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  • 51.
    Aspegren Kendall, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Karl-Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hurtig, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Raak, Ragnhild
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sören, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahren, Lis Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Differences in sensory thresholds in the skin of women with fibromyalgia syndrome: A comparison between ketamine responders and ketamine non-responders2003In: Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain, ISSN 1058-2452, E-ISSN 1540-7012, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare detection and pain thresholds in the skin of female fibromyalgia patients who were either ketamine responders or ketamine nonresponders.

    Methods: Detection thresholds to innocuous warmth, of cold, heat or cold pain, and touch and dynamic touch sensation were determined in the skin. Pressure pain thresholds, local and widespread pain intensity, and pain duration were also registered.

    Results: Ketamine nonresponse was associated with more pronounced hypersensitivity for thermal pain [especially cold pain] than ketamine response.

    Conclusions: Blockade of N-metyl-D-aspartic acid receptors by ketamine and the recording of pain thresholds in the skin, especially for cold pain, might reveal different mechanisms of allodynia.

  • 52.
    Aspevall, O
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Osterman, Björn
    Dittmer, R
    Stén, L
    Lindbäck, E
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Performance of four chromogenic urine culture media after one or two days of incubation compared with reference media.2002In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 40, p. 1500-1503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four chromogenic urine culture media were compared to culture on blood agar, MacConkey agar, and CLED (cysteine-, lactose-, and electrolyte-deficient) agar for detection of uropathogens in 1,200 urine specimens. After 2 nights of incubation, 96% of all isolates were recovered on blood agar, 96% were recovered on CLED agar, 92% were recovered on CPS ID2, 96% were recovered on CHROMagar Orientation from BBL, 95% were recovered on CHROMagar Orientation from The CHROMagar Company, and 95% were recovered on Chromogenic UTI Medium.

  • 53.
    Aspevall, Olle
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst Stockholm.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Preiminary report: Concepts and terms used to describe urinary tract infection in primary health care and in the clinical microbiology laboratory1999In: Medical Informatics Europe99,1999, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1999, p. 899-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Aspevall, Olle
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet Stockholm.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Building a concept system to structure the contents of a decision support system - a grounded theory study of concepts in the knowledge domain of urinary tract infection2001In: Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine (Print), ISSN 1463-9238, E-ISSN 1464-5238, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Asplund Persson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The nitrosoamine dephostatin interacts with nitric oxide/cGMP signalling and modulates cytosolic calcium responses in human plateletsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1 The effects of the nitrosoamine dephostatin on cytosolic Ca2+ and nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signallings in human platelets were investigated.

    2 Dephostatin has been characterised as a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor, and may on that account affect platelet responses. However, western blot analysis revealed that dephostatin (1-100 µM) did not increase tyrosine-specific protein phosphorylation.

    3 Dephostatin dose-dependently (0.003-3 µM) inhibited thrombin-, thrombin-receptor activating peptide-, and ADP-stimulated rises in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i. in fura-2-loaded platelets. Surprisingly, higher doses of dephostatin (10-30 µM) augmented thrombin-triggered Ca2+ response. This dual action of dephostatin mainly involved modulation of Ca2+ influx.

    4 The results revealed that dephostatin antagonised NO/cGMP- and prostaglandin E1/cAMP-mediated inhibition of [Ca2+]1. The action of the thrornbin-neutralising peptide hirudin was, however, unaffected.

    5 Dephostatin did not affect basal or NO-mediated rises in platelet cGMP content. On the other hand, dephostatin alone directly increased the phosphorylation of ser239 on vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and markedly enhanced NO/cGMP-dependent VASP phosphorylation.

    6 Cell functional studies revealed that dephostatin amplified NO-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation. Opposite to that, dephostatin diminished the inhibitory action of NO on phosphatidylserine exposure.

    7 In conclusion, the results revealed that dephostatin affects a wide range of mechanisms involved in Ca2+ homeostasis in platelets. These effects are apparently not due to inhibition of PTPs. However, enhancement of VASP phosphorylation represents another important molecular mechanism of dephostatin. Considering NO signalling, the results indicate that dephostatin may be an excellent tool when elucidating the relative importance of inhibition of Ca2+ versus VASP phosphorylation.

  • 56.
    Augustinsson (Nilsdotter-Augustinsson), Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Frydén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interaction of staphylococcus epidermidis from infected hip prostheses with neutrophil granulocytes2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 408-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the interaction of Staphylococcus epidermis isolated from granulation tissue covering infected hip prostheses and neutrophil granulocytes. Bacterial strains isolated from normal flora were used as controls. The bacteria were well characterized with routine methods and further characterized with random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses and slime tests. Phagocytosis and chemiluminescence (CL) assays were used in the neutrophil interaction studies. The prostheses strains were ingested to a lesser extent than strains from normal flora (p ≤ 0.001). There was no significant difference between the prostheses strains and the normal flora strains in terms of total CL response. However, the extracellular CL response from the neutrophils was lower in comparison with the normal flora when interacting with the prostheses strains. The results of this study support the notion that S. epidermidis strains isolated from infected hip prostheses have an enhanced capacity to resist phagocytosis and that most of these strains elicit a reduced inflammatory response, measured as the production of extracellular oxidative metabolites from the neutrophils, compared to normal flora.

  • 57.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Alternative for estimating the burden of lung cancer from occupational exposures - Some calculations based on data from Swedish men2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. This study attempts to demonstrate a calculation of the occupational lung cancer burden using economically active men in Sweden as an example. Methods. Estimates were calculated using Swedish register data on occupation in 1970, lung cancer incidence in 1971-1989, smoking frequencies in 1963, and the formula I = RI0F + I0(I-F), where I is the overall incidence, R is the relative risk associated with a factor (here smoking), F is the fraction of persons at risk (smokers), and I0 is the incidence among those not at risk (nonsmokers). Results. Farmers, gardeners, forestry workers, and fishermen had the lowest lung cancer risk (42.1 per 100 000 person-years) and a smoking frequency of 44.7%. Their I0 was 12.6 or 8.4 per 100 000 person-years, taking R for smoking as 6 or 10, respectively. From these I0 estimates, the expected rates for white- and blue-collar workers (smoking frequencies 52.7 and 57.7%, respectively) were 45.8 and 49.1 per 100 000 person-years, as compared with the 22% and 57% higher observed rates, respectively. Weighing these excesses proportionally according to the sizes of the three occupational categories gave, respectively for R equal to 6 and 10, occupation-related excesses of 39% and 32% and population-attributable risks of 28% and 24%. Conclusions. About one-fourth of the lung cancers that occur among economically active Swedish men seem to have been related to occupation. This figure agrees with estimates made by other methods in Nordic countries. Due to interaction, the population-attributable risk from smoking is still high, 73% and 83% at relative risk values of 6 and 10, respectively.

