liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 5781
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wu, Richard Y.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Microbiota in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Infancy: Implications for Management2017In: INTESTINAL MICROBIOME: FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE, KARGER , 2017, Vol. 88, p. 107-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex and diverse intestinal microbiome is recognized as important in promoting human health. An altered gut microflora, referred to as dysbiosis, is increasingly recognized as having an etiologic role in a variety of conditions, including functional gastrointestinal disorders: colic in infants and irritable bowel syndrome in older children. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, if ingested in sufficient amounts, restore microbial homeostasis and have a benefit on health. Randomized controlled trials indicate that probiotics can be effective in a variety of intestinal conditions, including colic and irritable bowel syndrome. Probiotics may promote gut microbial diversity, but timing of the intervention appears crucial. Strain-specific effects on colonization resistance, epithelial barrier integrity, modulation of signal transduction, impacts on innate and adaptive immune responses, and effects on visceral hyperalgesia likely explain the observed variability in various probiotic strains. In the future, probiotics are likely to be chosen for use in a defined clinical setting based on underlying mechanism(s) of action. The precise component of the probiotic agent mediating observed effects is the subject of current research. Unresolved issues relate to optimal dosages, timing of ingestion, single versus combination formulations, maintenance of viability in storage, and the merits of employing probiotic- derived products. (C) 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 52.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. University of Toronto, Canada.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period2015In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 53.
    Abrate, Alberto
    et al.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Buono, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Canu, Tamara
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Esposito, Antonio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Del Maschio, Alessandro
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Luciano, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bettiga, Arianna
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Colciago, Giorgia
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Guazzoni, Giorgio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Benigni, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Altaner, Cestmir
    Slovak Academic Science, Slovakia; St Elisabeth Cancer Institute, Slovakia.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Cavarretta, Ilaria T. R.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Mesenchymal stem cells expressing therapeutic genes induce autochthonous prostate tumour regression2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 2478-2488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as vehicles of therapeutic genes represent a unique tool to activate drugs within a neoplastic mass due to their property to home and engraft into tumours. In particular, MSC expressing the cytosine deaminase:: uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) have been previously demonstrated to inhibit growth of subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts thanks to their ability to convert the non-toxic 5-fluorocytosine into the antineoplastic 5-fluorouracil. Since both the immune system and the tumour microenvironment play a crucial role in directing cancer progression, in order to advance towards clinical applications, we tested the therapeutic potential of this approach on animal models that develop autochthonous prostate cancer and preserve an intact immune system. As cell vectors, we employed adipose-tissue and bone-marrow MSC. CD-MSC toxicity on murine prostate cancer cells and tumour tropism were verified in vitro and ex-vivo before starting the preclinical studies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was utilised to follow orthotopic tumour progression. We demonstrated that intravenous injections of CD-MSC cells, followed by intraperitoneal administration of 5-fluorocytosine, caused tumour regression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, which develops aggressive and spontaneous prostate cancer. These results add new insights to the therapeutic potential of specifically engineered MSC in prostate cancer disease.

  • 54.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ajan, Aida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Malignant Transformation of Ossifying Fibroma into Parosteal Osteosarcoma with High-grade Component: Presentation of an Unusual Case and Review of the Literature2018In: The Open Dentistry Journal, E-ISSN 1874-2106, Vol. 12, p. 1059-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parosteal Osteosarcoma of the Jaw (POSJ) is a rare entity that is associated with a high survival rate. Several case reports and case series of POSJ have been published in the literature, but few authors have described development of this tumor by possible transformation from a fibro-osseous neoplasm. Objective: We present a rare occurrence of parosteal osteosarcoma with involvement of the posterior maxilla, orbit floor, and infra-temporal fossa in a 20-year-old man. Furthermore, we performed a literature review regarding clinical, radiological, and histological features; treatment strategies; and etiology/pathophysiology. Methods: A PubMed search yielded a total of 74 articles and the articles were sorted according to their corresponding key area of focus. Results: This was a case of POSJ with high-grade component in the maxillofacial region of a 20-year old male. Co-expression of MDM2 and CDK4 was confirmed. At 2.5-year follow-up, the patient had died. The literature review revealed 18 articles including 20 cases of POSJ. Four cases represent the possible development of this tumor by transformation from a fibro-osseous neoplasm: Two cases of fibrous dysplasia, one case of cemento-ossifying fibroma, and the case of Ossifying Fibroma (OF) in the present study. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found an unusual case of POSJ of the midface in a patient with a previous diagnosis of OF in the same region. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of development of POSJ in OF. Furthermore, this is the first described case of high-grade surface osteosarcoma in the craniofacial region.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 55.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, G.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Randomised trial of bisphosphonate-coated dental implants: Radiographic follow-up after five years of loading2016In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1564-1569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of a randomised trial with bisphosphonate-coated dental implants have been reported previously. Each patient received one coated and one uncoated implant in a double-blind split-mouth design study. After 6 months of osseointegration, resonance frequency analysis indicated better fixation of the coated implants. Reduced marginal bone resorption was also shown. However, it was not known whether the advantage of the bisphosphonate coating would persist over time. The radiographic results at 5 years after implant installation are reported herein. A blinded investigator measured marginal resorption on fresh radiographs obtained for 14 of the 16 patients (two had died) and compared these with the post-implantation images. Non-parametric statistics were used. All implants functioned well. The median marginal bone loss for control implants was found to be 0.70 mm, which is less than usually reported in the literature. The bisphosphonate-coated implants showed even less resorption (median 0.20 mm). The median difference within each pair of implants after 5 years of use was 0.34 mm (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.75 mm; P = 0.04). The present data suggest that bisphosphonate-coated implants enable prolonged preservation of the marginal bone.

  • 56.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, Gustav
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Impact of a zoledronate coating on early post-surgical implant stability and marginal bone resorption in the maxilla-A split-mouth randomized clinical trial.2019In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate coating on a titanium implant on the implant stability quotient (ISQ) and the radiographic marginal bone levels at implants during early healing (2-8 weeks).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomized double-blind trial with internal controls, 16 patients received a dental implant coated with zoledronate and one uncoated implant as a control. The coated and uncoated implants which were visually indistinguishable were bone level titanium implants with a moderately rough surface and a microthreaded neck. ISQ values were obtained at insertion and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at insertion and at 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in ISQ values between the coated implants and the control implants at 4 and 6 weeks, corrected for insertion values. The secondary outcome was loss of marginal bone level from insertion to 8 weeks.

    RESULTS: Implant stability quotient values remained largely constant over the 8 weeks, and there was no significant difference between coated and uncoated implants at any time point. There was 0.12 (SD 0.10) mm marginal bone loss at the control implants and 0.04 (SD 0.08) mm at the coated implants. The difference was 0.17 mm; SD 0.14; p < 0.006). On blind qualitative scoring, 13 of the 15 control implants and two of 15 coated implants showed small marginal bone defects (p = 0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS: There were no statistically significant differences observed in ISQ values between the coated and uncoated implants during the early healing. There was less marginal bone loss at the coated implants.

  • 57.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Malakuti, Iman
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ajan, Aida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Surgical Management of Granular Cell Tumor of the Orbit: Case Report and Literature Review2019In: Open Dentistry Journal, ISSN 1874-2106, E-ISSN 1874-2106, Vol. 13, p. 33-40Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Granular Cell Tumors (GCTs) of the orbit are rare-entity soft-tissue tumors, and few reports have been published in the literature. The treatment of the choice is total excision. Early diagnosis prior to surgery is valuable for the distinction of malignant from benign tumor.

    Case presentation: We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with a solitary slow-growing mass in the right orbit with the involvement of the rectus inferior muscle, and present a review of the recent literature. The lesion had a diameter of 1 cm and was noticed 2 years before the examination. Excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of GCT. The tumor was resected through a retroseptal transconjunctival approach. The final histological examination revealed findings characteristic of GCT, including positive reaction for protein S-100, SOX10, and calcitonin and negative reaction for desmin, myogenin, Smooth Muscle Antigen (SMA), Melan-A, and HMB-45. There were no signs of malignancy in this sample. Disturbance of motility was not noted by the patient after surgery.

