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  • 51.
    Barbe, Laure
    et al.
    Univ Nantes, France.
    Le Moullac-Vaidye, Beatrice
    Univ Nantes, France.
    Echasserieau, Klara
    Univ Nantes, France; Univ Nantes, France.
    Bernardeau, Karine
    Univ Nantes, France; Univ Nantes, France.
    Carton, Thomas
    Biofortis, France.
    Bovin, Nicolai
    RAS, Russia.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ruvoen-Clouet, Nathalie
    Univ Nantes, France; Oniris, France.
    Le Pendu, Jacques
    Univ Nantes, France.
    Histo-blood group antigen-binding specificities of human rotaviruses are associated with gastroenteritis but not with in vitro infection2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 12961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human strains of rotavirus A (RVAs) recognize fucosylated glycans belonging to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) through their spike protein VP8*. Lack of these ligands due to genetic polymorphisms is associated with resistance to gastroenteritis caused by P[8] genotype RVAs. With the aim to delineate the contribution of HBGAs in the process, we analyzed the glycan specificity of VP8* proteins from various P genotypes. Binding to saliva of VP8* from P[8] and P[4] genotypes required expression of both FUT2 and FUT3 enzymes, whilst binding of VP8* from the P[14] genotype required FUT2 and A enzymes. We further defined a glycan motif, GlcNAc beta 3Gal beta 4GlcNAc, recognized by P[6] clinical strains. Conversion into Lewis antigens by the FUT3 enzyme impaired recognition, explaining their lower binding to saliva of Lewis positive phenotype. In addition, the presence of neutralizing antibodies was associated with the presence of the FUT2 wild type allele in sera from young healthy adults. Nonetheless, in vitro infection of transformed cell lines was independent of HBGAs expression, indicating that HBGAs are not human RV receptors. The match between results from saliva-based binding assays and the epidemiological data indicates that the polymorphism of human HBGAs controls susceptibility to RVAs, although the exact mechanism remains unclear.

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  • 52.
    Barde, Swapnali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ruegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden; Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Prudhomme, Jose
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada.
    Ekström, Tomas J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Turecki, Gustavo
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Juhasz, Gabriella
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; University of Manchester, England.
    Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mechawar, Naguib
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Hokfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 113, no 52, p. E8472-E8481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL(1-3), are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL(3) antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation.

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  • 53.
    Barranco, Isabel
    et al.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Roca, Jordi
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Tvarijonaviciute, Asta
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vicente Carrillo, Alejandro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ceron, Jose J.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Martinez, Emilio A.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Measurement of Activity and Concentration of Paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) in Seminal Plasma and Identification of PON-2 in the Sperm of Boar Ejaculates2015In: Molecular Reproduction and Development, ISSN 1040-452X, E-ISSN 1098-2795, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study revealed and characterised the presence of the antioxidant enzymes paraoxonase (PON) type 1 (PON-1, extracellular) and type 2 (PON-2, intracellular) in boar semen. To evaluate PON-1, an entire ejaculate from each of ten boars was collected and the seminal plasma was harvested after double centrifugation (1,500g for 10min). Seminal plasma was analysed for concentration as well as enzymatic activity of PON-1 and total cholesterol levels. Seminal-plasma PON-1 concentration ranged from 0.961 to 1.670ng/ml while its enzymatic activity ranged from 0.056 to 0.400 IU/ml, which represent individual variance. Seminal-plasma PON-1 concentration and enzymatic activity were negatively correlated (r=-0.763; Pless than0.01). The activity of seminal-plasma PON-1 negatively correlated with ejaculate volume (r=-0.726, Pless than0.05), but positively correlated with sperm concentration (r=0.654, Pless than0.05). Total seminal-plasma cholesterol concentration positively correlated with PON-1 activity (r=0.773; Pless than0.01), but negatively correlated with PON-1 concentration (r=-0.709; Pless than0.05). The presence of intracellular PON-2 was determined via immunocytochemistry in spermatozoa derived from artificial insemination. PON-2 localised to the post-acrosomal area of the sperm head and principal piece of the tail in membrane-intact spermatozoa. In summary, PON is present in boar semen, with PON-1 at low levels in seminal plasma and PON-2 within the spermatozoa. Further studies are needed to characterise the relationship between antioxidant PONs with sperm and other seminal-plasma parameters. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 82: 58-65, 2015. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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  • 54.
    Basabe-Desmonts, L.
    et al.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin.
    Ramstrom, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.
    Lopez-Alonso, A.
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.
    Somers, M.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin.
    Ricco, A.J.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin.
    Kenny, D.
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.
    DISPOSABLE BIOANALYTICAL MICRODEVICE FOR MONITORING THE EFFECT OF ANTI-PLATELET DRUGS2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a disposable self-powered integrated microfluidic chip that enables a rapid and simple plateletfunction assay from small samples of whole blood. The chip integrates a single-cell adhesion assay with a microfluidic platform; it enables accurate quantification of platelet adhesion, and it controls whole blood flow rate, shear stress, volume of sample, and assay time.

  • 55.
    Bastami, Salumeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gupta, A.
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Anna Lena
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Influence of UGT2B7, OPRM1 and ABCB1 gene polymorphisms on morphine use2014In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic modulation of pain with morphine and other opioids is associated with significant variation in, both, effects and adverse effects in individual patients. Many factors including gene polymorphisms have been shown to contribute to the interindividual variability in the response to opioids. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of UGT2B7, OPRM1 and ABCB1 polymorphisms for interindividual variability in morphine induced analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy. The frequency of these polymorphisms was also investigated in forensic autopsy cases as morphine is also a very commonly abused drug

    Blood samples were collected from 40 patients following abdominal hysterectomy, 24 hours after initiation of analgesia through a PCA pump. Samples were genotyped and analysed for morphine and its metabolites. We also genotyped approximately 200 autopsy cases found positive for morphine in routine forensic analysis.

    Patients homozygous for UGT2B7 802C needed significantly lower dose of morphine for pain relief. The same trend was observed for patients homozygous for ABCB1 1236T and 3435T, as well as to OPRM1 118A. Dose of morphine in patients included in this study was significantly related to variation in UGT2B7 T802C. Age was significantly related to both dose and concentration of morphine in blood.

    Regression analysis showed that 30% of differences in variation in morphine dose could be explained by SNPs in these genes. The genotype distribution was similar between the forensic cases and the patients. However, the mean concentration of morphine was higher in forensic cases compared to patients.

    We conclude that gene polymorphisms contribute significantly to the variation in morphine levels observed in individual patients.

  • 56.
    Bastami, Salumeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haage, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Anna-Lena
    National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Pharmacogenetic aspects of tramadol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics after a single oral dose2014In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 238, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major purpose of this study was to elucidate if genotyping can facilitate interpretations of tramadol (TRA) in forensic case work, with special regard to the estimation of the time of drug intake and drug related symptoms (DRS). The association between genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6, OPRM1 and ABCB1 and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TRA was studied. Nineteen healthy volunteers were randomized into two groups receiving a single dose of either 50 or 100 mg of orally administrated TRA. Blood samples were collected prior to dosing and up to 72 h after drug intake. The subjects were asked to report DRS during the experimental day. We found a positive correlation between the metabolic ratio of O-desmethyltramadol (ODT) to TRA and the time after drug intake for both CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizers and extensive metabolizers. For the only poor metabolizer with detectable ODT levels the metabolic ratio was almost constant. Significant associations were found between the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and three of the investigated ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms for TRA, but not for ODT and only in the 50 mg dosage group. There was great interindividual variation in DRS, some subjects exhibited no symptoms at all whereas one subject both fainted and vomited after a single therapeutic dose. However, no associations could be found between DRS and investigated polymorphisms. We conclude that the metabolic ratio of ODT/TRA may be used for estimation of the time of drug intake, but only when the CYP2D6 genotype is known and taken into consideration. The influence of genetic polymorphisms in ABCB1 and OPRM1 requires further study.

  • 57.
    Baumgardt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Yaghmaeian Salmani, Behzad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bivik, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    MacDonald, Ryan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnar, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Global Programmed Switch in Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation Mode Triggered by a Temporal Gene Cascade2014In: Developmental Cell, ISSN 1534-5807, E-ISSN 1878-1551, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 192-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During central nervous system (CNS) development, progenitors typically divide asymmetrically, renewing themselves while budding off daughter cells with more limited proliferative potential. Variation in daughter cell proliferation has a profound impact on CNS development and evolution, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We find that Drosophila embryonic neural progenitors (neuroblasts) undergo a programmed daughter proliferation mode switch, from generating daughters that divide once (type I) to generating neurons directly (type 0). This typelgreater than0 switch is triggered by activation of Dacapo (mammalian p21(CIP1)/p27(KIP1)/p57(Kip2)) expression in neuroblasts. In the thoracic region, Dacapo expression is activated by the temporal cascade (castor) and the Hox gene Antennapedia. In addition, castor, Antennapedia, and the late temporal gene grainyhead act combinatorially to control the precise timing of neuroblast cell-cycle exit by repressing Cyclin E and E2f. This reveals a logical principle underlying progenitor and daughter cell proliferation control in the Drosophila CNS.

