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  • 51.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Willén, JuliaLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Austere histories in European societies: social exclusion and the contest of colonial memories2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Austere Histories in European Societies discusses how the current economic and political crisis in Europe affects not just our present but also our views and interpretations of the past. The contributions to the book examine a firmly defined problem: in which ways do crisis and decline in contemporary Europe trigger a selective forgetting and remodelling of the past? This problem is addressed through a set of questions, which the contributors to the collection address at various levels:

    • How do present policies of austerity and the ensuing social exclusion of migrants and minorities influence the perceptions and interpretations of the place of minorities, migrants and colonized peoples in European history?
    • How do new regimes of historiography and memory culture relate to emerging and established patterns of discrimination and social segmentation in today’s European societies?

     In seeking to answer these questions, the book makes a strong contribution to a European-wide discussion on the backlash against multiculturalism, diversity, and immigration, and on changing interpretations of the imperial and colonial systems that have shaped Europe’s position in the world.

    The point of departure for the collection is the recent turn of European societies toward more austere political regimes, entailing budget cuts, deregulation of labour markets, restrictions of welfare systems, securitization of borders, and new regimes of migration and citizenship. In the wake of such changes, new forms of social inclusion and exclusion appear that are justified through a reactivation of differences of race, class and gender. Against this backdrop, the book investigates contemporary understandings of history and cultural memory. Are we witnessing a turn toward austerity also in theories and practices of historiography, as well as in pedagogies of history? Can we speak of an austere historiography, an enforcement of conformity on Europe past and present?

    The contributions to the book examine, in both national and comparative perspective, how this development entails a privileging of certain narratives of the European past, whereas other parts of the cultural heritage are being weeded out. Strong interests are apparently at work to purge the histories of specific European nations, but also those of Europe, the West, and globalization from cultural plurality. The authors also discuss how heroic and homogeneous stories about the past of nations, regions, institutions and religions are being retold, reinvented, and re-launched. The book thus explores to what extent history (including public debate on history and history education) is again becoming “nationalistic”, and to what extent Europe’s proclaimed “cosmopolitanism” is being narrowed down so as to simply celebrate the achievements of Europe and posit the West as a model of universality to be emulated by others.

    Most chapters in the book focus on debates on history and colonial legacies in Britain, France, Netherlands, Denmark, Portugal, Sweden and Germany. They show how an increasing number of historians and intellectuals are again becoming blind to less gratifying parts of Europe’s history. While it is still too early to speak of a historical revisionism in the strict sense (for there are also strong counter-tendencies in parts of the academic community and postcolonial and migrant communities and organizations), the authors nonetheless argue that a transformation is under way, corresponding to a new politics of austerity that seems impatient with both democracy and the complexities of past. Among the sacrifices of this tendency are multiculturalism, postcolonial memories, and minority discourses of all kinds. What is lost is thus the very complexity and contradictoriness of Europe and the West. Especially, colonial and postcolonial memories are evicted from their recently claimed habitats in the European past, and again placed at the outskirts, far beyond the limit of the Western world. There is thus a strong correlation, which this collection aims to extract and analyze, between the ways in which migrant and migrant labourers are treated by present policies and the ways in which memories and experiences of migrants, minorities and colonized peoples are treated in historiography, historical pedagogy, and cultural heritage institutions.

  • 52.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Willén, Julia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introducing austere histories2016In: Austere histories in European societies: social exclusion and the contest of colonial memories / [ed] Stefan Jonsson, Julia Willén, London: Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory chapter, we present the concept of ‘austere histories’ by situating it in the intersection of at least three contemporary issues, cultural contexts and academic discussions: first, discussions on Europe’s cultural memory and the precarious place of the colonial legacy in it; second, controversies on multiculturalism, racism, xenophobia and Europe’s migration crises; third and finally, the debate on austerity as policy and as ideology.

    We analyse how austerity turns economic concerns into moral and cultural ones and how it simultaneously remodels historical consciousness and conceptions of Europe’s colonial past. Examining how such processes in turn changes the relationships between classes, ethnic minorities, majorities and migrants, we seek to reveal how this affects the very definition and self-image of contemporary European Societies. Furthermore, we explore to what extent and in which ways present-day historical debate and practises of history writing support and legitimize the idea of ‘austerity’ and its social and political consequences, in the areas of citizenship, migration and social exclusion.

