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  • 51.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Citizenship Awareness: The Importance of Recognition, Respect and Redistribution for Citizens Living with Dementia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Supportive decision-making in the case of citizensliving with dementia in Sweden: Rules and practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    The (un)making of citizens living with dementia: Rethinking belongingness, solidarity and aging in a changing society by the concept of citizenship.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Nielsen, T. Rune
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Waldemar, Gunhild
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cognitive Advantages in Adult Turkish Bilingual Immigrants - a Question of the Chicken or the Egg2019In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies suggest both cognitive disadvantages and advantages of bilingualism. In the current study, it is attempted to provide an account of the cognitive advantages associated with bilingualism in a Turkish immigrant population in Denmark.The total sample consisted of 71 middle-aged and older adults born and raised in Turkey who had migrated to Denmark in their teenage years or later. All participants were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery and degree of Turkish-Danish bilingualism was estimated via rater assessment according to a three-point scale. Associations between bilingualism and cognitive function were established for five cognitive domains: executive function, memory, language, visuospatial function and speed. Analysis of covariance was used to estimate the independent association between bilingualism and cognitive function for each cognitive domain. Covariates included education, gender, ethnicity, and proportion of life lived in Denmark. In unadjusted analyses, greater degree of bilingualism was associated with better executive functioning (pamp;lt;.001), visuospatial functioning (p=.002) and speed (pamp;lt;.001). However, in analyses adjusted for covariates only executive functioning (p=.01) and task switching ability (p=.01) remained significant, while a trend for better memory function was found in those with a high degree of bilingualism (p=.07).The current study indicates that bilingual Turkish immigrants have better executive functioning and episodic memory compared to Turkish immigrant monolinguals. Whether this is due to the effects of bilingualism or reflects inherent cognitive abilities in those able to acquire bilingualism in later life remains to be resolved.

  • 55.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Hyden, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    People diagnosed with dementia in Sweden: What type of home care services and housing are they granted? A cross-sectional study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study aims to examine what types of home care services and housing are granted to people with a dementia diagnosis and how these types are associated with socio-demographic factors (sex, age, marital status, native or foreign born, and regional area).

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study of all people diagnosed with dementia in three Swedish counties was conducted from the medical records in 2012. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to investigate associations between home care services and housing and socio-demographic variables.

    RESULTS: In total, 17,405 people had a dementia diagnosis, and the majority were women, aged 80+ years, and unmarried. Some 72% were living in ordinary housing and 28% lived in special housing. Of those who lived in ordinary housing, 50% did not receive any home care service. Not receiving any type of home care services was less common for older people and was also associated with being married and living in rural municipalities. The most common home care services granted were home help and personal care. Special housing was more common for older people, unmarried persons, and those living in rural municipalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most people with a dementia diagnosis were living in ordinary housing, and, surprisingly, half of those did not receive any type of home care service. This knowledge is essential for making the living conditions and needs of people living with dementia more visible and to provide good home care services for people with dementia and their families.

  • 56.
    Pettersson, Monica E.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital Sahlgrenska, Sweden.
    Ohlen, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden; Ersta Hospital, Sweden.
    Friberg, Febe
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Topics and structure in preoperative nursing consultations with patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 674-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe preoperative education, which occurs in preoperative patient consultations, is an important part of the surgical nurses profession. These consultations may be the building blocks of a partnership that facilitates communication between patient and nurse. AimThe aim of the study was to describe topics and structure and documentation in preoperative nursing consultations with patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. MethodThe study was based on analysis of consultations between seven patients and nurses at a Swedish university hospital. The preplanned preoperative consultations were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The structure of the consultations was described in terms of phases and the text was analysed according to a manifest content analysis ResultsThe consultations were structured on an agenda that was used variously and communicating different topics in an equally varied manner. Seven main topics were found: Health status, Preparation before surgery, Discovery, Tumour, Operation, Symptoms and Recovery after surgery. The topic structure disclosed a high number of subtopics. The main topics Discovery, Tumour and Symptoms were only raised by patients and occupied only 11% of the discursive space. Documentation was sparse and included mainly task-oriented procedures rather than patients worries and concerns. ConclusionThere was no clear structure regarding preoperative consultation purpose and content. Using closed questions instead of open is a hindrance of developing a dialogue and thus patient participation. Preoperative consultation practice needs to be strengthened to include explicit communication of the consultations purpose and agenda, with nurses actively discussing and responding to patients concerns and sensitive issues. The results of the study facilitate the development of methods and structure to support person-centred communication where the patient is given space to get help with the difficult issues he/she may have when undergoing surgery.