    Conclusion: GCT should be included in the differential diagnosis of intraorbital lesions, particularly those that involve the orbit muscles. A biopsy is recommended before surgical resection, to exclude malignancy and prevent radical resection.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 58.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Bisphosphonate coating might improve fixation of dental implants in the maxilla: A pilot study2010In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 673-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study evaluates the clinical stability of bisphosphonate-coated dental implants placed using a two-stage surgical procedure in five patients. Each patient received seven regular Branemark implants, one of which was coated with bisphosphonate in a fibrinogen matrix. The coated implant was inserted where the bone was expected to have the least favourable quality. The level of the marginal bone around each implant was measured by intraoral periapical radiographs and implant stability was recorded using resonance frequency measurements. Frequency values (ISQ) were obtained peroperatively before flap closure and after 6 months at abutment connection. At abutment connection the bisphosphonate-coated implants were removed en bloc in two patients for histological examination. An animal experiment had previously confirmed that gamma-sterilization did not reduce bioactivity of the bisphosphonate coating. In each patient, the bisphosphonate-coated implant showed the largest improvement in ISQ level of all implants. Their values at the start tended to be lower, and the absolute value at 6 months did not differ. No complications occurred with the coated implants. Histology showed no abnormalities. Improvement in ISQ values was an expected effect of the bisphosphonate coating, but could be due to the choice of insertion site. This finding warrants a randomized blinded study.

  • 59.
    Abuzeid, Nadir
    et al.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan; Omdurman Islamic University, Sudan.
    Kalsum, Sadaf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Koshy, Richin John
    Larsson, Marie C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Glader, Mikaela
    Andersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Raffetseder, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pienaar, Elsje
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alhassan, Muddathir S.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    AlGadir, Haidar A.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Koko, Waleed S.
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Schon, Thomas
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Ahmed Mesaik, M.
    University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia; University of Karachi, Pakistan.
    Abdalla, Omer M.
    University of Karachi, Pakistan.
    Khalid, Asaad
    Medical and Aromat Plants Research Institute, Sudan.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antimycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases2014In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 157, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis underscores the need for continuous development of new and efficient methods to determine the susceptibility of isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the search for novel antimycobacterial agents. Natural products constitute an important source of new drugs, and design and implementation of antimycobacterial susceptibility testing methods are necessary to evaluate the different extracts and compounds. In this study we have explored the antimycobacterial properties of 50 ethanolic extracts from different parts of 46 selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases. Materials and methods: Plants were harvested and ethanolic extracts were prepared. For selected extracts, fractionation with hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents was undertaken. A luminometry-based assay was used for determination of mycobacterial growth in broth cultures and inside primary human macrophages in the presence or absence of plant extracts and fractions of extracts. Cytotoxicity was also assessed for active fractions of plant extracts. Results: Of the tested extracts, three exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on an avirulent strain of Mycobacterium tubercluosis (H37Ra) at the initial screening doses (125 and 6.25 mu g/ml). These were bark and leaf extracts of Khaya senegalensis and the leaf extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Further fractions of these plant extracts were prepared with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, ethanol and water, and the activity of these extracts was retained in hydrophobic fractions. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that the chloroform fraction of Khaya senegalensis bark was non-toxic to human monocyte-derived macrophages and other cell types at the concentrations used and hence, further analysis, including assessment of IC50 and intracellular activity was done with this fraction. Conclusion: These results encourage further investigations to identify the active compound(s) within the chloroform fraction of Khaya senegalensis bark. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 60.
    Acerini, Carlo L.
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wac, Katarzyna
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Bang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lehwalder, Dagmar
    Merck KGaA, Germany.
    Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for children receiving Growth Hormone2017In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, ISSN 1664-2392, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 8, article id 313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360 degrees GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany), examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled "Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral," "Optimizing Patient Management," and "Managing Transition," each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patients journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on-going need for innovations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 61.
    Ackerley, Rochelle
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Sverrisdottir, Yrsa B.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Birklein, Frank
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Elam, Mikael
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kraemer, Heidrun H.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    Cutaneous warmth, but not touch, increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity during a muscle fatigue hand-grip task2020In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In homeostasis, somatosensory C fibre afferents are hypothesised to mediate input to the brain about interactions with external stimuli and sympathetic efference provides the output that regulates bodily functions. We aimed to test this hypothesis and whether different types of innocuous somatosensory input have differential effects. Healthy volunteers performed a muscle fatigue (hand-grip) task to exhaustion, which produces increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), as measured through microneurography. Participants completed the muscle fatigue task without concurrent cutaneous sensory stimulation (control) or we applied skin warming (heat pack) as a C fibre stimulation, slow brush stroking as C and A beta fibre stimulation, or vibration as A beta fibre stimulation, to the participants forearm. We also measured heart rate, the duration of the hand-grip task, and ratings of pain at the end of the task. Concurrent skin warming showed increased MSNA compared to the other conditions. Tactile stimuli (brushing, vibration) were not significantly different to the control (no intervention) condition. Warming increased the pain from the muscle contraction, whereas the tactile stimuli did not. We interpret the effect of warming on MSNA as providing relevant afferent information during muscle contraction, which needed to be counteracted via vasoconstriction to maintain homeostasis. Brushing and vibration were less homeostatically relevant stimuli for the muscle contraction and hence had no significant effect. The findings add sensory specificity to our current understanding of homeostatic regulation through somatosensory afferent and sympathetic efferent pathways.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 62.
    Adamina, Michel
    et al.
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Bonovas, Stefanos
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Raine, Tim
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Spinelli, Antonino
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Warusavitarne, Janindra
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Armuzzi, Alessandro
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Bachmann, Oliver
    Siloah St Trudpert Hosp, Germany.
    Bager, Palle
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Biancone, Livia
    Univ Tor Vergata Rome, Italy.
    Bokemeyer, Bernd
    Gastroenterol Practice Minden, Germany.
    Bossuyt, Peter
    Imelda Gen Hosp, Belgium.
    Burisch, Johan
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Collins, Paul
    Royal Liverpool Univ Hosp, England.
    Doherty, Glen
    St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland; St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland.
    El-Hussuna, Alaa
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ellul, Pierre
    Mater Dei Hosp, Malta.
    Fiorino, Gionata
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Frei-Lanter, Cornelia
    Hosp Zollikerberg, Switzerland.
    Furfaro, Federica
    Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Gingert, Christian
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Gionchetti, Paolo
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Gisbert, Javier P.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Gomollon, Fernando
    Hosp Cli Univ Lozano Blesa, Spain.
    Lorenzo, Marien Gonzalez
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Gordon, Hannah
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Hlavaty, Tibor
    Comenius Univ, Slovakia; Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Juillerat, Pascal
    Univ Hosp Bern, Switzerland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos
    Univ and Med Sch Ioannina, Greece.
    Kopylov, Uri
    Tel HaShomer Sheba Med Ctr, Israel; Sackler Med Sch, Israel.
    Krustins, Eduards
    Riga Stradins Univ, Latvia.
    Kucharzik, Torsten
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Lytras, Theodore
    Natl Publ Hlth Org, Greece.
    Maaser, Christian
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Magro, Fernando
    Dept Pharmacol and Therapeut, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Marshall, John Kenneth
    McMaster Univ, Canada; McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pellino, Gianluca
    Univ Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy.
    Rosa, Isadora
    IPOLFG, Portugal.
    Sabino, Joao
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Savarino, Edoardo
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Stassen, Laurents
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Torres, Joana
    Hosp Beatriz Angelo, Portugal.
    Uzzan, Mathieu
    Beaujon Hosp, France.
    Vavricka, Stephan
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Verstockt, Bram
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Zmora, Oded
    Shamir Med Ctr Assaf Harofe, Israel.
    ECCO Guidelines on Therapeutics in Crohns Disease: Surgical Treatment2020In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 155-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the second in a series of two publications relating to the European Crohns and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] evidence-based consensus on the management of Crohns disease. The first article covers medical management; the present article addresses surgical management, including preoperative aspects and drug management before surgery. It also provides technical advice for a variety of common clinical situations. Both articles together represent the evidence-based recommendations of the ECCO for Crohns disease and an update of previous guidelines.

