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  • 51.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Under the rainbow: migration, precarity and people power in post-apartheid South Africa2016In: Politics of precarity: migrant conditions, struggles and experiences / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup and Martin Bak Jørgensen, Leiden & Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 276-315Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bak Jørgensen, Martin
    Department of Culture and Global Studies CoMID - Center for the Study of Migration and Diversity, Aalborg Universitet, Danmark.
    From ‘Social Exclusion’ to ‘Precarity’. The becoming-migrant of labour: an introduction2016In: Politics of precarity: migrant conditions, struggles and experiences / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Martin Bak Jørgensen, Leiden & Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, 1, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bak Jørgensen, MartinInstitut for Kultur og Globale Studier, Aalborgs University, Denmark.
    Politics of precarity: migrant conditions, struggles and experiences2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Politics of Precarity: Migrant Conditions, Struggles and Experiences, edited by Carl-Ulrik Schierup and Martin Bak Jørgensen, the contributing authors look into precarity. Precarity has become a buzzword in as well academia as among activist. The book depicts precarity as being both a condition and a mobilizing force for resistance. The volume asks questions that investigate conditions and resistance across diverse cases such as first generation urbanites in China, migrant pensioners and unemployed youth in Sweden and Spain, refugees in Germany, irregular and regular migrants in Southern Europe, Turkey, Russia the United States and South Africa.

    Readership - Politics of Precarity is of interest for students and scholars within migration studies, sociology, social anthropology and political economy as well as people interested in the effects of neoliberalism.

    Table of contents

    1. From ‘Social Exclusion’ to ‘Precarity’. The Becoming Migrant of Labour. An IntroductionCarl-Ulrik Schierup and Martin Bak Jørgensen

    2. A Geneology of Precarity: A Toolbox for Rearticulating Fragmented Social Realities in and out of the WorkplaceMaribel Casas-Cortés

    3. The Precariat strikes back – precarity struggles in practiceMartin Bak Jørgensen

    4. The Precariat: A View from the SouthRonaldo Munck

    5. Turkey’s new precariat: Differentiated vulnerability and new alliancesNazli Senses

    6. Multiplex migration and axes of precarization: Swedish retirement migrants to Spain and their service providersAnna Gavanas and Ines Calzada

    7. Employment in crisis: Cyprus and the extension of precarityGregoris Ioannou

    8. Regulating Illegal Work in China: Immigration Law and Precarious Migrant StatusMimi Zou

    9. Running into nowhere: Educational migration in Beijing and the conundrum of social and existential mobilitySusanne Bregnbæk

    10. Necropolitics and the Migrant as a Political Subject of Disgust: The Precarious Everyday of Russia’s Labour MigrantsJohn Round and Irina Kuznetsova-Morenko

    11. Mobile commons and/in precarious spaces: Mapping migrant struggles and social resistanceNicos Trimikliniotis, Dimitris Parsanoglou & Vassilis Tsianos

    12. The Working Class and the city as Political Platform in New YorkPeter Schultz Jørgensen

    13. Under the Rainbow: Precarity and People Power in Post-Apartheid South Africa Carl-Ulrik Schierup

  • 54.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Delgado Wise, Raul
    Unidad Académica de Estudios de Desarrollo, Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Mexico.
    Rother, Stefan
    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Postscript: The global compact for migration: what road from Marrakech?2019In: Migration, civil society and global governance / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Branka Likić-Brborić, Raúl Delgado Wise, Gülay Toksöz, Abingdon and New York (NY): Routledge, 2019, p. 156-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chapters in this volume have followed different fora and deliberations on the global governance of migration initiated by the UN High Level Dialogue on Migration and Development (UNHLD) in 2006 up till and including the summit of the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD) in Berlin 2017. The focus of the book is on the impact of civil society groups and organizations on these processes concerned with the formulation of an overall normative framework for the governance of migration.

    This postscript addresses venues taking place after the Berlin GFMD. It revolves around the idea of ‘invited’ versus ‘invented’ spaces (Chapters 2, 6 and 7). Invited spaces stand for positions and platforms occupied by civil society organizations (CSOs) or non-governmental organizations (NGOs), embodied in a general neoliberal idea of ‘participatory governance’ in terms of state–market–civil society partnerships. Invented spaces are in contrast organizational and ideopolitical positions or counterhegemonic platforms occupied by contestative movements which through their collective action confront the status quo (Chapter 6). In the present text invited spaces refer to civil society groups in their position as participants within intergovernmental and international fora for deliberation on migration management. Invented spaces refer to independent civil society platforms for the development of strategies and action aimed at inclusive social, labour, citizenship and human rights of migrants.

    rom this perspective we relate in the following to the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) agreed upon by governments on an intergovernmental conference 10–11 December 2018 in Marrakech and formally adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 19 December 2018.1 Our focus is on civil society’s perceptions of the GCM, and potentials for following up intentions of the compact through ‘invited spaces’ for dialogue with governments and international organizations on the road from Marrakech. We continue with a short presentation of professed ‘invented spaces’ for solidarity mobilization of social movements and their strategies for social inclusion: the People’s Global Action on Migration, Development and Human Rights (PGA), the Permanent Peoples Tribunal (PPT), La Via Campesina, Churches Witnessing With Migrants (CWWM) and the World Social Forum on Migration (WSFM).

  • 55.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Delgado Wise, Raul
    Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Estudios de Desarrollo, Zacatecas, Mexico.
    Toksöz, Gülay
    Department of Labor Economics and Industrial Relations, Ankara University, Turkey.
    Migration, civil society and global governance: an introduction to the global issue2019In: Migration, civil society and global governance / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Branka Likić-Brborić, Raúl Delgado Wise, Gülay Toksöy, Abingdon and New York (NY): Routledge, 2019, p. 3-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses dilemmas of global civic activism from a neo-Gramscianperspective as both subordinated and a potential challenge to hegemonicneoliberal order. With the investigational focus on the People’s Global Actionon Migration, Development and Human Rights (PGA) event, the space forcivic activism relating to the intergovernmental Global Forum on Migrationand Development (GFMD) and its associated Civil Society Days and CommonSpace is analysed. The article asks how the future of PGA activism may beinfluenced by its formalized representation within the GFMD. It posits thatthe PGA has landed at a crossroad between becoming a global activistcounterhegemonic movement to a dominant neoliberal migration policy andbeing captured in a tokenist subordinated inclusion within a truncated‘invited space’ for interchange. This ambiguous position jeopardizes itsimpact on global migration governance, discussed with reference to theoriesof transversal politics and issues of counterhegemonic alliance-building.

