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  • 51.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Population-based study on prognostic factors for recurrence and progression in primary stage T1 bladder tumours2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) exhibits heterogeneous clinical behaviour, and the treatment is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for UCB in a defined, population-based cohort comprising patients with a first time diagnosis of primary stage T1 UCB.

    Material and methods. The study population initially consisted of 285 patients with primary stage T1 UCB reported to the regional Bladder Cancer Registry in the Southeast Healthcare Region of Sweden from 1992 to 2001. The histological specimens were re-evaluated concerning stage, substaging of T1, World Health Organization (WHO) grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumour volume and total resected volume. Hospital records provided data on tumour size and multiplicity, occurrence of possible relapse and/or progression, death from UCB and whether treatment was given.

    Results. After re-evaluation, the study population comprised 211 patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. LVI was a prognostic factor for UCB progression and recurrence. Tumour size larger than 30 mm and multiplicity increased the risk of recurrence. T1 substaging, tumour volume and total resected volume were not associated with recurrence or tumour progression.

    Conclusions. LVI is significantly correlated with progression and recurrence in patients with primary stage T1 UCB. Therefore, the presence of LVI should be evaluated in every new case of T1 UCB.

  • 52.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    SUB STAGING OF T1 BLADDER TUMOURS2009In: in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 8, issue 4, 2009, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 287-287Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 53.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Methods for evaluating HER2 status in breast cancer: comparison of IHC, FISH, and real-time PCR analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue2013In: Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International, ISSN 1179-2698, Vol. 5, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) is amplified in approximately 15%–20% of all breast cancers. This results in overexpression of the HER2 protein, which is associated with worse clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. Several studies have shown that trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that interferes with the HER2/neu receptor, can improve overall survival in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), combined with different methods for in situ hybridization, is currently used for routine assessment of HER2 status. The aim of the present study was to determine whether real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can serve as a supplementary method for evaluation of HER2 status in primary breast cancer. For this purpose, 145 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary breast cancer samples were tested by real-time PCR amplification of HER2, using amyloid precursor protein as a reference. The results were compared with HER2 status determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and IHC. The specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility of real-time PCR were evaluated, and a comparison of formalin-fixed and fresh-frozen samples was performed. This showed concordance of 93% between real-time PCR and FISH, and 86% between real-time PCR and IHC. Therefore, we suggest that real-time PCR can be a useful supplementary method for assessment of HER2 status.

  • 54.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and p53 mutations in urinary bladder carcinoma stage T12013In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 13, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder carcinoma stage T1 is an unpredictable disease that in some cases has a good prognosis with only local or no recurrence, but in others can appear as a more aggressive tumor with progression to more advanced stages. The aim here was to investigate stage T1 tumors regarding MDM2 promoter SNP309 polymorphism, mutations in the p53 gene, and expression of p53 and p16 measured by immunohistochemistry, and subsequently relate these changes to tumor recurrence and progression. We examined a cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and their tumors.

    Methods: After re-evaluation of the original slides and exclusions, the study population comprised 141 patients, all with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The hospital records were screened for clinical parameters and information concerning presence of histologically proven recurrence and progression. The paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Any mutations found in the p53 gene were studied by single-strand conformation analysis and Sanger sequencing. The MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism was investigated by pyrosequencing. Multivariate analyses concerning association with prognosis were performed, and Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted for a combination of changes and time to progression.

    Results: Of the 141 patients, 82 had at least one MDM2 SNP309 G allele, and 53 had a mutation in the p53 gene, but neither of those anomalies was associated with a worse prognosis. A mutation in the p53 gene was associated with immunohistochemically visualized p53 protein expression at a cut-off value of 50%. In the group with p53 mutation Kaplan-Meier analysis showed higher rate of progression and shorter time to progression in patients with immunohistochemically abnormal p16 expression compared to them with normal p16 expression (p = 0.038).

    Conclusions: MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and mutations in p53 were not associated with worse prognosis in this cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urinary bladder carcinoma. However, patients with abnormal p16 expression and a mutated p53 gene had a higher rate of and a shorter time to progression, and p53 gene mutation was associated with an abnormal immunohistochemistry for p53 at a cut-off of 50%.