  • 63.
    Adamopoulos, Stamatis
    et al.
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Corra, Ugo
    Ctr Med Riabilitaz Veruno, Italy.
    Laoutaris, Ioannis D.
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Greece.
    Pistono, Massimo
    Ctr Med Riabilitaz Veruno, Italy.
    Agostoni, Pier Giuseppe
    IRCCS, Italy; Univ Milan, Italy.
    Coats, Andrew J. S.
    IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Italy.
    Leiro, Maria G. Crespo
    UDC, Spain.
    Cornelis, Justien
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Davos, Constantinos H.
    Acad Athens, Greece.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Attikon Univ Hosp, Greece.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Univ Heart Ctr, Switzerland.
    Seferovic, Petar M.
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Schmid, Jean-Paul
    Klin Barmelweid AG, Switzerland.
    Volterrani, Maurizio
    IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Italy.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    Guglielmo da Saliceto Hosp, Italy.
    Exercise training in patients with ventricular assist devices: a review of the evidence and practical advice. A position paper from the Committee on Exercise Physiology and Training and the Committee of Advanced Heart Failure of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology2019In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 21, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise training (ET) and secondary prevention measures in cardiovascular disease aim to stimulate early physical activity and to facilitate recovery and improve health behaviours. ET has also been proposed for heart failure patients with a ventricular assist device (VAD), to help recovery in the patients functional capacity. However, the existing evidence in support of ET in these patients remains limited. After a review of current knowledge on the causes of the persistence of limitation in exercise capacity in VAD recipients, and concerning the benefit of ET in VAD patients, the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology has developed the present document to provide practical advice on implementing ET. This includes appropriate screening to avoid complications and then starting with early mobilisation, ET prescription is individualised to meet the patients needs. Finally, gaps in our knowledge are discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 64.
    Adeback, Petra
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schulman, Abbe
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Children exposed to a natural disaster: psychological consequences eight years after 2004 tsunami2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 75-81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for studies that follow up children and adolescents for many years post disaster since earlier studies have shown that exposure during natural disasters constitutes a risk factor for poor psychological health.Aims: The main aim was to examine whether there was an association between severity of exposures during a natural disaster experienced in childhood or adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms, psychological distress, self-rated health, diagnosis of depression, anxiety or worry, thoughts about or attempted suicide, physical symptoms or daily functioning eight years later in young adulthood. A second aim was to compare psychological distress and self-rated health of exposed young adults with a matched population-based sample.Method: Young adults, who experienced the 2004 tsunami as children between 10 and 15 years of age, responded to a questionnaire eight years post disaster. The results were compared to a matched population sample.Results: The results showed that the likelihood for negative psychological outcomes was higher for those who had been exposed to several types of exposures during this natural disaster.Conclusions: The negative psychological impact on children and adolescents can still be present eight years post-disaster and seems to have association with the type of exposure; loss, physical presence and subjective experience. It is important for clinicians, who meet young adults seeking help, to be conscious about the impact as long as eight years post disaster and to be aware of possible clinical implications associated with severity of exposures.

  • 65.
    Adil, Mohammed Yasin
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway.
    Xiao, Jiaxin
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway.
    Olafsson, Jonatan
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Chen, Xiangjun
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway; Arendal Hosp, Norway; Vestre Viken Hosp Trust, Norway; Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Norway.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Raeder, Sten
    Norwegian Dry Eye Clin, Norway.
    Utheim, Oygunn A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Dartt, Darlene A.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Utheim, Tor P.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Oslo, Norway; Vestre Viken Hosp Trust, Norway; Univ Coll Southeast Norway, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Meibomian Gland Morphology Is a Sensitive Early Indicator of Meibomian Gland Dysfunction2019In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, ISSN 0002-9394, E-ISSN 1879-1891, Vol. 200, p. 16-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between meibomian gland (MG) morphology and clinical dry eye tests in patients with meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS: Total 538 MGD patients and 21 healthy controls. METHODS: MG loss on meibography images of upper (UL) and lower lids (LL) was graded on a scale of 0 (lowest degree of MG loss) to 3. MG length, thickness, and interglandular space in the UL were measured. Clinical tests included meibum expression and quality, tear film break-up time, ocular staining, osmolarity, Schirmer I, blink interval timing, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire. RESULTS: Mean UL and LL meibogrades were significantly higher in MGD patients compared to controls (P amp;lt; .001 for UL and LL). The sensitivity and specificity of the meibograde as a diagnostic parameter for MGD was 96.7% and 85%, respectively. Schirmer I was significantly increased in MGD patients with meibograde 1 compared to patients with meibograde 0, 2, and 3 in the UL (P amp;lt; .05 ). MG thickness increased with higher meibograde (P amp;lt; .001). MG morphology correlated significantly but weakly with several clinical parameters (P amp;lt; .05). OSDI did not correlate with any MG morphologic parameter. CONCLUSIONS: Grading of MG loss using meibograde effectively diagnoses MGD. Compensatory mechanisms such as increased aqueous tear production and dilation of MGs make early detection of MGD difficult by standard clinical measures of dry eye, whereas morphologic analysis of MGs reveals an early stage of MGD, and therefore represents a complementary clinical parameter with diagnostic potential. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 66.
    Adlam, David
    et al.
    Univ Leicester, England; Glenfield Hosp, England.
    Alfonso, Fernando
    Hosp Univ La Princess, Spain.
    Maas, Angela
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Vrints, Christiaan
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Writing commitee, (Contributor)
    European Society of Cardiology, acute cardiovascular care association, SCAD study group: a position paper on spontaneous coronary artery dissection ESC-ACCA Position Paper on spontaneous coronary artery dissection2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 36, p. 3353-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 67.
    Adnan, Ali
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hogmo, Anders
    Karolinska Hosp, Sweden.
    Sjodin, Helena
    Karolinska Hosp, Sweden.
    Gebre-Medhin, Maria
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Laurell, Goran
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Reizenstein, Johan
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Speech Therapy, Otorhinolaryngology and Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Norberg, Lena S.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Notstam, Isak
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Cange, Hedda H.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hammerlid, Eva
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life among tonsillar carcinoma patients in Sweden in relation to treatment and comparison with quality of life among the population2020In: Head and Neck, ISSN 1043-3074, E-ISSN 1097-0347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of tonsillar carcinoma survivors was explored to investigate any HRQOL differences associated with tumor stage and treatment. The survivors HRQOL was also compared to reference scores from the population. Methods In this exploratory cross-sectional study patients were invited 15 months after their diagnosis and asked to answer two quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ- C30, EORTC QLQ- HN35), 405 participated. Results HRQOL was associated with gender, with males scoring better than females on a few scales. Patients HRQOL was more associated with treatment than tumor stage. Patients HRQOL was worse than that in an age- and sex-matched reference group from the normal population, the largest differences were found for problems with dry mouth followed by problems with sticky saliva, senses, swallowing and appetite loss. Conclusions The tonsillar carcinoma patients had a worse HRQOL compared to the general population one year after treatment.

  • 68. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Miscarriage: Women’s Experience and its Cumulative Incidence2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women experience miscarriage every year. Every fourth woman who has given birth reports that she has previous experience of miscarriage. In a study of all women in the Swedish Medical Birth Register 1983-2003, we found that the number of cases of self reported miscarriage had increased in Sweden during this 21 year period. This increase can be explained by the introduction of sensitive pregnancy tests around 1990, as well as an increase in the mean age of the mothers, by approximately 3 years, during the observation period. The risk of miscarriage is 13% with the first child. With subsequent pregnancies, the risk of miscarriage is 8%, 6% and 4% with the second, third and fourth child, respectively.