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  • 56.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Likic-Brboric, Branka
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Delgado Wise, Raul
    Academic Unit in Development Studies, Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Mexico.
    Toksöz, Gülay
    Labour Economics and Industrial Relations, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Migration, civil society and global governance: An introduction to the special issue2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 733-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current special issue examines the development of an emerging globalgovernance on migration and the spaces, roles, strategies and alliancemakingof a composite transnational civil society engaged in issues of rightsand the protection of migrants and their families. This question is connectedwith how different actors – the United Nations, international organizations,governments and a wide variety of civil society organizations and regionaland global trade unions – perceive the root causes of migration, globalinequality and options for sustainable development. The contributionsincluded in the special issue interrogate from different perspectives thepositionality and capacity of civil society to influence the Global Forum forMigration and Development. They examine the opportunities and challengesfaced by civil society in its endeavor to promote a rights-based approachwithin international and intergovernmental fora engaged in setting up aglobal compact for the management of migration and in other global policyspaces.

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  • 57.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Likić-Brborić, BrankaLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Delgado Wise, RaulDevelopment Studies, Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Mexico.Toksöz, GülayDepartment of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations at Ankara University, Turkey.
    Migration, Civil Society and Global Governance2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do the United Nations, international organizations, governments, corporate actors and a wide variety of civil society organizations and regional and global trade unions perceive the root causes of migration, global inequality and options for sustainable development? This is one of the most pertinent political questions of the 21st century.

    This comprehensive collection examines the development of an emerging global governance on migration with the focus on spaces, roles, strategies and alliance-making of a composite transnational civil society engaged in issues of rights and the protection of migrants and their families. It reveals the need to strengthen networking and convergence among movements that adopt different entry points to the same struggle, from fighting ‘managed’ migration to contesting corporate control of food and land. The authors examine the opportunities and challenges faced by civil society in its endeavour to promote a rights-based approach within international and intergovernmental fora engaged in setting up a global compact for the management of migration, such as the Global Forum for Migration and Development, and in other global policy spaces.

    This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Globalizations.

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  • 58.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO – Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Munck, Ronaldo
    Civic Engagement, Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Likić-Brborić, Branka
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO – Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introduction: Migration, Precarity and Global Governance: Challenges and Opportunities for Labour2015In: Migration, Precarity and Global Governance: Challenges and Opportunities for Labour / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Ronaldo Munck, Branka Likić-Brborić & Anders Neergaard, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, 1, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory editorial chapter paints the background to current issues of international migration, unfree labour, racialization, and changing frameworks of citizenship. The theoretical basis for this chapter is drawn from a modified view of the writings of Karl Polanyi. Using the notion of ‘precarity’ as a central concept, the editors analyse the prospects for a contemporary ‘double movement’ which challenges the commodification of labour under conditions of neoliberal globalization. The introduction summarizes and discusses the content of the book’s fifteen chapters in the light of this perspective, and posits a discussion of human rights as a stratagem for today’s labour movements. It makes a case for bringing the labour movement back in, through debates on migration, migrants’ working conditions, the organization of labour, and the utopia of social justice in a post-neoliberal era.

  • 59.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Munck, RonaldoDublin City University, Ireland.Likić-Brborić, BrankaLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.Neergaard, AndersLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Migration, Precarity, and Global Governance: Challenges and Opportunities for Labour2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For too long the movement of labour and the labour movement have been studied in splendid isolation. This volume addresses their intersection. Karl Polanyi’s intuition that history moves through a double movement of disembedding under market rule followed by re-embedding under societal control underlies the overall argument. In different, but complementary, ways the book’s 15 chapters address migration and precarious work along with diverse social movement responses beyond ‘North’ and ‘South’. An interdisciplinary and comparative approach emphasizes the complexity of historically grounded social relations. The first part of the book presents five complementary perspectives on the political economy of migration, labour and citizenship. Part two analyses labour unions’ historical relations with migrant workers and the current changes in their orientation and approaches to organisation of, with or by migrants, immigrants and new ethnic minorities. Part three discusses alternative global norms and institutional propositions by international organisations as they relate to an incipient global framework for the governance of migration. It examines states’ and regional organisations’ subscriptions to international human, labour and migrants’ rights and it discusses these powerful actors’ accountability for the actual implementation of these rights. Its four chapters explore, in detail, the standpoints of trade unions, migrant organisations and other organisations and movements of civil society vis-à-vis an emerging normative framework for the global governance of migration, and enquire into the actual possibilities of civil society impacting on the implementation of human rights claims and codes of corporate social responsibility.

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  • 60.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Scarpa, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Migration: ett hot mot välfärden?2018In: Nation i ombildning: essäer om 2000-talets Sverige / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup och Anders Neergaard, Stockholm: Boréa Bokförlag, 2018, 1, p. 31-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den svenska samhällsekonomiska modellensupplösning under 2000-talet har följts av en djup politisk kris. Det är enkris som har tagits till intäkt för den upprepade berättelsen om liberalt präglad invandrings- och mångfaldspolitik som misslyckat experiment. Författarna ifrågasätter denna berättelse genom attvända på argumentet om det negativa förhållandet mellan migrationoch välfärdsstatlig solidaritet. De hävdar således att det främst är deneuropeiska och svenska åtstramningspolitiken som sedan tidigt 90-talhar undergrävt samhällets socialpolitiska integrationspotential, skapat fördjupade etniskt präglade klasskillnader, permanentat social exkluderingav stora befolkningsgrupper från sociala och medborgerliga rättigheter,samt i sin konsekvens medfört bristande solidaritet kring välfärdsstatens institutioner.

  • 61.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reimagineering the Common in Precarious Times2018In: Journal of Intercultural Studies, ISSN 0725-6868, E-ISSN 1469-9540, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 207-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores movements for social transformation in precarious times of austerity, dispossessed commons and narrow nationalism; movements counterpoised to an exhausted neoliberalism on the one hand, and a neoconservative xenophobic populism on the other. Applying ‘rainbow coalition’ as generic concept it points at contours of a globally extended countermovement for social transformation, traversing ‘race’, class and gender, driven by reimaginings of the commons and indicating how they could be repossessed and democratically ruled; that is ‘reimagineered’). A multisited enquiry explores how actors express their claims as activist citizens under varying conditions and constellations, and if/how discourses and practices from different locations and at different scales inform each other. It interrogates whether there may be an actual equivalence of outlook, objective and strategy of ostensibly homologous contending movements which develop under varying local, national and regional circumstances in contemporary communities riveted by schisms of class, ‘race’/ethnicity and gender, occupied by the ‘migration’ issue and challenged by popular demands for social sustainability. The paper contributes to social theory by linking questions posed by critics of ‘post-politics’ concerning contingences of pluralist democracy and revitalised politics of civil society, to precarity studies focused on globalisation and the changing conditions of citizenship, labour and livelihoods.

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  • 62.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nation i ombildning2018In: Nation i ombildning: Essäer om 2000-talets Sverige / [ed] Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup och Anders Neergaard, Stockholm: Boréa Bokförlag, 2018, 1, p. 7-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har länge betraktats som en demokratisk förebild och ett öppet och solidariskt välfärdssamhälle. Under 2000-talet har social ojämlikhet och boendesegregering ökat, åtföljd av rasism och en allt mer restriktiv flyktingpolitik. Sverige är en nation i ombildning. Åtstramningspolitik och högerpopulism har fått bred förankring i partipolitiken. Samtidigt uppstår motrörelser, där civilsamhälleliga aktörer kräver en fördjupad demokrati och social rättvisa. Vi står inför ett skifte. Kommer en nyliberal ekonomisk politik att smälta samman med en auktoritär, rasistisk populism? Eller är de nya rörelserna en öppning mot ett mer inkluderande, jämlikt och rättvist samhälle, där visionen för framtiden byggs på hopp och optimism — inte rädsla och hot?