  • 58.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ethylene oxide and cancer2004In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Negative and non-positive epidemiological studies.2004In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Balbus, JM
    Cohen, G
    Davis, D
    Donnay, A
    Doolittle, R
    Duran, BM
    Egilman, D
    Epstein, SS
    Goldman, L
    Grandjean, P
    Hansen, ES
    Heltne, P
    Huff, J
    Infante, P
    Jacobson, MF
    Joshi, TK
    LaDou, J
    Landrigan, PJ
    Lee, PR
    Lockwood, AH
    MacGregor, G
    Melnick, R
    Messing, K
    Needleman, H
    Ozonoff, D
    Ravanesi, B
    Richter, ED
    Sass, J
    Schubert, D
    Suzuki, D
    Teitelbaum, D
    Temple, NJ
    Terracini, B
    Thompson, A
    Tickner, J
    Tomatis, L
    Upton, AC
    Whyatt, RM
    Wigmore, D
    Wilson, T
    Wing, SB
    Sharpe, VA
    Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology.2003In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 9, p. 386-389Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Castleman, B
    Epstein, S
    Franco, G
    Giannasi, F
    Grandjean, P
    Greenberg, M
    Hooper, K
    Huff, J
    Jacobsson, M
    Joshi, TK
    Kulkarni, GK
    La Dou, J-F
    Mazaheri, Marie
    Mekonnen, Y
    Melnick, R
    Mirabelli, DK
    Ofrin, R
    Partanen, Tony
    Pott, FJ
    Sass, J
    Soskolne, CL
    Suplido, ML
    Terracini, B
    Tomatis, L
    Ungvary, G
    Watterson, A
    Wessling, C
    Yassi, A
    Re: Implementation of WHO Guidelines on Disclosure of Interest by members of WHO Expert Panels.2002In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 8, p. 271-273Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Assessing dose-response relationships by cumulative exposures in epidemiological studies2007In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If the occurrence of disease monotonically increases with the degree of exposure in an epidemiologic study, a dose-response (or exposure-response) relationship is indicated and facilitates the interpretation that the exposure has a causal role. It is not uncommon, however, that there is some effect in terms of an overall increased relative risk but no clear dose-response relationship. Methods: Models presented here show that cumulative exposure, as involving the duration of exposure, is not an adequate parameter when more recent exposure or the intensity of the exposure plays the greater role for the disease outcome. Conclusions: In lack of a dose-response pattern by cumulative exposure, the interpretation of an overall increased risk might well be that there is no definite effect. The proper consideration should be, however, that the measure of exposure could be inadequate, suggesting a need for further analyses and evaluations of the material studied. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 63.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Åkerblom, G
    Hardell, L
    Leukemia in childhood and adolescence and exposure to ionizing radiation in homes built from uranium-containing alum shale concrete2002In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 146-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns in Sweden about indoor radon around 1980 prompted measurements of gamma-radiation from the facades of houses to identify those constructed of uranium-containing alum shale concrete, with potentially high radon concentrations. To evaluate any possible risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from exposure to elevated gamma-radiation in these homes, we identified the acute lymphocytic leukemia cases less than 20 years of age in Sweden during 1980-1989 as well as eight controls per case from the population registry, matching on age, gender, and county. Using the existing measurements, exposure was assessable for 312 cases and 1,418 controls from 151 properly measured municipalities. A conditional logistic odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.9) was obtained for those ever having lived in alum shale concrete houses, with the average exposure exceeding 0.10 microsieverts per hour. Comparing those who ever lived in alum shale concrete houses (divided by higher and lower annual average exposure) with those who never lived in such houses, we found a weak dose-response relation. The results suggest some risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from indoor ionizing radiation among children and young adults.

  • 64.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Multiple sclerosis and ionizing radiation.2001In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 120, p. 175-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) may involve exposure to infectious, chemical or physical agents damaging the blood-brain barrier and an autoimmune reaction against myelin breakdown products. Here we report a pooled analysis of 174 MS cases and 815 population controls from two case-control studies with regard to such a potentially damaging exposure, namely X-ray examinations, radiological work and treatment with ionizing radiation. Exposure was assessed by questionnaires to the subjects. We obtained odds ratios of 4.4 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.6-11.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.6) for radiological work and X-ray examinations, respectively, 5 cases, but no controls, in one of the studies had been treated with ionizing radiation. Our data and some other observations reported in the literature suggest a contributory role for ionizing radiation to the development of MS in some cases.