    Thirteen of these women who had suffered a recent miscarriage were interviewed four months later, and their feelings of guilt and emptiness were explored. Their experience was that they wanted their questions to be answered, and that they wanted others to treat them as the mothers to be that they felt themselves to be. They also experienced the need for time to grieve their loss.

    Measurement of grief by means of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) is used in research but has also been proposed for clinical use. We have translated this psychological instrument to Swedish, back-translated and tested it in a small pilot study. In a randomized controlled study, women with early miscarriage were allocated, either to a structured visit (study group) or a regular visit (control group) to a midwife. The structured visit was conducted according to the Swanson caring theory. We could conclude that the structured visit had no significant effect on grief compared to the regular visit, as measured using the PGS. However, women with the sub-diagnosis missed abortion have significantly more grief four months after early miscarriage, regardless of visit type.

    We also performed a content analysis of the tape-recorded structured follow-up visit. The code-key used was Bonanno and Kaltman’s general grief categorization. Women’s expression of grief after miscarriage was found to be very similar to the grief experienced following the death of a relative. Furthermore, the grief was found to be independent of number of children, women’s age, or earlier experience of miscarriage.

    Conclusions: Every fourth woman who gives birth reports that she has also experienced early miscarriage. The experience of these women is that they have suffered a substantial loss and their reaction is grief similar to that experienced following the death of a relative.

    List of papers
    1. Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden 1983-2003: A register study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden 1983-2003: A register study
    2006 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 741-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of this study is to find out how common miscarriages are among women who have delivered a child.

    Methods. The numbers of deliveries and miscarriages were extracted from the Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1983 and 2003. Linear regression was performed in order to investigate whether the increasing mean age of mothers or differences in pregnancy identification methods could explain the increased frequency of miscarriage.

    Results. The reported number of miscarriages increased each year during the 21-year period, with a marked increase between 1991 and 1993 and only a slight increase during the final 10 years. For primiparous women, the frequency of reported miscarriages per delivery increased from 8.6% in 1983 to 13.9% in 2003. The corresponding figures for 2-parous women showed an increase from 14.5% to 21.3% respectively. Women aged 30-34 years had an odds ratio of 1.43 (95% CI 1.40-1.45) to suffer spontaneous abortion compared to the age group 25-29 years. Linear regression showed that an increase in mean age at delivery could only partly explain the increase in the frequency of reported miscarriages. A possible explanation could be differences in methods of identifying early pregnancy.

    Conclusion. Of all women who deliver a child, nearly 20% have experienced previous miscarriage. The increased mean age of women could only explain a small portion of the seen increase in miscarriage. The marked increase from 1991 to 1993 is interesting. Possible reasons for the increase are discussed.

    Keywords
    Miscarriage; register study; retrospective study; spontaneous abortion; Medical Birth Register
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13806 (URN)10.1080/00016340600627022 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03
    2. Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage
    2004 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13807 (URN)10.1080/07399330490444821 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2018-11-15
    3. Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 269-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Women's emotions and grief after miscarriage are influenced not only by the context in which the miscarriage occurred but also by their past experience, the circumstances around the miscarriage and their future prospects. Their emotions therefore express a specific form of grief. Normally the time needed to work through the loss varies. A number of different scales, measuring women's emotions and grief after miscarriage have been published. One instrument that measures the specific grief, such as the grief after miscarriage is the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) that was designed to measure grief after perinatal loss and has good reliability and validity.

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to translate the PGS into Swedish and to use the translation in a small pilot study.

    Material and method: The original short version of the PGS was first translated from English into Swedish and then back-translated into English, using different translators. During translation and back-translation, not only the linguistic and grammatical aspects were considered but also cultural differences. The Likert 5-point and a 10-point scale were tested in a pilot study where 12 volunteers anonymously answered the PGS twice. The intra-personal correlations were compared and analysed with weighted κ-coefficient.

    Findings: In all, five different versions were tested before the final Swedish version was established. The weighted κ-coefficient for the volunteers was 0.58, which is regarded as representing good reproducibility.

    Conclusion: The PGS was translated successfully into Swedish and could be used in a Swedish population. As this work is rather time-consuming we therefore wish to publish the Swedish version so that it may be used by other researchers.

    Keywords
    translation, Perinatal Grief Scale, miscarriage, grief, spontaneous abortion
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13808 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2006.00404.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2010-05-17
    4. Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study
    2006 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2). Methods. We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post. Results. There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit. Conclusions. A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

    Keywords
    Early miscarriage; grief; midwife; support; treatment
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13809 (URN)10.1080/00016340500539376 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2013-09-12
    5. Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women’s experiences after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno´s taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women’s experiences after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno´s taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.
    2010 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.

    Material and methods. Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.

    Results. Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.

    Conclusion. Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.

    Keywords
    Content analysis, factor analysis, general grief theory, miscarriage, perinatal grief scale, women
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13810 (URN)10.3109/03009731003739851 (DOI)000281013000008 ()
    Note
    On the day of the defence day the status of this article was Submitted.Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2010-09-03
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 69.
    Adolfsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    Persson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    Prosodiska aspekter av nonordsproduktion hos barn med cochleaimplantat och barn med språkstörning2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Prosody can be defined as the rythmic, dynamic and melodic aspects of speech. Without prosody, speech would sound monotonous and communication could be obstructed. The aim of the present study was to examine prosodic aspects of nonword repetition by children with cochlear implants and children with language impairment. Previous studies of prosody in these groups have not in detail described what kinds of errors that occur and therefore this is interesting to investigate.

    The present study is based on previously collected data of nonword repetition among a total of 41 children, all participating in previous studies. Of these children, 27 were children with language impairment aged between 4:6-7:6 years. Fourteen were children with CI aged between 3:0-13:4. The recorded data was transcribed and analyzed group wise and the mean value of the groups were calculated.

    Children with CI showed prosodic problems in nonword repetition to a greater extent than children with language impairment did. Both children with language impairment and children with CI had difficulties with number of syllables, stress, tonal word accent and quantity of vowel. However, the children with CI generally made errors to a greater extent as well as more types of errors, compared to the children with language impairment. All children with CI made some type of prosodic error whilst 11 out of 27 of the language impaired children produced all the words prosodically correct. Children who were implanted at an older age showed greater difficulties with prosody than children who were implanted at a younger age.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 70.
    Adolfsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Persson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Äldreriktat tal på boenden för äldre: Förekomst och karaktäristik2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The term elderspeak refers to the adjustments of communication towards elderly people which are similar to those made towards young children. The adjustments are made within several language domains, and are a part of the communicative environment of the elders. The subject is relatively uninvestigated, and few, if any, studies have been conducted on the subject in Sweden. Thus the aim of the present study was to investigate the possible occurrence of elderspeak, and to describe its characteristics.

    The present study is based upon five participants working at different forms of geriatric institutions. Conversations between a caregiver and a resident and conversations between a caregiver and a colleague were recorded and broadly transcribed. The recordings were cut into separate files according to the purpose of respective analysis. The study was carried out with a data-driven perspective and previously established aspects of elderspeak and child directed speech was searched for.

    The present study established that caregivers to a varying extent adjusted their communication within several language domains. The adjustments mainly took place within the prosodic domain but they also took place within the grammatical domain. Adjustments within the pragmatic domain were found to some extent, but no adjustments within the semantic domain were found. Tendencies to adjustments of the speech were present in the majority of the participants. The present study suggests the following additions to the aspects of the elderspeak phenomenon; frequent use of name, less hesitation phenomena and less frequent simultaneous speech. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Äldreriktat tal på boenden för äldre
  • 71. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lithium formate EPR dosimetry for accurate measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium formate has shown to be a material with properties suitable for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry, among them up to 7 times higher sensitivity compared to alanine, which is a well-established EPR detector material for dose determinations in radiotherapy.

    The aim of this thesis was to further investigate the properties of lithium formate and develop the dosimetry system towards applications in radiotherapy. The intrinsic efficiency for energies of relevance to brachytherapy and the signal stability were investigated. The dosimetry system was expanded to include a smaller dosimeter model, suitable for measurements in dose gradient regions. An individual sensitivity correction method was applied to the smaller dosimeters to be able to perform dose determinations with the same precision as for the larger ones. EPR dosimetry in general is time consuming and effort was spent to optimize the signal readout procedure regarding measurement time and measurement precision.

