraine.
    Sundgren, Pia C.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Munoz, Luis E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Herrmann, Martin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Germany.
    Höög, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Active NET formation in Libman-Sacks endocarditis without antiphospholipid antibodies: A dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus2018In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 310-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been highlighted in several systemic inflammatory diseases, their clinical correlates and potential pathological role remain obscure. Herein, we describe a dramatic onset of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with clear-cut pathogenic implications for neutrophils and NET formation in a young woman with cardiac (Libman-Sacks endocarditis) and central nervous system (psychosis and seizures) involvement. Despite extensive search, circulating antiphospholipid autoantibodies, a hallmark of Libman-Sacks endocarditis, could not be detected. Instead, we observed active NET formation in the tissue of the mitral valve, as well as in the circulation. Levels of NET remnants were significantly higher in serially obtained sera from the patient compared with sex-matched blood donors (p=.0011), and showed a non-significant but substantial correlation with blood neutrophil counts (r=0.65, p=.16). The specific neutrophil elastase activity measured in serum seemed to be modulated by the provided immunosuppressive treatment. In addition, we found anti-Ro60/SSA antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient but not NET remnants or increased elastase activity. This case illustrates that different disease mechanisms mediated via autoantibodies can occur simultaneously in SLE. NET formation with release of cytotoxic NET remnants is a candidate player in the pathogenesis of this non-canonical form of Libman-Sacks endocarditis occurring in the absence of traditional antiphospholipid autoantibodies. The case description includes longitudinal results with clinical follow-up data and a discussion of the potential roles of NETs in SLE.

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  • 88.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enocsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skogman, Barbro H
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna-Uppsala University, Region Dalarna and Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Nordberg, Marika
    Åland Central Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, AX-22 100 Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Perander, Linda
    Åland Central Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, AX-22 100 Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Nyman, Dag
    Bimelix AB, AX-22 100 Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Nyberg, Clara
    Åland Central Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, AX-22 100 Mariehamn, Åland, Finland.
    Knopf, Jasmin
    Department of Internal Medicine 3-Rheumatology and Immunology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), DE-91 054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Muñoz, Luis E
    Department of Internal Medicine 3-Rheumatology and Immunology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), DE-91 054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples from Children and Adults with Central Nervous System Infections.2020In: Cells, ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 9, no 1, article id E43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophils operate as part of the innate defence in the skin and may eliminate the Borrelia spirochaete via phagocytosis, oxidative bursts, and hydrolytic enzymes. However, their importance in Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) is unclear. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, which is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species, involves the extrusion of the neutrophil DNA to form traps that incapacitate bacteria and immobilise viruses. Meanwhile, NET formation has recently been studied in pneumococcal meningitis, the role of NETs in other central nervous system (CNS) infections has previously not been studied. Here, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from clinically well-characterised children (N = 111) and adults (N = 64) with LNB and other CNS infections were analysed for NETs (DNA/myeloperoxidase complexes) and elastase activity. NETs were detected more frequently in the children than the adults (p = 0.01). NET presence was associated with higher CSF levels of CXCL1 (p < 0.001), CXCL6 (p = 0.007), CXCL8 (p = 0.003), CXCL10 (p < 0.001), MMP-9 (p = 0.002), TNF (p = 0.02), IL-6 (p < 0.001), and IL-17A (p = 0.03). NETs were associated with fever (p = 0.002) and correlated with polynuclear pleocytosis (rs = 0.53, p < 0.0001). We show that neutrophil activation and active NET formation occur in the CSF samples of children and adults with CNS infections, mainly caused by Borrelia and neurotropic viruses. The role of NETs in the early phase of viral/bacterial CNS infections warrants further investigation.