  • 65.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Early induction of GAD(65)-reactive Th2 response in type 1 diabetic children treated with alum-formulated GAD(65)2010In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 559-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g alum-formulated glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD(65)) (GAD-alum; Diamyd (R)) in children with recent-onset type 1 diabetes lead to preservation of residual insulin secretion. In vitro cytokine production at the 15 months follow-up indicated immunomodulation. In the present study, we took advantage of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cryopreserved during early follow-ups, to investigate whether the immunomodulatory effect of GAD-alum was apparent earlier after treatment, preceding the changes previously reported at 15 months.<p>Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 70 type 1 diabetic children, randomly assigned GAD-alum (n = 35) or placebo (n = 35), that had been frozen at baseline (n = 27) and after 1 (n = 58), 3 (n = 67) and 9 (n = 66) months, were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65), tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 peptide, insulin peptide, GAD-alum, alum formulation or phytohaemagglutinin. Interleukin (IL)-5, -6, -10, -12, -13, -17, tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma were measured in cell supernatants and serum samples using Luminex. Expression of FOXP3 and transforming growth factor-beta was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.</p><p>Results Already 1 month after the first injection, GAD(65)-induced IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 were enhanced in GAD-alum-treated patients compared to those with placebo. The in vitro response at 3 and 9 months was characterized by a broader range of cytokines in the treated group. Notably, only the T-helper 2-associated cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 increased continuously over time.</p><p>Conclusions Treatment with GAD-alum in type 1 diabetic children induced an early T-helper 2 immune enhanced response to GAD(65), followed by a wider spectrum of cytokines at 3 and 9 months. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>

  • 66.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Machine learning to support diagnostics in the domain of asymptomatic liver disease1995In: MEDINFO95,1995, Edmonton: HC & CC , 1995, p. 809-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Hedin, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Decision support for monitoring of chronic Hepatitis C: can blood laboratory tests help?1996In: Medical Informatics Europe 96,1996, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1996, p. 551-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamn County Hospital Sweden.
    Hedin, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Assessing an AI knowledge-Base for asymptomatic liver diseases1998In: AMIA98,1998, Philadelphia: Hanley & Belfuse , 1998, p. 513-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamn Hospital .
    Artificial neural networks in clustering and classification of data on unspecified liver diseases1993In: Nordic Meeting on Medical and Biomeidical engineering,1993, 1993, p. 136-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Backteman, K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ledent, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A rapid and reliable flow cytometric routine method for counting leucocytes in leucocyte-depleted platelet concentrates2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: To ensure a proper quality control it is important to use a reliable method to count low numbers of leucocytes in leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates (PCs). Materials and Methods: A modified flow cytometric method for counting low numbers of leucocytes, based on a reference population contained in tubes with an exact number of fluorescent beads and staining with propidium iodide was used. To increase the number of events, the original sample volume was increased. Results: There was a good correlation in the number of leucocytes (r = 0.99) between the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy of samples from unfiltered and expected numbers from serially diluted PCs. Samples from leucocyte-reduced PCs obtained by apheresis or filtered buffy coats showed no correlation between results from the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy (Nageotte). Conclusion: Counting by microscopy gave a lower number of leucocytes than the modified flow cytometric method when counting a low number of cells. However, analysis of the serially diluted PCs proved that the modified flow cytometric method was reliable and rapid, making it suitable for clinical routine use.

  • 71.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults2007In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although lymphocyte populations are often monitored over time, information about the biological variation over time is limited. Three-colour-flow cytometry was used to investigate the biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte populations in blood. Fifteen healthy individuals (11 females and 4 males) were longitudinally monitored for 2-8 years. Blood samples were drawn monthly when possible. In total, 493 observations were included. Absolute counts and proportions were determined for T-cells (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD3+ CD4+), cytolytic T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), B-cells (CD3- CD19+) and NK-cells (CD3- CD16+/56+). As to variation over the year, ANOVA testing showed only a minor monthly variation for absolute counts of the CD8+ population (p < 0.05) for October compared with June and July, whereas no significant differences were found for the other populations or in the proportions of lymphocyte subsets. Although lower than the longitudinal variation, the methodological variation, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV %), was in a similar range as the variation over time, indicating that the normal biological variation should not be overestimated, while the methodological inter-assay should be taken into consideration in longitudinal studies or monitoring of patients. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 72.
    Bak, Julia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Stereotactic brain biopsies guided by intraoperative cytological diagnosis2001In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1214-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 73. Baniulis, Danas
    et al.
    Burritt, James B
    Taylor, Ross M
    Dinauer, Mary C
    Heyworth, Paul G
    Parkos, Charles A
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Jesaitis, Algirdas J
    Monoclonal antibody CL5 recognizes the amino terminal domain of human phagocyte flavocytochrome b558 large subunit, gp91phox2005In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 337-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human phagocyte flavocytochrome b558 (Cytb) is a heterodimeric integral membrane protein that serves as the electron transferase of the β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotidephosphate, reduced (NADPH)-oxidase, an enzyme complex important in the host defense function of phagocytic cells. In this study, we report the characterization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) CL5 that is specific for the large subunit, gp91phox, of the oxidase protein. This antibody recognizes gp91phox by immunoblot analysis of membrane extracts and samples of the immunopurified gp91phox/p22 phox heterodimer, prepared on anti-p22phox affinity matrices. Phage display analysis confirmed this specificity, indicating that the CL5 epitope contains the region 135-DPYSVALSELGDR of gp91phox. The antibody was used to probe for the presence of gp91phox in membrane preparations from neutrophils of patients with nine genetically distinct forms of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). The causative mutations included missense errors as well as nonsense errors that result in premature termination of gp91phox synthesis. Analysis of the CGD samples by immunoblotting indicated that CL5 recognizes only the full-length wild-type and two missense mutations, consistent with the absence of stable short gp91 phox peptide expression in CGD neutrophils. Interestingly, CL5 was also shown to be cross-reactive with cytosolic and membrane-bound gelsolin, identified by purification, mass spectrometry and immunoblot analysis. CL5 probably cross-reacts with the sequence 771-DPLDRAMAEL in the C-terminus of gelsolin. We conclude that mAb CL5 is a useful probe for detection of full length and possibly truncated N-terminal fragments of gp91phox from membranes of Cytb-producing cells. © Blackwell Munksgaard 2005.