  • 53.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    East Carolina University, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Austerity, labour market segmentation and emigration: the case of Lithuania2015In: Industrial relations journal, ISSN 0019-8692, E-ISSN 1468-2338, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 236-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The so-called ‘Baltic model’ of austerity sometimes receives uncritical praise from advocates of tightened austerity. This model has achieved an almost uncontested vogue among international finance officials and European Union policy makers who portray it as a ‘socially costless’ template for other crisis economies. The article examines the impact of austerity on Baltic Lithuania, a peripheral newer EU member state, and suggests that the harsh austerity measures adopted by its government in order to restore fiscal balance have been far from socially costless. Austerity has accelerated fragmentation of the labour market into a differentially advantaged primary (largely public) sector, and an increasingly informalised secondary (low-skill manufacturing and services) sector, stimulating extraordinarily high levels of emigration as the population, especially younger persons, depart from the country. We describe this here as the formation of a new austeriat.

  • 54.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    East Carolina University, North Carolina, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exodus from Lithuania: State, social disenfranchisement and resistance in an era of austerity2012In: Building justice in post-transition Europe?: processes of criminalisation within Central and Eastern European societies / [ed] Kay Goodall, William Munro and Margaret Malloch, London: Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 56-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After the collapse of the Berlin wall in 1989 and disintegration of the Soviet Union, scholars focused on the problems of legal transitions within the newly emerging democracies. Two decades on, these states are in 'post-transition' conditions; having undergone and continuing to experience political, economic and constitutional upheavals to varying degrees. This book provides an interdisciplinary perspective on this largely unexamined topic. Part I of the book sets the scene with a socio-historical overview and a theoretical chapter; both of which contextualise the book within current debates and provide the theoretical direction of the book as a whole. The later chapters set out contrasting perspectives and consist of themed essays on individual legal systems, investigating these through approaches ranging from socio-legal study to political economy. The book aims to refine important directions for the comparative conceptual study of criminal law policy and processes of criminalisation in emerging democratic states. The result is a significant contribution to the understanding of this subject in the fields of criminology, law, philosophy and political science. The book will appeal to academics, policy-makers and practitioners who are attempting to grapple with the area of "transitions" in the fields of criminology, law, philosophy and political science. As a distinctively interdisciplinary text, it brings together analysis of both the social processes of creating (and abandoning) criminal law and a philosophical reflection. The book provides a comprehensive and critical analysis which points to future directions in criminalisation in the emerging democratic states of Eastern Europe.

  • 55.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Policing political protest in Lithuania2012In: Crime, law and social change, ISSN 0925-4994, E-ISSN 1573-0751, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 403-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes policing political protest in post-independent Lithuania. It argues that since the early 2000s, policing of political protest as an issue has increased in importance as Lithuania has experienced political mobilization and radicalization among groups disadvantaged by post-socialist reforms. It is suggested that police responses reveal precursor tendencies towards growing authoritarianism which has become more visible in the most recent period. In 2008, the onset of deep economic crisis across the region has generated rising social unrest (including outbreaks of street riot) as a result of government adoption of severe austerity measures. The article examines the growing centralization and militarization of policing and the increasing criminalization of public protest, as well as the restriction and litigation of organized dissent by authorities. At the same time, it also points to the internal contradictions of austerity programs which lack popular legitimacy both at the level of the state and society, including more vocal and militant labor unions; increasing challenges to the drift towards a new authoritarianism by the courts; and, paradoxically, the emergence of growing labor unrest within police force itself, with the potential to undermine authoritarian tendencies in policing ‘from within.’ The wider implications of (re)turn to post-communist authoritarianism to public order policing are discussed.

     

  • 56.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    East Carolina University, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    'Safety Crime' in Neoliberal Post-communist Society: The collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of disaster, both immediate and underlying, that resulted in 54 fatalities in Riga in November 2013 are analyzed in this paper. The collapse of the Maxima supermarket is seen as a safety failure resulting from longer-term deregulation in Latvia encouraged by external advisors such as the World Bank and the EU, and the specific crisis-induced drive to minimize regulation by local political actors, especially in the aftermath of ongoing austerity. The paper raises the issue of what is a ‘safety crime’ in the context of post-communist Baltic states, and asks whether the notion of ‘corporate killing’ or corporate manslaughter is applicable to the circumstances of the disaster. The paper suggests the need to establish accountability for social harms caused by the unfettered pursuit of private profit over public safety.