    The system was applied in two clinical applications chosen for their high demands on the dosimetry system: 1) a dosimetry audit for external photon beam therapy and 2) dose verification measurements around a low energy HDR brachytherapy source.

    The conclusions drawn from this thesis were: dose determinations can be performed with a standard uncertainty of 1.8-2.5% using both the original size dosimeters and the new developed smaller ones. The dosimetry system is robust and useful for applications when high measurement precision and accuracy is prioritized. It is a good candidate for dosimetry audits, both in external beam therapy and brachytherapy.

    List of papers
    1. Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 4946-4959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at 60Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions.

    METHODS:

    Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in 137Cs and 60Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for 60Co was determined for each beam quality.

    RESULTS:

    Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages < or = 180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for 137Cs and 250 kV x rays.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    When calibrated in 60Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy range of 20-150 keV such as 169Yb and electronic sources.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Association of Physicists in Medicine, 2010
    Keywords
    lithium formate EPR, brachytherapy, dosimetry, detector response, kV x rays
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59955 (URN)10.1118/1.3475938 (DOI)000281906000046 ()20964214 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-10-01 Created: 2010-10-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 2209-2217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate signal fading in lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters used for clinical applications in radiotherapy. A new experimental method for determination of signal fading, designed to resolve small changes in signal from slowly decaying unstable radicals, was used. Possible signal fading in lithium formate due to different storage temperatures was also tested. Air humidity was kept at a constant level of 33% throughout the experiments. The conclusion drawn from the investigations was that the EPR signal from lithium formate is stable during at least 1 month after irradiation and is not sensitive to variations in storage temperature andlt;40 degrees C when kept at a relative air humidity of 33%. This makes lithium formate a suitable dosimeter for transfer dosimetry in clinical audits.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics (IOP), 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77095 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/57/8/2209 (DOI)000302567100008 ()22456424 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Cancer foundation (CF)|100443|FORSS|86231|

    Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Radiation Measurements, ISSN 1350-4487, E-ISSN 1879-0925, Vol. 70, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    EPR; ESR; Lithium formate; High precision dosimetry; High spatial resolution dosimetry
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111088 (URN)10.1016/j.radmeas.2014.08.013 (DOI)000345110700005 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k=1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Dosimetry audit; remote audit; end-to-end; EPR; ESR; lithium formate
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111089 (URN)10.1016/j.radonc.2014.11.027 (DOI)000347657200021 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 3869-3882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film.

    Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water.

    Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison.

    This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2015
    Keywords
    Electronic brachytherapy, EPR, lithium formate, radiochromic film, intrinsic efficiency
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111090 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/60/9/3869 (DOI)000354104700030 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    Lithium formate EPR dosimetry for accurate measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
  • 72.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry2014In: Radiation Measurements, ISSN 1350-4487, E-ISSN 1879-0925, Vol. 70, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements.

  • 73.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Olsson, Sara
    Medical Physics and Technology, Växjö Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry2014In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k=1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 74.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wesolowska, Paulina
    IAEA, Austria.
    Izewska, Joanna
    IAEA, Austria.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    END-TO-END AUDIT: COMPARISON OF TLD AND LITHIUM FORMATE EPR DOSIMETRY2019In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 186, no 1, p. 119-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to test two different solid state dosimetry systems for the purpose of end-to-end audits of radiotherapy volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique; a lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance system and a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry system. As a complement to the solid state systems, ion chamber measurements were performed. A polystyrene phantom with a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR) structure was scanned using CT. A VMAT dose plan was optimized to deliver 2 Gy to the target volume and to minimize the dose to the OAR. The different detectors were inserted into the phantom and the planned dose distribution was delivered. The measured doses were compared to the treatment planning system (TPS) calculated doses. Good agreement was found between the TPS calculated and the measured doses, well accepted for the dose determinations in remote dosimetry audits of VMAT treatment technique.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 75.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White, Shane
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Landry, Guillaume
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Brigitte
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film2015In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 3869-3882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film.

    Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water.

    Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison.

    This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  • 76.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Is surgery for the subacromial pain syndrome ever indicated? in ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, vol 86, issue 6, pp 639-6402015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 639-640Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 77.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Nestorson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Scheer, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Extensive soft tissue lesions in redislocated after simple elbow dislocations2017In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1294-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The majority of simple elbow dislocations (no associated fractures) can be treated nonoperatively with a short period of immobilization followed by guided aftercare. This case series describes the soft tissue injuries in a rare subset of patients in whom the elbow redislocated despite adequate immobilization. Methods: During a 6-year period, 8 patients were identified. They were all treated with reduction and casting in 90 degrees of flexion or more. At 1 week of follow-up, redislocation had occurred in all patients and open soft tissue repair was performed. The injuries were documented and the patients were followed up clinically and with radiographs. Results: Extensive soft tissue injuries, including both collateral ligament injuries and muscle origin avulsions from either or both sides, were found in all patients. The functional result at follow-up was satisfactory in all patients. Conclusion: Vast soft tissue injuries including both collateral ligaments and muscle origins should be expected in the event of early severe instability of a dislocated elbow joint. (C) 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 78.
    Aerts, Joel
    et al.
    University of Liege, Belgium; University of Paris 07, France.
    Ballinger, James R.
    Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.
    Behe, Martin
    ETH PSI USZ Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI, Switzerland.
    Decristoforo, Clemens
    Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.
    Elsinga, Philip H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Faivre-Chauvet, Alain
    CHU Nantes, France.
    Mindt, Thomas L.
    University Hospital Basel, Switzerland.
    Kolenc Peitl, Petra
    University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Todde, Sergio C.
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Guidance on current good radiopharmacy practice for the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals using automated modules: a European perspective2014In: Journal of labelled compounds & radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 0362-4803, E-ISSN 1099-1344, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This document is meant to complement Part B of the EANM Guidelines on current good radiopharmacy practice (cGRPP) in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals issued by the Radiopharmacy Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, covering small-scale in-house preparation of radiopharmaceuticals with automated modules. The aim is to provide more detailed and practice-oriented guidance to those who are involved in the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, which are not intended for commercial purposes or distribution.

  • 79.
    Aerts, Marc
    et al.
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Minalu, Girma
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Bösner, Stefan
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Buntinx, Frank
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium; Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Burnand, Bernard
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland..
    Haasenritter, Jörg
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Herzig, Lilli
    Institute of Family Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Knottnerus, J André
    Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Renier, Walter
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Sox, Carol
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, USA..
    Sox, Harold
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH , USA; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Washington, USA..
    Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Pooled individual patient data from five countries were used to derive a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease in primary care.2017In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 81, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To construct a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with chest pain in primary care.

    STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Meta-Analysis using 3,099 patients from five studies. To identify candidate predictors, we used random forest trees, multiple imputation of missing values, and logistic regression within individual studies. To generate a prediction rule on the pooled data, we applied a regression model that took account of the differing standard data sets collected by the five studies.