  • 57.
    Poli, Arianna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A research tool for measuring non-participation of older people in research on digital health2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Healthcare services are being increasingly digitalised in European countries. However, in studies evaluating digital health technology, some people are less likely to participate than others, e.g. those who are older, those with a lower level of education and those with poorer digital skills. Such non-participation in research – deriving from the processes of non-recruitment of targeted individuals and self-selection – can be a driver of old-age exclusion from new digital health technologies. We aim to introduce, discuss and test an instrument to measure non-participation in digital health studies, in particular, the process of self-selection.

    Methods

    Based on a review of the relevant literature, we designed an instrument – the NPART survey questionnaire – for the analysis of self-selection, covering five thematic areas: socioeconomic factors, self-rated health and subjective overall quality of life, social participation, time resources, and digital skills and use of technology. The instrument was piloted on 70 older study persons in Sweden, approached during the recruitment process for a trial study.

    Results

    Results indicated that participants, as compared to decliners, were on average slightly younger and more educated, and reported better memory, higher social participation, and higher familiarity with and greater use of digital technologies. Overall, the survey questionnaire was able to discriminate between participants and decliners on the key aspects investigated, along the lines of the relevant literature.

    Conclusions

    The NPART survey questionnaire can be applied to characterise non-participation in digital health research, in particular, the process of self-selection. It helps to identify underrepresented groups and their needs. Data generated from such an investigation, combined with hospital registry data on non-recruitment, allows for the implementation of improved sampling strategies, e.g. focused recruitment of underrepresented groups, and for the post hoc adjustment of results generated from biased samples, e.g. weighting procedures.

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  • 58.
    São José, José Manuel Sousa
    et al.
    Faculty of Economics, University of Algarve and CIEO, Faro, Portugal.
    Amado, Carla Alexandra Filipe
    Faculty of Economics, University of Algarve and CIEO, Faro, Portugal.
    Ilinca, Stefania
    European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna, Austria.
    Buttigieg, Sandra Catherine
    Department of Health Services Management, University of Malta, Malta.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ageism in Health Care: A Systematic Review of OperationalDefinitions and Inductive Conceptualizations2019In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 59, no 2, p. E98-E108Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    International and national bodies have identified tackling ageism in health care as an urgent goal. However, health professionals, researchers, and policy makers recognize that it is not easy to identity and fight ageism in practice, as the identification of multiple manifestations of ageism is dependent on the way it is defined and operationalized. This article reports on a systematic review of the operational definitions and inductive conceptualizations of ageism in the context of health care.

    Design and Methods:

    We reviewed scientific articles published from January 1995 to June 2015 and indexed in the electronic databases Web of Science, PubMed, and Cochrane. Electronic searches were complemented with visual scanning of reference lists and hand searching of leading journals in the field of ageing and social gerontology.

    Results:

    The review reveals that the predominant forms of operationalization and inductive conceptualization of ageism in the context of health care have neglected some components of ageism, namely the self-directed and implicit components. Furthermore, the instruments used to measure ageism in health care have as targets older people in general, not older patients in particular.

    Implications:

    The results have important implications for the advancement of research on this topic, as well as for the development of interventions to fight ageism in practice. There is a need to take into account underexplored forms of operationalization and inductive conceptualizations of ageism, such as self-directed ageism and implicit ageism. In addition, ageism in health care should be measured by using context-specific instruments.

  • 59.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jeppsson-Grassman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ”Om det kunde hålla sig så här ett tag nu”: Ett långt liv med sviktande hälsa och funktionsförsämringar2018In: Mellan hälsa och ohälsa: ett livsloppsperspektiv / [ed] Eva Jeppsson Grassman och Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 175-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Xu, Wenqian
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Government Regulation of Online Audio-Visual Entrepreneurship in China2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at investigating (1) how the government regulates online audio-visual enterprises and content, and (2) what the major influences of government regulation on online audio-visual entrepreneurship are, with a specific focus on the administration in Beijing. This study draws from data gained from semi-structured interviews with 14 respondents. It finds that license management and content censorship are principal approaches to regulating practices of online audio-visual entrepreneurship in Beijing.