  • 57.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    University of East Carolina, NC, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Lithuanian labor market under the impact of crisis: the formation of the new austeriat2014In: The contraditions of austerity: the socio-economic costs of the neoliberal Baltic model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, p. 87-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The great economic recession was experienced with particular severity in the Baltic states. In response, Baltic governments introduced harsh austerity programmes known as ‘internal devaluation.’ The article argues that austerity measures combined with the effects of previous massive EU financial transfers have accelerated the fragmentation of the labour market into a differentially advantaged primary (largely public) sector, and an increasingly ‘informalized’ secondary (largely low-skill manufacturing and services) sector. Taking Lithuania as an example, it is argued that the production of a segmented labour market has acted as a major stimulus to high levels of emigration from Lithuania, shaping anticipatory educational choices and preferences, despite signs of economic recovery. This sustained outflow of migrants appears counterintuitive to the expected outcomes of simple “push” and “pull” explanations. In the absence of state policy to address a gathering sociodemographic crisis that is the specific but largely unacknowledged legacy of radical austerity measures, this chapter examines the constitutive dynamics of the latest wave of emigration from Lithuania.

  • 58.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    East Carolina University, NC 27858 USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The lmoral discourses of post-crisis neoliberalism: a case study of Lithuanias Labour Code reform2017In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 132-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the neoliberal reconfiguration of labour rights in Lithuania, a newer European Union member state, in which the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis were particularly severe and where radical austerity measures were subsequently imposed. Now, after six years, in an attempt to resolve the exhaustion of previous austerity-based solutions for economic recovery, a new Labour Code is being introduced which will further weaken labour protections and labour rights. This article analyses conflicting positions in current debates over Labour Code reform. It attempts to map the mobilization of strategic discursive resources in an unfolding dialogical moral politics of Labour Code reform in the current conjuncture of postcrisis. Theoretically, this article draws upon the seminal work of the early Soviet Marxist scholar V. N. Voloshinov in proposing a dialogical method which foregrounds the interconnections of language, class and ideology.

  • 59.
    Juska, Arunas
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The moral discourses of ‘post-crisis’ neoliberalism: a case study of Lithuania’s Labour Code reform2016In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 132-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the neoliberal reconfiguration of labour rights in Lithuania, a newer European Union member state, in which the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis were particularly severe and where radical austerity measures were subsequently imposed. Now, after six years, in an attempt to resolve the exhaustion of previous austerity-based solutions for economic recovery, a new Labour Code is being introduced which will further weaken labour protections and labour rights. This article analyses conflicting positions in current debates over Labour Code reform. It attempts to map the mobilization of strategic discursive resources in an unfolding dialogical ‘moral’ politics of Labour Code reform in the current conjuncture of ‘postcrisis’. Theoretically, this article draws upon the seminal work of the early Soviet Marxist scholar V. N. Voloshinov in proposing a dialogical method which foregrounds the interconnections of language, class and ideology.

  • 60.
    Kallaste, Epp
    et al.
    Estonian Center for Applied Research CentAR, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Negotiated responses to the crisis in the Baltic countries2013In: Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research, ISSN 1024-2589, E-ISSN 1996-7284, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews the negotiated responses to the crisis at different levels of social dialogue in the Baltic countries. The Baltic countries form a relatively coherent group of small open economies that can be classified as belonging to the neoliberal type of central and eastern European capitalism. Their responses to the crisis were consistent with such classification: flexible labour markets absorbed the main impacts of the crisis through rapid increases in unemployment, as well as nominal and real drops in wages. A negotiated response was either not sought at all by governments or was of minor importance at all levels of interaction between the social partners. If anything, national-level social dialogue deteriorated, remaining at a low level even after the crisis had peaked. Based on qualitative examples from Estonia and Lithuania we show that, at company level, responses to the crisis varied.

  • 61.
    Kings, Lisa
    et al.
    Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Södertörn Högskola .
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO – Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    Mångkulturell centrum, Tumba.
    Contesting urban management regimes: the rise of urban justice movements in Sweden2016In: Solidarity without borders: Gramscian perspectives on migration and civil society alliances / [ed] Óscar García Agustín, Martin Bak Jørgensen, Chicago: Pluto Press, 2016, , p. 186-203p. 186-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing segregation, racism and welfare transformation, a new form of grassroots mobilization among young adults is emerging in the peripheries of Swedish cities. The common denominator is that they define themselves as urban justice movements – with place as the social ground for mobilization. With a Gramscian perspective, the article analysis the rise of urban justice movements in relation to contemporary urban policies in Sweden. We argue that Swedish urban policies during the last 20 years have created a hegemonic urban management regime underpinned by area based programs with a focus on network steering and new forms of partnership between civil society and public institutions. The emergence of urban justice movements is here understood in relation to firsthand negative experience of– and later active revulsion from – having participated in activities and issues related to the urban management regime. These experiences have been a key condition for the beginning of a broader struggle that merges local rootedness with wider structural-institutional conditionality.