  • 63.
    Smith, Joel B.
    et al.
    Stratus Consulting, PO Box 4059, Boulder, CO 80302, USA.
    Dickinson, Thea
    Burton Dickinson Consulting Ltd, 204-600 Kingston Road, Toronto, Ontario M4E 1R1, Canada.
    Donahue, Joseph D.B.
    Stratus Consulting, 1920 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA.
    Burton, Ian
    University of Toronto, 26 St. Anne’s Road, Toronto M6J 2C1, Canada / International Institute for Environment and Development, 3 Endsleigh Street, London WC1H ODD, UK.
    Haites, Erik
    Margaree Consultants Inc., 120 Adelaide Street West, Toronto M5H 1T1, Canada.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Kra ̈ftriket 2B, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patwardhan, Anand
    S.J. Mehta School of Management, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Development and climate change adaptation funding: coordination and integration2011In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 987-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within a few decades, tens of billions, and possibly over a hundred billion, dollars will be needed for climate change adaptation in developing countries. In recent international climate negotiations, US$100 billion per year by 2020 was pledged by developed countries for mitigation and adaptation. Even if this pledge is realized, it is not clear that it will generate sufficient funds to address the adaptation needs of developing countries. A majority of what has been identified as climate change adaptation needs could be considered as funding for basic development. In addition, a large share of current development assistance is spent on climate-sensitive projects. With the potential for funding of climate change adaptation to fall short of what is needed and for development funding to continue funding many climate-sensitive activities, coordination of the two funding streams may enable more effective support for both sustainable development and climate change adaptation. Preliminary steps to facilitate such coordination are part of the Cancun Agreements and initiatives by other organizations.

  • 64.
    Sovacool, Benjamin
    et al.
    Vermont Law School, USA.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    The Political Economy of Climate Change Adaptation2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on concepts in political economy, political ecology, justice theory, and critical development studies, the authors offer the first comprehensive, systematic exploration of the ways in which adaptation projects can produce unintended, undesirable results.

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  • 65.
    Stanojcic, Ana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Inkluderande partnerskap för långsiktig utveckling?: En diskursanalys av hur bilder av väst kontra ”de andra” konstrueras och gestaltas i OECD dokument2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande uppsats syftar till att synliggöra hur diskursiva bilder kring utveckling och partnerskap gestaltas och konstrueras i tre dokument utgivna av Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development. Ett särskilt fokus riktas till hur relationer mellan OECD, multinationella företag och de utvecklingsländer företagen är verksamma i, gestaltas i dokumenten. Genom att synliggöra särdrag i diskursen kring utveckling och partnerskap finns förhoppningen att se om och hur, utifrån ett postkolonialt perspektiv bilder av ”väst” kontra ”de andra” produceras.

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  • 66.
    Stenekvist, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science.
    Terrorismens uppkomst: En studie av terroruppkomsten i Israel/Palestinakonflikten2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an analytical framework for the study of terrorism, and secondly to apply it on the Israel/Palestine conflict. To achieve the first purpose, I examined the history and background of the conflict. The purpose of the study has been achieved by using a qualitative text analysis.

    The questions that were requested answers in this study are:

    - What are the main reasons that might trigger terrorism?- What are the main reasons that might triggered the terrorism in this case?

    The outcome of this study is that the cause-factors to the terrorism appearance is modernisation and urbanisation, social tolerance of political violence, revolutionary ideologies and beliefs, powerless states and state response, the lack of political participation and minorities and terror-leader dissatisfaction. I developed the theory that I used and added other factors like occupation, strive for independence and self-sufficiency, and other like the diplomatic impasse, provocative event and religion that have characterised the conflict from the beginning.

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  • 67.
    Ståhlgren, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Skärvall, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    En värld i förändring: En litteraturstudie om utbildning för hållbar utveckling och deliberativa samtal i den svenska gymnasieskolan2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den svenska gymnasieskolans läroplan understryker att undervisning ska ge elever de väsentliga insikter som krävs för att förstå hur de själva kan främja en hållbar utveckling (Skolverket 2011: 7). Denna litteraturstudie syftar huvudsakligen till att undersöka huruvida implementeringen av utbildning för hållbar utveckling har främjat elevers förståelse för hållbar utveckling. Ett ytterligare delsyfte är att analysera deliberativa samtal som undervisningsmetod kopplat till hållbar utveckling. Syftet besvaras genom två preciserade frågeställningar.

    De vetenskapliga artiklar som används i denna studie riktar sig i synnerhet mot den svenska gymnasieskolans verksamhet och all insamlad data har analyserats genom en kvalitativ innehållsanalys. Uppsatsen utgår ifrån teorin om deliberativa samtal som undervisningsmetod men tar också avstamp i den normativa, faktabaserade och pluralistiska lärandetraditionen.

    Studien visar att implementeringen av utbildning för hållbar utveckling inte har resulterat i att elever signifikant ökat sin förståelse för hållbar utveckling. Denna studie påvisar dock att det deliberativa samtalet kan bidra till elevers förståelse för hållbar utveckling i den bemärkelsen att det ökar elevers kommunikationsförmåga, förståelse för andras perspektiv och engagemang. Vidare visar studien att det deliberativa samtalet uppfyller många kriterier för den pluralistiska undervisningstraditionen. Detta indikerar att metoden kan bidra till en förståelse för hållbar utveckling och att den således kan vara ett alternativ vid undervisning för hållbar utveckling.

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  • 68.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmquist, Carin
    Department of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Klinthäll, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Centre for Local Government Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Entrepreneurial dynamics in the third age - a study of trajectories for start-ups by entrepreneurs aged 55 and 60.2019In: Handbook of Research on Entrepreneurship and Aging / [ed] Mikaela Backman, Charlie Karlsson and Orsa Kekezi,, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, ch 15, p. 143-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Thörnquist, Annette
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    Law and Order or Social Dumping in the Road Haulage Industry?2019In: Truckers: A profession in change / [ed] Mikael Ottosson & Hans Wallengren, Landskrona: Centrum för Arbetarhistoria , 2019, p. 12-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Law and Order or Social Dumping in the Road Haulage Industry?
  • 70.
    Tlostanova, Madina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Decolonizing east european memory: between postdependence traumas and neo-imperial obsessions2016In: The New Heroes-The Old Victims: Politics of Memory in Russia and the Baltics / [ed] Igors Gubenko, Deniss Hanovs, Vladiskavs Malahovskis, Zinatne, 2016, 1, p. 16-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Tomas, Cusicanqui
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science.
    Assessing the adaptive capacity of Sweden's environmental governance2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Different challenges arising from increasingly uncertain and unpredictable environmental and economicconditions have been shifting the focus of public governance and socio-economic development. Morerecently, empirical studies have demonstrated a transitional epoch in which humanity is currently in: TheAnthropocene, as well as its harmful effects that degrade the biosphere, and thus our economic, political,social well-being. The casual dynamics of climate change and its impacts on life-supporting ecosystemshas increasingly been recognized by a resilient approach which incorporates adaptive processes andschemes, allowing public governance to embrace the changes rather than control uncertainty. Thisresearch introduces the interwoven concepts of adaptive capacity, adaptive governance, and resiliencewithin a social and environmental framework. It provides a review of how these concepts support aparadigm shift to mitigating current and future challenges—understood through a multidisciplinaryapproach, and how scholars have sought to develop a blueprint to improve the need to foster and mobilizeadaptive capacity within the governance of the commons. In Sweden, key governmental and businessleaders have shown the ability to foster environmental governance that is capable of developing analternative form of planning, implementing, and managing public policy. Moreover, Sweden’s concertedmultilevel governance and public policy efforts have promoted an all-encompassing generational, mainlythrough: coordinated environmental policies and private, public, and civil society partnerships. Theseinitiatives have led to innovative technologies and projects (e.g. urban vertical farming technology) as wellas cross collaboration and integration of companies and industries in order to achieve economic, social,and environmentally symbiosis.

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  • 72.
    Trönnberg, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    State Regulation of Anti-Democratic Parties: A Comparative Study of Germany, Spain and Sweden2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to study state regulation of anti-democratic parties, i.e. party regulation. The term ‘Party regulation’ refers to laws that may regulate the activities and behavior of political parties. This thesis uses a comparative method, conducted on three European countries which regulate anti-democratic parties differently. The cases studied are Germany, Spain and Sweden.The basis for understanding state regulation of anti-democratic parties rests on a historical institutionalist perspective along with theories of democratic tolerance. The analysis reveals that states regulate anti-democratic parties differently as a result of their historical past which has made them adopt different ideas of how political parties should be seen. Further, the analysis shows that there is no connection between the party regulation adopted and the effect it has on the anti-democratic parties.

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    Frida Trönnberg Master's Thesis
  • 73. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Upadhyaya, Prabhat
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    National Appropriateness of International Climate Policy Frameworks in India, Brazil, and South Africa2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How does the international climate policy frameworks influence the domestic institutional responses to climate mitigation in emerging economies? And how, in turn, do domestic institutions and politics in emerging economies influence the fate of international climate policy frameworks? The thesis provides answers to these questions by studying domestic engagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in three emerging economies – India, Brazil, and South Africa. The thesis specifically studies how these engagements were influenced by the domestic institutional context provided by national climate policy, norms, and institutional capacity in the three countries. Drawing upon the variations in the engagements with nationally appropriate mitigation actions, made visible by use of the policy cycle as a heuristic device, the thesis informs the implementation of another nascent, yet prevalent, international climate policy framework – Nationally Determined Contributions. The thesis identifies how engagements with nationally appropriate mitigation actions varied in India, Brazil, and South Africa in agenda-setting, policy formulation, decision-making, implementation, and evaluation. In cases where international support is considered crucial for taking mitigation actions, external factors such as lack of clarity on definitional aspects and availability of international support can hamper the prospects of such frameworks at the agenda-setting and policy formulation stages. Efforts to engage with these frameworks under this uncertainty are held back by non-decisions, overriding national climate policy, as well as by uneven inter-ministerial coordination. The thesis argues that successful implementation of upcoming Nationally Determined  Contributions will be influenced by a country’s ability to align them with its national climate policy, localization of the transnational norms, and the extent to which efforts to enhance institutional capacity for  coordinating the implementation of national climate policy are made. In sum, the effective implementation of International Climate Policy Frameworks will be dependent on the willingness of the state to  provide oversight and coordination, and clarity on the availability of international support.

    List of papers
    1. Developments in national climate change mitigation legislation and strategy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developments in national climate change mitigation legislation and strategy
    2013 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 649-664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The results are presented from a survey of national legislation and strategies to mitigate climate change covering almost all United Nations member states between 2007 and 2012. This data set is distinguished from the existing literature in its breadth of coverage, its focus on national policies (rather than international pledges), and on the use of objective metrics rather than normative criteria. The focus of the data is limited to national climate legislation and strategies and does not cover subnational or sectoral measures. Climate legislation and strategies are important because they can: enhance incentives for climate mitigation; provide mechanisms for mainstreaming; and provide a focal point for actors. Three broad findings emerge. First, there has been a substantial increase in climate legislation and strategies between 2007 and 2012: 67% of global GHG emissions are now under national climate legislation or strategy compared to 45% in 2007. Second, there are substantial regional effects to the patterns, with most increases in non-Annex I countries, particularly in Asia and Latin America. Third, many more countries have adopted climate strategies than have adopted climate legislation between 2007 and 2012. The article concludes with recommendations for future research.Policy relevance The increase in climate legislation and strategy is significant. This spread suggests that, at the national level, there is some movement in reshaping climate governance despite the relatively slow pace of global negotiations, although the exact implications of this spread require further research on stringency of actions and their implementation. Asia and Latin America represent the biggest improvements, while OECD countries, which start from a high base, remain relatively stagnant. Implications of regional patterns are further refined by an analysis by emissions, which shows that some areas of low levels of legislation and strategy are also areas of relatively low emissions. A broad trend toward an emphasis on strategies rather than legislation, with the significant exception of China, calls for enhanced research into the practical impact of national non-binding climate strategies versus binding legislation on countries' actual emissions over time.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis, 2013
    Keywords
    Climate change, domestic policy instruments, national policies, policy measures, public policy
    National Category
    Climate Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99869 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2013.845409 (DOI)000325845100001 ()
    Projects
    GoVNAMAs - Phase I
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency
    Available from: 2013-10-22 Created: 2013-10-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Aligning Climate Policy with National Interest: Disengagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in South Africa
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aligning Climate Policy with National Interest: Disengagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in South Africa
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 463-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) were proposed as a policy framework that could provide middle ground for meeting both the development and mitigation objectives in developing countries. While South Africa engaged actively with the NAMA terminology in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, its engagement at the domestic level has been rather lacklus- tre. This presents an interesting paradox. The paper studies the interplay of international norms embodied in NAMAs with South Africa’s domestic policy process. Disengagement and contestation around NAMAs in South Africa is played out at three stages: decision- making stage where the symptoms surrounding this contestation first emerge; policy for- mulation stage where NAMAs have to not only align with the National Development Plan but also compete with a predilection for domestically familiar terminology of flagships under the national climate policy; and finally the broader agenda-setting stage of policy process, where NAMAs have to prove useful in not only pursuing the developmental state agenda but also in tackling the underlying material factors that represent country’s economic dependency on fossil fuels. NAMAs faced combined resistance from ideas and interests in various degrees at all these stages resulting in their disengagement.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
    Keywords
    Climate Policy, South Africa, Domestic Politics, International Relations, Policy process, NAMA
    National Category
    Climate Research Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124580 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2016.1138402 (DOI)000381299800005 ()
    Projects
    GoverningNAMAs: Phase 2 -- Enhancing design and support for low-carbon trajectories
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, P35462-2
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Energy Agency (Energimyndigheten) [P35462-2]

    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
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    National Appropriateness of International Climate Policy Frameworks in India, Brazil, and South Africa
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  • 74.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cross-Cultural Challenges in Product Realization Process2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With increased global competition, companies need to diversify their product realization process to gain advantages offered by different geographical areas. However, different cultural backgrounds of people and companies situated around the world can lead to challenges in crosscultural collaboration. Taking into account the whole product realization process, this thesis focuses on the three main areas of the product realization research field: product development, product introduction, and production ramp-up/serial production. The aim is to identify crosscultural challenges in the product realization process and contribute to knowledge on possible strategies facilitating a cross-cultural collaboration.

    This thesis is based on a qualitative research approach. First, a systematic literature review was conducted to explore the research field and gain more understanding regarding challenges in cross-cultural human collaboration. Then, case study methodology was adopted to explore cross-cultural transfer of management concepts and possible strategies to facilitate crosscultural human collaboration.

    Results reveal that cross-cultural challenges exist both directly, when people from different cultural backgrounds work together, and indirectly, when management concepts are transferred across cultural contexts. In the case of human collaboration, different cultures lead to crosscultural challenges such as misunderstanding, tensions at work, difficulties in communication and knowledge transfer as well as a mismatch in resource planning and control. Regarding transfer of management concepts, there is a cultural imprint in management concepts causing challenges when they are implemented in a different culture. However, this is a two-way adaptation in which both the organization and some principles of the management concepts can be adapted to better fit with each other during the implementation process.

    The study also suggests that Quality Management is a possible strategy to mitigate crosscultural challenges in human collaboration. Quality Management may serve as a guideline to establish working procedures to facilitate collaboration and help employees overcome cultural boundaries.

    List of papers
    1. The Influences of National Culture on Product Development and Industrialization: A Systematic Literature Review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Influences of National Culture on Product Development and Industrialization: A Systematic Literature Review
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased globalization provides both opportunities and challenges. It requires the development of new means of collaboration within cross-national functional groups, processes, and projects related to product development and industrialization (PD&I). The objective of this paper is to review the relevant research on national cultural issues in the context of multicultural collaborations in PD&I. Findings are reported concerning national cultures, cultural challenges, and key findings show that previous research is mostly a comparison of different national cultures in a specific phase of PD&I. The review reveals that most studies have looked at crosscultural issues related to product development rather than industrialization. Furthermore, Power Distance, Individual vs. Group Identity, and relation to time and environment are considered to be key cultural factors that influence global collaboration, as they have impact on the innovative knowledge transfer process. Further research is suggested to examine cultural issues in relation to all aspects of PD&I, especially the industrialization process, which has only been the subject of a few research studies. A need to further explore cultural effects in the PD&I research field has also been identified. Future research should address how to utilize, integrate, and operationalize culture research into a wide span of business practices in different phases of the PD&I.

    Keywords
    Cross-cultural, organizational performance, international collaboration, product realization
    National Category
    Economics and Business Globalisation Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122732 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    2. Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development: Experiences from a Swedish Perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development: Experiences from a Swedish Perspective
    2014 (English)In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lean principles and methods, originating in a Japanese cultural context, have spread to a large number of companies throughout the world. The aim of this case study research is to identify and compare national cultural aspects that influence Lean Production and Lean Product Development implementation in Swedish companies. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and an industrial workshop with Swedish Lean practitioners. The study shows that some sub-areas in Lean, such as value definition, control systems, leadership, team development, knowledge management, and strategies, are highly dependent on contextual factors related to human, cultural and organizational aspects. These are related to the national culture and should be considered to a higher extent for successful sustainable implementation of Lean in different cultural contexts. As for implementing Lean in Sweden, national cultural characteristics, such as individualism, autonomy and supportive management style fit well with Lean thinking.

    Keywords
    National cultural characteristics; organizational development; case study
    National Category
    Economics and Business Globalisation Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122733 (URN)10.12776/qip.v18i1.321 (DOI)
    Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Quality management – a means to bridge cultural differences?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality management – a means to bridge cultural differences?
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of the paper is to explore how quality management (QM) principles can be used to mitigate cross-cultural challenges in new product introduction across national borders.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – Data for this longitudinal case study were collected through semi-structured interviews in the planning phase, during and after a product introduction involving one Swedish and one Chinese company. In total, 35 interviews were conducted with employees and managers from several organizational functions in Sweden and China.

    Findings – Several challenges in the collaboration project were revealed that affected the product realization process. The study showed that QM dimensions may be used to handle the cross-cultural challenges. Strategy and leadership are essential in terms of top management support to set a high priority for the cross-cultural collaboration projects. The study demonstrated that lack of understanding of cultural differences negatively affected the product realization process and product quality, and that these outcomes could be mitigated by a QM approach. The means that may be used include continuous improvements, the development of measurement systems and the use of checklists. Employee development and involvement, finally, is an important QM dimension for cross-cultural management in order to set the same understanding and standards throughout the whole project.

    Practical implications – The results demonstrate the strong need to take a systematic approach to work on quality issues in cross-cultural collaboration contexts. Furthermore the study shows that specific attention needs to be paid to understanding cultural differences, as these may have significant impact on quality outcome. Knowledge about cultural characteristics should be integrated in the QM model and tools to mitigate cross-cultural challenges.

    Originality/Value of paper – This paper proposes the possibility of using quality management as a means to mitigate cultural challenges in cross-cultural product introduction.

    Keywords
    Cross-cultural, new product introduction, Sweden-China, QM
    National Category
    Economics and Business Globalisation Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122734 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
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  • 75.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF, Department of Product Realization, Mölndal, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems. Department of Product and Production Development, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quality management – a means to bridge cultural differences?2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of the paper is to explore how quality management (QM) principles can be used to mitigate cross-cultural challenges in new product introduction across national borders.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – Data for this longitudinal case study were collected through semi-structured interviews in the planning phase, during and after a product introduction involving one Swedish and one Chinese company. In total, 35 interviews were conducted with employees and managers from several organizational functions in Sweden and China.

    Findings – Several challenges in the collaboration project were revealed that affected the product realization process. The study showed that QM dimensions may be used to handle the cross-cultural challenges. Strategy and leadership are essential in terms of top management support to set a high priority for the cross-cultural collaboration projects. The study demonstrated that lack of understanding of cultural differences negatively affected the product realization process and product quality, and that these outcomes could be mitigated by a QM approach. The means that may be used include continuous improvements, the development of measurement systems and the use of checklists. Employee development and involvement, finally, is an important QM dimension for cross-cultural management in order to set the same understanding and standards throughout the whole project.

    Practical implications – The results demonstrate the strong need to take a systematic approach to work on quality issues in cross-cultural collaboration contexts. Furthermore the study shows that specific attention needs to be paid to understanding cultural differences, as these may have significant impact on quality outcome. Knowledge about cultural characteristics should be integrated in the QM model and tools to mitigate cross-cultural challenges.

    Originality/Value of paper – This paper proposes the possibility of using quality management as a means to mitigate cultural challenges in cross-cultural product introduction.

  • 76.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Department of Production System Development, Swerea IVF, Mölnda l, Sweden.
    Gullander, Per
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development: Experiences from a Swedish Perspective2014In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean principles and methods, originating in a Japanese cultural context, have spread to a large number of companies throughout the world. The aim of this case study research is to identify and compare national cultural aspects that influence Lean Production and Lean Product Development implementation in Swedish companies. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and an industrial workshop with Swedish Lean practitioners. The study shows that some sub-areas in Lean, such as value definition, control systems, leadership, team development, knowledge management, and strategies, are highly dependent on contextual factors related to human, cultural and organizational aspects. These are related to the national culture and should be considered to a higher extent for successful sustainable implementation of Lean in different cultural contexts. As for implementing Lean in Sweden, national cultural characteristics, such as individualism, autonomy and supportive management style fit well with Lean thinking.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 77.
    Wangwacharakul, Promporn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gullander, Per
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems, Department of Product and Production Development, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influences of National Culture on Product Development and Industrialization: A Systematic Literature ReviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased globalization provides both opportunities and challenges. It requires the development of new means of collaboration within cross-national functional groups, processes, and projects related to product development and industrialization (PD&I). The objective of this paper is to review the relevant research on national cultural issues in the context of multicultural collaborations in PD&I. Findings are reported concerning national cultures, cultural challenges, and key findings show that previous research is mostly a comparison of different national cultures in a specific phase of PD&I. The review reveals that most studies have looked at crosscultural issues related to product development rather than industrialization. Furthermore, Power Distance, Individual vs. Group Identity, and relation to time and environment are considered to be key cultural factors that influence global collaboration, as they have impact on the innovative knowledge transfer process. Further research is suggested to examine cultural issues in relation to all aspects of PD&I, especially the industrialization process, which has only been the subject of a few research studies. A need to further explore cultural effects in the PD&I research field has also been identified. Future research should address how to utilize, integrate, and operationalize culture research into a wide span of business practices in different phases of the PD&I.

  • 78.
    Watkiss, Paul
    et al.
    Paul Watkiss Associates, Oxford, UK.
    Benzie, Magnus
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klein, Richard J T
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The complementarity and comparability of climate change adaptation and mitigation2015In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 541-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both mitigation and adaptation can reduce the risks of climate change. This study reviews the complementarity and comparability between the two, looking first at the global level and then at the national-to-local domain. At the global level, the review finds differing definitions and viewpoints exist in the literature. Much of the economic literature reports that global mitigation and adaptation are substitutes (in economic terms). In contrast, the scientific literature considers them to be complementary (in policy terms), as they address different risks that vary temporally and spatially. The degree of complementarity and comparability therefore depends on the perspective taken, although there is a policy space where the two can overlap. However, the governance, institutional, and policy-based literature identifies that even if a global mitigation and adaptation mix could be defined, it would be highly contentious and extremely difficult to deliver in practice. The review then considers the complementarity and comparability of mitigation and adaptation at the national-to-local domain, in national policy and at sector level. The review finds there is greater potential for complementarity at this scale, although possible conflicts can also exist. However, the institutional, governance, and policy literature identifies a number of barriers to practical implementation, and as a result, complementary mitigation and adaptation action is unlikely to happen autonomously. Finally, the lessons from the review are drawn together to highlight policy relevant issues and identify research gaps. WIREs Clim Change 2015, 6:541–557. doi: 10.1002/wcc.368This article is categorized under: * Integrated Assessment of Climate Change > Methods of Integrated Assessment of Climate Change * The Carbon Economy and Climate Mitigation > Benefits of Mitigation * Climate and Development > Sustainability and Human Well-Being

  • 79.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    En bok som utmanar2018In: Ett smartare samhälle?: Sju perspektiv på digitaliseringen av vår vardag / [ed] Lotta Gröning och Elin Whilborg, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, 1, p. 155-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Med denna bok har vi ur olika perspektiv belyst hur vi kan förstå digitaliseringens samhällsförändring. Vi har rört oss från folkhemmets teknikbyggen för demokrati, öppenhet och innovation, till dagens politik för bredbandsutbyggnad i glesbygd. Det visar på behovet av politisk styrning av tekniken i samhället.

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    En bok som utmanar
  • 80.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tillit till staten i digitala relationer2018In: Ett smartare samhälle?: Sju perspektiv på digitaliseringen av vår vardag / [ed] Lotta Gröning och Elin Whilborg, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, 1, p. 52-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tillit till staten är avgörande för en fungerande demokrati. Det bygger bland annat på mötet med tjänstemän. Den tillitsbaserade styrningen måste även gälla de digitala tjänster som brukare och medborgare möter. Digitala tjänster är en slags robotar. Men hur skapar vi tillit till robotarna när de utför sitt arbete i statens och samhällets tjänst?

    Download full text (pdf)
    Tillit till staten i digitala relationer
  • 81.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.
    Austerity and the Demise of Social Europe: The Baltic Model versus the European Social Model2016In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 78-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws on the experience of the imposition of radical austerity measures in the Baltic states. It challenges the myth that austerity can be achieved in a socially and economically ‘costless’ manner. Baltic-style austerity has now become a template of ‘successful adjustment’ and a recipe for recovery of the Eurozone. The authors argue contra such ‘myth-making’ that austerity is compromising the longer run sustainability of societies that follow this path, while simultaneously ending prospects of the adhesion of a European ‘Social Model’ in the post-communist periphery. The article is a contribution to an emerging debate in academic and policy circles concerning the viability and future of Europe’s ‘Social Model’ in an age of austerity.

  • 82.
    Woolfson, Charles
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sommers, Jeffrey
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.
    Conclusion: The neoliberal Baltic austerity model against Social Europe2014In: The Contradictions of Austerity : The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 103-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 83. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Yuksekdag, Yusuf
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Culture and Aesthetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doctors Behind Borders: The Ethics of Skilled Worker Emigration2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis within applied ethics consists of four articles together with a cover essay. All articles concern the ethics of skilled health worker emigration from under-served and resourcepoor regions, often referred to as ‘medical brain drain’. Methodologically, the thesis utilizes normative ethical theory to analyse the justifiability of temporary or long-term emigration restrictions, such as compulsory health service programmes, that are employed by developing countries with the aim of safeguarding their needs for health care provision. Such programmes restrict the mobility of individual health workers and give rise to conflicts between different types of rights and interests.

    The ethics of skilled worker emigration warrants an exploration of the ethical implications of such restrictive programmes for different stakeholders, such as the under-served countries and health workers; and a clarification of the rights and duties of the concerned parties. This thesis provides a thorough analysis and clarification of such rights restrictions and offers theoretically and empirically grounded recommendations as to how they ought to be managed. Rights theory and accounts of individual responsibilities are employed to assess the acceptability of restrictive health service programmes.

    In brief, the thesis (a) discusses the conditions under which individual health workers may have responsibilities to attend to the basic health needs of a population, (b) explicates the rights at stake such as the freedom of movement and the right to exit, (c) offers insight into what it means to restrict one’s right and its implications and (d) suggests ways for conflicting rights and interests to be balanced and resolved. Taken together, the thesis presents a nuanced approach towards individual responsibilities in under-served contexts and an improved understanding of the right to exit as well as the implications of restricting the right. The thesis also contributes to the ethics of skilled worker emigration with a discussion on the responsibilities of skilled workers when the other parties do not fulfil their fair share of responsibilities.

    List of papers
    1. Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts
    2018 (English)In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue - while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first step of her defence of emigration restrictions, Brock provides three reasons why skilled workers themselves would hold responsibilities to assist with respect to vital needs of their compatriots. These are fair reciprocity, duty to support vital institutions, and attending to the unintended harmful consequences of one's actions. While the first two are explained and also largely discussed in the literature, the third requires an explication on how and on which basis skilled workers would have a responsibility as such. In this article, I offer a vulnerability approach with its dependency aspect that may account for why the health workers in underserved contexts would have a responsibility to attend to the unintended side effects of their actions that may lead to a vital risk of harm for the population. I discuss HIV/AIDS care in Zimbabwe as a case in point in order to show that local health workers may have responsibilities to assist the population who are vulnerable to their mobility.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2018
    Keywords
    medical brain drain, ethics, vulnerability, Zimbabwe, HIV/AIDS, health workers
    National Category
    Ethics Philosophy Medical Ethics International Migration and Ethnic Relations
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134570 (URN)10.1007/s10728-017-0342-x (DOI)000425320600002 ()28224293 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation, FO2013-0484
    Note

    Funding agencies: Stiftelsen Lars Hiertas Minne [FO2013-0484]

    Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2019-05-27
    2. How to Understand Limitations of the Right to Exit with Respect to Losses Associated with Health Worker Emigration: A Clarification
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to Understand Limitations of the Right to Exit with Respect to Losses Associated with Health Worker Emigration: A Clarification
    2018 (English)In: Etikk i praksis, ISSN 1890-3991, E-ISSN 1890-4009, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    There is a recent interest in the ethics of high-skilled worker emigration through which the limitations of the right to exit are discussed. Insightful arguments have been made in favour of (or against) the emigration restrictions on skilled workers in order to tackle the deprivations in developing countries. However, there is still a need for clarification on how we can understand, discuss and implement limitations of a right from a normative perspective. Significantly, how we understand the limitation of a right might determine how we approach such limitations –both in terms ofthe process of assessing the limitations and in terms of their implications. In this paper, I identify two distinct ways to understand limitations of the right to exit with respect to losses associated with health worker emigration, while also pointing totheir implications for restrictive policies: (i) as a matter of scope, and (ii) as a matter of weight or emergency, which requires a compensatory scheme for the individual right holders. While the emergency restrictions seem to be a point of convergence in the literature, what defines an emergency and the nature of the compensation still warrant exploration. To that end, I also discuss from a normative perspective what might constitute a public emergency that would give states a prima facie prerogative to regulate temporary limitations on the exercise of the right to exit. In addition, I briefly introduce the implications of emergency restrictions, with a particular focus on compensatory schemes for individual right holders.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Akademika forlag, 2018
    Keywords
    compensation, emergency, health worker emigration, right limitations, right to exit
    National Category
    Globalisation Studies Ethics Philosophy International Migration and Ethnic Relations
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152885 (URN)10.5324/eip.v12i2.2433 (DOI)000451375500006 ()
    Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
    3. The Right to Exit and Skilled Labour Emigration: Ethical Considerations for Compulsory Health Service Programmes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Right to Exit and Skilled Labour Emigration: Ethical Considerations for Compulsory Health Service Programmes
    2019 (English)In: Developing World Bioethics, ISSN 1471-8731, E-ISSN 1471-8847, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Compulsory (health) service contracts have recently received considerable attention in the normative literature. The service contracts are considered and offered as a permissible and liberal alternative to emigration restrictions if individuals relinquish their right to exit via contract in exchange for the state-funded tertiary education. To that end, the recent normative literature on the service programmes has particularly focused on discussing the circumstances or conditions in which the contracts should be signed, so that they are morally binding on the part of the skilled workers. However, little attention is devoted to the relevance of the right to exit for the debate on compulsory service programmes. In this paper, I argue that even if the service contracts are voluntary, and thus the would-be medical students voluntarily relinquish their right to exit, the reasons behind the right should be taken into account for the contracts to be morally valid. A clear understanding of the right to exit is a must in order not to breach its basic components and for the service contracts to be morally binding. To that end, I provide two accounts of the reasons to value the right to exit by presenting Patti Lenard’s discussion of the right and by reconstructing James Griffin’s account of human rights. I conclude by offering brief ethical considerations for compulsory health service programmes grounded in the reasons to value the right to exit.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
    Keywords
    compulsory service, ethics, right to exit, contract, health workers, migration
    National Category
    Ethics Philosophy Medical Ethics Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) International Migration and Ethnic Relations
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152001 (URN)10.1111/dewb.12217 (DOI)000483705700007 ()30548442 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Individual Responsibilities in Partial Compliance: Skilled Health Worker Emigration from Under-Served Regions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual Responsibilities in Partial Compliance: Skilled Health Worker Emigration from Under-Served Regions
    2019 (English)In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, p. 1-10, article id phz016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    One of the ways to address the effects of skilled worker emigration is to restrict the movement of skilled workers. However, even if skilled workers have responsibilities to assist their compatriots, what if other parties, such as affluent countries or source country governments, do not fulfil their fair share of responsibilities? This discussion raises an interesting problem about how to think of individual responsibilities under partial compliance where other agents (including affluent countries, developing states, or other individuals) do not fulfil their fair share of responsibilities. What is fair to expect from them? Taking health worker emigration as a case in point, I discuss whether the individual health workers’ fair share of responsibilities to address basic health care needs decreases or increases when the other parties do not fulfil their share. First, I review the responsibilities that different stakeholders may hold. Second, I argue that there are strong reasons against increasing or decreasing health workers’ fair share of responsibilities in a situation of partial compliance. I also argue that it is unfair for non-complier states to enforce health workers to fulfil their fair share or take up the slack.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
    National Category
    International Migration and Ethnic Relations Ethics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161454 (URN)10.1093/phe/phz016 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-11-01 Created: 2019-11-01 Last updated: 2019-11-01Bibliographically approved
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    Doctors Behind Borders: The Ethics of Skilled Worker Emigration
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  • 84.
    Yuksekdag, Yusuf
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
    Domination and Global Justice: Implications of a Social-Republican Account2016In: Global Justice: Theory Practice Rhetoric, ISSN 1835-6842, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 108-113Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Yuksekdag, Yusuf
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Institute of Philosophy, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    How to Understand Limitations of the Right to Exit with Respect to Losses Associated with Health Worker Emigration: A Clarification2018In: Etikk i praksis, ISSN 1890-3991, E-ISSN 1890-4009, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a recent interest in the ethics of high-skilled worker emigration through which the limitations of the right to exit are discussed. Insightful arguments have been made in favour of (or against) the emigration restrictions on skilled workers in order to tackle the deprivations in developing countries. However, there is still a need for clarification on how we can understand, discuss and implement limitations of a right from a normative perspective. Significantly, how we understand the limitation of a right might determine how we approach such limitations –both in terms ofthe process of assessing the limitations and in terms of their implications. In this paper, I identify two distinct ways to understand limitations of the right to exit with respect to losses associated with health worker emigration, while also pointing totheir implications for restrictive policies: (i) as a matter of scope, and (ii) as a matter of weight or emergency, which requires a compensatory scheme for the individual right holders. While the emergency restrictions seem to be a point of convergence in the literature, what defines an emergency and the nature of the compensation still warrant exploration. To that end, I also discuss from a normative perspective what might constitute a public emergency that would give states a prima facie prerogative to regulate temporary limitations on the exercise of the right to exit. In addition, I briefly introduce the implications of emergency restrictions, with a particular focus on compensatory schemes for individual right holders.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 86.
    Yuksekdag, Yusuf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Culture and Aesthetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Institute of Philosophy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Palm, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Culture and Aesthetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
    Special Issue on Globalization, Cosmopolitanism, and Migration: Ethics of Inclusion and Exclusion2018In: Etikk i praksis, ISSN 1890-3991, E-ISSN 1890-4009, no 2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The contributors to this issue offer applied critical and normative perspectives on central, yet overlooked, ethical aspects of migration management with a certain cosmopolitan lance in some capacity. However, cosmopolitanism might mean different things for transnational migration. It can refer to “political cosmopolitanism” that provides the reasons for why there should be certain global institutions governing migration. It can also refer to “moral cosmopolitanism” that simply represents a moral concern for individual rights and interests first and foremost (Caney 2005). Cosmopolitanism can also work as a lens that is based on a scepticism towards using the nation-state as the ultimate unit or locus of analysis. These perspectives are not mutually exclusive, and the contributions in this special issue accommodate a form of cosmopolitan outlook or stance to some extent in their discussion on migration management practices.

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  • 87. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Zhang, Ya
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Contextualization of Evolving Patterns in the Internationalization of Small Firms2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The internationalization of SMEs has been recognized as one of the important paths to growth in SMEs. However, internationalization is also a resource and competence-demanding process. This is especially true for smaller-sized SMEs – the small and micro-sized firms – which have a large resource constraint, making internationalization even more challenging. Although this group of small firms counts for an average of over 98% of the total population of enterprises in EU countries, extant research on the internationalization of this group is still limited. Therefore, the main purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to a better understanding of evolving patterns of internationalization in the smaller-sized SMEs.

    The study uses emerging market entry along the internationalization of small firms as a context to probe the dynamics of perceived risk (uncertainty) and perceived opportunity in different foreign markets which influence the important decisions of small firms during their internationalization. The main study takes a longitudinal approach and uses mixed methods to investigate the features in both the initial period and the continued period of internationalization. It mainly builds on a multiple-case study of 12 Swedish firms, which have/had emerging market entry experience and/or involvement. This study illustrates influences from the environmental, organizational and individual levels on evolving patterns of internationalization in the investigated firms.

    This dissertation concludes that critical decisions and actions taken in the internationalization process depend on interactions among the influence and resources from the three levels. Such interactions form a conditional preference on perceived risk (uncertainty) and perceived opportunity during the internationalization of small firms. The study further proposes that the dynamics in the internationalization process are caused by a prospect-guided change mechanism.

    This dissertation contributes to the literature by: differentiating patterns of internationalization; enriching the study of “born global” in the continued period of internationalization; introducing a new perspective on the interpretation of dynamics in the internationalization; and increasing the understanding on the interactions of resources from three levels on the internationalization of small firms.

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    Contextualization of Evolving Patterns in the Internationalization of Small Firms
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  • 88.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making or Unmaking a Movement?: Challenges for Civic Activism in the Global Governance of Migration2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 809-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses dilemmas of global civic activism from a neo-Gramscian perspective as both subordinated and a potential challenge to hegemonic neoliberal order. With the investigational focus on the People’s Global Action on Migration, Development and Human Rights (PGA) event, the space for civic activism relating to the intergovernmental Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD) and its associated Civil Society Days and Common Space (CSD/CS) is analysed. The article asks how the future of PGA activism may be influenced by its formalised representation within the GFMD. It posits that the PGA has landed at a crossroad between becoming a global activist counterhegemonic movement to a dominant neoliberal migration policy and being captured in a tokenist subordinated inclusion within a truncated ‘invited space’ for interchange. This ambiguous position jeopardises its impact on global migration governance, discussed with reference to theories of transversal politics and issues of counterhegemonic alliance-building.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 89.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making or unmaking a movement: challenges for civil society in the global governance of migration2019In: Migration, Civil Society and Global Governance / [ed] Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Branka Likić-Brborić, Raúl Delgado Wise, Gülay Toksöz, Abingdon and New York (NY): Routledge, 2019, p. 79-93Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chaper discusses dilemmas of global civic activism from a neo-Gramscianperspective as both subordinated and a potential challenge to hegemonicneoliberal order. With the investigational focus on the People’s Global Actionon Migration, Development and Human Rights (PGA) event, the space forcivic activism relating to the intergovernmental Global Forum on Migrationand Development (GFMD) and its associated Civil Society Days and CommonSpace is analysed. The article asks how the future of PGA activism may beinfluenced by its formalized representation within the GFMD. It posits thatthe PGA has landed at a crossroad between becoming a global activistcounterhegemonic movement to a dominant neoliberal migration policy andbeing captured in a tokenist subordinated inclusion within a truncated‘invited space’ for interchange. This ambiguous position jeopardizes itsimpact on global migration governance, discussed with reference to theoriesof transversal politics and issues of counterhegemonic alliance-building.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 90.
    Ålund, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schierup, Carl-Ulrik
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Осень или весна демократии?: Эссе о миграции, социальных движениях и переменах в Швеции [Democratic fall or spring? An essay on migration, social movements and Sweden's current transformation]2016In: Транснациональные миграции и современные государства в условиях экономической турбулентности [Transnational migrations and modern states in times of economic turbulence] / [ed] Vladimir Malahov, Mark Simon, Moscow: Delo , 2016, p. 77-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
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