    RESULTS: The most parsimonious rule included six equally weighted predictors: age ≥55 (males) or ≥65 (females) (+1); attending physician suspected a serious diagnosis (+1); history of CAD (+1); pain brought on by exertion (+1); pain feels like "pressure" (+1); pain reproducible by palpation (-1). CAD was considered absent if the prediction score is <2. The area under the ROC curve was 0.84. We applied this rule to a study setting with a CAD prevalence of 13.2% using a prediction score cutoff of <2 (i.e., -1, 0, or +1). When the score was <2, the probability of CAD was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.1-3.9%); when the score was ≥ 2, it was 43.0% (95% CI: 35.8-50.4%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical prediction rules are a key strategy for individualizing care. Large data sets based on electronic health records from diverse sites create opportunities for improving their internal and external validity. Our patient-level meta-analysis from five primary care sites should improve external validity. Our strategy for addressing site-to-site systematic variation in missing data should improve internal validity. Using principles derived from decision theory, we also discuss the problem of setting the cutoff prediction score for taking action.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 80.
    Afzelius, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ostman, Margareta
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Råstam, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Lund University, Sweden.
    Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support.Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration.Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions.Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care.Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

  • 81.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 82.
    Ageno, Walter
    et al.
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Buller, Harry R.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Falanga, Anna
    Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy; Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy.
    Hacke, Werner
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Lobban, Trudie
    Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Assoc, England.
    Merino, Jose
    University of La Paz, Spain.
    Milojevic, Ivan S.
    Gen Hospital Cuprija, Serbia.
    Moya, Francisco
    Vithas Xanit Int Hospital, Spain.
    Bart van der Worp, H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Randall, Gary
    SAFE, England.
    Tsioufis, Konstantinos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Verhamme, Peter
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    John Camm, A.
    St Georges University of London, England; Imperial Coll, England.
    Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1003-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies are critical. Until recently, the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban lacked a specific reversal agent. This report is based on findings from the Anticoagulation Education Task Force, which brought together patient groups and professionals representing different medical specialties with an interest in patient safety and expertise in AF, VTE, stroke, anticoagulation, and reversal agents, to discuss the current status of anticoagulation reversal and fundamental changes in management of bleeding associated with DOACs occasioned by the approval of idarucizumab, a specific reversal agent for dabigatran, as well as recent clinical data on specific reversal agents for factor Xa inhibitors. Recommendations are given for when there is a definite need for a reversal agent (e.g. in cases of life-threatening bleeding, bleeding into a closed space or organ, persistent bleeding despite local haemostatic measures, and need for urgent interventions and/or interventions that carry a high risk for bleeding), when reversal agents may be helpful, and when a reversal agent is generally not needed. Key stakeholders who require 24-7/around-the-clock access to these agents vary among hospitals; however, from a practical perspective the emergency department is recommended as an appropriate location for these agents. Clearly, the advent of new agents requires standardised protocols for treating bleeding on an institutional level.

  • 83.
    Agholme, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Macias, Brandon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamang, Matt
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Lucchesi, Jonathan
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Adrian, Mary D.
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Kuhstoss, Stuart
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Harvey, Anita
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Sato, Masahiko
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA .
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Efficacy of a Sclerostin Antibody Compared to a Low Dose of PTH on Metaphyseal Bone Healing2014In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 471-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared the effect of a sclerostin antibody to that of a clinically relevant dose of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a rat model for metaphyseal bone healing. Screws of steel or poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) were inserted bilaterally into the proximal tibia of young male rats. During 4 weeks the animals then received injections of either phosphate buffered saline (control), sclerostin antibody (25mg/kg, twice weekly) or PTH (5 mu g/kg, daily). The healing response around the screws was then assessed by mechanical testing and X-ray microtomography (mu CT). To distinguish between effects on healing and general effects on the skeleton, other untraumatized bone sites and serum biomarkers were also assessed. After 4 weeks of treatment, PTH yielded a 48% increase in screw pull-out force compared to control (p=0.03), while the antibody had no significant effect. In contrast, the antibody increased femoral cortical and vertebral strength where PTH had no significant effect. mu CT showed only slight changes that were statistically significant for the antibody mainly at cortical sites. The results suggest that a relatively low dose of PTH stimulates metaphyseal repair (screw fixation) specifically, whereas the sclerostin antibody has wide-spread effects, mainly on cortical bone, with less influence on metaphyseal healing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 84.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Domert, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2014In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 58, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of two misfolded and aggregated proteins, β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. Both cellular systems responsible for clearance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the lysosomal and the proteasomal, have been shown to be malfunctioning in the aged brain and more so in AD patients. This malfunction could be the cause of β-amyloid and tau accumulation, eventually aggregating in plaques and tangles. We have investigated how decreased proteasome activity affects AD related pathophysiological changes of microtubule transport and stability, as well as tau phosphorylation. To do this, we used our recently developed neuronal model where human SH-SY5Y cells obtain neuronal morphology and function through differentiation. We found that exposure to low doses of the proteasome inhibitor MG-115 caused disturbed neuritic transport, together with microtubule destabilization and tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, reduced proteasome activity activated several kinases implicated in AD pathology, including JNK, c-Jun and ERK 1/2. Restoration of the microtubule transport was achieved by inhibiting ERK 1/2 activation, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK 1/2 and c-Jun reversed the proteasome inhibition-induced tau phosphorylation. Taken together, this study suggests that a decrease in proteasome activity can, through activation of c-Jun and ERK 1/2, result in several events contributing to AD pathology. Restoring proteasome function or inhibiting ERK 1/2 and c-Jun could therefore be used as novel treatments against AD.

  • 85. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Västra Götalandsregionen, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    A Biopsychosocial and Long Term Perspective on Child Behavioral Problems: Impact of Risk and Resilience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health has become a prominent issue in society. Yet, much remains unknown about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the association between biological, psychological and social factors of risk and resilience and behavioral problems in a birth cohort of Swedish children. 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to the age of 12 as part of the South East Sweden Birth Cohort Study (the SESBiC study). Information was gathered through register data, standardized questionnaires and DNA samples.

    In study I, stability of maternal symptoms of depression and the impact on child behavior at age 12 were investigated. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be 12.0 % postpartum. Symptoms of postpartum depression significantly increased the risk for subsequent depressive symptoms 12 years later in women. Children whose mothers reported concurrent symptoms of depression and anxiety had an increased risk for both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12, but no long term effect on child behavior was seen for postpartum depressive symptoms. The greatest risk was seen for children whose mothers reported symptoms of depression on both occasions. In study II, the impact of gene-environment interaction of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and experience of life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety on child behavior at age 12 was studied. A main effect of 5-HTTLPR was noticed, but no geneenvironment effects were shown. Similarly to study I, concurrent symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety were an important predictor of child behavioral problems. A high degree of psychosocial stress around childbirth was found to have long lasting detrimental effects on child behavior, increasing the risk for internalizing problems at age 12. Study III investigated the impact of geneenvironment interactions of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and birth characteristics on behavioral problems at age 3. Symptoms of postpartum depression were found to predict internalizing as well as externalizing problems in children three years later. Child experience of life events was a stable predictor of behavioral problems across the scales similar to sociodemographic factors such as parental immigration status and unemployment. No gene-environment interaction effects of 5-HTTLPR or BDNF Val66Met were shown. Study IV used the risk factors identified in studies I-III to investigate factors of resilience to behavioral problems at age 12. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was associated with a lower risk for behavioral problems at age 12, especially for children facing low adversity. Good social functioning was found to be a general resource factor, independent of the level of risk, while an easy temperament was associated with resilience for children with a high degree of adversity. However, effect sizes were small.

    In summary, the results from the present thesis emphasize the importance of maternal mental health and sociodemographic factors for child mental health at ages 3 and 12, which must be taken into account in clinical settings. Moreover, it adds to the null-findings of the gene-environment effect of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met on behavioral problems in children, but indicates a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms at age 12.