  • 74. Baniulis, Danas
    et al.
    Nauseef, William M
    Burritt, James B
    Taylor, Ross M
    Heyworth, Paul G
    Dinauer, Mary C
    Bumelis, Vladas A
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Jesaitis, Algirdas J
    Unusual polyclonal anti-gp91phox peptide antibody interactions with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease-derived human neutrophils are not from compensatory expression of Nox proteins 1, 3, or 42005In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To obtain topological information about human phagocyte flavocytochrome b558 (Cytb), rabbit anti-peptide antibodies were raised against synthetic peptides mimicking gp91phox regions: 1-9 (MGN), 30-44 (YRV), 150-159 (ESY), 156-166 (ARK), 247-257 (KIS-1, KIS-2). Following affinity purification on immobilized peptide matrices, all antibodies but not prebleed controls recognized purified detergent-solubilized Cytb by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Affinity-purified antibodies recognizing KIS, ARK and ESY but not YRV, MGN or prebleed IgG specifically detected gp91phox in immunoblot analysis. Antibodies recognizing MGN, ESY, ARK and KIS but not YRV or the prebleed IgG fraction labeled intact normal neutrophils. Surprisingly, all antibodies, with the exception of YRV and pre-immune IgG controls, bound both normal and Cytb-negative neutrophils from the obligate heterozygous mother of a patient with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) and all neutrophils from another patient lacking the gp91phox gene. Further immunochemical examination of membrane fractions derived from nine genetically unrelated patients with X-CGD, using an antibody that recognizes other Nox protein family members, suggests that the unusual reactivity observed does not reflect the compensatory expression of gp91phox homologs Nox1, 3 or 4. These results suggest that an unusual surface reactivity exists on neutrophils derived from X-linked chronic granulomatous disease patients that most likely extends to normal neutrophils as well. The study highlights the need for caution in interpreting the binding of rabbit polyclonal antipeptide antibodies to human neutrophils in general and, in the specific case of antibodies directed against Cytb, the need for Cytb-negative controls.

  • 75. Bardhan, KD
    et al.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: gastromed.
    Geldof, H
    Schütz, E
    Heath, A
    Mills, G
    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled dose-ranging study to evaluate the efficacy of alosetron in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.2000In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 14, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Jones, AW
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine.
    Impact of water-induced diuresis on excretion profiles of ethanol, urin-creatinine, and urine-osmolality. 1999In: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, E-ISSN 1945-2403, Vol. 23, p. 565-569Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    The muscle in fibromyalgia.2002In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 41, p. 721-724Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Henriksson, Karl-Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Fibromyalgi2006In: Rehabiliteringsmedicin / [ed] Jörgen Borg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, 1, p. 156-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitel om rehabiliteringsmedicinens utveckling och nuvarande plats i sjukvården samt begrepp och metodik inleder boken. I två delar ges därefter rehabiliteringsmedicinska aspekter på de dominerande sjukdomsgrupperna - komplexa smärttillstånd respektive skador och sjukdomar i nervsystemet. Som avslutning beskrivs bland annat  stressrelaterade tillstånd. Läroboken är avsedd för grundutbildning av läkare, arbetsterapeuter och sjukgymnaster, logopeder samt för läkare under AT-tjänstgöring. Den är också lämplig som introduktion i specialistutbildningen i rehabiliteringsmedicin, geriatrik, neurologi och smärtlindring. Vidareutbildningar av olika vårdyrkesgrupper kan ha nytta av boken och den kan också användas som referenslitteratur av yrkesverksamma med intresse för rehabiliteringsmedicin.

  • 79. Bengtsson, T.
    et al.
    Jaconi, ME
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theler, JM
    Lew, DP
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Actin dynamics in human neutrophils during adhesion and phagocytosis is controlled by changes in intracellular free calcium1993In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 19-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of changes in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the assembly and disassembly of actin during adhesion and phagocytosis was evaluated. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining combined with quantitative fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to measure local F-actin changes in single adherent human neutrophils phagocytosing yeast particles on different surfaces and under different calcium conditions. Cells were suspended in a) calcium-containing medium (CCM) or b) calcium-free medium (CFM) or c) were first depleted of calcium (i.e., MAPT/AM-loaded in CFM) and then suspended in CFM (MAPT). In parallel, local [Ca2+]i changes were monitored using a fura-2 ratio imaging system. In CCM or CFM, attachment to the substrate and formation of pseudopods around a yeast particle generated, within a few seconds, rises in [Ca2+]i, both around the phagosome and in the cell body. During continued phagocytosis, [Ca2+]i was more elevated around the phagosome compared to the rest of the cell. No [Ca2+]i fluctuations were observed in MAPT cells. Adhesion and phagocytosis led to a several-fold increase in F-actin. The increase was transient in cells in CCM and CFM, but remained high in Ca-depleted neutrophils. A distinct ring of F-actin was formed around a phagosome with a yeast particle. Twenty min after ingestion the amount of this actin decreased more than 50% in CCM and CFM cells but increased by 40 to 100% in MAPT cells. The accumulation of F-actin in MAPT cells was reduced to resting levels by adding Ca2+ and ionomycin after ingestion. This treatment reestablished the periphagosomal [Ca2+]i rises, as observed in CCM cells. In conclusion, the present study shows that the actin polymerization, occurring in human neutrophils during adhesion and phagocytosis, is not influenced by changes in [Ca2+]i, whereas the subsequent depolymerization is. The accumulation of actin filaments around the phagosome in calcium-depleted cells could be involved in the inhibition of phagolysosome fusion seen in the absence of [Ca2+]i changes (Jaconi et al., J. Cell Biol. 110, 1555-1564 (1990)). This suggests that the actin network, controlled by [Ca2+]i, regulates the movement of granules during phagocytosis.