  • 61.
    Xu, Wenqian
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Government Regulation on the Flourishing Network Audio-Visual Entrepreneurship: Experience From the Administration in Beijing2019In: Journal of Media Management and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 2577-5103, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The network audio-visual entrepreneurship in China has achieved great progress and engendered conspicuous negative externalities in the early development stage. Few studies have investigated how media entrepreneurship coordinates with government regulation and the influence of government regulation on media entrepreneurship. This study aims at investigating government regulation on the flourishing network audio-visual entrepreneurship. This study performs semi-structured interviews with 14 respondents who are experienced in government regulation of the network audio-visual sector. It is found that license management and content censorship are principal approaches to regulating entrepreneurship. The media companies have been constrained by limited government support and social resources, and therefore endeavored to legitimate their business by collaborating with Internet conglomerates. Strict rules of content censorship discourage users from producing audio-visual content, and impose restrictions on Internet companies and other producers producing and displaying audio-visual content.

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  • 62.
    Xu, Wenqian
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Media Representation of Social Networks of Adolescents: Analysis of Photographs Posted on Norrköping Municipal Facebook Accounts2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Adolescence is acknowledged as a transitional life stage towards adulthood together with a set of pivotal movements, such as developing from dependence to independence and from irresponsibility to responsibility. The adolescents’ relationship with others is of significance to the meaning of life and the evolving of the life course. The media portrayals are conceived as value-expressive and constructing the public image of ageing. Most studies on media representation have analysed the portrayal of adolescents in relation to gender, sexuality, violence, alcohol use and tobacco use predominantly from a victim perspective, with scant attention on their social network developments. The aim of this study is to explore how Norrköping municipality portrays adolescents’ social network with special focuses on the contexts and activities in the photographs.

    Method: The material consists of the photos collected from 32 Facebook accounts produced by municipal bodies during the entire year of 2018. The analysis is based on a categorization of various features of the photos in order to statistically describe the relation between signs, activities and contexts during the life stage of adolescence. Further, the meaning of frequently-used symbols in the photographs is analysed.

    Result: The study concludes that adolescents are dominantly portrayed on Facebook pages of recreational gardens (in Swedish: Fritidsgård). The social networking activities that adolescents are frequently engaged in are practical courses, meal preparations, physical exercises and collaborative games. The characters associated with adolescents in media portrayal are restricted to their peers and leisure managers, stereotypically excluding people at other life stages. A number of signs and objects in the photographs are identified which might influence adolescents developing their social network with others, such as smartphones and commercial logos. Further, the result indicates that adolescents develop their social network mostly with other adolescents who have the same ethnicity. 

    Conclusion: The municipality depicts stereotypical images of social networks at the adolescence stage, which may lead to negative influences on adult developments and social integration in Swedish society. Therefore, communication professionals need to be aware of the cultural construction of adolescents’ social network in the media.

  • 63.
    Xu, Wenqian
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Portrayal of Life Stages on Swedish Municipal Media: A Life Course Perspective2019In: Vista - Visual Culture Journal, E-ISSN 2184-1284, no 4, p. 93-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media portrayal of older adults is an expression of social realities and expectations, and the image of ageing has significant implications for intergenerational relations. A life course perspective is suggested for viewing old age as the final stage of successive lifespan development and investigating the social meaning of old age through comparisons of life stages. This article focuses on the visual portrayal of citizens at a particular life stage (infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age) in Swedish municipal new media. It aims to examine the ways that the municipality visually portrayed citizens at different life stages, as well as the media portrayal of older people that was produced from a life course perspective. This study is based on document analysis of municipal guidelines for visual language and other pertinent documents, as well as indepth visual analysis of six representative Facebook photos published by the municipality in 2018. This article finds that the municipality has designated diversity and inclusiveness (including age) as two vital communication goals, in addition to applying a life-stage grouping technique to audience analysis. Visual analysis reveals that the visual portrayal of citizens is communicated using a set of traits attributed to the life stages represented. Specifically, these findings suggest that the particular visual components serve to categorize older people as a vulnerable group, while perpetuating age stereotypes and ageist perceptions in society.

