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  • 51.
    Sekretaryova, Alina N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrocatalytic Currents from Single Enzyme Molecules2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 8, p. 2504-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single molecule enzymology provides an opportunity to examine details of enzyme mechanisms that are not distinguishable in biomolecule ensemble studies. Here we report, for the first time, detection of the current produced in an electrocatalytic reaction by a single redox enzyme molecule when it collides with an ultramicroelectrode. The catalytic process provides amplification of the current from electron-transfer events at the catalyst leading to a measurable current. This new methodology monitors turnover of a single enzyme molecule. The methodology might complement existing single molecule techniques, giving further insights into enzymatic mechanisms and filling the gap between fundamental understanding of biocatalytic processes and their potential for bioenergy production.

  • 52.
    Shchyrba, Aneliia
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Waeckerlin, Christian
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland .
    Nowakowski, Jan
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland .
    Nowakowska, Sylwia
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fatayer, Shadi
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Girovsky, Jan
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland .
    Nijs, Thomas
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Martens, Susanne C.
    University of Basel, Switzerland; Heidelberg University, Germany .
    Kleibert, Armin
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland .
    Stoehr, Meike
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Ballav, Nirmalya
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune, India.
    Jung, Thomas A.
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland .
    Gade, Lutz H.
    Heidelberg University, Germany .
    Controlling the dimensionality of on-surface coordination polymers via endo- or exoligation2014In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 136, no 26, p. 9355-9363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of on-surface coordination polymers is controlled by the interplay of chemical reactivity and structure of the building blocks, as well as by the orientating role of the substrate registry. Beyond the predetermined patterns of structural assembly, the chemical reactivity of the reactants involved may provide alternative pathways in their aggregation. Organic molecules, which are transformed in a surface reaction, may be subsequently trapped via coordination of homo- or heterometal adatoms, which may also play a role in the molecular transformation. The amino-functionalized perylene derivative, 4,9-diaminoperylene quinone-3,10-diimine (DPDI), undergoes specific levels of dehydrogenation (-1 H-2 or -3 H-2) depending on the nature of the present adatoms (Fe, Co, Ni or Cu). In this way, the molecule is converted to an endo- or an exoligand, possessing a concave or convex arrangement of ligating atoms, which is decisive for the formation of either ID or 2D coordination polymers.

  • 53.
    Stochkel, Kristian
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Nygaard Hansen, Christian
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Houmoller, Jorgen
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Munksgaard Nielsen, Lisbeth
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Anggara, Kelvin
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nogueira, Fernando
    University of Coimbra, Portugal .
    Maltsev, Oleg V.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany .
    Hintermann, Lukas
    Technical University of Munich, Germany .
    Brondsted Nielsen, Steen
    Aarhus University, Denmark .
    Naumov, Pance
    New York University of Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates .
    Milne, Bruce F.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal .
    On the Influence of Water on the Electronic Structure of Firefly Oxyluciferin Anions from Absorption Spectroscopy of Bare and Monohydrated Ions in Vacuo2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 17, p. 6485-6493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A complete understanding of the physics underlying the varied colors of firefly bioluminescence remains elusive because it is difficult to disentangle different enzyme-lumophore interactions. Experiments on isolated ions are useful to establish a proper reference when there are no microenvironmental perturbations. Here, we use action spectroscopy to compare the absorption by the firefly oxyluciferin lumophore isolated in vacuo and complexed with a single water molecule. While the process relevant to bioluminescence within the luciferase cavity is light emission, the absorption data presented here provide a unique insight into how the electronic states of oxyluciferin are altered by microenvironmental perturbations. For the bare ion we observe broad absorption with a maximum at 548 +/- 10 nm, and addition of a water molecule is found to blue-shift the absorption by approximately 50 nm (0.23 eV). Test calculations at various levels of theory uniformly predict a blue-shift in absorption caused by a single water molecule, but are only qualitatively in agreement with experiment highlighting limitations in what can be expected from methods commonly used in studies on oxyluciferin. Combined molecular dynamics simulations and time-dependent density functional theory calculations closely reproduce the broad experimental peaks and also indicate that the preferred binding site for the water molecule is the phenolate oxygen of the anion. Predicting the effects of microenvironmental interactions on the electronic structure of the oxyluciferin anion with high accuracy is a nontrivial task for theory, and our experimental results therefore serve as important benchmarks for future calculations.

  • 54.
    Teilum, Kaare
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry.
    Brath, Ulrika
    Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry.
    Akke, Mikael
    Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry.
    Biosynthetic 13C labeling of aromatic side chains in proteins for NMR relaxation measurements2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, ISSN 0002-7863, Vol. 128, no 8, p. 2506-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Toward Complementary Ionic Circuits: The npn Ion Bipolar Junction Transistor2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 26, p. 10141-10145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many biomolecules are charged and may therefore be transported with ionic currents. As a step toward addressable ionic delivery circuits, we report on the development of a npn ion bipolar junction transistor (npn-IBJT) as an active control element of anionic currents in general, and specifically, demonstrate actively modulated delivery of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. The functional materials of this transistor are ion exchange layers and conjugated polymers. The npn-IBJT shows stable transistor characteristics over extensive time of operation and ion current switch times below 10 s. Our results promise complementary chemical circuits similar to the electronic equivalence, which has proven invaluable in conventional electronic applications.