  • 80.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Frydén, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Zalavary, S
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Whiss, Per A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Orselius, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Platelets enhence neutrophil locomotion: evidence for a role of P-selectin1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 59, p. 439-450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Grenegård, M
    Leucocyte activation by collagen-stimulated platelets in whole blood2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction between vascular cells plays an important role in the initial phases of the inflammatory process, but the mechanisms responsible for cell-cell communication are not fully understood. In this study, activation of leucocytes and platelets in heparinized whole blood was assessed using lumi-aggregometry. This technique enables simultaneous measurement of aggregation and oxygen radical production by monitoring impedance and luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL), respectively. Collagen induced aggregation and CL, depending on dose, and markedly enhanced subsequent aggregation and CL-response triggered by the chemotactic peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMet-Leu-Phe). Collagen stimulation of whole blood down- and upregulated the expression of L-selectin and CD11b, respectively. Monoclonal antibodies against sialyl LewisX and P-selectin caused a pronounced inhibition of the oxidative burst, triggered by collagen itself or by a combination of collagen and fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser(RGDS)-peptide effectively inhibited collagentriggered aggregation and CL, and the subsequent enhancement of the fMet-Leu-Phe-induced responses. This suggests that fibrinogen plays a part in linking platelet GpIIb/IIIa with CD11b on the leucocyte surface. However, neither anti-CD11b nor the PI-peptide (containing the ?-chain motif in fibrinogen that interacts with CD11b) counteracted the stimulatory effects of activated platelets on leucocyte functions. The selectin- and integrin-antagonizing substances were ineffective on the CL-responses induced by fMet-Leu-Phe itself. This study suggests that, through selectin- and integrin-dependent interaction, activated platelets potentiate leucocyte aggregation and oxygen radical production, which might be important for the outcome of inflammatory reactions.

  • 82.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Orselius, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Role of the actin cytoskeleton during respiratory burst in chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils2006In: Cell Biology International, ISSN 1065-6995, E-ISSN 1095-8355, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 154-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of the actin cytoskeleton during chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated respiratory burst in human neutrophil granulocytes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured as luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) and F-actin content as bodipy phallacidin fluorescence in neutrophils treated with latrunculin B or jasplakinolide, an inhibitor and activator of actin polymerization, respectively. Latrunculin B markedly decreased, whereas jasplakinolide increased, the F-actin content in neutrophils, unstimulated or stimulated with fMLF. Latrunculin B enhanced the fMLF-triggered ROS-production more than tenfold. Jasplakinolide initially inhibited the fMLF-induced CL-response, however, caused a potent second sustained phase (>400% of control). Both actin drugs triggered a substantial CL-response when added 5-25 min after fMLF. This was also valid for chemotactic doses of fMLF, where latrunculin B and jasplakinolide amplified the ROS-production 5-10 times. By using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we found that the NADPH oxidase activation triggered by destabilization of the actin cytoskeleton occurs downstream of phospholipase C and protein kinase C but is mediated by Rho GTPases and tyrosine phosphorylation. In conclusion, rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton are a prerequisite in connecting ligand/receptor activation, generation of second messengers and assembly of the NADPH oxidase in neutrophil granulocytes. © 2005 International Federation for Cell Biology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 83.
    Benn, CS
    et al.
    Dept of Epidemiology Köpenhamn, Danmark.
    Fagerås Böttcher, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Pedersen, BV
    Dept of Epidemiology Köpenhamn, Danmark.
    Filteau, SM
    Centre of International Child Health London, UK.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mammary epithelial paracellular permeability in atopic and non-atopic mothers versus childhood atopy2004In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 123-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sodium/potassium (Na/K) ratios are considered to be a marker of mammary epithelial paracellular permeability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between maternal atopy and Na/K ratios in breast milk and the association between Na/K ratios in breast milk and the development of atopy in the offspring. Early and mature milk samples were obtained from 30 atopic and 43 non-atopic women. We found no differences in the Na/K ratios between atopic and non-atopic women. At 18 months of age, 22 (30%) of the children had a positive skin prick test (SPT) and 26 (36%) had symptoms of atopic diseases. Overall, high levels of Na/K compared with low and slightly raised levels of Na/K in the maternal milk tended to be associated with a positive SPT and atopic disease. However, if the mother was atopic, high levels of Na/K in early or mature milk were associated with a significantly increased risk of a positive SPT or atopic disease in the offspring [RR = 4.8 (1.9-12)] whereas no such association was observed in non-atopic mothers [RR = 0.8 (0.4-1.7), p for interaction = 0.001]. Thus, high Na/K levels in the breast milk may be associated with the development of atopy and atopic diseases in the offspring of atopic mothers.

  • 84.
    Berg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöstrand, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Morphological support for paracrine inhibition of gastric acid secretion by nitric oxide in humans2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1016-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Functional studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits gastric acid secretion in a variety of species, including man. We have performed a morphological study with the intention of localizing the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in the human gastric mucosa.

    Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects voluntarily participated in the study, and mucosal biopsies were obtained from the cardia, corpus and antrum. The presence and localization of eNOS were studied using immunohistochemical techniques.

    Results: eNOS-immunoreactivity (eNOS-IR) is found in surface mucous cells of cardia, corpus and antrum. Unique to the oxyntic mucosa is the presence of eNOS-IR in 'endocrine-like' cells, found in close contact with parietal cells.

    Conclusions: eNOS-IR cells in close apposition to parietal cells provide morphological support for paracrine inhibition of gastric acid secretion by NO.

  • 85.
    Berg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mechanisms of platelet-mediated fibroblast proliferation2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is a multicomponent event that involves a network of molecular and cellular crosstalk between cells, including leukocytes, platelets and fibroblasts. Despite increased knowledge over the past decades regarding the regulation of cell and tissue growth, the inter- and intracellular systems that control wound healing are incompletely understood. The platelet is a rich source of growth factors essential to natural tissue repair. In the present thesis, the role of platelets and platelet-derived factors on fibroblast proliferation was evaluated, and related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and eicosanoids.

    We found that whole platelets, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induce fibroblast proliferation. Exposure of fibroblasts to these stimuli caused an extensive intracellular production of ROS, measured as increase in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. Both fibroblast growth and the associated ROS production were inhibited by intracellular antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidinethiocarbamate (PDTC)) and NADPH-oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) and apocynin). Moreover, platelet-mediated fibroblast proliferation was abrogated in the presence of the sphingosine kinase inhibitor DL-threo-dihydrosphingosine, but only slightly affected by antibodies directed against PDGF and TGF-ß.