  • 64.
    Xu, Wenqian
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relationship between Liabilities and Firm Performance of China’s Listed Media Companies2020In: Communication and Media in Asia Pacific, E-ISSN 2630-0621, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 78-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on financial data for Chinese listed media companies between 2011 and 2016, this paper examines the relationship between liability and corporate performance and offers a structural equation model of firm performance (media business). Results reveal that debt maturity structure, managerial shareholding, long-term liability, debt/tangible assets ratio and asset-liability ratio are all key factors in firm performance (media business). Additionally, it is found that debt/tangible assets ratio, asset-liability ratio and liability-equity ratio are associated with firm performance (overall business). This paper presents a structural equation model with four influencing paths related to firm performance (media business). It sets forth suggestions for improving firm performance (media business) and capital utilization with the requirement that business managers and policymakers foster better liability management and achieve debt structure optimization.

  • 65.
    Xu, Wenqian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Islam, Sikander
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What Does ASEAN Economic Community Bring to Older Workers?: Examining Inequality in Old Age in Thailand’s Fast-Ageing Society2019In: Journal of ASEAN Studies, ISSN 2338-1361, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 86-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ASEAN Economic Community is envisaged to promote economic integration initiatives to create a single market across Southeast Asian member countries. It is acknowledged that the intergovernmental initiatives need to be accommodative to national and regional contexts. Thailand, as a pivotal and active partnership, endeavours to facilitate economic transformation and regional integration within the ASEAN and cope with population ageing in Thai society. Since Thailand has been the third most rapidly ageing country in the world, demographic changes pose new challenges for how to achieve persistent economic growth, productive employment and decent work. This article is based on a qualitative approach to investigate the emergent inequality within and across age cohorts shaped by the AEC structural forces, as well as utilizes reliable secondary data to formulate argumentation, including academic publications, policy analysis, scientific reports. We are particularly concerned about the heterogeneity and poverty in old age from the perspective of cumulative advantages/disadvantages. In conclusion, this article suggests policy recommendations of mitigating inequality in old age and advocates a critical lens to examine how political economic structure shapes older individuals in the labour market.

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  • 66.
    Xu, Wenqian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Media Representation of Life Stages: Analysis of Photographs Posted on Norrköping Municipal Facebook Accounts2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: It has been found by researchers that older adults are statistically underrepresented and associated with negative stereotypes in the mass media. Older adults are generally viewed as incompetent from stereotyped media content, which may make them socially excluded from a set of opportunities and resources. The media portrayals are conceived as value-expressive and constructing the image of older adults and ageing. The purpose of this study is to investigate how Norrköping municipality portrays citizens at different life stages in social media with a special emphasis on the use of age stereotypes in the photos used.

    Method: The material consists of the photos collected from 32 Facebook accounts produced by municipal bodies during the entire year of 2018. The analysis is based on a categorization of various features of the photos in order to statistically describe the relation between signs, activities and contexts associated with distinct life stages. Further, the meaning of frequently-used symbols in the photographs is analysed.

    Result: The study concludes that old age persons are numerically underrepresented in the material. A number of signs and activities in the photographs, and contexts beyond the photographs, that stereotypically corresponded to five distinct life stages (infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age) are identified. Old age is repetitively portrayed in the context of coffee drinking and foot bathing on Norrköping municipality’s Facebook page, while adolescence is depicted with practical training at high schools to an excessive degree. Besides, the result suggests that certain minorities of citizens did not show up in the municipal social media: people with disabilities, migrants, people with dementia and on forth.

    Conclusion: The municipality communicates stereotypical images of life stages through associating with specific contexts in the photographic coverage. Therefore, communication professionals need to be aware of the stereotypical construction of life stages in the media.

  • 67.
    Ågren, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Loneliness among older people in the Swedish media: Constructions, discourses and the designation of responsibility2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Feelings of belonging or not belonging to other people are commonly seen as an essential and universal part of human existence. How loneliness is talked about and understood is, however, found to differ depending on historical, cultural and societal contexts. Today, there are intense discussions on loneliness among older people in the Swedish news-press. Constructions within mass media and - in this licentiate thesis - news-press are found to have a significant influence on how older people evaluate their own life and how older people are treated by the surrounding society. Research with this focus is, however, scarce despite the large amount of studies on loneliness and despite research on constructions of older people within mass media being a frequently addressed issue for ageing research. The aim of this thesis is to explore how loneliness among older people is constructed and how the responsibility for reducing loneliness is designated within the Swedish news-press.