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  • 89.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Marginal-Zone B-Cells Are Main Producers of IgM in Humans, and Are Reduced in Patients With Autoimmune Vasculitis2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mice, B1 and marginal zone (MZ) B-cells play an important role in prevention of autoimmunity through production of regulatory cytokines and natural antibodies. There is limited knowledge about the human counterparts of these cells. We therefore investigated functions of MZ-like B-cells and the frequency of circulating MZ-like and Bl-like B-cells in healthy controls (HC), as well as in patients with autoimmune vasculitis to learn more about the role of these cells in autoimmune disease. After stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) of class B in vitro, MZ-like B-cells were the main producers of IgM whereas switched memory B-cells primarily produced IgG and IgA. TNF and IL-10 were produced by both MZ-like and switched memory B-cells. Neither antibody nor TNF/IL-10 production by the B-cell subsets differed between patients and HC. Patients with autoimmune vasculitis, irrespective of disease activity, had lower percentage and absolute numbers of circulating MZ-like B-cells, and lower absolute numbers of B1-like B-cells. The percentage of B1-like B-cells was reduced during active disease. These findings remained significant when the analysis was confined to active treatment-naive patients (disease onset).Our results suggest that human innate-like B-cells might have a physiological role in prevention of autoimmunity.

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  • 90.
    Arapovic-Johansson, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kwak, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Björklund, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Work-related stress assessed by a text message single-item stress question2017In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Given the prevalence of work stress-related ill-health in the Western world, it is important to find cost-effective, easy-to-use and valid measures which can be used both in research and in practice. Aims To examine the validity and reliability of the single-item stress question (SISQ), distributed weekly by short message service (SMS) and used for measurement of work-related stress. Methods The convergent validity was assessed through associations between the SISQ and subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support model, the Effort-Reward Imbalance model and scales measuring depression, exhaustion and sleep. The predictive validity was assessed using SISQ data collected through SMS. The reliability was analysed by the test-retest procedure. Results Correlations between the SISQ and all the subscales except for job strain and esteem reward were significant, ranging from -0.186 to 0.627. The SISQ could also predict sick leave, depression and exhaustion at 12-month follow-up. The analysis on reliability revealed a satisfactory stability with a weighted kappa between 0.804 and 0.868. Conclusions The SISQ, administered through SMS, can be used for the screening of stress levels in a working population.

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  • 91.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Axen, Iben
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bjorklund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Experience of Stress Assessed by Text Messages and Its Association with Objective Workload-A Longitudinal Study2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 3, article id 680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring stress trajectories in detail and over a long time may give valuable information in terms of both understanding and practice. We followed a group of primary health care employees in a randomized controlled trial. The objective was to describe their experience of stress, explore the intra-individual variability and examine the association between the experience of stress and the objective workload. Weekly text messages with a single item stress question were distributed in two time series: 12 weeks at the beginning of the trial and 26 weeks after the 6-month follow up. Aggregated objective data about workload were collected from their administration office and related to stress levels. There was a seasonal variation, with higher stress during the fall than in spring and summer. The analysis comparing high and low stress subgroups showed that the stress trajectory of a high-stress subgroup was different from that of a low-stress subgroup. Individuals with high exhaustion scores had higher odds of belonging to a subgroup of individuals with high intra-individual variability in stress experience. The objective workload was measured in two ways and was strongly associated with the stress experience. We found that the lower the productivity, the higher the feeling of stress.

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  • 92.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Participatory work place intervention for stress prevention in primary health care. A randomized controlled trial2018In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore whether a participatory, organizational intervention can reduce work-related risk factors, and thereby prevent stress-related ill health. We build on the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models of stress. It is a two-armed randomized trial, with one primary health care unit receiving the intervention and a two-unit control group. Validated questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial work environment and health were administered, at the baseline and at 6 and 12-month follow up. The primary outcome was job strain. Secondary outcomes were effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep, and recovery. Group-level objective data on workload and data about relevant processes during the study were continuously collected. The changes in the intervention group with regard to job strain, effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep and recovery were not statistically different from changes in the control group. For the non-exhausted employees though, reward was significantly higher at follow up compared to baseline, but only in the intervention group. An important piece of information is that the objective workload was statistically significantly higher in the intervention group throughout the study. Not all the components of the intervention were implemented as intended. Context and process information, such as objective data and implementation fidelity are necessary for a valid interpretation of the results.

  • 93.
    Arestedt, K
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Inger Flemme, I F
    Halmstad University.
    Bedbra Moser, D M
    University Kentucky.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Psychometric properties of the swedish version of the Control Attitudes Scale (CAS) for patients with cardiac disease and their partners in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 230-2302010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 230-230Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 94.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    1Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratories, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Case definitions in Swedish register data to identify systemic lupus erythematosus2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and investigate the utility of several different case definitions for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using national register data in Sweden.

    METHODS: The reference standard consisted of clinically confirmed SLE cases pooled from four major clinical centres in Sweden (n=929), and a sample of non-SLE comparators randomly selected from the National Population Register (n=24 267). Demographics, comorbidities, prescriptions and autoimmune disease family history were obtained from multiple registers and linked to the reference standard. We first used previously published SLE definitions to create algorithms for SLE. We also used modern data mining techniques (penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression, elastic net regression and classification trees) to objectively create data-driven case definitions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the case definitions identified.

    RESULTS: Defining SLE by using only hospitalisation data resulted in the lowest sensitivity (0.79). When SLE codes from the outpatient register were included, sensitivity and PPV increased (PPV between 0.97 and 0.98, sensitivity between 0.97 and 0.99). Addition of medication information did not greatly improve the algorithm's performance. The application of data mining methods did not yield different case definitions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of SLE International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in outpatient clinics increased the accuracy for identifying individuals with SLE using Swedish registry data. This study implies that it is possible to use ICD codes from national registers to create a cohort of individuals with SLE.

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  • 95.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmsten, Kristin
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salmon, Jane E
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.
    Simard, Julia F
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA ;Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What to Expect When Expecting With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Population-Based Study of Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in SLE and Pre-SLE.2016In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 68, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and fetal outcomes associated with subclinical (pre-systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] and SLE presenting up to 5 years postpartum) and prevalent maternal SLE during pregnancy compared with the general population.

    METHODS: This prospective cohort study used population-based Swedish registers to identify 13,598 women with first singleton pregnancies registered in the Medical Birth Register (551 prevalent SLE, 65 pre-SLE within 0-2 years, 133 pre-SLE within 2-5 years, and 12,847 general population). SLE was defined as ≥2 SLE-coded discharge diagnoses in the patient register with ≥1 diagnosis from a specialist. Unadjusted risks of adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes were calculated by SLE status, and Cochran-Armitage tests evaluated trend across exposure groups.

    RESULTS: Maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia, hypothyroidism, stroke, and infection were more common among women with SLE. Sixteen percent of prevalent-SLE pregnancies were diagnosed with preeclampsia compared with 5% of those from the general population. Among the pre-SLE women, preeclampsia was found in 26% of those with SLE within 2 years postpartum and 13% in those with SLE within 2-5 years postpartum. Similarly, infant outcomes, such as preterm birth, infection, and mortality, were worse among those born to mothers with prevalent SLE and pre-SLE during pregnancy. The test for trend was significant for most outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that adverse maternal and fetal outcomes are more common in SLE pregnancies. Furthermore, these unfavorable outcomes are observed in pregnancies occurring prior to the diagnosis of SLE. Thus, the underlying immunologic profile of SLE and alterations preceding clinical SLE may contribute to these pregnancy complications.

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  • 96.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Rossides, Marios
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
    Response to 'Increased stroke incidence in systemic lupus erythematosus patients"2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no 10, article id UNSP e72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stanford School Med, CA USA; Stanford School Med, CA USA.
    Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus: a Swedish population-based cohort study2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no 9, p. 1544-1549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To study the occurrence of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the general population by age, sex and time since SLE diagnosis Methods Adults with incident SLE were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR, n=3390) and general population comparators from the Total Population Register were matched on age, sex and county (n=16730). Individuals were followed prospectively until first of death, December 2013, emigration or incident stroke (identified from the NPR, Cause of Death Register and the Stroke Register). Incidence rates, rate differences and HR were estimated comparing SLE with non-SLE. Estimates were stratified by sex, age and time since diagnosis. Results We observed 126 strokes in SLE and 304 in the general population. Individuals with SLE had a twofold increased rate of ischaemic stroke compared with the general population (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.7 to 2.8). The HR for intracerebral haemorrhage was 1.4 (95% CI 0.7 to 2.8). There was effect modification by sex and age, with the highest HRs for females and individuals amp;lt;50 years old. The HR for ischaemic stroke was highest in the first year of follow-up (3.7; 95% CI 2.1 to 6.5). Conclusions The relative risk of ischaemic stroke in SLE was more than doubled compared with the general population, and importantly, the highest relative risks were observed within the first year after SLE diagnosis. Thus, the first encounter with patients presents an opportunity for rheumatologists to screen for risk factors and intervene.

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  • 98.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hansen, Peter Steen
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
    Mortensen, Leif Spange
    Danish Information Technology Centre for Education and Research, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results from a MANTRA-PAF substudy.2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this prospective substudy was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) compared with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A decision-analytic Markov model, based on MANTRA-PAF (Medical Antiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) study data, was developed to study long-term effects and costs of RFA compared with AADs as first-line treatment. Positive clinical effects were found in the overall population, a gain of an average 0.06 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) to an incremental cost of €3033, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €50 570/QALY. However, the result of the subgroup analyses showed that RFA was less costly and more effective in younger patients. This implied an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €3434/QALY in ≤50-year-old patients respectively €108 937/QALY in >50-year-old patients.

    CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment is a cost-effective strategy for younger patients with paroxysmal AF. However, the cost-effectiveness of using RFA as first-line therapy in older patients is uncertain, and in most of these AADs should be attempted before RFA (MANTRA-PAF ClinicalTrials.gov number; NCT00133211).

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  • 99.
    Arund, Jurgen
    et al.
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Luman, Merike
    North Estonia Medical Centre, Estonia.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Tanner, Risto
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Fridolin, Ivo
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia.
    Is Fluorescence Valid to Monitor Removal of Protein Bound Uremic Solutes in Dialysis?2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0156541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution and removal dynamics of the main fluorophores during dialysis by analyzing the spent dialysate samples to prove the hypothesis whether the fluorescence of spent dialysate can be utilized for monitoring removal of any of the protein bound uremic solute. A high performance liquid chromatography system was used to separate and quantify fluorophoric solutes in the spent dialysate sampled at the start and the end of 99 dialysis sessions, including 57 hemodialysis and 42 hemodiafiltration treatments. Fluorescence was acquired at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm. The main fluorophores found in samples were identified as indole derivatives: tryptophan, indoxyl glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, indoleacetyl glutamine, and indoleacetic acid. The highest contribution (35 +/- 11%) was found to arise from indoxyl sulfate. Strong correlation between contribution values at the start and end of dialysis (R-2 = 0.90) indicated to the stable contribution during the course of the dialysis. The reduction ratio of indoxyl sulfate was very close to the decrease of the total fluorescence signal of the spent dialysate (49 +/- 14% vs 51 +/- 13% respectively, P = 0.30, N = 99) and there was strong correlation between these reduction ratio values (R-2 = 0.86). On-line fluorescence measurements were carried out to illustrate the technological possibility for real-time dialysis fluorescence monitoring reflecting the removal of the main fluorophores from blood into spent dialysate. In summary, since a predominant part of the fluorescence signal at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm in the spent dialysate originates from protein bound derivatives of indoles, metabolites of tryptophan and indole, the fluorescence signal at this wavelength region has high potential to be utilized for monitoring the removal of slowly dialyzed uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate.

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  • 100.
    Auffray, Charles
    et al.
    European Institute Syst Biol and Med, France; University of Lyon, France.
    Balling, Rudi
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England.
    Bencze, Laszlo
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bergeron, Jay
    Pfizer Inc, MA 02139 USA.
    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique
    IACS IIS Aragon, Spain.
    Blomberg, Niklas
    EL IXIR, England.
    Bock, Christoph
    Austrian Academic Science, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Max Planck Institute Informat, Germany.
    Conesa, Ana
    Principe Felipe Research Centre, Spain; University of Florida, FL 32610 USA.
    Del Signore, Susanna
    Bluecompan Ltd, England.
    Delogne, Christophe
    KPMG Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Di Meglio, Alberto
    European Org Nucl Research CERN, Switzerland.
    Eijkemans, Marinus
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Flicek, Paul
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Graf, Norbert
    University of Saarland, Germany.
    Grimm, Vera
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany.
    Guchelaar, Henk-Jan
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Guo, Yi-Ke
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Glynne Gut, Ivo
    BIST, Spain.
    Hanbury, Allan
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hanif, Shahid
    Assoc British Pharmaceut Ind, England.
    Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter
    University of Klinikum Aachen, Germany.
    Honrado, Angel
    SYNAPSE Research Management Partners, Spain.
    Rod Hose, D.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine
    University of Leeds, England.
    Hubbard, Tim
    Kings Coll London, England; Genom England, England.
    Helen Janacek, Sophie
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Karanikas, Haralampos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kievits, Tim
    Vitr Healthcare Holding BV, Netherlands.
    Kohler, Manfred
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    Kremer, Andreas
    ITTM SA, Luxembourg.
    Lanfear, Jerry
    Pfizer Ltd, England.
    Lengauer, Thomas
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Maes, Edith
    Health Econ and Outcomes Research, Belgium.
    Meert, Theo
    Janssen Pharmaceut NV, Belgium.
    Mueller, Werner
    University of Manchester, England.
    Nickel, Dorthe
    Institute Curie, France.
    Oledzki, Peter
    Linguamat Ltd, England.
    Pedersen, Bertrand
    PwC Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Petkovic, Milan
    Philips, Netherlands.
    Pliakos, Konstantinos
    KU Leuven Kulak, Belgium.
    Rattray, Magnus
    University of Manchester, England.
    Redon i Mas, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Schneider, Reinhard
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Sengstag, Thierry
    SIB, Switzerland; University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Serra-Picamal, Xavier
    Agency Health Qual and Assessment Catalonia AQuAS, Spain.
    Spek, Wouter
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vaas, Lea A. I.
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    van Batenburg, Okker
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vandelaer, Marc
    Integrated BioBank Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Varnai, Peter
    Technopolis Grp, England.
    Villoslada, Pablo
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Antonio Vizcaino, Juan
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Peter Mary Wubbe, John
    European Platform Patients Org Science and Ind Epposi, Belgium.
    Zanetti, Gianluigi
    CRS4, Italy; BBMRI ERIC, Austria.
    Making sense of big data in health research: Towards an EU action plan2016In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 8, no 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medicine and healthcare are undergoing profound changes. Whole-genome sequencing and high-resolution imaging technologies are key drivers of this rapid and crucial transformation. Technological innovation combined with automation and miniaturization has triggered an explosion in data production that will soon reach exabyte proportions. How are we going to deal with this exponential increase in data production? The potential of "big data" for improving health is enormous but, at the same time, we face a wide range of challenges to overcome urgently. Europe is very proud of its cultural diversity; however, exploitation of the data made available through advances in genomic medicine, imaging, and a wide range of mobile health applications or connected devices is hampered by numerous historical, technical, legal, and political barriers. European health systems and databases are diverse and fragmented. There is a lack of harmonization of data formats, processing, analysis, and data transfer, which leads to incompatibilities and lost opportunities. Legal frameworks for data sharing are evolving. Clinicians, researchers, and citizens need improved methods, tools, and training to generate, analyze, and query data effectively. Addressing these barriers will contribute to creating the European Single Market for health, which will improve health arid healthcare for all Europearis.

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