  • 62.
    Klinthäll, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mitchell, Craig
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Schölin, Tobias
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Slavnic, Zoran
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Urban, Susanne
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Invandring och företagande2016Report (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Klinthäll, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Older as Entrepreneurs: A Diversified Group: Illustrated Through Entrepreneurship in Technical Consultancy and Artistic and Literary Work2017In: Ageing, Organizations and Management: Constructive Discourses and Critical Perspectives / [ed] Aaltio, I., Mills, A.J. & Helms Mills, J., London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, p. 277-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the variety of old age entrepreneurship is illustrated through entrepreneurs in two different sectors: technical consultants and those involved in art and literary work. The empirical overview of older entrepreneurs is based on register data on the whole population of Sweden, as well as interviews with entrepreneurs. Unexpectedly, although the two industries are very different regarding markets, work content and formal skills requirements, the patterns of entrepreneurship towards the end of working life are similar. Basic economic security provided by the Swedish welfare system seems to mitigate some of the expected differences.

  • 64.
    Koptyaeva, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Creating a Home Abroad: Home-making Practices Among Post-Soviet Immigrants in Athens2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary world is characterized by the increase in human mobility and the rise of opportunities to travel and migrate from one place to another. Being historically a country of emigration, in the last three decades, Greece became a destination place for people from the neighboring countries, including the post-Soviet migrants who moved there after the collapse of the USSR. While some of them came for a limited period of time, others were willing to settle down permanently, and create their new home there. The current paper aims to explore the question of home and its various meanings focusing on the everyday life of the male and female immigrants in Athens, who had been residing there between three and twenty years and came from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova. This work shows that the concept of home and the practices of its making have multiple dimensions that are intertwined and that the difference in the feelings towards a ‘new home’ depends on the reasons behind migration to a new country.

  • 65.
    Larsson, Jennie K.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Empiri och teori i växelverkan: en analys av närbyråkratin2016In: Introduktion till politisk etnografi: metoder för statsvetare / [ed] Maria-Therese Gustafsson och Livia Johannesson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, p. 125-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Larsson, Jennie K.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Flyktingar måste få en bättre start2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 5 decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I avhandlingen ”Integrationen och arbetets marknad” har jag granskat hur den så kallade etableringsreformen fungerat i praktiken. Slutsatserna är tydliga: integrationspolitiken fungerar inte som det är tänkt. Nu krävs förändringar för att dagens flyktingar ska få en bättre start.

  • 67.
    Likic Brboric, Branka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Swedish ‘Exceptionalism’ and the Integration of Refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina in the 1990s: acceptance and Strategies of Citizenship2016In: Citizens at Heart? Perspectives on integration of refugees in the EU after the Yugoslav wars of succession / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman, Roland Kostic, Branka Likic-Brboric, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2016, p. 87-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Likic Brboric, Branka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO – Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Kostic, Roland
    Institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning, Uppsala universitet.
    Introduction2016In: Citizens at Heart? Perspectives on integration of refugees in the EU after the Yugoslav wars of succession / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman, Roland Kostic and Branka Likic-Brboric, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2016, p. 11-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Global migration governance, civil society and the paradoxes of sustainability2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 762-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the presentation of an asymmetric global governance, this article analyzes the formation of global migration governance with its focus on the politics of migration and development. It traces the marginalization of a rights-based approach to migration and the streamlining of migration governance into business-friendly migration management and a geopolitical securitization agenda. It also reviews the trajectory towards factoring migration into a global development policy discourse as formulated in the UN 2030 Development Agenda. Specifically, it indicates that the inclusion of migration into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) may promote migrant workers rights because several of these invoke universal human rights instruments, social protection and the observance of the ILO decent work agenda. However, this will only be possible if civil society critically engages powerful state and non-state actors in the process of monitoring the SDGs implementation, and resists their streamlining into investment and free trade neoliberal development regimes.

  • 70.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Slavnic, Zoran
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Informalisering: migration och arbete i ett utvidgat Europa2013In: Migrationens och etnicitetens epok: kritiska perspektiv i etnicitets- och migrationsstudier / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt och Anders Neergaard, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 261-279Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Slavnic, Zoran
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Labour migration and informalisation: east meets west2015In: International migration and ethnic relations: critical perspectives / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt and Anders Neergaard, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 227-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– Against a theoretical discussion of informalisation, the purpose of this paper is to trace wider commonalities and migratory interconnections that are leading to informalised or deteriorated employment conditions both East and West in the enlarged Europe. Design/methodology/approach– The paper examines the ways in which informalisation has come increasingly to typify employment relations both East and West via contrastive case studies from Sweden and Latvia. Findings– The paper illustrates how a growing tendency towards informalisation of work and economy comes about as a consequence of dual tendencies towards informalisation both “from above” and “from below”. Migrant labour has a part in this process, especially in the post-EU enlargement period, increasingly enabling free movement of labour from the former socialist countries to the West. Research limitations/implications– The implications of the paper are that the harmonisation of labour standards in the enlarged EU is not necessarily in an upward direction and that wider EU labour markets may be increasingly segmented as processes of informalisation grow in scope. Practical implications– Policy-makers concerned with preserving labour standards and norms of decent work may consider the implications of the interconnected processes of informalisation and migration, in particular, with regard to “undeclared work”. Social implications– The paper raises issues concerning the European social model and its viability. Originality/value– The paper bridges research on informalisation of the economy and labour migration in the context of EU enlargement.

  • 72.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Slavnic, Zoran
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Labour migration and informalisation: East meets West2013In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 33, no 11/12, p. 677-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Against a theoretical discussion of informalisation, the purpose of this paper is to trace wider commonalities and migratory interconnections that are leading to informalised or deteriorated employment conditions both East and West in the enlarged Europe.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines the ways in which informalisation has come increasingly to typify employment relations both East and West via contrastive case studies from Sweden and Latvia.

    Findings – The paper illustrates how a growing tendency towards informalisation of work and economy comes about as a consequence of dual tendencies towards informalisation both “from above” and “from below”. Migrant labour has a part in this process, especially in the post-EU enlargement period, increasingly enabling free movement of labour from the former socialist countries to the West.

    Research limitations/implications – The implications of the paper are that the harmonisation of labour standards in the enlarged EU is not necessarily in an upward direction and that wider EU labour markets may be increasingly segmented as processes of informalisation grow in scope.

    Practical implications – Policy-makers concerned with preserving labour standards and norms of decent work may consider the implications of the interconnected processes of informalisation and migration, in particular, with regard to “undeclared work”.

    Social implications – The paper raises issues concerning the European social model and its viability.

    Originality/value – The paper bridges research on informalisation of the economy and labour migration in the context of EU enlargement.

  • 73.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating ‘international communities’ in southern Spain: Self-segregation and ‘institutional whiteness’ in Swedish lifestyle migration2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Southern Spain is the most attractive region in Europe for so called lifestyle migrants from a number of European countries, preferably from the Nordic countries and Great Britain. This paper examines intra-European relations as they are narrated by Swedish lifestyle migrants living permanently or part-time at the Spanish Suncoast. The aim is to discuss classed and racial aspects of self-segregation and constructions of cultural similarity and parallel difference that both override and uphold boundaries tied to national, cultural and social divisions. By looking at how formations of ‘international communities’ are shaped among north Western European lifestyle migrants, theories on ‘orientations’ towards whiteness and likeness, and institutions as ‘meeting points’ where some bodies tend to feel comfortable in certain spaces as they already belong here, are developed. These ‘international communities’ recruit particular subjects, yet resulting in a division between migrants from northern Europe, non-European migrants and locals from Spain. The results destabilize the idea of a common, culturally homogeneous European identity, displaying divisions mediated through discourses of cultural differences. What appears is a south-north divide built upon a deep Swedish postcolonial identification with Anglo-Saxon countries and cultures and parallel dis-identification with (the former colonial powers in) Southern Europe.

  • 74.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating ‘international communities’ in southern Spain: Self-segregation and ‘institutional whiteness’ in Swedish lifestyle migration2019In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 22, no 5-6, p. 799-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines intra-European relations in narratives of Swedish lifestyle migrants living permanently or part-time on the Spanish Sun Coast. It pays particular attention to the complexities of Swedish migrants’ cultural identities and patterns of self-segregation in the Spanish society by investigating the following questions: How do boundaries of social networks that Swedish lifestyle migrants participate in, or interrelate, with a sense of ‘likeness’? In what ways are the formation of these ‘international’ networks mediated through ideas of cultural similarity and parallel difference, and how do such notions both override and uphold boundaries tied to social, cultural and racial divisions? It is argued that the formation of so-called ‘international communities’ on the Spanish Sun Coast tend to cluster mainly north-western European lifestyle migrants, which calls for an analysis of ‘orientations’ towards a certain ‘likeness’, and the function of these spaces and communities as spaces of ‘institutional whiteness’ that work as a ‘meeting point’ where some bodies tend to feel comfortable as they already belong here. The social and cultural boundaries that surround these communities destabilises the idea of a common, culturally homogeneous European identity and display intra-European racial divisions mediated through discourses of cultural differences. What appears is a south–north divide built upon a deep Swedish postcolonial identification with Anglo Saxon and north-western European countries and cultures, and a parallel dis-identification with (the former colonial powers in) southern Europe.

  • 75.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Embodying Exoticism: Gendered Nuances of Swedish Hyper-Whiteness in the United States2017In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 179-199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hemmafru hemma [A housewife “at home”]: Återvändande migrantkvinnors möte med svenska jämställdhetsnormer i politik och praktik [Returning migrant women’s encounters of Swedish gender equality in policy and in practice]2018In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 55, no 2-3, p. 389-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A housewife “at home”. Returning migrant women’s encounters of Swedish gender equality in policy and in practice

    This article discusses the experiences of Swedish migrant women who are returning to Sweden after having lived abroad for a period of their lives. Most of them have been situated outside the formal labour market during their time abroad and been occupied with family related work. The aim of this article is to analyse how political ideals formulated around work, gender equality and income redistribution, encounter the constructions of Swedishness, gender and heterosexuality in these women’s stories. When living abroad, the women were provided for by their husbands. Yet, their positions as “trailing spouses” had had severe impact on their opportunities for reintegration into the labour market as well as for their future – or current – pensions. The article discusses the political and sociological consequences of women’s economic dependence, primarily in terms of welfare state distribution and pensions by asking: In what ways are returning migrant women situated in-between a global labour market and the Swedish welfare system in relation to migration, gender and gender equality?

  • 77.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ’I didn't come here to clean my house’: Gendered and racialized divisions of domestic work in Swedish transnational migration to Sinapore.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Icke/vit migration: Reflektioner kring ras, medborgarskap och tillhörighet i en svensk kontext.2018In: Studier om rasism: Tvärvetenskapliga perspektiv på ras, vithet och diskriminering / [ed] Tobias Hübinette & Andréaz Wasniowski, Arx Förlag , 2018, p. 273-301Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    If something happens I can always go home: Transnational migration, citizenship and the politics of belonging among Swedish women.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mistresses and maids in transnational ‘contact zones’: The case of Swedish migrants in Singapore2011In: Kinship, Gender and Generation in Disparate Transnational Spaces, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mistresses and Maids’ in Transnational Migrations: Global Divisions of Labor in Swedish Expat Homes in Singapore2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mistresses and Maids in Transnational Migrations: Global Divisions of Labor in Swedish Expat Homes in Singapore.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On 'the migrant'2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 84.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Racialized practices in gendered transnationalism: Swedish migrants and domestic work in Singapore.2010In: Global Challenges – Local Responses., 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The white side of migration: Reflections on race, citizenship and belonging2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘The migrant’ tends to be imagined as a non-privileged, non-white, non-Westernsubject in search for a better future in Europe or the US, and as such a preconstitutedsubject shaped by notions of marginalization and poverty. What kind ofstories are obscured by this recurrent image of ‘the migrant’, and how does suchcategorization hamper the thinking of privilege, belonging and white normativity?Why are some migrants not regarded as migrants despite their migrant status andwhy are other individuals seen as migrants and thus denied their national belongingin spite of their formal status as national citizens? The presentation aims to developexisting theoretical perspectives on migration and citizenship by combining findingsin current migration studies with critical race and whiteness studies with particularattention to a) autochthony and belonging, b) race and citizenship, and c) whitecapital.

  • 86.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The white side of migration: Reflections on race, citizenship and belonging in Sweden2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘The migrant’ tends to be imagined as a non-privileged, non-white, non-western subject in search of a better future in Europe or the United States and as such is a pre-constituted subject shaped by notions of marginalization and poverty. What kinds of stories are obscured by this recurrent image of ‘the migrant’ and how do such categorizations hamper the analysis of privilege, belonging and white normativity within studies of migration? Why are some individuals not regarded as migrants despite their migrant status? Why are other individuals seen as migrants and thus denied their national belonging in spite of their formal status as national citizens? The article develops analytical tools on migration, belonging and citizenship, with particular attention to (a) autochthony and belonging, (b) race and citizenship and (c) white capital.