    In Paper 1 the empirical material consisted of 94 news-press articles from the years 2013-2014. The prime finding was that loneliness was not the main focus in the articles from the Swedish news-press. The concept was used more to motivate the need for political change, enhancing the importance of volunteer work and described as a risk factor within research reports. The material analysed in Paper 2 consisted of 40 news-press articles from October 2016. The responsibility for reducing loneliness among older people was found to be designated between welfare state institutions on different levels. Institutions and political parties both defend the planned or performed measures to reduce loneliness, but also admit to not doing enough in this regard. Older people were found to be constructed as recipients of activities for reducing loneliness, and the “we” in “society” were those who should perform activities in order to reduce loneliness among older people.

    The main overall finding of the thesis is that loneliness was not the main focus in the articles from Swedish news-press. Instead, loneliness was used as a motive for political change and to enhance the value of volunteer work. Furthermore, loneliness among older people is understood as a problem that needs to be solved. The contexts and logics of the mass media were found to have an influence on how loneliness among older people was constructed, as the issue was mainly addressed in local debate articles with ambitions of achieving change.

    List of papers
    1. What are we talking about?: Constructions of loneliness among older people in the Swedish news-press
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What are we talking about?: Constructions of loneliness among older people in the Swedish news-press
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 41, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Loneliness among older people is an issue that engages the general public and various professions and organizations in contemporary Swedish society. One public arena where this engagement is particularly evident is within the Swedish news-press, where articles on loneliness among older people are frequently published. Loneliness is commonly perceived as significantly related to ageing and older people. In addition, the mass media is considered to have a crucial influence in shaping general perceptions of older people. The aim of this study is to examine how loneliness among older people is constructed in the Swedish news-press and whether there is a prevailing “loneliness discourse” within this context. The empirical material consists of 94 articles from the Swedish news-press from the years 2013–2014. Two dominating discourses was found. Loneliness — within the discourse of eldercare, politics and the welfare society, is primarily written about in news articles and debate articles by a variety of authors, such as politicians and representatives from organizations. Within this discourse, loneliness is utilized as a concept to motivate the need for political change and the allocations of resources and to amplify deficiencies within eldercare, politics and the welfare society. The second discourse, Loneliness — within the discourse of volunteer work, is addressed in reportage articles written by journalists. In this discourse focus was on depicting volunteers and enhancing the importance of volunteer work. Here, loneliness serves as a motive for performing volunteer work. In addition, the discourse of Research reports on older people's health was found, although less significant compared to the two major discourses. Within this discourse ageing is presented as a risk, where loneliness is one of these risk factors. Despite some minor differences, loneliness, within all three discourses, is given the meaning of being a problem that needs to be solved. A central finding in this study is that focus in the articles, from Swedish news-press, is not mainly on loneliness but rather on eldercare, politics and the welfare state, volunteer work and health among older people. Loneliness is, consequently, used as a concept to motivate the need for political change and the allocation of resources for older people, to enhance the values of volunteer work and to emphasize the risks associated with ageing.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Loneliness, Older people, Mass media, Discourse theory
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136131 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2017.03.002 (DOI)000404490400003 ()28610751 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Fundingagencies: Norrkepingsfonden [KS 2013/0721]

    Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Reducing loneliness among older people – who is responsible?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing loneliness among older people – who is responsible?
    2020 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 584-603Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish news-press, loneliness among older people is presented as a severe problem that needs to be solved. The issue of who is responsible for reducing loneliness and how this responsibility is designated is, however, rarely discussed. In this study, we have analysed how responsibility is designated and constructed in articles from the Swedish news-press. Focus has been on identifying responsibility in discourses proceeding from the concept of subject positions. This concept has enabled analysis on how responsibility is negotiated and who is positioned as a responsible actor with the ability to perform actions that reduce loneliness. Three dominating discourses were found. In the discourse of responsibility within politics and the welfare state, the responsibility is both self-taken and designated to other institutions held responsible for not initiating sufficient measures to reduce loneliness. In the discourse of responsibility within societal and evolutionary perspectives on loneliness, developments beyond the individual's control are considered to contribute to loneliness. At the same time ‘we’ in ‘society’ are considered capable of reducing loneliness, thereby constructing individuals as responsible actors. Within the discourses of responsibility within senior organisations, both senior organisations and people who participate in activities are constructed as responsible actors. In conclusion, the responsibility for reducing loneliness is, apart from the discourse on senior organisations, designated to those working with older people.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020
    Keywords
    loneliness, responsibility, news-press, subject positions, discourses
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153334 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X18001162 (DOI)000510751800007 ()2-s2.0-85055109228 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Norrkoping Municipality Research and Development Fund (Norrkopings fond for forskning och utveckling) [KS 2013/0721]

    Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
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    Loneliness among older people in the Swedish media: Constructions, discourses and the designation of responsibility
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  • 68.
    Ågren, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reducing loneliness among older people – who is responsible?2020In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 584-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish news-press, loneliness among older people is presented as a severe problem that needs to be solved. The issue of who is responsible for reducing loneliness and how this responsibility is designated is, however, rarely discussed. In this study, we have analysed how responsibility is designated and constructed in articles from the Swedish news-press. Focus has been on identifying responsibility in discourses proceeding from the concept of subject positions. This concept has enabled analysis on how responsibility is negotiated and who is positioned as a responsible actor with the ability to perform actions that reduce loneliness. Three dominating discourses were found. In the discourse of responsibility within politics and the welfare state, the responsibility is both self-taken and designated to other institutions held responsible for not initiating sufficient measures to reduce loneliness. In the discourse of responsibility within societal and evolutionary perspectives on loneliness, developments beyond the individual's control are considered to contribute to loneliness. At the same time ‘we’ in ‘society’ are considered capable of reducing loneliness, thereby constructing individuals as responsible actors. Within the discourses of responsibility within senior organisations, both senior organisations and people who participate in activities are constructed as responsible actors. In conclusion, the responsibility for reducing loneliness is, apart from the discourse on senior organisations, designated to those working with older people.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 69.
    Ågren, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Ensommes gamle vaern, Danmark..
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who is designated responsibility for reducing loneliness among older people?2018In: Lessons of a lifetime, Oslo, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Ågren, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Äldres ensamhet - vems ansvar?2019In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 4, p. 4p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I en aktuell studie av artiklar om ensamhet i svensk press framträder personer, institutioner och organisationer som är ”icke-äldre” som ansvariga för att genomföra åtgärder för att motverka ensamhet.

  • 71.
    Ågren, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swane, Christine
    Ensomme gamles vaern, Denmark.
    Constructions of loneliness in Swedish and Danish daily-press2017In: 13th ESA Conference: Abstract book, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Autobiographical occasions in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia2018In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 41-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has often been argued that identities have a strong connection to stories and storytelling and thus that life stories should be used to individualize care for people with dementia. A problem with this view is that storytellers are seen as individuals, freely reflecting on, composing, and telling life stories. This view becomes especially problematic when persons with dementia tell stories in institutional contexts where certain information is requested and necessary for decision-making. The aim of this study is to investigate how autobiographical stories are used and what functions they have in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia. Fifteen assessment meetings were audio-recorded and transcribed. Narratives were extracted and analyzed by coding who the narrator or narrators were, what the narrator(s) accomplished by telling this story, and what the consequences were for the ongoing meeting. It was found that all interlocutors told stories about the person with dementia. These stories were found to have three functions: (1) to justify why care services were needed; (2) to describe experiences about previous care; and (3) to provide a good working climate. Thus, not all autobiographical stories are the persons story. For care managers in their everyday work it is important to be aware of this and not only be satisfied with a story that suits the organizations needs. Furthermore, stories told in assessment meetings often positioned the person as dependent on others, which could undermine the identity and sense of self of the person with dementia.

  • 73.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Audio recorded data as a method to understand encounters between people living with dementia and social workers2018In: Social research methods in dementia studies: inclusion and innovation / [ed] John Keady, Lars-Christer Hydén, Ann Johnson, Caroline Swarbrick, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 38-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Audio recorded data as a method to understand encounters between peopleliving with dementia and social workers2017In: Social Research Methodsin Dementia Studies: Inclusion and Innovation / [ed] J. Keady, L-C Hydén, A. Johnson & C. Swarbrick, Routledge, 2017, p. 38-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 51 - 74 of 74
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