    The production of the arachidonic acid metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) in fibroblasts, analysed by HPLC, was markedly elevated in the presence of platelets. Furthermore, inhibition of phospholipase A2, by 7,7-dimethyl-5,8-eicosadienoic acid (DMDA), or 5-lipoxygenase, by 5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid (ETI) or 5,6-dehydro arachidonic acid (5,6-dAA), decreased the platelet-induced fibroblast proliferation and formation of 5-HETE. This indicate a role for transcellular metabolism of arachidonic acid during platelet-fibroblast interaction.

    We conclude that the production of ROS and 5-HETE is crucial in the plateletmediated stimulation of fibroblast growth. These findings may represent new targets in the future therapy for a successful wound healing.

    List of papers
    1. Platelets induce reactive oxygen species-dependent growth of human skin fibroblasts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platelets induce reactive oxygen species-dependent growth of human skin fibroblasts
    2003 (English)In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 82, no 11, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A growing amount of evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, regulate intracellular signalling and have a role in cell proliferation. In the present study, we show that platelets increase the mitogenic rate in human fibroblasts and that this effect was inhibited by the intracellular antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). The mitogenic effects of platelets were mimicked by the platelet factors platelet-derived growth factor BB-isoform (PDGF-BB), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The sphingosine kinase inhibitor DL-threo-dihydrosphingosine (DL-dihydro) abrogated the platelet-induced growth, while antibodies directed against PDGF or TGF-β had modest effects. Exposure of fibroblasts to platelets, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 or S1P caused an extensive intracellular ROS production, measured as changes in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. This ROS production was totally inhibited by NAC, pyrrolidinethiocarbamate (PDTC), DPI and apocynin. In conclusion, the results presented are indicative of a crucial role of ROS in the platelet-mediated regulation of fibroblast proliferation.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26383 (URN)10.1078/0171-9335-00344 (DOI)000187637800004 ()10917 (Local ID)10917 (Archive number)10917 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Platelet-induced growth of human fibroblasts is associated with an increased expression of 5-lipoxygenase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platelet-induced growth of human fibroblasts is associated with an increased expression of 5-lipoxygenase
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 652-659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Proliferation of fibroblasts is vital for adequate wound healing but is probably also involved in different hyperproliferative disorders such as atherosclerosis and cancer. The regeneration of tissue usually starts with coagulation, involving release of mitogenic and inflammatory factors from activated platelets. This study focuses on the role of eicosanoids in the proliferative effects of platelets on human fibroblasts. We show that the phospholipase A2 inhibitor 7,7-dimethyl-5,8-eicosadienoic acid (DMDA), the combined cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitor 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) and the LOX inhibitor 5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid (ETI) block the platelet-induced proliferation of serum starved subconfluent human fibroblasts. Anti-proliferative effects were also obtained by specific inhibition of 5-LOX with 5,6-dehydro arachidonic acid (5,6-dAA), whereas the 12-LOX inhibitor cinnamyl-3,4-dihydroxy-α-cyanocinnamate (CDC) did not affect the platelet-stimulated growth of fibroblasts. The expression of 5-LOX was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR (RT-PCR), Western blotting and HPLC. 5-LOX message and protein was detected in fibroblasts but not in platelets. Incubation with platelets markedly increased, already after one hour, the expression of 5-LOX in the fibroblast culture. The increased 5-LOX activity was associated with an elevated level of the 5-LOX metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) reaching its maximum after 1-2 hours of co-incubation of fibroblasts and platelets. The 5-HETE production was reduced by the inhibitors DMDA, ETYA and ETI. In conclusion, this study suggests that platelet-stimulated proliferation of fibroblasts is mediated by an increased 5-LOX activity, which supports recent findings indicating a crucial role for this enzyme in proliferative disorders such as atherosclerosis. © 2006 Schattauer GmbH, Stuttgart.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36111 (URN)10.1160/TH06-02-0069 (DOI)000242168400016 ()29986 (Local ID)29986 (Archive number)29986 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 86.
    Berg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trofast, Catarina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Platelets induce reactive oxygen species-dependent growth of human skin fibroblasts2003In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 82, no 11, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing amount of evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, regulate intracellular signalling and have a role in cell proliferation. In the present study, we show that platelets increase the mitogenic rate in human fibroblasts and that this effect was inhibited by the intracellular antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). The mitogenic effects of platelets were mimicked by the platelet factors platelet-derived growth factor BB-isoform (PDGF-BB), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The sphingosine kinase inhibitor DL-threo-dihydrosphingosine (DL-dihydro) abrogated the platelet-induced growth, while antibodies directed against PDGF or TGF-β had modest effects. Exposure of fibroblasts to platelets, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 or S1P caused an extensive intracellular ROS production, measured as changes in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. This ROS production was totally inhibited by NAC, pyrrolidinethiocarbamate (PDTC), DPI and apocynin. In conclusion, the results presented are indicative of a crucial role of ROS in the platelet-mediated regulation of fibroblast proliferation.

  • 87.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    HRT - Hormonell substitutionsbehandling av postmenopausala kvinnor.2002In: Nordisk geriatrik, ISSN 1403-2082, Vol. 2, p. 54-59Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lindgren, R
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cytokine changes in postmenopausal women treated with estrogens: A placebo-controlled study2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is being increasingly used in postmenopausal women. Sex steroids are known to affect the immune system in several ways, although this is mainly based on clinical observations and experimental studies. Method of study: We studied the in vivo effects of transdermal estrogens (50 ╡g 17 ▀-Estradiol/24 hr) on cytokine production in postmenopausal women. A total of 17 women were randomized to either placebo (n = 7) or active estrogen therapy (n = 10) for 14 weeks, with addition of oral medoxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily during the last 2 weeks in both groups. Secretion of the cytokines IFN-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-6 in blood mononuclear cells was determined, spontaneously and after stimulation with common vaccination antigens and mitogen, using the cell ELISA technique. Results: IL-6 production after stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD) decreased in the estrogen treated group (P < 0.01). Mitogen-induced IL-6 production was reduced in the estrogen treated group in contrast to an increase in the placebo group, leading to a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the groups after 12 weeks of treatment. This difference was eliminated after an addition of progestagens for 2 weeks. No significant changes were noted for IFN-?, IL-4 or IL-10 in relation to estrogen or placebo treatment. Conclusions: In the present controlled study, the main in vivo effect of estrogens was a decrease in IL-6 production, indicating a possible beneficial effect of estrogen therapy.

  • 89. Berg, I
    et al.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Nygren, KG
    Barn födda efter in vitro-fertilisering i Sverige 1982-19972001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 4020-4025Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Berg, Sören
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engman, A
    Stockholm.
    Holmgren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lundahl, T
    Västervik.
    Laurent, T
    Uppsala.
    Increased plasma hyaluronan in severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multi-system disorder with general endothelial disease, often with a component of hepatic dysfunction. The pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia is not fully understood, and no specific diagnostic tests are available for early and reliable diagnosis, or for monitoring of the disease process. Hyaluronan is an extracellular matrix polysaccharide present at low concentrations in plasma. Normally, it is rapidly eliminated from the blood by the liver. Increased concentrations of circulating hyaluronan are seen in conditions with impaired hepatic function such as liver cirrhosis, and hyaluronan concentrations have previously been used to evaluate hepatic function in other diseases. In the present study, 11 pregnant women admitted to the intensive care unit with severe pre-eclampsia or eclampsia were studied. As control 31 healthy pregnant women, 18 undergoing vaginal delivery and 13 caesarean section, were included. Plasma hyaluronan was measured before and after delivery. Increased concentrations of plasma hyaluronan were found in the pre-eclampsia group both before (171 (75-586) ╡g/L (p < 0.01) and after delivery (215 (124-768) ╡g/L (p < 0.001) (median and inter-quartile range), as compared to both caesarean section (13 (7-28) ╡g/L before and 28 (18-48) ╡g/L after delivery) and vaginal delivery healthy controls (12 (8-24) ╡g/L before and 30 (13-63) ╡g/L after delivery). In the control groups, a small increase in plasma hyaluronan was seen after delivery, after both caesarean section (p < 0.05) and vaginal delivery (p < 0.01). In conclusion, plasma hyaluronan is increased in severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. The cause of the increase is unknown.

  • 91.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Läkarutbildningen i Linköpings förnyas. Problembaserat lärande, basvetenskap och folkhälsa förstärks2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 38, p. 2654-2658Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Berglund, Johnny
    et al.
    Umeå .
    Samuelsson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Kull, Tomas
    Umeå .
    Müren, Umut
    Umeå .
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå .
    Relative strength of resource and predation limitation of heterotrophic nanoflagellates in a low-productive sea area2005In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 923-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The magnitude of resource and predation limitation of heterotrophic nanoflagellales (HMF) was studied in two short-term enclosure experiments performed in a low-productive sea area in the northern Baltic Sea in 2001. A cross-factorial design was used to simultaneously assess the relative importance of the two factors. Resource limitation was removed by adding bacteria, and predation limitation was eliminated by selective filtration. The first experiment was performed in June just after the spring bloom decline and the second in September at the end of the productive season. Resource limitation prevailed during both experiments, contributing to 60% of the net growth increase in June and 74% in September. Removal of predators had a significant effect only in June. Evidence for simultaneous resource and predation limitation was thus found only during the post-bloom situation. The results were applied to a model on resource and predation control of HNF abundances. To evaluate seasonal differences, field data on HNF and bacteria from a whole year study were applied to the model. Except for a few occasions during spring, the model indicated prevailing resource control of HNF at two locations with slightly different productivity. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  • 93. Bergman, Vivi
    et al.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Urinary excretion of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde after high dose radiochemotherapy preceding stem cell transplantation2004In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 300-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urinary excretion of the hydroxylated DNA base 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was monitored in 11 patients with hematological malignancies undergoing total body irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy preceding bone marrow transplantation. Nine patients showed a prompt increase in urinary 8-OHdG (8-25 times the initial baseline level) on days 0-7 after irradiation onset, the excretion then decreased during the aplastic period and increased again when engraftment took place (in 7 patients). A significant positive correlation was found between urinary 8-OHdG and whole blood leukocyte count, both on day 5 (p = .04, r = .72) and on day 22 (p = .009, r = .80) after irradiation onset. One patient who lacked the first peak of 8-OHdG excretion showed low blood leukocyte counts (less than 2×109/l) before therapy onset, this patient, however, later had a successful engraftment and then also showed considerable increases in both 8-OHdG excretion and leukocyte count. These observations suggest leukocytes play a part in the excretion of 8-OHdG after conditioning therapy preceding bone marrow transplantation. As opposed to the biphasic 8-OHdG excretion, the excretion of MDA showed a single peak appearing on days 11-19 after radiochemotherapy onset, i.e., during the period in which the patients suffered from cytopenia, mucositis, and other side effects of the treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that these clinical manifestations are associated with increased lipid peroxidation. Altogether, these findings illustrate the utility of serial urinary samples for monitoring oxidative stress due to conditioning therapy in clinical practice. They also demonstrate that different oxidative stress markers may behave quite differently regarding their appearance in the urine after whole-body oxidative stress.

  • 94. Bergquist, A
    et al.
    Ekbom, A
    Olsson, R
    Kornfeldt, D
    Lööf, L
    Danielsson, P
    Hultcrantz, R
    Lindgren, S
    Prytz, H
    Sandberg-Gertzén, H
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, EMK-magtarm.
    Hepatic and extrahepatic malignancies in primary sclerosing cholangitis2002In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 321-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: To assess the risk of hepatic and extrahepatic malignancies in a large cohort of Swedish primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients compared with that of the general Swedish population. Methods: The study cohort comprised 604 PSC patients identified between 1970 and 1998. Follow-up was provided through linkages to the Swedish Cancer and Death registries. Cumulative incidence of malignancies and standard incidence ratio were calculated with the incidence rates in the Swedish population, taking into account: sex, age and calendar year as comparison group. Results: Median time of follow-up was 5.7 years (range 0-27.8). Seventy-nine percent had concomitant inflammatory bowel disease. The cause of death was cancer in 44%. The frequency of hepatobiliary malignancies was 13.3% (81/604). Thirty-seven percent (30/81) of all hepatobiliary malignancies were diagnosed less than 1 year after the diagnosis of PSC. The risk for hepatobiliary malignancy was increased 161 times, for colorectal carcinoma 10 times and for pancreatic carcinoma 14 times, compared with that of the general population. Conclusions: In this national-based study including the largest cohort of PSC patients ever presented, the frequency of cholangiocarcinoma is 13 %. The risk of hepatobiliary carcinoma is constant after the first year after PSC diagnosis with an incidence rate of 1.5% per year. The risk of pancreatic carcinoma is increased 14 times compared with the general Swedish population. These results are suggestive of an increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma in patients with PSC.

  • 95.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Challoner, KE
    Woodson, RD
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Low-O2 affinity erythrocytes improve performance of ischemic myocardium2002In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 1267-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O2 transport and O2 diffusion interact in providing O2 to tissue, but the extent to which diffusion may be critical in the heart is unclear. If O2 diffusion limits mitochondrial oxygenation, a change in blood O2 affinity at constant total O2 transport should alter cardiac O2 consumption (VO2) and function. To test this hypothesis, we perfused isolated isovolumically working rabbit hearts with erythrocytes at physiological blood-gas values and P50 (PO2 required to half-saturate hemoglobin) values at Ph of 7.4 of 17 ▒ 1 Torr (2,3-bisphosphoglycerate depletion) and 33 ▒ 5 Torr (inositol hexaphosphate incorporation). When perfused at 40 and 20% of normal coronary flow, mean VO2 decreased from the control value by 37 and 46% (P < 0.001), and function, expressed as cardiac work, decreased by 38 and 52%, respectively (P < 0.001). Perfusion at higher P50 during low-flow ischemia improved VO2 by 20% (P < 0.001) and function by 36% (P < 0.02). There was also modest improvement at basal flow (P < 0.02 and P < 0.002, respectively). The improvement in VO2 and function due to the P50 increase demonstrates the importance of O2 diffusion in this cardiac ischemia model.

  • 96.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    AD/HD i ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv2005Report (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Bertilsson, PM
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Olsson, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Cytokines influence mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 and MDRI in intestinal cells.2001In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0022-3549, E-ISSN 1520-6017, Vol. 90, p. 638-646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Berzina, L.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Saduaskaite-Kühne, Vaiva
    Laboratory of Pediatric Endocrinology, Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shtauvere-Brameus, A.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sanjeevi, C. B.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    DR3 is associated with type 1 diabetes and blood group ABO incompatibility2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 958, p. 345-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes is associated with autoimmunity against pancreatic β cells. ABO incompatibility is associated with ABO immunization during pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with certain HLA DR and DQ haplotypes. The mechanism by which blood group incompatibility is associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes is not known. We propose that certain HLA alleles contribute to the development of both type 1 diabetes and ABO blood group incompatibility. We studied 57 children with ABO blood group incompatibility, 118 children with type 1 diabetes, and 98 age- and sex-matched unrelated healthy controls from Linköping. Typing of HLA DQA1, DQB1, and DRB1 was done on DNA extracted from peripheral blood, by PCR amplification, manual dot-blotting onto nylon membranes, synthetic sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probe 3′ end-labeling with 32P-dCTP, and hybridization followed by stringency washes and autoradiography. We observed that DR3 allele was more frequent in patients with ABO incompatibility when compared to healthy controls (OR = 2.7, Pc < 0.05). Patients with type 1 diabetes had significantly higher frequency of DR3, DQ2, DR4, and DQ8 alleles when compared to healthy controls. No significant difference was observed in frequency of DR3 between ABO blood group incompatibility and type 1 diabetes patients. We conclude that DR3 is associated with both the development of type 1 diabetes and ABO incompatibility.

  • 99. Berzina, L
    et al.
    Shtauvere-Brameus, S
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Sanjeevi, CB
    Newborn screening for high-risk human leukocyte antigen markers associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: The ABIS study2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 958, p. 312-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is associated with specific high-risk HLA DQ and DR haplotypes and islet cell antibodies. IDDM susceptibility in Caucasians is more strongly associated with DQ2/DQ8 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201/DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302) and DQ6 (B1*0604) than with DRB1*03/DRB1*04, while a single copy of DQ6 (B1*0602) gives sufficient protection against type 1 diabetes. As a part of the ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden) study we have done typing of DQA1, DQB1, and DRB1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the second exon of the genes, manually dot-blotting onto nylon membranes synthetic sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes, 3' end-labeling with 32P-dCTP, and hybridization followed by stringency washes and autoradiography using the SSO probe. Among 3756 newborns born in southeast Sweden we have found the high-risk genotype DQ2/DR3-DO8/DR4 to be present in 1%, haplotype DQ8/DR4 in 7.8%, and haplotype DQ2/DR3 in 9.6%. DQ2/DR3 or DQ8/DR4 was carried by 16.4% of newborns, the low-risk DQ6 molecule was carried by newborns as follows: DQ2/DR3-DQ6/DR15, 1.3%, DQ8/DR4-DQ6/DR15, 1.3%, and DQ6/DR15, 9.4%. We conclude from our results that the high incidence of IDDM in Sweden is at least in part due to increased prevalence of high-risk HLA haplotypes compared to protective haplotypes (20% vs. 13%) in the general population.

  • 100. Bevan, S
    et al.
    Popat, S
    Braegger, CP
    Busch, A
    O'Donoghue, D
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Ferguson, A
    Godkin, A
    Hogberg, L
    Holmes, G
    Hosie, KB
    Howdle, PD
    Jenkins, H
    Jewell, D
    Johnston, S
    Kennedy, NP
    Kerr, G
    Kumar, P
    Logan, RFA
    Love, AHG
    Marsh, M
    Mulder, CJJ
    Sjöberg, K
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Walker-Smith, J
    Marossy, AM
    Houlston, RS
    Contribution of the MHC region to the familial risk of coeliac disease. 1999In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 36, p. 687-690Article in journal (Refereed)
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