  • 87.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vit migration: kön, vithet och privilegier i transnationella migrationsprocesser2017Book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    “We are the world”: Swedish migrant women and white cosmopolitanism2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Race and whiteness fundamentally structures mobility and migration by the means of border controls and visa policies or by the lack thereof. These principles in contemporary globalization make up the foundation for our different approaches to the world around us. This paper emerges from the concept of white cosmopolitanism to capture the interrelation between white upper-middle-class migrant women’s sense of being ‘citizens of the world’ and the production of Swedish national modernity. Empirically, the paper is based on nearly ten years of ethnographic work including in-depth interviews with Swedish women living abroad and returning migrants to Sweden. For the women abroad, it is of utmost importance to preserve their Swedish national identity yet transcending the national to become ‘citizens of the world’. For returning Swedes, the undertaking is to bring this world back ‘home’ to Sweden. This process reflects how the reproduction of Swedish modernity acts upon the women’s bodies as representatives of the Swedish nation abroad simultaneously re-inscribing the nation into the global. It is here argued that the very language of cosmopolitanism is structured by whiteness, white capital and class, which grant uninterrupted mobility and the authority to bring pieces and parts of the world ‘back’ into the national. Such expressions and subject positions of white upper-middle-class women are further re-constructed through other women’s work as they care for the domestic and the family while the white women acquire cosmopolitan capital by traveling around the world. Apart from obscuring global inequalities, white cosmopolitanism is here seen as imbricated in national politics. As Sweden searches for a post-Social Democrat identity domestically and globally, white cosmopolitan femininity may well be the place where global intimacies reconnect with a renewed white nationalism that re-inscribes Sweden into the contemporary neoliberal global soul, even with closed borders.

  • 89.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White Women. White Nation. White Cosmopolitanism: Swedish Migration between the National and the Global2019In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging from the concepts of white cosmopolitanism and white cosmopolitan femininity, this article analyses "cosmopolitan narratives" of Swedish migrant women who lived abroad for an extended period and eventually returned to Sweden. Based on eight months' ethnographic work, including 46 in-depth interviews with migrants who had returned in Sweden, the article explores how national boundaries are both maintained and traversed in the construction of a "world citizen". It is argued that the women?s self-identification with a cosmopolitan ethos is structured by whiteness, nationality, and class that grants uninterrupted mobility and "worldliness". As symbolic bearers of the Swedish nation, national ideals act on the white women?s bodies internationally, in ways that both uphold and re-inscribe the nation into the global. Thus, apart from obscuring global inequalities, white cosmopolitan femininity is imbricated in both national and global politics as a place where global structures reconnect with the white nation, thereby enabling Swedish migrants to re-install themselves into contemporary global settings as self-defined cosmopolitan subjects

  • 90.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White women. White nation. White cosmopolitanism.: Swedish return migration between the national and the global.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism is intrinsically associated with the transgression of narrowing national boundaries, performing the function of a ‘globalization from within’. This paper emerges from the concept of white cosmopolitanism, providing a critique of the inherent racial aspects of cosmopolitanism and the ‘cosmopolitan class’, based on the argument that the very language of cosmopolitanism is structured by whiteness and class, granting uninterrupted mobility and a sense of becoming ‘worldly’. The concept captures Swedish white upper-middle-class returning migrant women’s’ sense of being ‘citizens of the world’ including ideas of certain ethics such as ‘tolerance’ and a cultured approach to ‘otherness’. The paper analyses how national boundaries are confined, yet transgressed in the narratives of the ‘Swedish world citizen’. Such process reflects how the reproduction of Swedish nationality acts upon the women’s bodies as representatives of the nation abroad and simultaneously re-inscribing the (white) nation into the global.

  • 91.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Den vita maskulinitetens kris är nu2017In: Feministiskt perspektiv, ISSN 2002-1542Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    La mélancolie blanche ou comment pleurer la ’bonne vieille Suède2012In: La Revue Nouvelle, ISSN 0035-3809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Teitelbaum, Benjamin R.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Nordic Whiteness: An Introduction2017In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Mešić, Nedžad
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Framing solidarity in the unionisation of undocumented migrant workers2017In: Reimagineering the nation: essays on twenty-first-century Sweden / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Anders Neergard, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 303-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the capacity of two Swedish trade union initiatives, SAC Syndicalists and LO-TCO centre, to extend solidarity to undocumented migrant workers. The author asks what solidarity linkages have been established since the shift of millennia and what obstacles encountered in forging solidarity between workers with strong versus weak legal status. He illuminates the emergence of a transformative form of solidarity, which may open for protection of new groups of disadvantaged workers.