    List of papers
    1. Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    2013 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Children of depressed mothers have been shown to express behaviour problems to a greater extent than children of non-depressed mothers. The purpose of this study was to examine the persistence of depressive symptoms in mothers and to evaluate the relative importance of symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and concurrent maternal symptoms of depression, on child behaviour at age 12. A birth cohort of 1,707 children and their mothers was followed from 3 months after birth to 12 years after birth. Self-reported symptoms of depression in mothers were assessed at baseline and 12-year follow-up where 893 mothers (52.3 %) and their children participated. The mothers reports on the behaviour of their children at age 12 were used. Multivariate analysis was used to assess factors that increased the risk of child behaviour problems. At baseline, 10.4 % scored above the cutoff for symptoms of postpartum depression. At follow up, 18.2 % scored above the cutoff for depressive symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that ongoing maternal symptoms of depression, as distinct from PPD-symptoms, was the strongest predictor of child behaviour problems at age 12. The gender of the child and socio-demographic factors at baseline were additional factors that affected the risk of behaviour problems in the 12 year old children. Children of mothers who reported symptoms of depression, both postpartum and at follow-up, were at a greater risk of behaviour problems compared to children of women with no depressive symptoms on either occasion. Our findings indicate that recurrent and ongoing maternal depressive symptoms significantly increase the risk of child behaviour problems as reported by mothers, while symptoms of PPD do not seem to result in an increased risk of behaviour problems in 12 year olds. High maternal socio-demographic life stress at childbirth constitutes an important risk factor for later child behaviour problems.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2013
    Keywords
    CBCL, Children, Mental health, Postpartum depression, SESBiC-study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90750 (URN)10.1007/s10995-012-0985-z (DOI)000316021200003 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104869 (URN)10.1186/1753-2000-7-10 (DOI)23518193 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124207 (URN)10.1186/s12887-016-0614-x (DOI)000377535800002 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:Funding was obtained from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS), the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Clas Groschinsky Memorial Foundation, Stockholm, Samariten Foundation, Stockholm, the Hallsten Research Foundation and ALF, County Council of Ostergotland.

    Vid tiden för publicering förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    4. A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Show others...
    2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

    Keywords
    Child, genotype, longitudinal, mental health, resilience
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124208 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2016-01-22Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 86.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental health in young mothers, single mothers and their children2019In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parenthood is a life transition that can be especially demanding for vulnerable individuals. Young maternal age and maternal single status have been reported to increase the risk for adverse outcomes for both mother and child. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of young maternal age and maternal single status on maternal and child mental health and child development at age 3. Methods: A birth-cohort of 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to age 3. Sixty-one mothers (3.5%) were age 20 or younger, and 65 (4.0%) reported single status at childbirth. The mothers filled out standardized instruments and medical information was retrieved from the standardized clinical assessment of the children at Child Welfare Centers, (CWC). Results: Young maternal age was associated with symptoms of postpartum depression whereas single status was not. Young mothers were more prone to report internalizing and externalizing problems in their children, while there was no association between single status and child behavioral problems. No differences were seen on child development (CWC scores). School drop-out was, however, a more influential factor on depressive symptoms postpartum than maternal age. Conclusion: Young mothers are at increased risk for symptoms of postpartum depression which indicates the need for attention in pre- and postnatal health care programs. Single mothers and their children were not found to be at increased risk for adverse outcomes. The importance of schooling was demonstrated, indicating the need for societal support to encourage adolescents to remain in school.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 87.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comasco, Erika
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dekeyser, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oreland, Lars
    Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.2013In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 88.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden.
    Norman Kjellstrom, Anna
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Torgerson, Jarl
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rusner, Marie
    Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Somatic comorbidity in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders2019In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1517-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the adult population, psychiatric disorders are associated with somatic illness. Explanatory life style factors have been found, but also a failure to recognize somatic illness in this group. Another factor is side effects from long-term use of antipsychotic drugs. Given the psychiatric-somatic comorbidity in the adult population, it is of interest to investigate whether an association exists already during childhood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of somatic illness in children and adolescents with a psychiatric diagnose. Data were obtained from the regional health care database Vega, Sweden. Psychiatric and somatic diagnoses obtained during 2011-2013 for individuals aged 3-18 years were extracted. Descriptive statistics were used to examine difference in somatic morbidity between children with and without psychiatric diagnoses. Logistic regression was used in age-stratified models to test the association between psychiatric and somatic diagnoses. Anxiety and behavioral disorders were associated with all somatic conditions investigated at nearly all ages. The same applied to substance use, investigated at age 9-18 years. Affective disorders were associated with all somatic conditions at age 12-18 years. Psychotic conditions were associated with asthma, bowel disorders and myalgia in adolescents. Children with psychiatric disorders are at remarkably high risk for concurrent somatic illness. The associations span across many types of conditions and across all ages. The results support the need for awareness of somatic morbidity in child and adolescent psychiatric clinical settings, and the need for coordinated health care for children with comorbid states.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 89.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and childrens experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/ l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 90.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

  • 91.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

  • 92.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bélteky, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brain size is reduced by selectionfor tameness in Red Junglefowl–correlated effects in vital organs2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During domestication animals have undergone changes in size of brain and other vital organs. We hypothesize that this could be a correlated effect to increased tameness. Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens) were selected for divergent levels of fear of humans for five generations. The parental (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5) were culled when 48–54 weeks old and the brains were weighed before being divided into telencephalon, cerebellum, mid brain and optic lobes. Each single brain part as well as the liver, spleen, heart and testicles were also weighed. Brains of S5 birds with high fear scores (S5 high) were heavier both in absolute terms and when corrected for body weight. The relative weight of telencephalon (% of brain weight) was significantly higher in S5 high and relative weight of cerebellum was lower. Heart, liver, testes and spleen were all relatively heavier (% of body weight) in S5 high. Hence, selection for tameness has changed the size of the brain and other vital organs in this population and may have driven the domesticated phenotype as a correlated response.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 93.
    Agren, Martin
    et al.
    Prosthodont Specialist Clin, Sweden.
    Sahin, Christofer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland.
    Pettersson, Mattias
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    The effect of botulinum toxin injections on bruxism: A systematic review2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To systematize evidence on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BTA) in the treatment of bruxism measured through bite force or electromyography (EMG) at the masseter muscle. Method Identification of relevant articles through databases PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, Ovid and EBSCO and manual search were performed for sources from review articles. Studies scoring less than 3 on the Jadad Scale were excluded. Results Four articles were included after an exclusion of 333 articles. 3 articles measured EMG and 1 bite force. 1 article did not record a significant drop of activity, 1 article recorded reduction midway and at final endpoint. 2 articles recorded initial reduction, but a non significant difference at later follow up. Conclusion The available research is inconclusive and does not show enough evidence that bruxism can be treated with BTA injections. However, promising results have been shown in individual studies and further research in this area is needed.

  • 94.
    Agren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Presentation av post-doctoral mentorship2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Agren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Luttik, ML
    Caregiving tasks and caregiver burden over time: effects of an intervention for patients with post-operative heart failure and their partners.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Aguilar, Helena
    et al.
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Urruticoechea, Ander
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Halonen, Pasi
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Kiyotani, Kazuma
    Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Yokohama, Japan.
    Mushiroda, Taisei
    Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Yokohama, Japan.
    Barril, Xavier
    University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Islam, Abul
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Caizzi, Livia
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Di Croce, Luciano
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Zwart, Wilbert
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Bostner, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm South General Hospital, Sweden.
    Sgroi, Dennis C
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Garcia-Mata, Rafael
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Jansen, Maurice Phm
    Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    García, Nadia
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Bonifaci, Núria
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Climent, Fina
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Soler, María Teresa
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Vida, Alejo
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Gil, Miguel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Brunet, Joan
    Hospital Josep Trueta, Girona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Martrat, Griselda
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Gómez-Baldó, Laia
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Extremera, Ana I
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Figueras, Agnes
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Balart, Josep
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Clarke, Robert
    Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
    Burnstein, Kerry L
    University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.
    Carlson, Kathryn E
    University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Katzenellenbogen, John A
    University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Vizoso, Miguel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Esteller, Manel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain .
    Villanueva, Alberto
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B
    CSIC-University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Bustelo, Xosé R
    CSIC-University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Nakamura, Yusuke
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Zembutsu, Hitoshi
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Beijersbergen, Roderick L
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam .
    Pujana, Miguel Angel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    VAV3 mediates resistance to breast cancer endocrine therapy2014In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. R53-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Endocrine therapies targeting cell proliferation and survival mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) are among the most effective systemic treatments for ERalpha-positive breast cancer. However, most tumors initially responsive to these therapies acquire resistance through mechanisms that involve ERalpha transcriptional regulatory plasticity. Here, we identify VAV3 as a critical component in this process.