  • 56.
    van Reenen, Stephan
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Akatsuka, Takeo
    University of Valencia, Spain; Nippon Shokubai Co Ltd, Japan.
    Tordera, Daniel
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Bolink, Henk J.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Universal Transients in Polymer and Ionic Transition Metal Complex Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 886-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two types of light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) are commonly distinguished, the polymer-based LEC (p-LEC) and the ionic transition metal complex-based LEC (iTMC-LEC). Apart from marked differences in the active layer constituents, these LEC types typically show operational time scales that can differ by many orders of magnitude at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate that despite these differences p-LECs and iTMC-LECs show current, light output, and efficacy transients that follow a universal shape. Moreover, we conclude that the turn-on time of both LEC types is dominated by the ion conductivity because the turn-on time exhibits the same activation energy as the ion conductivity in the off-state. These results demonstrate that both types of LECs are really two extremes of one class of electroluminescent devices. They also implicate that no fundamental difference exists between charge transport in small molecular weight or polymeric mixed ionic and electronic conductive materials. Additionally, it follows that the ionic conductivity is responsible for the dynamic properties of devices and systems using them. This likely extends to mixed ionic and electronic conductive materials used in organic solar cells and in a variety of biological systems.

  • 57.
    van Reenen, Stephan
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Matyba, Piotr
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dzwilewski, Andrzej
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    A Unifying Model for the Operation of Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 39, p. 13776-13781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of doping in semiconductors plays a major role in the high performances achieved to date in inorganic devices. In contrast, doping has yet to make such an impact in organic electronics. One organic device that does make extensive use of doping is the light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC), where the presence of mobile ions enables dynamic doping, which enhances carrier injection and facilitates relatively large current densities. The mechanism and effects of doping in LECs are, however, still far from being fully understood, as evidenced by the existence of two competing models that seem physically distinct: the electrochemical doping model and the electrodynamic model. Both models are supported by experimental data and numerical modeling. Here, we show that these models are essentially limits of one master model, separated by different rates of carrier injection. For ohmic nonlimited injection, a dynamic p-n junction is formed, which is absent in injection-limited devices. This unification is demonstrated by both numerical calculations and measured surface potentials as well as light emission and doping profiles in operational devices. An analytical analysis yields an upper limit for the ratio of drift and diffusion currents, having major consequences on the maximum current density through this type of device.

  • 58.
    Wang, Ergang
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Ma, Zaifei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Zhen
    Chalmers.
    Vandewal, Koen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Henriksson, Patrik
    Chalmers.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats R
    Chalmers.
    An Easily Accessible Isoindigo-Based Polymer for High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 36, p. 14244-14247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new, low-band-gap alternating copolymer consisting of terthiophene and isoindigo has been designed and synthesized. Solar cells based on this polymer and PC(71)BM show a power conversion efficiency of 6.3%, which is a record for polymer solar cells based on a polymer with an optical band gap below 1.5 eV. This work demonstrates the great potential of isoindigo moieties as electron-deficient units for building donor-acceptor-type polymers for high-performance polymer solar cells.

  • 59.
    Wang, L.-L.
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Khare, S.V.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, United States.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Johnson, D.D.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Rockett, A.A.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Frenkel, A.I.
    Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10016, United States.
    Mack, N.H.
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Nuzzo, R.G.
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Origin of bulklike structure and bond length disorder of Pt37 and Pt6Ru31 clusters on carbon: Comparison of theory and experiment2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a theoretical analysis of the structures of self-organizing nanoparticles formed by Pt and Ru-Pt on carbon support. The calculations provide insights into the nature of these metal particle systems-ones of current interest for use as the electrocatalytic materials of direct oxidation fuel cells- and clarify complex behaviors noted in earlier experimental studies. With clusters deposited via metalloorganic Pt or PtRu5 complexes, previous experiments [Nashner et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 7760, Nashner et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1998, 120, 8093, Frenkel et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2001, 105, 12689] showed that the Pt and Pt-Ru based clusters are formed with fcc(111)-stacked cuboctahedral geometry and essentially bulklike metal-metal bond lengths, even for the smallest (few atom) nanoparticles for which the average coordination number is much smaller than that in the bulk, and that Pt in bimetallic [PtRu5] clusters segregates to the ambient surface of the supported nanoparticles. We explain these observations and characterize the cluster structures and bond length distributions using density functional theory calculations with graphite as a model for the support. The present study reveals the origin of the observed metal-metal bond length disorder, distinctively different for each system, and demonstrates the profound consequences that result from the cluster/carbon-support interactions and their key role in the structure and electronic properties of supported metallic nanoparticles. © 2006 American Chemical Society.

  • 60.
    Yang, Biao
    et al.
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Björk, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lin, Haiping
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Xiaoqing
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Haiming
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Youyong
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Fan, Jian
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Li, Qing
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Chi, Lifeng
    Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Synthesis of Surface Covalent Organic Frameworks via Dimerization and Cyclotrimerization of Acetyls2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 15, p. 4904-4907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of additional phenyl rings on surfaces is of particular interest because it allows for the building-up of surface covalent organic frameworks. In this work, we show for the first time that the cyclotrimerization of acetyls to aromatics provides a promising approach to 2D conjugated covalent networks on surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum. With the aid of scanning tunneling microscopy, we have systematically studied the reaction pathways and the products. With the combination of density functional theory calculations and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, the surface-assisted reaction mechanism, which is different from that in solution, was explored.

  • 61.
    Yao, Huifeng
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Cui, Yong
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Qian, Deping
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ponseca, Carlito
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Honarfar, Alireza
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Xu, Ye
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Xin, Jingming
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Zhenyu
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hong, Ling
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Bowei
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Runnan
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zu, Yunfei
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ma, Wei
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chabera, Pavel
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Pullerits, Tonu
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Yartsev, Arkady
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hou, Jianhui
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    14.7% Efficiency Organic Photovoltaic Cells Enabled by Active Materials with a Large Electrostatic Potential Difference2019In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 141, no 19, p. 7743-7750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although significant improvements have been achieved for organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), the top-performing devices still show power conversion efficiencies far behind those of commercialized solar cells. One of the main reasons is the large driving force required for separating electron-hole pairs. Here, we demonstrate an efficiency of 14.7% in the single-junction OPV by using a new polymer donor PTO2 and a nonfullerene acceptor IT-4F. The device possesses an efficient charge generation at a low driving force. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements probe the formation of loosely bound charge pairs with extended lifetime that impedes the recombination of charge carriers in the blend. The theoretical studies reveal that the molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) between PTO2 and IT-4F is large, and the induced intermolecular electric field may assist the charge generation. The results suggest OPVs have the potential for further improvement by judicious modulation of ESP.

  • 62.
    Ye, Fangmao
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Wu, Changfeng
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Jin, Yuhui
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Chan, Yang-Hsiang
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Chiu, Daniel T
    Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Ratiometric temperature sensing with semiconducting polymer dots2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 21, p. 8146-8149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication describes ultrabright single-nanoparticle ratiometric temperature sensors based on semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots). We attached the temperature sensitive dye—Rhodamine B (RhB), whose emission intensity decreases with increasing temperature—within the matrix of Pdots. The as-prepared Pdot-RhB nanoparticle showed excellent temperature sensitivity and high brightness because it took advantage of the light harvesting and amplified energy transfer capability of Pdots. More importantly, the Pdot-RhB nanoparticle showed ratiometric temperature sensing under a single wavelength excitation and has a linear temperature sensing range that matches well with the physiologically relevant temperatures. We employed Pdot-RhB for measuring intracellular temperatures in a live-cell imaging mode. The exceptional brightness of Pdot-RhB allows this nanoscale temperature sensor to be used also as a fluorescent probe for cellular imaging.

  • 63.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ali Ballem, Mohamed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanoscale Ln(III)-carboxylate coordination polymers (Ln = Gd, Eu, Yb): temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and light harvesting2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 30, p. 10391-10397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the self-assembly of stable nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs), which exhibit temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and release, as well as an efficient light-harvesting property. NCPs are obtained by coordination-directed organization of pi-conjugated dicarboxylate (L1) and lanthanide metal ions Gd(III), Eu(III), and Yb(III) in a DMF system. Guest molecules trans-4-styryl-1-methylpyridiniumiodide (D1) and methylene blue (D2) can be encapsulated into NCPs, and the loading amounts can be controlled by changing reaction temperatures. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD) results reveal that the self-assembled discus-like NCPs exhibit long-range ordered structures, which remain unchanged after guest encapsulations. Experimental results reveal that the negatively charged local environment around the metal connector is the driving force for the encapsulation of cationic guests. The D1 molecules encapsulated in NCPs at 140 degrees C can be released gradually at room temperature in DMF. Guest-loaded NCPs exhibit efficient light harvesting with energy transfer from the framework to the guest D1 molecule, which is studied by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime decays. This coordination-directed encapsulation approach is general and should be extended to the fabrication of a wide range of multifunctional nanomaterials.

  • 64.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore.
    Chen, Zhi-Kuan
    Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Singapore.
    Loh, Kian Ping
    Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore.
    Coordination-Assisted Assembly of 1-D Nanostructured Light-Harvesting Anntea2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, no 21, p. 7210-7211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient light-harvesting antenna was achieved via self-assembly of two distinct chromophores into nanoscale supramolecular coordination polymers (NSCPs). Efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer is favorable in the self-assembled 1-D nanostructure as a result of fast and efficient exciton migration in the ordered architecture.

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