  • 95.
    Mulinari, Diana
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing racism, performing femininity: women in the Sweden Democrats2017In: Gender and far right politics in Europe / [ed] Michaela Köttig, Renate Bitzan, Andrea Petö, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 13-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he article has two aims. The first is to illuminate the contributions of antiracist scholarship and feminist studies to an understanding of the upsurge of extreme-right-wing cultural racist parties throughout Europe. The second is to explore how women active in the Sweden Democrats (SD), a Swedish version of these parties, name and act upon their identities as members of what many citizens and a growing number of scholars define as a racist party. We argue that the SD, despite its efforts to include women in the party, is confronted by two contending nationalist narratives: on the one hand that of a gender-equal Sweden and on the other the need for traditional gender roles to be treated as vital for the maintenance of the nation.

  • 96.
    Mulinari, Diana
    et al.
    Genusvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sverigedemokraternas Sverige: från rasifererande politik till en rasistisk stat?2018In: Nation i ombildning: essäer om 2000-talets Sverige / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Anders Neergaard, Stockholm: Boréa Bokförlag, 2018, Vol. 225-259, p. 225-259Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Den svenska modellen av idag: facken och rasifierade arbetare2018In: Nation i ombildning: essäer om 2000-talets Sverige / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Anders Neergaard, Stockholm: Boréa Bokförlag, 2018, Vol. 79-120, p. 79-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ”Det fackliga löftet”: solidaritet, fackföreningsrörelse och arbetskraftsinvandring2015In: Arbetskraft från hela världen: Hur blev det med 2008 års reform? / [ed] Catharina Calleman, Petra Herzfeld Olsson, Stockholm: Delmi , 2015, p. 200-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här kapitlet diskuterar jag arbetskraftsmigration i Sverige och fackföreningsrörelsens syn på invandrad arbetskraft. Jag fokuserar dels på 2008 års arbetskraftsinvandringsreform i ett Sverige där gränserna mellan olika migrationsformer håller på att suddas ut, dels på Landsorganisationens (LO) och LO-förbundens syn på frågan. Migrationen måste ses som en aspekt av den pågående globaliseringen, med förändrade former för produktionens och arbetets organisering, samt med ökad rörlighet för kapital och arbete. Vidare hämtar jag inspiration från teorier om arbetskraftsmigration och teorier om facklig organisering. Informalisering, rasifiering, ofritt arbete och föreställd solidaritet är centrala begrepp i mitt resonemang. Jag vill förstå kopplingen mellan å ena sidan fackets varierande förhållningssätt till arbetskraftsmigration och därmed hur man uttrycker solidaritet, och å andra sidan förändrade styrkeförhållanden mellan kapital och arbete samt fackföreningsrörelsens syn på den ekonomiska utvecklingen och på sin egen roll.

  • 99.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Swedish Model in transition: trade unions and racialised workers2017In: Reimagineering the Nation: essays on twenty-first-century Sweden / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Anders Neergaard, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 85-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Neergaard, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Woolfson, Charles
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sweden: A model in dissolution?2017In: Trade Unions and Migrant Workers: New Contexts and Challenges in Europe / [ed] Marino, Stefania, Judith Roosblad and Rinus Penninx, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 200-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This timely book analyses the relationship between trade unions, immigration and migrant workers across eleven European countries in the period between the 1990s and 2015. It constitutes an extensive update of a previous comparative analysis – published by Rinus Penninx and Judith Roosblad in 2000 – that has become an important reference in the field. The book offers an overview of how trade unions manage issues of inclusion and solidarity in the current economic and political context, characterized by increasing challenges for labour organizations and rising hostility towards migrants. The qualitative analysis of trade union strategies towards immigration and migrant workers is based on a common analytical framework centred on the idea of ‘dilemmas’ that trade unions have to face when dealing with immigration and migrant workers. This approach facilitates comparative analysis and distinguishes patterns of union policies and actions across three groups of countries, identifying some explanations for observed similarities and differences. In addition, the book also includes theoretical chapters by expert scholars from a range of disciplinary fields including industrial relations, migration studies and political economy.This comprehensive comparative analysis is an essential resource for academics across a range of disciplines as well as policy-makers, practitioners and organizations involved in trade unions and migrant inclusion and integration. 

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