    METHODS: A cell-based chemical compound screen was carried out to identify therapeutic strategies against resistance to endocrine therapy. Binding to ERalpha was evaluated by molecular docking analyses, an agonist fluoligand assay, and short-hairpin (sh) RNA-mediated protein depletion. Microarray analyses were performed to identify altered gene expression. Western blot of signaling and proliferation markers and shRNA-mediated protein depletion in viability and clonogenic assays were performed to delineate the role of VAV3. Genetic variation in VAV3 was assessed for association with the response to tamoxifen. Immunohistochemical analyses of VAV3 were carried out to determine the association with therapy response and different tumor markers. An analysis of gene expression association with drug sensitivity was carried out to identify a potential therapeutic approach based on differential VAV3 expression.

    RESULTS: The compound YC-1 was found to comparatively reduce the viability of cell models of acquired resistance. This effect was probably not due to activation of its canonical target (soluble guanylyl cyclase) but instead a result of binding to ERalpha. VAV3 was selectively reduced upon exposure to YC-1 or ERalpha depletion and, accordingly, VAV3 depletion comparatively reduced the viability of cell models of acquired resistance. In the clinical scenario, germline variation in VAV3 was associated with response to tamoxifen in Japanese breast cancer patients (rs10494071 combined P value = 8.4 x 10-4). The allele association combined with gene expression analyses indicated that low VAV3 expression predicts better clinical outcome. Conversely, high nuclear VAV3 expression in tumor cells was associated with poorer endocrine therapy response. Based on VAV3 expression levels and the response to erlotinib in cancer cell lines, targeting EGFR signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study proposes VAV3 as a biomarker and rationale signaling target to prevent and/or overcome resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 97.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Paulsson, Thomas
    Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Belgium.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Resource use and cost implications of implementing a heart failure program for patients with systolic heart failure in Swedish primary health care2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Heart failure (HF) is a common but serious condition which involves a significant economic burden on the health care economy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cost and quality of life (QoL) implications of implementing a HF management program (HFMP) in primary health care (PHC).

    Methods and results: This was a prospective randomized open-label study including 160 patientswith a diagnosis of HF from five PHC centers in south-eastern Sweden. Patients randomized to the intervention group received information about HF from HF nurses and from a validated computer-based awareness program. HF nurses and physicians followed the patients intensely in order to optimize HF treatment according to current guidelines. The patients in the control group were followed by their regular general practitioner (GP) and received standard treatment according to local management routines. No significant changes were observed in NYHA class and quality-adjusted life years (QALY), implying that functional class and QoL were preserved. However, costs for hospital care (HC) and PHC were reduced by EUR 2167, or 33%. The total cost was EUR 4471 in the intervention group and EUR 6638 in the control group.

    Conclusions: Introducing HFMP in Swedish PHC in patients with HF entails a significant reduction in resource utilization and costs, and maintains QoL. Based on these results, a broader implementation of HFMP in PHC may be recommended. However, results should be confirmed with extended follow-up to verify  long-term effects.

  • 98. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently carried out with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS). CMR is the gold standard for the evaluation of scar after myocardial infarction and MPS the clinical gold standard for ischemia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is at times difficult for patients and may induce anxiety while patient experience of MPS is largely unknown.

    Aims: To evaluate image quality in CMR with respect to the sequences employed, the influence of atrial fibrillation, myocardial perfusion and the impact of patient information. Further, to study patient experience in relation to MRI with the goal of improving the care of these patients.

    Method: Four study designs have been used. In paper I, experimental cross-over, paper (II) experimental controlled clinical trial, paper (III) psychometric crosssectional study and paper (IV) prospective intervention study. A total of 475 patients ≥ 18 years with primarily cardiac problems (I-IV) except for those referred for MRI of the spine (III) were included in the four studies.

    Result: In patients (n=20) with atrial fibrillation, a single shot steady state free precession (SS-SSFP) sequence showed significantly better image quality than the standard segmented inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) sequence (I). In first-pass perfusion imaging the gradient echo-echo planar imaging sequence (GREEPI) (n=30) had lower signal-to-noise and contrast–to-noise ratios than the steady state free precession sequence (SSFP) (n=30) but displayed a higher correlation with the MPS results, evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (II). The MRIAnxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ) was validated on patients, referred for MRI of either the spine (n=193) or the heart (n=54). The final instrument had 15 items divided in two factors regarding Anxiety and Relaxation. The instrument was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties (III). Patients who prior CMR viewed an information video scored significantly (lower) better in the factor Relaxation, than those who received standard information. Patients who underwent MPS scored lower on both factors, Anxiety and Relaxation. The extra video information had no effect on CMR image quality (IV).

    Conclusion: Single shot imaging in atrial fibrillation produced images with less artefact than a segmented sequence. In first-pass perfusion imaging, the sequence GRE-EPI was superior to SSFP. A questionnaire depicting anxiety during MRI showed that video information prior to imaging helped patients relax but did not result in an improvement in image quality.

    List of papers
    1. Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Image quality and myocardial scar size determined with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: a comparison of two imaging protocols
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, ISSN 1475-0961, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart generally requires breath holding and a regular rhythm. Single shot 2D steady-state free precession (SS_SSFP) is a fast sequence insensitive to arrhythmia as well as breath holding. Our purpose was to determine image quality, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios and infarct size with a fast single shot and a standard segmented MRI sequence in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation and chronic myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty patients with chronic myocardial infarction and ongoing atrial fibrillation were examined with inversion recovery SS_SSFP and segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo (IR_FGRE). Image quality was assessed in four categories: delineation of infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, occurrence of artefacts and overall image quality. SNR and CNR were calculated. Myocardial volume (ml) and infarct size, expressed as volume (ml) and extent (%), were calculated, and the methodological error was assessed. Results: SS_SSFP had significantly better quality scores in all categories (P = 0 center dot 037, P = 0 center dot 014, P = 0 center dot 021, P = 0 center dot 03). SNRinfarct and SNRblood were significantly better for IR_FGRE than for SS_SSFP (P = 0 center dot 048, P = 0 center dot 018). No significant difference was found in SNRmyocardium and CNR. The myocardial volume was significantly larger with SS_SSFP (170 center dot 7 versus 159 center dot 2 ml, P andlt; 0 center dot 001), but no significant difference was found in infarct volume and infarct extent. Conclusion: SS_SSFP displayed significantly better image quality than IR_FGRE. The infarct size and the error in its determination were equal for both sequences, and the examination time was shorter with SS_SSFP.

    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation, magnetic resonance imaging, myocardial infarction, segmented inversion recovery 2D fast gradient echo, single shot inversion recovery 2D steady-state free precession
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54159 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2009.00914.x (DOI)000274438800006 ()
    Available from: 2010-02-26 Created: 2010-02-26 Last updated: 2016-08-24
    2. An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keywords
    cardiac imaging techniques, coronary heart disease, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, nuclear medicine, perfusion
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Medical Image Processing Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130795 (URN)10.1111/cpf.12267 (DOI)000390688200008 ()26147785 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [12437]; Futurum, the County council of Jonkoping [12440, 81851, 217261]; Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland [281281]; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20120449]

    Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, p. 1368-1380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
    Keywords
    anxiety; instrument development; magnetic resonance imaging; nurse; nursing; reliability; validity
    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129145 (URN)10.1111/jan.12917 (DOI)000376007400014 ()26893007 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; Futurum County Council of Jonkoping

    Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28
    Download full text (pdf)
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 99.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping / Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Starck, Sven-Åke
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University / Department of Oncology, Hospital Physics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

  • 100.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Astma lathund: Astma hos vuxna2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Åtta till tio procent av den vuxna befolkningen har astma. Av dessa har 65 procent lindrig, 25 procent medelsvår och 10 procent svår astma. Astma är en heterogen sjukdom, där en kronisk luftvägsinflammation oftast föreligger.

    Sjukdomen kännetecknas av återkommande luftvägssymtom såsom pip i bröstet, andnöd, trånghetskänsla i bröstet och hosta som varierar över tiden tillsammans med en variabel luftvägsobstruktion.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Astma lathund: Astma hos vuxna
1234567 51 - 100 of 5781
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf