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  • 51.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iandolo, Donata
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of ZnO seed layer precursor molar ratio on the density of interface defects in low temperature aqueous chemically synthesized ZnO nanorods/GaN light-emitting diodes2016In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 119, no 16, p. 165702-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS) of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) has been attracting considerable research interest due to its great potential in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The influence of the molar ratio of the zinc acetate (ZnAc): KOH as a ZnO seed layer precursor on the density of interface defects and hence the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in LT-ACS of ZnO NRs/GaN LEDs has been systematically investigated. The material quality of the as-prepared seed layer as quantitatively deduced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is found to be influenced by the molar ratio. It is revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence that the seed layer molar ratio plays a significant role in the formation and the density of defects at the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure interface. Consequently, LED devices processed using ZnO NRs synthesized with molar ratio of 1:5M exhibit stronger yellow emission (similar to 575 nm) compared to those based on 1:1 and 1:3M ratios as measured by the electroluminescence. Furthermore, seed layer molar ratio shows a quantitative dependence of the non-radiative defect densities as deduced from light-output current characteristics analysis. These results have implications on the development of high-efficiency ZnO-based LEDs and may also be helpful in understanding the effects of the ZnO seed layer on defect-related non-radiative recombination. Published by AIP Publishing.

  • 52.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Seed layer synthesis effect on the concentration of interface defects and emission spectra of ZnO nanorods/p-GaN light-emitting diode2017In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 214, no 1, article id 1600333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the low-temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS), holds great promises for the synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanostructure-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and hence require parameter tuning for optimal performance. N-ZnO nanorods (NRs)/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs have been synthesized by the LT-ACS using ZnO nanoparticle (NPs) seed layers prepared with different precursor solutions. The effect of these seed layers on the interface defect properties and emission intensity of the as-synthesized n-Zn/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs has been demonstrated by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) and electroluminescence (EL) measurements, respectively. A significant reduction of the interface defects in the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure synthesized from a seed layer prepared from zinc acetate (ZnAc) with a mixture of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) (donated as ZKH seed) compared with those prepared from ZnAc and KOH (donated as ZK seed) is observed as revealed by spatially resolved CL. Consequently, the LEDs based on n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN prepared from ZKH seed show an improvement in the yellow emission (approximate to 578nm) compared to that based on the ZK seed as deduced from the electroluminescence measurements. The improvement in the yellow EL emission on the ZKH LED probably attributed to the low presence of the non-radiative defect as deduced by light-output current (L-I) characteristics analysis.

  • 53.
    Alnoor, Hatim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Savoyant, Adrien
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    An effective low-temperature solution synthesis of Co-doped [0001]-oriented ZnO nanorods2017In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 121, no 21, article id 215102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate an efficient possibility to synthesize vertically aligned pure zinc oxide (ZnO) and Co-doped ZnO nanorods (NRs) using the low-temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (90 degrees C). Two different mixing methods of the synthesis solutions were investigated for the Co-doped samples. The synthesized samples were compared to pure ZnO NRs regarding the Co incorporation and crystal quality. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements confirmed the substitution of Co2+ inside the ZnO NRs, giving a highly anisotropic magnetic Co2+ signal. The substitution of Zn2+ by Co2+ was observed to be combined with a drastic reduction in the core-defect (CD) signal (g similar to 1.956) which is seen in pure ZnO NRs. As revealed by the cathodoluminescence (CL), the incorporation of Co causes a slight red-shift of the UV peak position combined with an enhancement in the intensity of the defect-related yellow-orange emission compared to pure ZnO NRs. Furthermore, the EPR and the CL measurements allow a possible model of the defect configuration in the samples. It is proposed that the as-synthesized pure ZnO NRs likely contain Zn interstitial (Zn-i(+)) as CDs and oxygen vacancy (V-O) or oxygen interstitial (O-i) as surface defects. As a result, Co was found to likely occupy the Zn-i(+), leading to the observed CDs reduction and hence enhancing the crystal quality. These results open the possibility of synthesis of highly crystalline quality ZnO NRs-based diluted magnetic semiconductors using the low-temperature aqueous chemical method. Published by AIP Publishing.

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  • 54.
    Alpat, B.
    et al.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy; Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Gulgun, M.A.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Corapcioglu, G.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yildizhan Özyar, Melike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Di Lazzaro, P.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Murra, D.
    ENEA, Italy.
    Kaplanoglu, T.
    Maprad Srl, Italy.
    Postolache, V
    Maprad Srl, Italy.
    Mengali, S.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Simeoni, M.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Urbani, A.
    Consorzio CREO, Italy.
    Testing of substrates for flexible optical solar reflectors: irradiations of nano-hybrid coatings of polyimide films with 20 keV electrons and with 200-400 nm ultraviolet radiation2019In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 14, article id T06003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the frame of a project aimed at developing a new type of optical solar reflectors we present the scientific and technological issues addressed during irradiations of nano-hybrid coatings on polyimide films by using 20 keV electron beam from a modified use of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and with ultraviolet (UV) dose equal to 300 space-equivalent Sun hours. Details of a new approach to use SEM for low energy electron irradiations and of a new UV irradiation setup are given.

  • 55.
    Amini, Shahram
    et al.
    Drexel University.
    Cordoba Gallego, Jose M
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    McGhie, Andrew R
    University of Pennsylvania.
    Ni, Chaoying
    University of Delaware.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Oden, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On the Stability of Mg Nanograins to Coarsening after Repeated Melting2009In: NANO LETTERS, ISSN 1530-6984, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 3082-3086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report on the extraordinary thermal stability of similar to 35 nm Mg-nanograins that constitute the matrix of a Ti2AlC-Mg composite that has previously been shown to have excellent mechanical properties. The microstructure is so stable that heating the composite three times to 700 degrees C, which is 50 degrees C over the melting point of Mg, not only resulted in the repeated melting of the Mg, but surprisingly and within the resolution of our differential scanning calorimeter, did not lead to any coarsening. The reduction in the Mg melting point due to the nanograins was similar to 50 degrees C. X-ray diffraction and neutron spectroscopy results suggest that thin, amorphous, and/or poorly crystallized rutile, anatase, and/or magnesia layers separate the Mg nanograins and prevent them from coarsening. Clearly that layer is thin enough, and thus mechanically robust enough, to survive the melting and solidification stresses encountered during cycling. Annealing in hydrogen at 250 degrees C for 20 h, also did not seem to alter the grain size significantly.

  • 56.
    Amloy, Supaluck
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Y. T.
    Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Chen, K. H.
    Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taiwan.
    Hsu, H. C.
    Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Hsiao, C. L.
    Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan.
    Chen, L. C.
    Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan.
    Holtz, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Excitons and biexcitons in InGaN quantum dot like localization centersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Indium segregation in a narrow InGaN single quantum well creates quantum dot (QD) like exciton localization centers. Cross section transmission electron microscopy reveals varying shapes and lateral sizes in the range ~1-5 nm of the QD-like features, while scanning near field optical microscopy demonstrates a highly inhomogeneous spatial distribution of optically active individual localization centers. Microphotoluminescence spectroscopy confirms the spectrally inhomogeneous distribution of localization centers, in which the exciton and the biexciton related emissions from single centers of varying geometry could be identified by means of excitation power dependencies. Interestingly, the biexciton binding energy (Ebxx) was found to vary from center to center, between 3 to -22 meV, in correlation with the exciton emission energy. Negative binding energies justify the three-dimensional quantum confinement, which confirms QD-like properties of the localization centers.! The observed energy correlation is proposed to be understood as variations of the lateral extension of the confinement potential, which would yield smaller values of Ebxx for reduced lateral extension and higher exciton emission energy. The proposed relation between lateral extension and Ebxx is further supported by the exciton and the biexciton recombination lifetimes of a single QD, which suggest a lateral extension of merely ~3 nm for a QD with strongly negative Ebxx = -15.5 meV.

  • 57.
    Amloy, Supaluck
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Thaksin University, Thailand.
    Karlsson, K. Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Martin O
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Y. T.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Academia Sinica, Taiwan .
    Chen, K. H.
    Academia Sinica, Taiwan; National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Hsu, H. C.
    National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Hsiao, C. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Chen, L. C.
    National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
    Holtz, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Excitons and biexcitons in InGaN quantum dot like localization centers2014In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, Vol. 25, no 49, p. 495702-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indium segregation in a narrow InGaN single quantum well creates quantum dot (QD) like exciton localization centers. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy reveals varying shapes and lateral sizes in the range ∼1–5 nm of the QD-like features, while scanning near field optical microscopy demonstrates a highly inhomogeneous spatial distribution of optically active individual localization centers. Microphotoluminescence spectroscopy confirms the spectrally inhomogeneous distribution of localization centers, in which the exciton and the biexciton related emissions from single centers of varying geometry could be identified by means of excitation power dependencies. Interestingly, the biexciton binding energy (Ebxx) was found to vary from center to center, between 3 to −22 meV, in correlation with the exciton emission energy. Negative binding energies are only justified by a three-dimensional quantum confinement, which confirms QD-like properties of the localization centers. The observed energy correlation is proposed to be understood as variations of the lateral extension of the confinement potential, which would yield smaller values of Ebxx for reduced lateral extension and higher exciton emission energy. The proposed relation between lateral extension and Ebxx is further supported by the exciton and the biexciton recombination lifetimes of a single QD, which suggest a lateral extension of merely ∼3 nm for a QD with strongly negative Ebxx = −15.5 meV. 

  • 58.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Ju Moon, Eun
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hosler, Brian C.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Caspi, Elad N.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Nucl Research Centre Negev, Israel.
    May, Steven J.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Experimental and theoretical characterization of ordered MAX phases Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC32015In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 118, no 9, p. 094304-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on the phase stabilities and crystal structures of two newly discovered ordered, quaternary MAX phases-Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC3-synthesized by mixing and heating different elemental powder mixtures of mMo:(3-m) Ti:1.1Al:2C with 1.5 less than= m less than= 2.2 and 2Mo: 2Ti:1.1Al:2.7C to 1600 degrees C for 4 h under Ar flow. In general, for m greater than= 2 an ordered 312 phase, (Mo2Ti) AlC2, was the majority phase; for mless than 2, an ordered 413 phase (Mo2Ti2)AlC3, was the major product. The actual chemistries determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are Mo2TiAlC1.7 and Mo2Ti1.9Al0.9C2.5, respectively. High resolution scanning transmission microscopy, XPS and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray diffraction confirmed the general ordered stacking sequence to be Mo-Ti-Mo-Al-Mo-Ti-Mo for Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo-Ti-Ti-Mo-Al-Mo-Ti-Ti-Mo for Mo2Ti2AlC3, with the carbon atoms occupying the octahedral sites between the transition metal layers. Consistent with the experimental results, the theoretical calculations clearly show that M layer ordering is mostly driven by the high penalty paid in energy by having the Mo atoms surrounded by C in a face-centered configuration, i.e., in the center of the Mn+1Xn blocks. At 331 GPa and 367 GPa, respectively, the Youngs moduli of the ordered Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC3 are predicted to be higher than those calculated for their ternary end members. Like most other MAX phases, because of the high density of states at the Fermi level, the resistivity measurement over 300 to 10K for both phases showed metallic behavior. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

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  • 59.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Drexel University, USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Voigt, Cooper A.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Mo2TiAlC2: A new ordered layered ternary carbide2015In: Scripta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6462, E-ISSN 1872-8456, Vol. 101, p. 5-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report on the synthesis of a new layered ternary carbide, Mo2TiAlC2, that was synthesized by heating an elemental mixture at 1600 degrees C for 4 h under an Ar flow. Its hexagonal, a and c lattice parameters were calculated via Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns to be, respectively, 2.997 angstrom and 18.661 angstrom. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy showed that this phase is ordered, with Ti layers sandwiched between two Mo layers in a M(3)AX(2) type ternary carbide structure. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 60.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA; Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rivin, Oleg
    Nucl Res Ctr Negev, Israel.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Voigt, Cooper
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Caspi, Elad N.
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA; Nucl Res Ctr Negev, Israel.
    A Tungsten-Based Nanolaminated Ternary Carbide: (W,Ti)(4)C4-x2019In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 1100-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanolamellar transition metal carbides are gaining increasing interests because of the recent developments of their twodimensional (2D) derivatives and promising performance for a variety of applications from energy storage, catalysis to transparent conductive coatings, and medicine. To develop more novel 2D materials, new nanolaminated structures are needed. Here we report on a tungsten based nanolaminated ternary phase, (W,Ti)(4)C4-x, synthesized by an Al catalyzed reaction of W, Ti, and C powders at 1600 degrees C for 4 h, under flowing argon. X-ray and neutron diffraction, along with Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy, were used to determine the atomic structure, ordering, and occupancies. This phase has a layered hexagonal structure (P6(3)/mmc) with lattice parameters, a = 3.00880(7) angstrom, and c = 19.5633(6) angstrom and a nominal chemistry of (W,Ti)(4)C4-x (actual chemistry, W2.1(1)Ti1.6(1)C2.6(1)). The structure is comprised of layers of pure W that are also twin planes with two adjacent atomic layers of mixed W and Ti, on either side. The use of Al as a catalyst for synthesizing otherwise difficult to make phases, could in turn lead to the discovery of a large family of nonstoichiometric ternary transition metal carbides, synthesized at relatively low temperatures and shorter times.

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  • 61.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Xie, Yu
    Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hosler, Brian C.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kent, Paul R. C.
    Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA; Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Two-Dimensional, Ordered, Double Transition Metals Carbides (MXenes)2015In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 9507-9516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The higher the chemical diversity and structural complexity of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the higher the likelihood they possess unique and useful properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered, carbides (MXenes), MM-2 C-2 and MM-2 C-2(3), where M and M are two different early transition metals. In these solids, M layers sandwich M" carbide layers. By synthesizing Mo2TiC2Tx, Mo2Ti2C3Tx, and Cr2TiC2Tx (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since the Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo2TiC2Tx and Ti3C2Tx. This work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.

  • 62.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Bebb, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Berry, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brys, T.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Buffet, J. -C.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Clergeau, J. -F.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Deen, P. P.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Ehlers, G.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    van Esch, P.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Everett, S. M.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Guerard, B.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Herwig, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Iruretagoiena, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Issa, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaplanov, A.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Kirstein, O.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Lopez Higuera, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Piscitelli, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Stefanescu, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Multi-Grid detector for neutron spectroscopy: results obtained on time-of-flight spectrometer CNCS2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P04030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Grid detector technology has evolved from the proof-of-principle and characterisation stages. Here we report on the performance of the Multi-Grid detector, the MG. CNCS prototype, which has been installed and tested at the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer, CNCS at SNS. This has allowed a side-by-side comparison to the performance of He-3 detectors on an operational instrument. The demonstrator has an active area of 0.2m(2). It is specifically tailored to the specifications of CNCS. The detector was installed in June 2016 and has operated since then, collecting neutron scattering data in parallel to the He-3 detectors of CNCS. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of this data, in particular on instrument energy resolution, rate capability, background and relative efficiency. Stability, gamma-ray and fast neutron sensitivity have also been investigated. The effect of scattering in the detector components has been measured and provides input to comparison for Monte Carlo simulations. All data is presented in comparison to that measured by the He-3 detectors simultaneously, showing that all features recorded by one detector are also recorded by the other. The energy resolution matches closely. We find that the Multi-Grid is able to match the data collected by He-3, and see an indication of a considerable advantage in the count rate capability. Based on these results, we are confident that the Multi-Grid detector will be capable of producing high quality scientific data on chopper spectrometers utilising the unprecedented neutron flux of the ESS.

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  • 63.
    Anders, Andre
    et al.
    University of California Berkeley.
    Lim, Sunnie H. N.
    University of California Berkeley.
    Man Yu, Kin
    University of California Berkeley.
    Andersson, Joakim
    University of California Berkeley.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    McFarland, Mike
    Acree Technology Inc.
    Brown, Jeff
    Acree Technology Inc.
    High quality ZnO:Al transparent conducting oxide films synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition2010In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 518, no 12, p. 3313-3319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide, ZnO:Al or AZO, is a well-known n-type transparent conducting oxide with great potential in a number of applications currently dominated by indium tin oxide. In this study, the optical and electrical properties of AZO thin films deposited on glass and silicon by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition are systematically studied. In contrast to magnetron sputtering, this technique does not produce energetic negative ions, and therefore ion damage can be minimized. The quality of the AZO films strongly depends on growth temperature while only marginal improvements are obtained with post-deposition annealing. The best films, grown at a temperature of about 200 degrees C, have resistivities in the low to mid 10(-4) Omega cm range with a transmittance better than 85% in the visible part of the spectrum. It is remarkable that relatively good films of small thickness (60 nm) can be fabricated using this method.

  • 64.
    Andersen, Ken
    et al.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Bigault, Thierry
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buffet, J. C.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Correa, Jonathan
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guerard, Bruno
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khaplanov, Anton
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Kirstein, Oliver
    Linköping University.
    Piscitelli, Fransesco
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Vettier, Christian
    European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden.
    10B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutrondetectors2013In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 720, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3He was a popular material in neutrons detectors until its availability dropped drastically in 2008. The development of techniques based on alternative convertors is now of high priority for neutron research institutes. Thin films of 10B or 10B4C have been used in gas proportional counters to detect neutrons, but until now, only for small or medium sensitive area. We present here the multi-grid design, introduced at the ILL and developed in collaboration with ESS for LAN (large area neutron) detectors. Typically thirty 10B4C films of 1 μm thickness are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in a proportional gas counter. The principle and the fabrication of the multi-grid are described and some preliminary results obtained with a prototype of 200 cm×8 cm are reported; a detection efficiency of 48% has been measured at 2.5 Å with a monochromatic neutron beam line, showing the good potential of this new technique.

  • 65.
    Andersson, Jon M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wallin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Münger, E. Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ab initio calculations on the effects of additives on alumina phase stability2005In: Physical review. B, Condensed matter and materials physics, ISSN 1098-0121, Vol. 71, no 014101, p. 014101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of substitutional additives on the properties and phase stability of - and -alumina (Al2O3), are investigated by density functional theory total energy calculations. The dopants explored are 5 at. % of Cr, Mo, Co, and As substituting for Al, respectively, N and S substituting for O, in the and lattices. Overall, the results show that it is possible to shift, and even reverse, the relative stability between - and -alumina by substitutional additives. The alumina bulk moduli are, in general, only slightly affected by the dopants but density of states profiles reveal additional peaks in the alumina band gaps. We also show that phase separations into pure oxides are energetically favored over doped alumina formation, and we present results on a number of previously unstudied binary oxides.

  • 66.
    Andersson, Mike
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Möller, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fashandi, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Puglisi, Donatella
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huotari, J.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Puustinen, J.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lappalainen, J.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Field Effect Based Gas Sensors, from Basic Mechanisms to the Latest Commercial Device Designs2016In: SENSORS AND ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION ADVANCES (SEIA), INT FREQUENCY SENSOR ASSOC-IFSA , 2016, p. 19-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution treats the latest developments in the understanding of basic principles regarding device design, transduction mechanisms, gas-materials-interactions, and materials processing for the tailored design and fabrication of SiC FET gas sensor devices, mainly intended as products for the automotive sector.

  • 67. Aouadi, S
    et al.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stuber, M.
    Veprek, S.
    Franz, R.
    ICMCTF 2014 : Preface2014In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 572, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 41st International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings andThin Films (ICMCTF), sponsored by the Advanced Surface EngineeringDivision (ASED) of the American Vacuum Society (AVS), was heldfrom April 28 to May 2, 2014 in San Diego, California, USA.The week's technical program consisted of 37 technical sessions,which were organized into 13 symposia. The conference opened witha Plenary Lecture by Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag, Materials Scienceand Engineering at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the TUDelft, The Netherlands, on “Self-healing Materials: an Alternative Approachto Create More Durable/Reliable Materials and Products”. TheExhibition Keynote Lecture was presented by Prof. Timothy P. Weihs,Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Johns HopkinsUniversity, Baltimore, MD, USA, on “Driving Commercial Applicationsand Exploring Scientific Questions with Reactive Multilayer Foils”.During the conference week, a well subscribed poster session wasattended by a large and appreciative attendee audience. An expansivelarge two-day interactive industrial exhibition, with more than 50booths,was held inwhich companies displayed theirmost recent developmentsin vacuumscience and plasma-based deposition technologies.In addition to the technical symposia sessions, there were threefocused topical sessions, and six specialized short courses offered.Professor Jindrich Musil from the faculty of Applied Sciences atthe University of Bohemia, Plzeň, Czech Republic, was the recipientof the 2014 ASED R.F. Bunshah Annual Award; he presented the HonoraryLecture, “Advanced Hard Nanocomposite Coatings with UniqueProperties”. The award recognizes and honors Prof. Musil's seminalcontributions to the development of advanced nanocomposite coatingswith enhanced hardness, oxidation resistance, toughness, and crackresistance.The ASED Annual ICMCTF Graduate Student Awards werepresented to Shiyu Liu (Gold Medal), University of Cambridge, UK;Samantha K. Lawrence (Silver Medal), Purdue University, WestLafayette, IN, USA; and Trevor Hardcastle (Bronze Medal), Universityof Leeds, UK.The electronic submission and handling of manuscripts via theElsevier Editorial System (EES), including the selection of reviewersand evaluation ofmanuscripts,were identical to the procedures appliedto manuscripts submitted as regular contributions for publication ininternational scientific journals. Following the tradition practiced since1987, the accepted manuscripts are published in the archival journalsSurface and Coatings Technology and Thin Solid Films. ICMCTF 2014proceedings are open-access to the participants for one year via theElsevier journals' web sites.The organization of this conference and the preparation of proceedingsvolumes would have been impossible without the tremendouseffort and dedication of many individuals, including the General Chair,Yip-Wah Chung, Northwestern University, USA, and the ProgramChair, Claus Rebholz, the University of Cyprus, the team of symposiaand session chairs that made possible the realization of an exciting technicalprogram. We especially thank all the authors and presenters fortheir contributions; we also thank the hundreds of reviewers for theirtimely submission of high quality reports. To our sponsors,we acknowledge,appreciate, and thank these companies for their most generousand continuing support.The 42nd International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings andThin Films (ICMCTF 2015) will be held in San Diego, California, April20–24, 2015, with Claus Rebholz, University of Cyprus, as the GeneralChair and Suneel Kodambaka, the University of California at Los Angeles, as the Program Chair.

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  • 68.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    Univ North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    SKF Res and Technol Dev, Netherlands.
    Figuero, Carlos A.
    Univ Caxias do Sul, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zapien, Juan Antonio
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Germany.
    ICMCTF 2018-Preface2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 357, p. 1014-1014Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 69.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    University of North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Figueroa, Carlos A.
    University of Caxias do Sul, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Muratore, Christopher
    University of Dayton, OH 45469 USA.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    ICMCTF 2017-Preface2017In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 644Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 70.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    Univ North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    SKF Res and Technol Dev Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
    Figueroa, Carlos A.
    Univ Caxias SulRua, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zapien, Juan Antonio
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Germany.
    Editorial Material: ICMCTF 2018-Preface in THIN SOLID FILMS, vol 669, issue , pp 670-6702019In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 669, p. 670-670Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 71.
    Aquila, Andrew L.
    et al.
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.
    Salmassi, Fahrad
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.
    Gullikson, Eric M.
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Measurements of the optical constants of scandium in the 50-1300 eV range2004In: SPIE 5538, Optical Constants of Materials for UV to X-Ray Wavelengths / [ed] Regina Soufli, John F. Seely, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2004, p. 64-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandium containing multilayers have been produced with very high reflectivity in the soft x-ray spectrum.  Accurate optical constants are required in order to model the multilayer reflectivity.  Since there are relatively few measurements of the optical constants of Scandium in the soft x-ray region we have performed measurements over the energy range of 50-1,300 eV.  Thin films of Scandium were deposited by ion-assisted magnetron sputtering at Linkoping University and DC Magnetron sputtering at CXRO.  Transmission measurements were performed at the Advanced Light Source beamline 6.3.2.  The absorption coefficient was deduced from the measurements and the dispersive part of the index of refraction was obtained using the Kramers-Kronig relation.  The measured optical constants are used to model the near-normal incidence reflectivity of Cr/Sc multilayers near the Sc L2,3 edge.

  • 72.
    Ardic, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Gifvars, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    A study on the effects of the process parameters of polymerised HMDSO using RF-PECVD in corrosion protection applications2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this master thesis the effects of the process parameters of pp-HMDSO were studied in the application of corrosion protection of an Al surface. The method for polymerising the HMDSO vapour was RF-PECVD. The following process parameters were studied: RF-power, flow of HMDSO, Oxygen as reactive gas, Ar as inert gas, the effect of applied bias voltage, as well as Ar etch as pre-treatment and subjecting the film to a pure O2 plasma as post-treatment. The results were a prolonging of the total decay time of the Al film when subjected to a 1M NaOH solution. The decay time increased from 5-20s for an unprotected Al film to 140min for the best pp-HMDSO coating. SEM/EDX, XRR, L*a*b* were used when analysing the pp-HMDSO films. The best performing coatings were tested on reflectors and passed the industry standard test of being subjected to a 0.1M NaOH for 5min without visible corrosion or decay.

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  • 73.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berlind, Torun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fernández del Río, Lia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Landin, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åkerlind, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Järrendahl, Kenneth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Polarization effects in reflection from the cuticle of scarab beetles studied by spectroscopic Mueller-matrix ellipsometry2012In: AES 2012, Advanced Electromagnetics Symposium, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polarization effects in reflection from the cuticle of scarab beetles studied by spectroscopic Mueller-matrix ellipsometry

     

    H. Arwin*, T. Berlind, J. Birch, L. Fernandez Del Rio, J. Gustafson, J. Landin,

    R. Magnusson, C. Åkerlind, and K. Järrendahl

    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Sweden

    *corresponding author: han@ifm.liu.se

     

    Abstract- Many scarab beetles exhibit structural colors and complex polarization phenomena in reflection. These effects are characterized with spectroscopic Mueller-matrix ellipsometry in our work. The polarization ellipse of reflected light as well as the degree of polarization is presented including variations with angle of incidence and wavelength. Emphasis is on beetles showing chiral effects and structural modeling of cuticle nanostructure is discussed.

     

    Background Since one hundred years it is known that some scarab beetles reflect elliptically polarized light as demonstrated by Michelson for the beetle Chrysina resplendens [1]. The handedness of the polarization is in a majority of the cases left-handed but also right-handed polarization has been found [2,3]. The ellipticity varies with wavelength and viewing angle but can be close to +1 or -1 (right or left circular polarization, respectively) and in addition these beetles may exhibit beautiful structural colors. The polarization and color effects are generated in the outer part of the exoskeleton, the cuticle. These natural photonic structures are often multifunctional and play important roles for survival of beetles, e.g. for hiding from or scaring predators, for intraspecies communication, etc. [4]. However, such structures may find use in many commercial applications and a major motivation for detailed studies of natural photonic structures is that they inspire to biomimetic applications [5,6].

    Approach Our objective is to use spectral Mueller-matrix data on scarab beetles to parameterize reflection properties in terms of polarization parameters and degree of polarization. The studied beetles all are phytophagous and include species from the Cetoniinae subfamily (e.g. Cetonia aurata and Coptomia laevis,), the Rutelinae subfamily (e.g. Chrysina argenteola and Chrysina resplendens) and the Melolonthinae subfamily (Cyphochilus insulanus). Furthermore, structural modeling is presented on Cetonia aurata and a few more beetles to demonstrate that structural parameters can be extracted by advanced modeling of Mueller-matrix data.

    Experimental A dual rotating compensator ellipsometer (RC2, J. A. Woollam Co., Inc.) is used to record all 16 Mueller-matrix elements mij (i,j=1..4) in the spectral range 300 – 900 nm at angles of incidence in the range 20-70º. The elements are normalized to m11 and thus have values between -1 and +1. All measurements are performed on the scutellum (a small triangular part on the dorsal side of the beetles) with focusing optics resulting in a spot size of the order of 50-100 mm. The software CompleteEASE (J. A. Woollam Co., Inc.) is used for analysis.

    Results and discussion As an example, Fig. 1 shows contour plots of Mueller-matrix data measured on Cetonia aurata. This beetle has a metallic shine and if illuminated with unpolarized white light it reflects left-handed polarized green light as revealed by the non-zero Mueller-matrix elements m14 and m41 in the green spectral region for angles of incidence below about 45º. This is clearly seen in the graph to the right in Fig. 1 which shows a spectrum for Mueller-matrix element m41at 20º as well as fitted model data. A model based on a twisted lamella structure, also called Bouligand structure, is used to model the chiral nanostructure [4]. Given the complexity of the nanostructure, an excellent model fit is achieved. The obtained model parameters are the spectral variation of the refractive index of the birefringent lamellas and the pitch. The model also includes a dielectric surface layer.

     

     

     

    Fig.1. Left: Mueller-matrix data on Cetonia aurata. Each contour plot shows mij, where i and j correspond to the row and column, respectively. m11 =1 and is not shown but is replaced with a photo of the beetle. Right: Experimental and model-generated Mueller-matrix element m41at an angle of incidence of 20º.

     

    From the Mueller-matrix data one can also determine so called derived parameters including azimuth and ellipticity of the polarization ellipse and the degree of polarization. The variations of these parameters with angle of incidence are presented for a selection of scarab beetles. Examples of both left-handed and right-handed polarization effects are shown and the importance of degree of polarization will be discussed.

    Concluding remarks Mueller-matrix spectra at oblique incidence are very rich in information about reflection properties and allows parameterization of polarization parameters of the reflected light. Both left-handed and right-handed reflected light is found in scarab beetles. Mueller-matrix data can also be used for a detailed modeling of the nanostructure of the cuticle of beetles.

    AcknowledgementsFinancial support was obtained from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation and the Swedish Research Council. The Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the National Museum of Natural Science in Madrid, the Berlin Museum of Natural History and the Natural History Museum in London are acknowledged for loan of beetles.

     

    REFERENCES

    1. Michelson, A. A. “On Metallic Colouring in Birds and Insects,” Phil. Mag., 21, 554-567, 1911.
    2. Goldstein, D. H. “Polarization properties of Scarabaeidae,” Appl. Opt., 45, 7944-7950, 2006.
    3. Hodgkinson, I., Lowrey, S., Bourke, L., Parker, A. and McCall, M. W. “Mueller-matrix characterization of beetle cuticle polarized and unpolarized reflections from representative architectures,” Appl. Opt., 49, 4558-4567, 2010.
    4. Vukusic, P. and Sambles, J. R. “Photonic structures in biology,” Nature, 424, 852-855, 2003.
    5. Lenau, T. and Barfoed, M. “Colours and Metallic Sheen in Beetle Shells - A Biomimetic Search for Material Structuring Principles Causing Light Interference,” Adv. Eng. Mat., 10, 299-314. 2008.
    6. Parker, A. R. and Townley, H. E “Biomimetics of photonic nanostructures,” Nature Nanotech., 2, 347-351, 2007.
  • 74.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fernandez Del Rio, Lia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Åkerlind, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Def Research Agency FOI, Div Command and Control Syst, SE-58111 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Valyukh, Sergiy
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mendoza-Galvan, A.
    CINVESTAV IPN, Mexico.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Landin, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Järrendahl, Kenneth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On the polarization of light reflected from beetle cuticle2017In: MATERIALS TODAY-PROCEEDINGS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2017, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 4933-4941Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Mueller matrices for studies of polarizing properties and cuticle structure of scarab beetles are partly reviewed. Specifically we show how the polarization of the reflected light can be quantified in terms of degree of polarization and ellipticity. It is also shown that sum decomposition of Mueller matrices reveals cuticle reflection characteristics in different spectral regions, e.g. in terms of mirrors and circular polarizers. With a differential decomposition of cuticle transmission Mueller matrices, we determine the spectral variation in the fundamental optical properties circular birefringence and dichroism. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 75.
    Asghar, M.
    et al.
    Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan .
    Iqbal, F.
    Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan .
    Faraz, Sadia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jokubavicius, Valdas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wahab, Qamar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Characterization of deep level defects in sublimation grown p-type 6H-SiC epilayers by deep level transient spectroscopy2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study deep level transient spectroscopy has been performed on boron-nitrogen co-doped 6H-SiC epilayers exhibiting p-type conductivity with free carrier concentration (N-A-N-D)similar to 3 x 10(17) cm(-3). We observed a hole H-1 majority carrier and an electron E-1 minority carrier traps in the device having activation energies E-nu + 0.24 eV, E-c -0.41 eV, respectively. The capture cross-section and trap concentration of H-1 and E-1 levels were found to be (5 x 10(-19) cm(2), 2 x 10(15) cm(-3)) and (1.6 x 10(-16) cm(2), 3 x 10(15) cm(-3)), respectively. Owing to the background involvement of aluminum in growth reactor and comparison of the obtained data with the literature, the H-1 defect was identified as aluminum acceptor. A reasonable justification has been given to correlate the E-1 defect to a nitrogen donor.

  • 76.
    Asghar, M.
    et al.
    Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan .
    Iqbal, F.
    Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan .
    Faraz, Sadia Municha
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jokubavicius, Valdas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wahab, Qamar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Study of deep level defects in doped and semi-insulating n-6H-SiC epilayers grown by sublimation method2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) is employed to study deep level defects in n-6H-SiC (silicon carbide) epilayers grown by the sublimation method. To study the deep level defects in n-6H-SiC, we used as-grown, nitrogen doped and nitrogen-boron co-doped samples represented as ELS-1, ELS-11 and ELS-131 having net (N-D-N-A) similar to 2.0 x 10(12) cm(-3), 2 x 10(16) cm(-3) and 9 x 10(15) cm(3), respectively. The DLTS measurements performed on ELS-1 and ELS-11 samples revealed three electron trap defects (A, B and C) having activation energies E-c - 0.39 eV, E-c - 0.67 eV and E-c - 0.91 eV, respectively. While DLTS spectra due to sample ELS-131 displayed only A level. This observation indicates that levels B and C in ELS-131 are compensated by boron and/or nitrogen-boron complex. A comparison with the published data revealed A, B and C to be E-1/E-2, Z(1)/Z(2) and R levels, respectively.

  • 77.
    Azina, Clio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Bordeaux, France; Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Cornu, Iiaki
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Silvain, Jean-Francois
    Univ Bordeaux, France; Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Lu, Yongfeng
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Battaglia, Jean-Luc
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Effect of titanium and zirconium carbide interphases on the thermal conductivity and interfacial heat transfers in copper/diamond composite materials2019In: AIP Advances, ISSN 2158-3226, E-ISSN 2158-3226, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 055315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal properties of metal matrix composite materials are becoming ever more relevant with the increasing demand for thermally efficient materials. In this work, the thermal conductivity and heat transfers at the interfaces of copper matrix composite materials reinforced with diamond particles (Cu/D) are discussed. The composite materials contain either ZrC or TiC interphases and exhibit, respectively, higher and lower thermal conductivities with respect to their pure Cu/D counterparts. These thermal conductivities are accounted to the presence of strong covalent bonds and increased relative densities. The role of these interphases is also discussed regarding the phonon transmission at the interfaces. (c) 2019 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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    fulltext
  • 78.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Multifunctional transition metal diboride thin films grown by magnetron sputtering with metal-ion irradiation2020Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    List of papers
    1. Controlling the B/Ti ratio of TiBx thin films grown by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controlling the B/Ti ratio of TiBx thin films grown by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 36, no 3, article id 030604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    TiBx thin films grown from compound TiB2 targets by magnetron sputter deposition are typically highly over-stoichiometric, with x ranging from 3.5 to 2.4, due to differences in Ti and B preferential-ejection angles and gas-phase scattering during transport from the target to the substrate. Here, the authors demonstrate that stoichiometric TiB2 films can be obtained using highpower impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) operated in power-controlled mode. The B/Ti ratio x of films sputter-deposited in Ar is controllably varied from 2.08 to 1.83 by adjusting the length of HiPIMS pulses t(on) between 100 and 30 mu s, while maintaining average power and pulse frequency constant. This results in peak current densities J(T), peak ranging from 0.27 to 0.88 A/cm(2). Energy- and time-resolved mass spectrometry analyses of the ion fluxes incident at the substrate position show that the density of metal ions increases with decreasing t(on) due to a dramatic increase in J(T, peak) resulting in the strong gas rarefaction. With t(on)amp;lt;60 mu s (J(T),(peak)amp;gt; 0.4 A/cm(2)), film growth is increasingly controlled by ions incident at the substrate, rather than neutrals, as a result of the higher plasma dencity and, hence, electron-impact ionization probablity. Thus, since sputter- ejected Ti atoms have a higher probability of being ionized than B atoms, due to their lower first-ionization potential and larger ionization cross-section, the Ti concentration in as-deposited films increases with decreasing ton (increasing J(T,peak)) as ionized sputtered species are steered to the substrate by the plasma in order to maintain charge neutrality. Published by the AVS.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    A V S AMER INST PHYSICS, 2018
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148101 (URN)10.1116/1.5026445 (DOI)000432372400013 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council VR [2014-5790, 642-2013-8020]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation [KAW 2015.0043]; Aforsk foundation [16-359]; Carl Tryggers Stiftelse Contract [CTS 15:219, CTS 17:166, CTS 14:431]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO Mat LiU) [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2020-04-01
    2. Strategy for simultaneously increasing both hardness and toughness in ZrB2-rich Zr1-xTaxBy thin films
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategy for simultaneously increasing both hardness and toughness in ZrB2-rich Zr1-xTaxBy thin films
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 37, no 3, article id 031506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Refractory transition-metal diborides exhibit inherent hardness. However, this is not always sufficient to prevent failure in applications involving high mechanical and thermal stress, since hardness is typically accompanied by brittleness leading to crack formation and propagation. Toughness, the combination of hardness and ductility, is required to avoid brittle fracture. Here, the authors demonstrate a strategy for simultaneously enhancing both hardness and ductility of ZrB2-rich thin films grown in pure Ar on Al2O3(0001) and Si(001) substrates at 475 degrees C. ZrB2.4 layers are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) from a ZrB2 target, while Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films are grown, thus varying the B/metal ratio as a function of x, by adding pulsed high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) from a Ta target to deposit Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films using hybrid Ta-HiPIMS/ZrB2-DCMS sputtering with a substrate bias synchronized to the metal-rich portion of each HiPIMS pulse. The average power P-Ta (and pulse frequency) applied to the HiPIMS Ta target is varied from 0 to 1800W (0 to 300 Hz) in increments of 600W (100 Hz). The resulting boron-to-metal ratio, y = B/(Zr+Ta), in as-deposited Zr1-xTaxBy films decreases from 2.4 to 1.5 as P-Ta is increased from 0 to 1800W, while x increases from 0 to 0.3. A combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), glancing-angle XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical Z-contrast scanning TEM, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atom-probe tomography reveals that all films have the hexagonal AlB2 crystal structure with a columnar nanostructure, in which the column boundaries of layers with 0 amp;lt;= x amp;lt; 0.2 are B-rich, whereas those with x amp;gt;= 0.2 are Ta-rich. The nanostructural transition, combined with changes in average column widths, results in an similar to 20% increase in hardness, from 35 to 42 GPa, with a simultaneous increase of similar to 30% in nanoindentation toughness, from 4.0 to 5.2MPa root m. Published by the AVS.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    A V S AMER INST PHYSICS, 2019
    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159001 (URN)10.1116/1.5093170 (DOI)000472182400035 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council VR [2014-5790, 2018-03957, 642-2013-8020]; Knut and Alice Wallenbergs foundation [KAW 2015.0043]; VINNOVA [2018-04290]; Aforsk Foundation [16-359]; Carl Tryggers Stiftelse [CTS 15: 219, CTS 17: 166, CTS 14: 431]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO Mat LiU) [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2019-07-19 Created: 2019-07-19 Last updated: 2020-04-01
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  • 79.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engberg, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strategy for simultaneously increasing both hardness and toughness in ZrB2-rich Zr1-xTaxBy thin films2019In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 37, no 3, article id 031506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refractory transition-metal diborides exhibit inherent hardness. However, this is not always sufficient to prevent failure in applications involving high mechanical and thermal stress, since hardness is typically accompanied by brittleness leading to crack formation and propagation. Toughness, the combination of hardness and ductility, is required to avoid brittle fracture. Here, the authors demonstrate a strategy for simultaneously enhancing both hardness and ductility of ZrB2-rich thin films grown in pure Ar on Al2O3(0001) and Si(001) substrates at 475 degrees C. ZrB2.4 layers are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) from a ZrB2 target, while Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films are grown, thus varying the B/metal ratio as a function of x, by adding pulsed high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) from a Ta target to deposit Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films using hybrid Ta-HiPIMS/ZrB2-DCMS sputtering with a substrate bias synchronized to the metal-rich portion of each HiPIMS pulse. The average power P-Ta (and pulse frequency) applied to the HiPIMS Ta target is varied from 0 to 1800W (0 to 300 Hz) in increments of 600W (100 Hz). The resulting boron-to-metal ratio, y = B/(Zr+Ta), in as-deposited Zr1-xTaxBy films decreases from 2.4 to 1.5 as P-Ta is increased from 0 to 1800W, while x increases from 0 to 0.3. A combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), glancing-angle XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical Z-contrast scanning TEM, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atom-probe tomography reveals that all films have the hexagonal AlB2 crystal structure with a columnar nanostructure, in which the column boundaries of layers with 0 amp;lt;= x amp;lt; 0.2 are B-rich, whereas those with x amp;gt;= 0.2 are Ta-rich. The nanostructural transition, combined with changes in average column widths, results in an similar to 20% increase in hardness, from 35 to 42 GPa, with a simultaneous increase of similar to 30% in nanoindentation toughness, from 4.0 to 5.2MPa root m. Published by the AVS.

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    fulltext
  • 80.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the B/Ti ratio of TiBx thin films grown by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering2018In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 36, no 3, article id 030604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TiBx thin films grown from compound TiB2 targets by magnetron sputter deposition are typically highly over-stoichiometric, with x ranging from 3.5 to 2.4, due to differences in Ti and B preferential-ejection angles and gas-phase scattering during transport from the target to the substrate. Here, the authors demonstrate that stoichiometric TiB2 films can be obtained using highpower impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) operated in power-controlled mode. The B/Ti ratio x of films sputter-deposited in Ar is controllably varied from 2.08 to 1.83 by adjusting the length of HiPIMS pulses t(on) between 100 and 30 mu s, while maintaining average power and pulse frequency constant. This results in peak current densities J(T), peak ranging from 0.27 to 0.88 A/cm(2). Energy- and time-resolved mass spectrometry analyses of the ion fluxes incident at the substrate position show that the density of metal ions increases with decreasing t(on) due to a dramatic increase in J(T, peak) resulting in the strong gas rarefaction. With t(on)amp;lt;60 mu s (J(T),(peak)amp;gt; 0.4 A/cm(2)), film growth is increasingly controlled by ions incident at the substrate, rather than neutrals, as a result of the higher plasma dencity and, hence, electron-impact ionization probablity. Thus, since sputter- ejected Ti atoms have a higher probability of being ionized than B atoms, due to their lower first-ionization potential and larger ionization cross-section, the Ti concentration in as-deposited films increases with decreasing ton (increasing J(T,peak)) as ionized sputtered species are steered to the substrate by the plasma in order to maintain charge neutrality. Published by the AVS.

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    fulltext
  • 81. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-friction and wear-resistant carbon nitride coatings for bearing components grown by magnetron sputtering2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of this thesis is the investigation of magnetron sputtered carbon nitride coatings suitable for roller bearing components. The research field of tribology of bearings focuses on minimizing friction between components by improving the lubricants. The development of lubricants is, however, expensive and involves environmentally deleterious chemical byproducts. A solution to avoid such harmful conditions, reduce the processing cost, and more importantly, minimize the friction, is to apply a low-friction and wear-resistant coating on the surface of the bearing. The deposition of such coatings on components can substantially increase their lifetime, reduce the maintenance costs, and eventually increase the reliability of the machinery.

    Carbon nitride (CNx) coatings have high resiliency and can withstand the demanding conditions of bearing operation. The morphology of CNx coatings is highly affected by applying a negative substrate bias voltage. At high bias (100-120 V ), the coatings become denser and more homogeneous with decreased porosity, resulting in more wear-resistant materials. I also found that the duty cycle of the applied bias affects the layer morphology. Less homogeneous films are produced using lower duty cycles (i.e., in high power impulse magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS) for a specific value of bias voltage. Thus, changing bias voltage, we can manipulate the structure of CNx and design layers, depending on the requirements of the bearing application.

    My results show that denser films yield higher hardness and wear-resistance, but also higher compressive stress, which is a disadvantage for the coating-substrate adhesion. In order to obtain improved adhesion on bearing steel, we developed an in-situ surface treatment, prior to the CNx deposition, which also surpasses the limitations set by the properties of each material. The steel substrates are successfully pretreated using W or Cr ions originating from a HiPIMS source. Plasma ions are accelerated to the substrates with energies of 900 eV , due to the application of a synchronized high bias voltage, which clean effectively the substrate surface from residual contaminants and strengthen the interfacial bonding.

    CNx-coated rollers are tested in rolling operation and show the absence of run-in period in all lubrication regimes. This is a big advantage for applications which rotate under boundary lubrication (BL). The coated rollers yield friction coefficients in the range of 0:020 and 0:025 in elastohydrodynamic (EHDL) and hydrodynamic (HDL) lubrication regimes, being lower than the friction coefficients of 0:026-0:052, exhibited by the uncoated rollers. Here, friction decreases steadily with increasing number of cycles, due to the presence of CNx in the contact. In BL, CNx-coated rollers present an increased friction coefficient of 0:052, but the wear is much lower than in the case of uncoated rollers. All rollers are covered with CNx in the wear tracks after the tests, avoiding failures and presenting low abrasive wear. The obtained tribological performance of the CNx-coated rollers in rolling is overall improved compared to the established operation of uncoated rollers. Thus, CNx layers can function as low-friction and wear-resistant coatings protecting the steel components in several roller bearing applications, such as in gearboxes and wheels in automotive, aerospace, marine, and turbine industry.

    List of papers
    1. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering
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    2015 (English)In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 05E112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited on steel AISI52100 and Si(001) substrates using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited at a low substrate temperature of 150 °C and a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage (Vs) was varied from 20 V to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films possessed amorphous microstructure with clearly developed columns extending throughout the entire film thickness. Layers grown with the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the technique used. Voids closed and dense films formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at% and increases as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with stress between – 0.4 and – 1.2 GPa for all Vs values, while for CNx films deposited by MFMS σ = – 4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing Vs for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CNx films produced by MFMS and DCMS at Vs = 100 V and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 x 10-5 mm3/Nm.

    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118343 (URN)10.1116/1.4923275 (DOI)000361229000012 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2015-05-27 Created: 2015-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Improved adhesion of carbon nitride coatings on steel substrates using metal HiPIMS pretreatments
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved adhesion of carbon nitride coatings on steel substrates using metal HiPIMS pretreatments
    2016 (English)In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 302, p. 454-462Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of low-temperature metal pretreatments in order to improve the adhesion of CNx coatings on steel substrates, which is crucial for tribological applications. The substrate pretreatments were conducted using five different metal targets: Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, and W, operated in high power impulse magnetron sputtering mode, known to produce significant ionization of the sputtered material flux. The CNx adhesion, as assessed by Rockwell C tests, did not improve upon Ti and Zr pretreatments. This is primarily ascribed to the fact that no interlayer was formed owing to severe re-sputtering due to high fluxes of doubly-ionized metal species in the plasma. A slight improvement in adhesion was observed in the case an Al pretreatment was carried out, while the best results were obtained using Cr and W. Here, 30-s-long pretreatments were sufficient to clean the steel surface and form a metallic interlayer between substrate and coating. Transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that Al, Cr, and W created intermixing zones at the interlayer/substrate and the interlayer/CNx interfaces. The steel surfaces, pretreated using Cr or W, showed the highest work of adhesion with W-adh(Cr) = 1.77 J/m(2) and W-adh(W) = 1.66 J/m(2), respectively. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2016
    Keywords
    Adhesion; Steel substrate; Carbon nitride; Coating; HiPIMS; Pretreatment
    National Category
    Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131494 (URN)10.1016/j.surfcoat.2016.06.048 (DOI)000381838400051 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|VINN Excellence Center Functional Nanoscale Materials (FunMat) [2005-02666]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [RMA11-0029]; Carl Trygger Foundation for Scientific Research [CTS 14:431]

    Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-23 Last updated: 2017-11-21
    3. Rolling contact fatigue of bearing components coated with carbon nitride thin films
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rolling contact fatigue of bearing components coated with carbon nitride thin films
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 98, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bearing rollers were coated with CNx films using high power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition in order to reduce their rolling-contact fatigue as investigated using a Micro-Pitting Rig tribometer under poly-alpha-olefin lubricated conditions. Coated rollers with a similar to 15 nm thick W adhesion layer to the substrate, exhibit the best performance, presenting mild wear and no fatigue after 700 kcycles. The steady-state friction coefficient was similar to 0.05 for both uncoated and coated rollers. Uncoated rollers show run-in friction in the first 50 kcycles, because of steel-to-steel contact, which is absent for coated rollers. Analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the presence of a CNx coating prevents steel-to-steel contact of the counterparts, prior to the elastohydrodynamic lubrication, reducing their wear and increasing the lifetime expectancy. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Coating; Pitting; Rolling; Lubrication
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128933 (URN)10.1016/j.triboint.2016.02.017 (DOI)000374426000011 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Carl Tryggers Foundation for Scientific Research [CTS 14:431]

    Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2017-11-30
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    Low-friction and wear-resistant carbon nitride coatings for bearing components grown by magnetron sputtering
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  • 82. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low Friction and Wear Resistant Carbon Nitride Thin Films for Rolling Components Grown by Magnetron Sputtering2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of this licentiate thesis is the investigation of carbon based thin films suitable for rolling components, especially roller bearings. Carbon and carbon nitride are materials with advantageous tribological properties and high resiliency. Such materials are required in order to withstand the demanding conditions of bearing operation, such as high loads and corrosive environments. A fundamental condition for coated bearings is that the deposition temperature must be striktly limited. Thus, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were synthesized here at low temperature of 150 oC by different reactive magnetron sputtering techniques, which are mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS), direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS), and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). While DCMS is a very well studied technique for carbon based films, MFMS and HiPIMS are relatively new sputtering techniques for carbon, and especially CNx depositions. Using different magnetron sputtering techniques, different ionization conditions prevail in the chamber during each process and influence the obtained film properties at a great extent. It was found that bias duty cycles and the amount of working gas ions are key parameters and affect the morphology and microstructure as well as the mechanical response of the films. Moreover, different bias voltages, from 20 V up to 120 V were applied during the processes in order to investigate the changes that the different ion energies induce in the film structure.

    The structural, mechanical and tribological properties of CNx films are also presented in this licentiate thesis. The morphology of CNx films strongly depends on both the deposition technique and ion energy. The special configuration of MFMS mode produces highly homogeneous and dense films even from low applied bias voltages, while in HiPIMS mode high bias voltages above 100 V must be applied in order to produce films with similar structural characteristics. DCMS is also proven as a good technique for homogeneous and dense films. Low bias voltages do not favor  homogeneous structures, thus at 20 V all techniques produced films with columnar structures with intercolumnar voids. High bias voltages influence the N incorporation in the films, with the appearance of re-sputtering of N-containing species and a promotion of sp2 bonding configurations with increasing ion energy. Nevertheless, the different deposition mode influences the sp2 content in different ways, with only MFMS showing a clear increase of sp2 content with increasing bias voltage and HiPIMS showing relatively constant sp2 content. The morphology and microstructure of the CNx films affects their mechanical response, with higher ion energies producing harder films. A dependency of hardness and elastic modulus with increasing ion energy was obtained, where for all deposition modes, hardness and elastic modulus increase linearly with increasing bias voltage. Films with hardness as high as 25 GPa were synthesized by MFMS at 120 V , while the softer film yielded a hardness of 7 GPa and was deposited by HiPIMS at 20 V . The elastic recovery of the films differs with increasing ion energies, presenting a correlation with the C sp2 bond content. The highest elastic recovery of 90% was extracted for the film deposited by MFMS at 120 V and is a value similar to the elastic recovery obtained for FL-CNx films. All films developed compressive residual stresses, depending also on the ion energies and the deposition mode used. It is demonstrated that the induced stresses in the films increase when denser and more homogeneous film morphologies are obtained and with higher Ar intercalcation. Low friction coefficients were obtained for all films between 0.05 and 0.07, although the deposition conditions are not detrimental for the development of friction coefficient. The wear resistance of the films was found to be dependent on the morphology and to some extent on the microstructure of the films. Harder, denser, and more homogeneous films have higher wear resistance. Especially, CNx films deposited by MFMS at 120 V present no wear.

    The tribological characteristics of the surface of the films were also investigated at nanoscale by a new reciprocal wear test. In this wear test, the recording of the track profile is performed in between consecutive test cycles, eliminating also thermal drift. The very low wear of the films deposited by MFMS at 100 V and 120 V revealed that during the wear test a phase transformation on the surface may take place, possibly graphitization. It is also demonstrated the way that the surface characteristics, such as asperities and roughness affects the tribological measurements. Attention is also turned to the presence of large asperities on the film surface and the way they affect the obtained average friction coefficient and tribological measured data.

    List of papers
    1. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering
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    2015 (English)In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 05E112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited on steel AISI52100 and Si(001) substrates using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited at a low substrate temperature of 150 °C and a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage (Vs) was varied from 20 V to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films possessed amorphous microstructure with clearly developed columns extending throughout the entire film thickness. Layers grown with the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the technique used. Voids closed and dense films formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at% and increases as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with stress between – 0.4 and – 1.2 GPa for all Vs values, while for CNx films deposited by MFMS σ = – 4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing Vs for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CNx films produced by MFMS and DCMS at Vs = 100 V and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 x 10-5 mm3/Nm.

    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118343 (URN)10.1116/1.4923275 (DOI)000361229000012 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2015-05-27 Created: 2015-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Nanotribological properties of wear resistant a-CNx thin films deposited by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanotribological properties of wear resistant a-CNx thin films deposited by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanotribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films deposited with mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) were investigated at the nanoscale using an in-situ technique in a Hysitron Triboindenter TI 950. The friction coefficient, wear rate, track roughness, and the track profiles were recorded as a function of the number of linear reciprocal cycles, revealing the manner that the nanotribological and surface properties change during the wear test. The surface composition of  the films was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The friction coefficient ranges between 0.05 – 0.07, while the wear coefficient ranges from 9.4 x 10-8 up to 1.5 x 10-4 mm3/Nm. Debris particles and surface modifications characterize the friction and lubrication behavior in the track. The friction and main lubrication mechanism on the modified surface changes after the removal of debris particles, while this change appears at different cycle for each CNx film depending on the substrate bias voltage. Films grown at higher bias are modified earlier than films grown at lower bias. The wear behavior can be divided into two, track roughnessdependent, regimes; (1) films with track roughness > 1 nm showed wear with obvious tracks and (2) the films with roughness < 1 nm showed negative wear at the nanometer scale with a volume of material projected in the area of the wear track. This material volume is believed to be result of a surface modification, where the molar volume of the modified surface is larger than the molar volume of the surface before the wear test.

    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118347 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-05-27 Created: 2015-05-27 Last updated: 2016-11-09Bibliographically approved
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  • 83.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanotribological properties of wear resistant a-CNx thin films deposited by mid-frequency magnetron sputteringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanotribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films deposited with mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) were investigated at the nanoscale using an in-situ technique in a Hysitron Triboindenter TI 950. The friction coefficient, wear rate, track roughness, and the track profiles were recorded as a function of the number of linear reciprocal cycles, revealing the manner that the nanotribological and surface properties change during the wear test. The surface composition of  the films was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The friction coefficient ranges between 0.05 – 0.07, while the wear coefficient ranges from 9.4 x 10-8 up to 1.5 x 10-4 mm3/Nm. Debris particles and surface modifications characterize the friction and lubrication behavior in the track. The friction and main lubrication mechanism on the modified surface changes after the removal of debris particles, while this change appears at different cycle for each CNx film depending on the substrate bias voltage. Films grown at higher bias are modified earlier than films grown at lower bias. The wear behavior can be divided into two, track roughnessdependent, regimes; (1) films with track roughness > 1 nm showed wear with obvious tracks and (2) the films with roughness < 1 nm showed negative wear at the nanometer scale with a volume of material projected in the area of the wear track. This material volume is believed to be result of a surface modification, where the molar volume of the modified surface is larger than the molar volume of the surface before the wear test.

  • 84.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivanov, Ivan G.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 05E112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited on steel AISI52100 and Si(001) substrates using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited at a low substrate temperature of 150 °C and a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage (Vs) was varied from 20 V to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films possessed amorphous microstructure with clearly developed columns extending throughout the entire film thickness. Layers grown with the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the technique used. Voids closed and dense films formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at% and increases as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with stress between – 0.4 and – 1.2 GPa for all Vs values, while for CNx films deposited by MFMS σ = – 4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing Vs for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CNx films produced by MFMS and DCMS at Vs = 100 V and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 x 10-5 mm3/Nm.

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  • 85.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glenat, Herve
    Technosud, France.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grillo, Stefano
    Technosud, France; University of Perpignan, France.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparative study of macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by HiPIMS2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering at different substrate bias voltages (V-b) were investigated. V-b of -100, -150, -200, and-300 V were used. A Hysitron Triboindenter TI950 and a reciprocating Tribotechnic tribometer with diamond counterparts were used in order to assess the tribological performance of the films at the micro- and macroscale, respectively. Initial Hertzian contact pressures of 2.5 GPa, 3.3 GPa and 3.9 GPa were chosen for the comparative measurements at both scales. At the macroscale, films with higher initial roughness present an increased wear. Debris creation and asperity deformation takes place causing abrasive wear. At the microscale, compression of the surface material occurs. The run-in friction shows similar trends at both scales; an initial decrease and an increase thereafter. Steady-state friction is not reached at the microscale, attributed to the absence of a graphitic tribolayer in the contact. At the macroscale, all films show abrasive wear and debris creation. Here, the changes in friction coefficients are attributed to the debris loss from the contact during the tribotests. The CN film tested at 2.5 GPa shows a continuous increase of friction, due to the continuous loss of debris from the contact. The other films reach a steady-state friction coefficient, since most of the debris is lost before the end of the tribotests. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 86.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meeuwenoord, Ralph
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    IHI Ionbond AG, Olten, Switzerland.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling performance of carbon nitride-coated bearing components in different lubrication regimes2017In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 114, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of carbon nitride (CN) coated roller bearings is investigated, using a micropitting rig. The rolling performance is evaluated using Stribeck test, with a continuously varying rolling speed (0.2 - 2 m/s). Rolling contact fatigue tests with constant speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3.5 m/s) are also conducted in order to study the high-cycle performance of the rollers. The obtained Stribeck curve shows that the presence of coatings eliminates run-in, resulting in low friction coefficients (similar to 0.08). Raman spectroscopy, performed at the wear tracks, reveals that CNx maintain stable chemical state. Coatings show abrasion although the wear rate is not detrimental for the performance of the rollers, since a CNx to-steel contact is retained during the entire rolling contact fatigue test.

  • 87.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling contact fatigue of bearing components coated with carbon nitride thin films2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 98, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bearing rollers were coated with CNx films using high power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition in order to reduce their rolling-contact fatigue as investigated using a Micro-Pitting Rig tribometer under poly-alpha-olefin lubricated conditions. Coated rollers with a similar to 15 nm thick W adhesion layer to the substrate, exhibit the best performance, presenting mild wear and no fatigue after 700 kcycles. The steady-state friction coefficient was similar to 0.05 for both uncoated and coated rollers. Uncoated rollers show run-in friction in the first 50 kcycles, because of steel-to-steel contact, which is absent for coated rollers. Analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the presence of a CNx coating prevents steel-to-steel contact of the counterparts, prior to the elastohydrodynamic lubrication, reducing their wear and increasing the lifetime expectancy. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 88.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    dos Santos, Renato B.
    Univ Fed Bahia, Brazil.
    Rivelino, Roberto
    Univ Fed Bahia, Brazil.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueorguiev, Gueorgui Kostov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-Healing in Carbon Nitride Evidenced As Material Inflation and Superlubric Behavior2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 19, p. 16238-16243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All known materials wear under extended mechanical contacting. Superlubricity may present solutions, but is an expressed mystery in C-based materials. We report negative wear of carbon nitride films; a wear-less condition with mechanically induced material inflation at the nanoscale and friction coefficient approaching ultralow values (0.06). Superlubricity in carbon nitride is expressed as C-N bond breaking for reduced coupling between graphitic-like sheets and eventual N-2 desorption. The transforming surface layer acts as a solid lubricant, whereas the film bulk retains its high elasticity. The present findings offer new means for materials design at the atomic level, and for property optimization in wear-critical applications like magnetic reading devices or nanomachines.

  • 89.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Improved adhesion of carbon nitride coatings on steel substrates using metal HiPIMS pretreatments2016In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 302, p. 454-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of low-temperature metal pretreatments in order to improve the adhesion of CNx coatings on steel substrates, which is crucial for tribological applications. The substrate pretreatments were conducted using five different metal targets: Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, and W, operated in high power impulse magnetron sputtering mode, known to produce significant ionization of the sputtered material flux. The CNx adhesion, as assessed by Rockwell C tests, did not improve upon Ti and Zr pretreatments. This is primarily ascribed to the fact that no interlayer was formed owing to severe re-sputtering due to high fluxes of doubly-ionized metal species in the plasma. A slight improvement in adhesion was observed in the case an Al pretreatment was carried out, while the best results were obtained using Cr and W. Here, 30-s-long pretreatments were sufficient to clean the steel surface and form a metallic interlayer between substrate and coating. Transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that Al, Cr, and W created intermixing zones at the interlayer/substrate and the interlayer/CNx interfaces. The steel surfaces, pretreated using Cr or W, showed the highest work of adhesion with W-adh(Cr) = 1.77 J/m(2) and W-adh(W) = 1.66 J/m(2), respectively. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 90.
    Barrirero, Jenifer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Pauly, C.
    Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Engstler, M.
    Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Ghanbaja, J.
    Univ Lorraine, France.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, J.
    Univ Leoben, Austria.
    Schumacher, P.
    Univ Leoben, Austria.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Muecklich, F.
    Saarland Univ, Germany.
    Eutectic modification by ternary compound cluster formation in Al-Si alloys2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 5506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Al-alloys with Si as the main alloying element constitute the vast majority of Al castings used commercially today. The eutectic Si microstructure in these alloys can be modified from plate-like to coral-like by the addition of a small amount of a third element to improve ductility and toughness. In this investigation the effects of Eu and Yb are studied and their influence on the microstructure is compared to further understand this modification. The two elements impact the alloy differently, where Eu modifies Si into a coral-like structure while Yb does not. Atom probe tomography shows that Eu is present within the Si phase in the form of ternary compound Al2Si2Eu clusters, while Yb is absent in the Si phase. This indicates that the presence of ternary compound clusters within Si is a necessary condition for the formation of a coral-like structure. A crystallographic orientation relationship between Si and the Al2Si2Eu phase was found, where the following plane normals are parallel: 011(Si) //0001(Al2Si2Eu), 111(Si)//6 (7) over bar 10(Al2Si2Eu) and 011(Si)//6 (7) over bar 10(Al2Si2Eu). No crystallographic relationship was found between Si and Al2Si2Yb. The heterogeneous formation of coherent Al2Si2Eu clusters inside the Si-phase is suggested to trigger the modification of the microstructure.

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  • 91.
    Bartosik, M.
    et al.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Keckes, J.
    University of Leoben, Austria.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Riedl, H.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Mayrhofer, P. H.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Interface controlled microstructure evolution in nanolayered thin films2016In: Scripta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6462, E-ISSN 1872-8456, Vol. 123, p. 13-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray nano-diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were conducted along the thickness of a similar to 4 pm thick CrN/AlN multilayer with continuously increasing AlN layer thicknesses from similar to 1 to 15 nm on similar to 7 nm thick CrN template layers. The experiments reveal coherent growth, large columnar grains extending over several (bi-)layers for thin AlN layer thicknesses below similar to 4 nm. Above similar to 4 nm, the nucleation of the thermodynamically stable wurtzite structured AlN is favored, leading to coherency breakdown and reduction of the overall strains, disrupting the columnar microstructure and limiting the maximum grain size in film growth direction to the layer thickness. (C) 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 92.
    Batista dos Santos, Renato
    et al.
    Institute Federal Baiano, Brazil.
    de Brito Mota, Fernando
    University of Federal Bahia, Brazil.
    Rivelino, Roberto
    University of Federal Bahia, Brazil.
    Gueorguiev, Gueorgui Kostov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electric-Field Control of Spin-Polarization and Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition in Carbon-Atom-Chain Devices2017In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 46, p. 26125-26132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose hybrid molecular systems containing small carbon atomic chains interconnected by graphene-like flakes, theoretically predicted as true energy minima, as low-dimensional structures that may be useful in electronic devices at the limit of the atomic miniaturization. The effects of an external electric field applied along the direction of the carbon chains indicate that it is possible to control energy gap and spin polarization with sufficiently high strength, within the limit of the structural restoring of the systems. In this sense, by applying electric fields with magnitudes in the 1-5 V/nm range, we obtain semiconductor-to-metallic transitions for all odd-numbered carbon-chain systems proposed here. Furthermore, high-spin-to-low-spin transitions are determined for these systems as a function of the electric-field magnitude. In the case of the even-numbered carbon-chain systems, the overall electric field effect is pushing electron density near the Fermi level, leading to a gapless or metallic regime at 3.0 V/nm. An electric-field control of the spin-polarization of these latter systems is only achieved by doping the extremities of the graphene-like terminations with sulfur atoms. This finding, however, is beneficial for applications of these systems in spin controlled carbon-based devices connected by gold electrodes, even in the presence of a weak spin-orbit coupling.

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  • 93.
    Baysal, Mustafa
    et al.
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Bilge, Kaan
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Yildizhan, Melike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yorulmaz, Yelda
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Oncel, Cinar
    Mugla Sitki Kocaman Univ, Turkey.
    Papila, Melih
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Yurum, Yuda
    Sabanci Univ, Turkey.
    Catalytic synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes at low temperatures2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 4658-4662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    KFeO2 is demonstrated to be an efficient catalyst for the formation of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). This alkali-based catalyst enables the formation of crystalline, multi-walled BNNTs with high aspect ratio at temperatures as low as 750 degrees C, significantly lower than those typically required for the product formation by TCVD.

  • 94. Beckers, M.
    et al.
    Schell, N
    Martins, R. M. S.
    Mucklich, A
    Möller, W.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Nucleation and growth of Ti2 AlN thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering onto MgO(111)2007In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 102, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleation and growth of Ti2 AlN thin films on MgO(111) substrates during dual direct current reactive magnetron cosputtering from Ti and Al targets in an Ar N2 atmosphere at a substrate temperature of 690 °C have been investigated. Time and thickness dependent in situ specular x-ray reflectivity and x-ray diffraction in combination with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy reveal the formation of competing phases for slight N superstoichiometry with respect to Ti2 AlN. The stoichiometry deviations initiate the layer-by-layer growth of a ∼380 Å thick epitaxial N-substoichiometric cubic (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer. N-vacancy driven diffusion of Ti and Al leads to decomposition of this metastable solid solution into nanosized cubic TiN y′ and AlN y″ domains as well as to a solid-state reaction with the MgO(111) by formation of a Mg2 (Al:Ti) O4 spinel, reducing the transformed (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer thickness down to ∼60 Å. Local AlN y″ domains serve as templates for Ti2 AlN nucleation at higher thicknesses. At the same time TiN y′ and AlN y″ serve as a sink for excess gas phase N during the subsequent polycrystalline Ti2 AlN growth with random (Ti1-x Alx) Ny renucleation as a tissue phase along Ti2 AlN grain boundaries. The individual Ti2 AlN grains with vertical sizes up to the total thickness retain local epitaxy to the substrate, with basal planes nonparallel to the substrate interface. Concurrently the (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer is further reduced by inward Ti2 AlN grain growth along the basal planes. © 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  • 95.
    Beckers, Manfred
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lauridsen, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baehtz, C.
    Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Formation of basal plane fiber-textured Ti2AlN films on amorphous substrates2010In: PHYSICA STATUS SOLIDI-RAPID RESEARCH LETTERS, ISSN 1862-6254, Vol. 4, no 05-Jun, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of fiber-textured Ti2AlN(0001) films on SiO2 was characterized by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Ti2AlN was formed by solid-state reaction between sequentially deposited Ti and AlN layers. A deposition at 275 degrees C yields a Ti(0001) out-of-plane orientation which is maintained for the following AlN(0001)/Ti(0001) layers. Annealing to 600 degrees C yields AlN decomposition and diffusion of Al and N into Ti, with consecutive transformation into (TiAlN)-Al-3(111) and Ti2AlN(0001) plus AlN residuals. Despite preferred Ti2AlN(0001) out-of-plane orientation, the in-plane distribution is random, as expected from the self-organized pseudo-epitaxial growth.

  • 96.
    Beckers, Manfred
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baehtz, Carsten
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    Martins, R.M.S.
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Möller, W.
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    The influence of substrate temperature and Al mobility on the microstructural evolution of magnetron sputtered ternary Ti-Al-N thin films2009In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 064915-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ternary Ti-Al-N films were deposited onto Al2O3 (0001) substrates by reactive co‑sputtering from elemental Ti and Al targets and analyzed by in situ and ex situ x-ray scattering, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The deposition parameters were set to values that yield Ti:Al:N ratios of 2:1:1 and 4:1:3 at room temperature. 2TiAlN depositions at 675 °C result in epitaxial Ti2AlN growth with basal planes parallel to the substrate surface. Nominal 4TiAl3N depositions at 675 °C and above, however, yield TiN and Ti2AlN domains due to Al loss to the vacuum. Depositions at a lower temperature of 600 °C yield films with correct 4:1:3 stoichiometry, but Ti4AlN3 formation is supposedly prevented by insufficient adatom mobility. Instead, an incoherent Tin+1AlNn structure with random twinned stacking sequences n is obtained, that exhibits both basal plane orientations parallel as well as nearly perpendicular to the substrate interface. X‑ray photoemission spectroscopy shows that in contrast to stoichiometric nitrides the Al is metallically bonded and hence acts as twinning plane within the Tin+1AlNn stackings. Domains with perpendicular basal plane orientation overgrowth those with parallel ones in a competitive growth mode. The resulting morphology is a combination of smooth‑surfaced parallel basal plane orientation domains interrupted by repeated facetted hillock-like features with perpendicular basal plane orientation.

  • 97.
    Belaineh, Dagmawi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Malti, Abdellah
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Bioecon, Sweden.
    Wagberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the Organization of PEDOT:PSS on Cellulose Structures2019In: ACS APPLIED POLYMER MATERIALS, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 1, no 9, p. 2342-2351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites of biopolymers and conducting polymers are emerging as promising candidates for a green technological future and are actively being explored in various applications, such as in energy storage, bioelectronics, and thermoelectrics. While the device characteristics of these composites have been actively investigated, there is limited knowledge concerning the fundamental intracomponent interactions and the modes of molecular structuring. Here, by use of cellulose and poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), it is shown that the chemical and structural makeup of the surfaces of the composite components are critical factors that determine the materials organization at relevant dimensions. AFM, TEM, and GIVVAXS measurements show that when mixed with cellulose nanofibrils, PEDOT:PSS organizes into continuous nanosized beadlike structures with an average diameter of 13 nm on the nanofibrils. In contrast, when PEDOT:PSS is blended with molecular cellulose, a phase-segregated conducting network morphology is reached, with a distinctly relatively lower electric conductivity. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of PEDOT:PSS crystallization and may have significant implications for the design of conducting biopolymer composites for a vast array of applications.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-22 13:05
  • 98.
    Belonovskii, A. V.
    et al.
    St Petersburg Acad Univ, Russia; ITMO Univ, Russia.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Levitskii, I. V.
    ITMO Univ, Russia; Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Morozov, K. M.
    St Petersburg Acad Univ, Russia; ITMO Univ, Russia.
    Mitrofanov, M. I.
    Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Girshova, E. I.
    St Petersburg Acad Univ, Russia; ITMO Univ, Russia; Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Ivanov, K. A.
    ITMO Univ, Russia.
    Rodin, S. N.
    Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Evtikhiev, V. P.
    Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Kaliteevski, M. A.
    St Petersburg Acad Univ, Russia; ITMO Univ, Russia; Ioffe Inst, Russia.
    Strong Coupling of Excitons in Hexagonal GaN Microcavities2020In: Semiconductors (Woodbury, N.Y.), ISSN 1063-7826, E-ISSN 1090-6479, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 127-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The GaN planar hexagonal microcavities are grown by the selective vapor-phase epitaxy technique. The spectra are measured by the low-temperature cathodoluminescence method using a scanning electron microscope. The obtained spectra show a huge Rabi splitting (similar to 100 meV). Numerical simulation of the spatial distribution of the intensities of modes in a hexagonal cavity is carried out. Certain modes can have a high spatial localization leading to strong coupling with the exciton and huge Rabi splitting. The fraction of excitons in polariton modes, which correlates with the intensity of exciton radiation associated with these modes, is theoretically calculated for hexagonal-shaped microcavities. Thus, the form of the dependence of the radiation probability on the eigenfrequencies of the structure is obtained.

  • 99.
    Ben Sedrine, Nabiha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Aveiro, Portugal; University of Aveiro, Portugal.
    Zukauskaite, Agne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Fraunhofer Institute Appl Solid State Phys, Germany.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schoeche, S.
    University of Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Schubert, M.
    University of Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Infrared dielectric functions and optical phonons of wurtzite YxAl1-xN (0 less than= x less than= 0.22)2015In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, ISSN 0022-3727, E-ISSN 1361-6463, Vol. 48, no 41, p. 415102-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YAlN is a new member of the group-III nitride family with potential for applications in next generation piezoelectric and light emitting devices. We report the infrared dielectric functions and optical phonons of wurtzite (0001) YxAl1-xN epitaxial films with 0 less than= x less than= 0.22. The films are grown by magnetron sputtering epitaxy on c-plane Al2O3 and their phonon properties are investigated using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The infrared-active E-1(TO) and LO, and the Raman active E-2 phonons are found to exhibit one-mode behavior, which is discussed in the framework of the MREI model. The compositional dependencies of the E-1(TO), E-2 and LO phonon frequencies, the high-frequency limit of the dielectric constant, epsilon(infinity), the static dielectric constant, epsilon(0), and the Born effective charge Z(B) are established and discussed.

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  • 100.
    Ben Sedrine, Nebiha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zukauskaite, Agne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bandgap Engineering and Optical Constants of YxAl1-xN Alloys2013In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-4922, E-ISSN 1347-4065, Vol. 52, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study wurtzite Yx Al1-xN (0 andlt;= x andlt;= 0:22) films with (0001) orientation deposited by magnetron sputtering epitaxy on Si(100) substrates and we determine the alloys band gap energies and optical constants. Room temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is employed in the energy range from 1 to 6.3 eV, and data modeling based on the standard dielectric function model is used. As a result of the SE data analysis the Yx Al1-xN refractive index and extinction coefficient are determined. The band gap of Yx Al1-xN is found to decrease linearly from 6.2 eV (x=0) down to 4.5 eV (x=0:22). We further observe an increase of the refractive index with increasing Y content; from 1.93 to 2.20 (at 2 eV) for x=0 and 0.22, respectively, reflecting the increase in material density.

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