  • 55.
    Peng, S.
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Naslund, J.
    Näslund, J., Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy, and Elderly Care Research (NEUROTEC), Section for Geriatrics, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology .
    Glennert, J.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, P.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    A computer-based training system for breast fine needle aspiration cytology2002In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 196, no 1, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is a rapid and inexpensive technique used extensively in the diagnosis of breast disease. To remove diagnostic subjectivity, a diagnostic decision support system (DDSS) called CytoInform© has been developed, based on a Bayesian belief network (BBN) for the diagnosis of breast FNAs. In addition to acting as a DDSS, the system implements a computer-based training (CBT) system, providing a novel approach to breast cytology training. The system guides the trainee cytopathologist through the diagnostic process, allowing the user to grade each diagnostic feature using a set of on-screen reference images as visual clues. The trainee positions a slider on a spectrum relative to these images, reflecting the similarity between the reference image and the microscope image. From this, an evidence vector is generated, allowing the current diagnostic probability to be updated by the BBN. As the trainee assesses each clue, the evidence entered is compared with that of the expert through the use of a defined teaching file. This file records the relative severity of each clue and a tolerance band within which the trainee must position the slider. When all clues in the teaching case have been completed, the system informs the user of inaccuracies and offers the ability to reassess problematic features. In trials with two pathologists of different experience and a series of ten cases, the system provided an effective tool in conveying diagnostic evidence and protocols to trainees. This is evident from the fact that each pathologist only misinterpreted one case and a total of 86%/88% (experienced/inexperienced) of all clues assessed were interpreted correctly. Significantly, in all cases that produced the correct final diagnostic probability, the route taken to that solution was consistent with the expert's solution. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 56.
    Pollard, K Michael
    et al.
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases2010In: CHEMICAL RESEARCH IN TOXICOLOGY, ISSN 0893-228X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 455-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely, drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing oil a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity, some similarities do exist, and a working model is proposed.

  • 57.
    Pollard, Kenneth M
    et al.
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Toomey, Christopher B
    cripps Research Institute.
    Cauvi, David M
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Correction: beta 2-microglobulin is required for the full expression of xenobiotic-induced systemic autoimmunity (vol 8, issue 5, pg 228)2011In: Journal of Immunotoxicology, ISSN 1547-691X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 398-398Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 58.
    Pollard, Kenneth M
    et al.
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Toomey, Christopher B
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Cauvi, David M
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Konoc, Dwight H
    Scripps Research Institute.
    beta 2-microglobulin is required for the full expression of xenobiotic-induced systemic autoimmunity2011In: JOURNAL OF IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY, ISSN 1547-691X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ercury exposure in both humans and mice is associated with features of systemic autoimmunity. Murine HgCl(2)-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA) requires MHC Class II, CD4(+) T-cells, co-stimulatory molecules, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), similar to spontaneous models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). beta(2)-microglobulin (B2m) is required for functional MHC Class I molecules and the neonatal F(c) receptor (F(c)Rn). Deficiency of B2m in lupus-prone strains is consistently associated with reduced IgG levels, but with variable effects on other manifestations. Herein, we examined the role of B2m in mHgIA and show that in the absence of B2m, mercury-exposed mice failed to exhibit hypergammaglobulinemia, had reduced anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA), and had a lower incidence of immune complex deposits in splenic blood vessels, whereas IgG anti-chromatin autoantibodies and renal immune deposits were largely unaffected. Subclass analysis of the IgG anti-chromatin, however, revealed a significant reduction in the IgG(1) subtype. Examination of IFN gamma, IL-4, and IL-2 in exposed skin, draining lymph nodes, and spleen following mercury exposure showed reduced IL-4 in the spleen and skin in B2m-deficient mice, consistent with the lower IgG(1) anti-chromatin levels, and reduced IFN-gamma expression in the skin. These findings demonstrate how a single genetic alteration can partially but significantly modify the clinical manifestations of systemic autoimmunity induced by exposure to xenobiotics.

  • 59.
    Pollard, Michael K
    et al.
    Scripps Research Institute, USA .
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Toomey, Christopher B.
    Scripps Research Institute, USA .
    Cauvi, David M.
    Scripps Research Institute, USA .
    Hoffman, Hal M.
    University of Calif San Diego, USA .
    Hamel, John C.
    Scripps Research Institute, USA .
    Kono, Dwight H.
    Scripps Research Institute, USA .
    Definition of IFN-gamma-related pathways critical for chemically-induced systemic autoimmunity2012In: Journal of Autoimmunity, ISSN 0896-8411, E-ISSN 1095-9157, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IFN-gamma is essential for idiopathic and murine mercury-induced systemic autoimmunity (mHgIA), and heterozygous IFN-gamma(+/-) mice also exhibit reduced disease. This suggests that blocking specific IFN-gamma-related pathways that may only partially inhibit IFN-gamma production or function will also suppress autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, mice deficient in genes regulating IFN-gamma expression (Casp1, Nlrp3, Il12a, Il12b, Stat4) or function (Ifngr1, Irf1) were examined for mHgIA susceptibility. Absence of either Ifngr1 or Irf1 resulted in a striking reduction of disease, while deficiency of genes promoting IFN-gamma expression had modest to no effect. Furthermore, both Irf1- and Ifng-deficiency only modestly reduced the expansion of CD44(hi) and CD44(hi)CD55(lo) CD4(+) T cells, indicating that they are not absolutely required for T cell activation. Thus, there is substantial redundancy in genes that regulate IFN-gamma expression in contrast to those that mediate later signaling events. These findings have implications for the therapeutic targeting of IFN-gamma pathways in systemic autoimmunity.

  • 60.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Letter: Novel L1CAM Splice Site Mutation in a Young Male With L1 Syndrome2011In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 155A, no 2, p. 439-441Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 61.
    Ryden, Lisa
    et al.
    Lund University Hospital.
    Haglund, Monica
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University Hospital.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Kolaric, Aleksandra
    University Hospital, Örebro.
    Kovacs, Aniko
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Olsson, Ann
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Strand, Carina
    Lund University Hospital.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University Hospital.
    Reproducibility of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 analysis in primary breast cancer - A national survey performed at pathology departments in Sweden2009In: ACTA ONCOLOGICA, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 860-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. HER2 is a treatment predictive factor for the effect of trastuzumab and associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The analysis of HER2 must be performed with good quality, with regard to both the immunohistochemical (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis. Material and methods. A tissue microarray (TMA) including 11 breast cancer samples was sent twice (once in 2005 and again in 2006) to 24 pathology departments in Sweden. A questionnaire was also sent to the departments in 2006. Results. With IHC, all departments reported the same results (0/1+ vs. 2+ vs. 3+) for three (2005) and six samples (2006). The mean kappa-value increased from 0.67 to 0.77, indicating a good reproducibility at both occasions. With fluorescence-ISH (FISH), the 11 departments using this technique reported the same results (amplified vs. normal) for nine (2005) and ten samples (2006). The mean kappa-value showed very good reproducibility both 2005 and 2006 (0.92 and 0.96, respectively). Based on the answers from the participating departments, the questionnaire revealed that 31% of primary breast cancer diagnosed in 2006 (n = 5 043) were 2+/3+. FISH analysis of 2+ confirmed 12% of the samples to be amplified. The corresponding figure for 3+ was 90%. In total, 14.3% of the samples were HER2 positive (2+ and amplified, or 3+). Discussion. The results obtained in this study indicate that the reproducibility for HER2 analysis is good (IHC) and very good (FISH) between the pathology departments in Sweden using TMA-based tumor samples. In 2006, 14.3% of invasive breast cancers were HER2 positive.

  • 62.
    Samuelsson, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Vårdhygien.
    Isaksson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Vårdhygien.
    Chabok, Abbas
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Changes in the aerobic faecal flora of patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 820-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An open observational study was performed to investigate changes in the rectal flora and antibiotic susceptibility among faecal bacteria in patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection. Methods: One hundred and forty patients with acute intra-abdominal infection requiring antibiotic treatment and hospitalization were included. Eight surgical units from the southern part of Sweden participated, between January 2006 and November 2007. Antibiotic treatments were according to local guidelines. Rectal swabs were obtained on admission (sample 1) and 2-14 days after the end of antibiotic treatment (sample 2). Aerobic bacteria and yeasts were analysed. The material was divided into 2 groups: 1 group with Enterobacteriaceae and 1 group with non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility to antibiotics in each group was compared between samples 1 and 2. Results: The main finding of this study on patients with severe intra-abdominal infections was a shift in the aerobic faecal flora following antibiotic treatment, from Escherichia coli to other more resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus faecium, and yeasts. The susceptibility to cephalosporins and piperacillin-tazobactam decreased in Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions: Following antibiotic treatment, a shift in the aerobic rectal flora to species with intrinsic antibiotic resistance was observed. This indicates that the emergence of resistance is not due to new mutations, but rather to selection of more resistant species. This should be taken into account when designing treatments for secondary intra-abdominal infections.

  • 63.
    Shabo, Ivan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Tumor cell expression of CD163 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    CD163 is a macrophage specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression, as a macrophage trait, and macrophage infiltration and their clinical-pathological significance in colorectal cancer. The hypothesis of macrophage-cancer cell fusion may explain the expression of CD163 in cancer cells.

    Immune-staining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffinembedded specimens, earlier analyzed for Ki-67, CD31 and D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 77 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data.

    CD163 is positive in cancer cells in 16-18% of the patients and it is related to advanced tumor stages (stage III-IV) and unfavorable prognosis. High macrophage infiltration may be related to lower survival but this relation was not statistically significant. The prognostic significance of CD163 expression is independent of tumor stage (p=0,015) and macrophage density in tumor stroma (p=0,007).

    The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis independently of tumor stage and macrophage density in the tumour stroma. Macrophages may promote tumour growth and progression by an autocrine interaction with cancer cells. Macrophage – cancer cell fusion may occur in colorectal cancer and contribute to tumour progression and metastasis.

  • 64.
    Shabo, Ivan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Breast Cancer Expression of DAP12 is Associated With Skeletal and Liver Metastases and Poor Survival2013In: Clinical Breast Cancer, ISSN 1526-8209, E-ISSN 1938-0666, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 371-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macrophages are an important cellular factor in breast cancer (BRC) progression and metastasis. DNAX activating protein of 12 kD (DAP12) is essential factor for macrophage fusion function. This study was conducted to investigate the expression and significance of DAP12 expression in BRC. DAP12 is expressed in BRC cells and associated with poor survival, liver metastases, and bone metastases. These data provide new insight into the pathophysiology of macrophages in BRC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground: The transmembrane adapter protein, DAP12, transduces activation signals for several arrays of receptors, including human signal-regulatory protein, DAP12-associating lectin-1, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, -2, and -3, in natural killer cells, granulocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. The macrophage-specific antigen, Cluster of Differentiation 163 (CD163), is expressed in breast and colorectal cancers and is associated with early cancer recurrence and poor prognosis. It was recently shown that fusion between intestinal tumor cells and macrophages results in nuclear reprogramming with hybrid transcripts from both cells of origin. The role of DAP12 in the fusion process is not known. This study investigates the expression of DAP12 in BRC cells, and its relation to other macrophage traits and to the clinical progression of disease. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining of DAP12 and CD163 was performed and evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens from 132 patients with BRC. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological data. Results: DAP12 expression in cancer cells was positive in 66 percent of the cancers and was associated with high tumor grade (P = .015), and with liver (P = .047) and skeletal (P = .067), but not with lung metastases (P = 1.00). Patients with BRC expressing DAP12 had poor prognosis, with higher recurrence rates of skeletal (P = .018) and liver metastases (P = .047), and shorter survival time (P = .0060). Conclusion: We suggest that macrophage traits in BRC cells facilitate the metastatic process and that DAP12 expression might promote metastatic homing to bone and liver tissues.

  • 65.
    Shabo, Ivan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    DAP12, a macrophage fusion receptor, is expressed in breast cancer cells and associated with skeletal and liver metastases and poor survivalManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    DAP12 is a transmembrane receptor present in myeloid cells and is essential for the development of functionally mature osteoclasts and microglia, and for integrin signaling in macrophages and neutrophils. The macrophage specific antigen CD163 is expressed in breast and colorectal cancer and is associated with early cancer recurrence and poor prognosis. We hypothesize that macrophage traits in cancer cells may be explained by fusion between cancer cells and tumor associated macrophages. The role of DAP12 in the fusion between cancer cells and macrophages is not known. This study was performed to investigate the expression of DAP12 in breast cancer cells and its´ relation to macrophage trait manifested by CD163 expression.

    Immunostaining of DAP12, CD163 and MAC387 were evaluated in paraffinembedded specimens from totally 133 patients with breast cancer. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological data.

    DAP12 expression was positive in the majority of cases (64%) with breast cancer and associated with advanced tumor grade (p= 0.015) and liver metastasis (p= 0.0465) but not lung metastasis (0.997). It tended to correlate with skeletal metastases (p=0.0673). Patients with breast cancer expressing high DAP12 had poor prognosis with higher rates of skeletal (p=0.023) and liver metastases (p=0.028) and overall shorter distant recurrence free survival (p=0.0028). DAP12 expression was neither correlated to CD163 nor MAC387 expression. To our knowledge, this is the first study where DAP12 expression is reported in breast cancer.

    In conclusion, DAP12 is expressed in breast cancer and is significantly related to skeletal and liver metastasis as well as poor prognosis. We hypothesize that DAP12 expression may promote fusion between breast cancer cells and macrophages. It may even promote homing of cancer cells in bone and liver tissue and result in increased metastasis at these sites.

  • 66.
    Shabo, Ivan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.2009In: International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer, ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 125, no 8, p. 1826-1831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation.

  • 67.
    Strand, Carina
    et al.
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bak, Martin
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Chebil, Gunilla
    Unilabs, Mammography, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Fjällskog, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hedenfalk, Ingrid
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Jirström, Karin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Klintman, Marie
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Malmström, Per
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Fernö, Mårten
    Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    The combination of Ki67, histological grade and estrogen receptor status identifies a low-risk group among 1,854 chemo-naïve women with N0/N1 primary breast cancer2013In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 2, no 111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The aim was to confirm a previously defined prognostic index, combining a proliferation marker, histological grade, and estrogen receptor (ER) in different subsets of primary N0/N1 chemo-naïve breast cancer patients.

    METHODSDESIGN:

    In the present study, including 1,854 patients, Ki67 was used in the index (KiGE), since it is the generally accepted proliferation marker in clinical routine. The low KiGE-group was defined as histological grade 1 patients and grade 2 patients which were ER-positive and had low Ki67 expression. All other patients made up the high KiGE-group. The KiGE-index separated patients into two groups with different prognosis. In multivariate analysis, KiGE was significantly associated with disease-free survival, when adjusted for age at diagnosis, tumor size and adjuvant endocrine treatment (hazard ratio: 3.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.6-4.7, P<0.0001).

    DISCUSSION:

    We have confirmed a prognostic index based on a proliferation marker (Ki67), histological grade, and ER for identification of a low-risk group of patients with N0/N1 primary breast cancer. For this low-risk group constituting 57% of the patients, with a five-year distant disease-free survival of 92%, adjuvant chemotherapy will have limited effect and may be avoided.

  • 68.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Karlsson, Maria H.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Effect of steroid injections on the rotator cuff: An experimental study in rats1999In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 271-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated steroid injections into the subacromial space. Thirty rats were injected either 3 or 5 times with triamcinolone in a dosage equivalent to that given to human beings or 3 or 5 times with saline into the subacromial space. One rat received no injection. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Two different staining methods were used on each sample including hematoxylin eosin and Miller's elastin/van Gieson's solution. After 5 steroid injections, we found focal inflammation, necrosis, and fragmentation of collagen bundles in the tendon in 4 of 7 rats. The tendons of the controls showed a normal structure (P < .05). There were no pathologic changes among the rats that were injected with triamcinolone 3 times. These results show that repeated subacromial injections of triamcinolone may cause damage to the rotator cuff of the rat. This finding may indicate cautious use of subacromial steroid injections in human beings.

  • 69.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Elise
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis caused changes in the rat's rotator cuff2001In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was designed to investigate the histologic expression of the rat's supra- and infraspinatus tendons in carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis. Thirty-two rats received subacromial injections with carrageenan (n = 28) or saline (n = 4). The tendons were analysed microscopically after staining with hematoxyline eosin, Van Giesons hematoxyline and immunofluorescent staining of fibronectin and fibrinogen. In the controls (saline × 10) and group A (carrageenan × 5) there were no changes in the tendons. In group B (carrageenan × 10) 3/8 rats showed macrophages between the collagen fibres and an increased staining of fibronectin. In group C (double dosis carrageenan) all rats had signs of fibrocartilaginous metaplasia in the supraspinatus tendon. In eight of these specimens even bony metaplasia was seen. The infraspinatus tendon showed fibrosis but no fibro-cartilaginous metaplasia. The results showed that iatrogenic bursitis after carrageenan subacromial injections was associated with marked changes of the supraspinatus tendon.

  • 70.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Elise
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Human biopsies in the rotator cuff diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Tornroos, Alexander
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Druvefors, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Postoperative intra-arterial methylene blue injection of colorectal cancer specimens increases the number of lymph nodes recovered2011In: HISTOPATHOLOGY, ISSN 0309-0167, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 408-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine the possible advantage of intra-arterial injection of methylene blue with a view to improving lymph node recovery in postoperative examination of colorectal cancer specimens. Methods and results: Thirty-two colorectal cancer specimens were assigned randomly to either dissection with intra-arterial methylene blue injection or to routine dissection (without methylene blue injection). Immediately postoperatively, the specimens in the staining group were injected intra-arterially with methylene blue dye. The two procedures were compared with respect to the number of lymph nodes recovered. The number of recovered lymph nodes was significantly higher in the intra-arterial methylene blue injection group than in the group investigated with routine procedures (P andlt; 0.0001). Conclusion: The intra-arterial methylene blue injection method is fairly easy to use postoperatively and increases significantly the number of lymph nodes recovered in colorectal cancer specimens.

  • 72.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Tell
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Identification of randomly selected colonies of Lactobacilli from normal vaginal fluid by pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA Variable V1 and V3 Regions2002In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 802-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to characterize lactobacilli in vaginal fluid from 23 adult healthy women by using high-throughput DNA sequencing for identification of a large number of randomly selected colonies appearing on Rogosa and blood agar. The typing method was based on broad-range PCR of 16S rRNA gene variable regions V1 and V3, pyrosequencing, and classification of the fragments by alignment with NCBI-catalogued sequences and type strain sequences. Four major groups of sequences were found among the 402 isolates clearly corresponding to Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus jensenii when compared to the sequences obtained for type strains. Our results indicate that pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments as used here is a fast and reliable method well suited for identification to the species level, even within the Lactobacillus acidophilus complex.

  • 73.
    Törnroos, Alexander
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Garvin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The number of identified lymph node metastases increases continuously with increased total lymph node recovery in pT3 colon cancer2009In: ACTA ONCOLOGICA, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 1152-1156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The positive correlation between the number of recovered benign lymph nodes and patient prognosis is well established for stage II colon cancer patients. One theory explaining this correlation focuses on potential understaging of cancer specimen, implying that a specimen with few examined lymph nodes is likely to be assigned a lower N-stage than the correct one. Understaging may be the result of an insufficient examination of the specimen post-operatively, whereby few lymph nodes are recovered and potential lymph node metastases are overlooked. This study aims to investigate the association between the total lymph node harvest and the number of lymph node metastases in colon cancer specimen. Material and methods. We studied the original pathology reports of 649 patients diagnosed with T3 adenocarcinoma of the colon at the Department of Clinical Pathology and Genetics at Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden between the years 2000 and 2008. Patient demographics, specimen staging data, and lymph node recovery data were collected for each case. Results. We found a positive association between the total lymph node harvest and the number of lymph node metastases per specimen. For every additional recovered lymph node 0.17 (95% CI: 0.15-0.19) metastases were detected (pandlt;0.001). Discussion. Our results support the conclusion that there is no minimum number of recovered lymph nodes at which an accurate determination of nodal status can be assured. Rather than focusing on a recommended minimum number of nodes, efforts should be shifted towards developing methods assuring that colon cancer specimen are dissected in a standardized way that optimizes the lymph node harvest.

  • 74.
    Wessels, Kathrin
    et al.
    Hannover Medical School.
    Bohnhorst, Bettina
    Hannover Medical School.
    Luhmer, Ingrid
    Hannover Medical School.
    Morlot, Susanne
    MVZ Wagnerstibbe, Hannover.
    Bohring, Axel
    Westphalian Wilhelms University.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Epplen, Joerg T
    Ruhr University Bochum.
    Gadzicki, Dorothea
    Hannover Medical School.
    Glaser, Stefanie
    Hannover Medical School.
    Goehring, Gudrun
    Hannover Medical School.
    Maelzer, Madeleine
    Hannover Medical School.
    Hein, Anke
    Hannover Medical School.
    Arslan-Kirchner, Mine
    Hannover Medical School.
    Stuhrmann, Manfred
    Hannover Medical School.
    Schmidtke, Joerg
    Hannover Medical School.
    Pabst, Brigitte
    Hannover Medical School.
    Novel CHD7 mutations contributing to the mutation spectrum in patients with CHARGE syndrome2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS, ISSN 1769-7212, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 280-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited multiple malformation disorder typically characterized by coloboma, choanal atresia, hypoplastic semicircular canal, cranial nerve defects, cardiovascular malformations and ear abnormalities. Mutations in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) gene are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome. Mutation analysis was performed in 18 patients with firm or tentative clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome. In this study eight mutations distributed across the gene were found. Five novel mutations - one missense (c.2936Tandgt;C), one nonsense (c.8093Candgt;A) and three frameshift mutations (c.804_805insAT, c.1757_1770del14, c.1793delA) - were identified. As far as familial data were available these mutations were found to have arisen de novo. Comparison of the clinical features of patients with the same mutation demonstrates that expression of the phenotype is highly variable. The mutation detection rate in this study was 44.4% in patients with a clinically established or suspected diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome.

  • 75.
    Winbladh, Anders
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gullstrand, P
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Segmental ischemia of the liver - microdialysis in a novel porcine model.2009In: European surgical research. Europäische chirurgische Forschung. Recherches chirurgicales européennes, ISSN 1421-9921, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 276-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Segmental liver ischemia is often used in rodents to study ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI). There are no reports of protocols using segmental ischemia in porcine models. Microdialysis (MD) provides the opportunity to study local effects of IRI in vivo. METHODS: Eight pigs received an MD catheter placed in liver segments IV and V, respectively. All circulation to segment IV was stopped for 80 min, and reperfusion was followed for 240 min. RESULTS: During ischemia the levels of lactate, glycerol and glucose increased 3-fold (p < 0.001), 40-fold (p < 0.001) and 4-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, in the ischemic segment compared to the perfused segment, whereas the levels of pyruvate fell to a tenth of the preischemic level (p < 0.001). All values returned to baseline after reperfusion. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase increased (p < 0.05). Polymorphonuclear cells increased in both segments, although the density was significantly higher in segment IV. CONCLUSION: Clamping of one liver segment in pigs is a simple, stable and reproducible model to study IRI with minimal systemic effects. MD revealed no signs of anaerobic metabolism in the perfused segment but still there was an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in this segment, although it was lower than that in the ischemic segment.

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