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  • 58.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 59.
    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia
    et al.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Bucardo, Filemon
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Vilchez, Samuel
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Enrique Zambrana, Luis
    Centre Epidemiol and Health CIDS, Nicaragua.
    Liu, Lan
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Weber, David J.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Pena, Rodolfo
    Centre Health Research CIS, Nicaragua.
    Barclay, Leslie
    Centre Disease Control and Prevent, GA USA.
    Vinje, Jan
    Centre Disease Control and Prevent, GA USA.
    Hudgens, Michael G.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Morgan, Douglas R.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; Vanderbilt University, TN 37235 USA.
    Espinoza, Felix
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Paniagua, Margarita
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Etiology of Childhood Diarrhea After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction A Prospective, Population-based Study in Nicaragua2014In: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, ISSN 0891-3668, E-ISSN 1532-0987, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1156-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement routine immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). In this RV5-immunized population, understanding infectious etiologies of childhood diarrhea is necessary to direct diarrhea treatment and prevention efforts. Methods: We followed a population-based sample of children less than5 years in Leon, Nicaragua for diarrhea episodes through household visits. Information was obtained on RV5 history and sociodemographics. Stool samples collected during diarrhea episodes and among healthy children underwent laboratory analysis for viral, bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens. Detection frequency and incidence of each enteropathogen was calculated. Results: The 826 children in the cohort experienced 677 diarrhea episodes during 607.5 child-years of exposure time (1.1 episodes per child-year). At least 1 enteropathogen was detected among 61.1% of the 337 diarrheal stools collected. The most common enteropathogens among diarrheal stools were: norovirus (20.4%), sapovirus (16.6%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (11.3%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (8.3%), Giardia lamblia (8.0%) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (7.7%), with rotavirus detected among 5.3% of diarrheal stools. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli were frequently detected among stools from healthy children. Among children with diarrhea, norovirus was more commonly detected among younger children (less than2 years) and G. lamblia was more commonly detected among older children (2-4 years). The mean age of rotavirus detection was 34.6 months. Conclusions: In this Central American community after RV5 introduction, rotavirus was not commonly detected among children with diarrhea. Prevention and appropriate management of norovirus and sapovirus should be considered to further reduce the burden of diarrheal disease.

  • 60.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    In the Forefront of Development:The New Undergraduate Medical Curriculu2006In: Celebrating the Past by Expanding the Future: The Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University 1986–2006 / [ed] Mats Hammar, Björn Bergdahl, Lena Öhman, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006, 1, p. 98-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 61. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Deliberations on the impact of antibiotic contamination on dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in aquatic environments2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The great success of antibiotics in treating bacterial infectious diseases has been hampered by the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Not only does antibiotic resistance threaten to increase the difficulty in treating bacterial infectious diseases, but it could also make medical procedures such as routine surgery and organ transplantations very dangerous to perform. Traditionally, antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a strictly clinical problem and studies of the problem have mostly been restricted to a clinical milieu. Recently, non-clinical environments, and in particular aquatic environments, have been recognised as important factors in development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Elevated concentrations of antibiotics in an environment are likely to drive a selection pressure which favours resistant bacteria, and are also believed to promote horizontal gene transfer among the indigenous bacteria. Antibiotic resistance genes are often located on mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and integrons, which have the ability to disseminate among taxonomically unrelated species. The environmental bacteria can thus serve as both reservoirs for resistance and hot spots for the development of new antibiotic resistance determinants.

    There is still a lack of data pertaining to how high antibiotic concentrations are necessary to drive a selection pressure in aquatic environments. The aim of this thesis is to determine the effect of high and low concentrations of antibiotics on environmental bacterial  communities from different aquatic environments. In the studies performed, antibiotics were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial diversity and evenness were assessed using molecular fingerprints obtained with 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were quantified using real-time PCR.

    Water and sediment samples were collected from different rivers and canals in Pakistan. The environments differed in anthropogenic exposure from undisturbed to heavily contaminated. A general trend could be observed of high concentrations of antibiotics correlating to elevated concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. Extremely high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were found in the sediments downstream of an industrial drug formulation site, which likely correlated to the high load of antibiotics found in the water. Antibiotic and antibiotic resistance gene concentrations were also shown to increase downstream of Ravi river, which flows through Lahore, a city of more than 10 million inhabitants. Rivers not impacted by anthropogenic contamination were found to contain antibiotics and resistance gene concentrations of similar levels as in Europe and the U.S. Similar measurements were performed in the Swedish river Stångån. The concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were shown to increase in the river after it had passed, and received urban wastewater effluent from the city of Linköping.

    A series of constructed wetlands were exposed to a mixture of different antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations over a few weeks. The antibiotic exposure did not observably affect the bacterial diversity or integron concentrations. Antibiotic resistance genes were found at low background concentrations, but the antibiotic exposure did not observably affect the concentrations. The constructed wetlands were also found to reduce most antibiotics at levels comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes, suggesting that constructed wetlands may be useful supplementary alternatives to conventional wastewater treatment.

    To investigate the effect of antibiotics on an uncontaminated aquatic environment in a more controlled setting, microcosms were constructed from lake water and sediments and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of antibiotics (ranging from wastewater-like concentrations to 1,000 times higher). The water and sediments were gathered from the lake Nydalasjön, near Umeå, which is not exposed to urban waste. While antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were found in the lake sediments, no increase in the concentrations of these genes could be observed due to the antibiotic additions.

    In conclusion, although antibiotic resistance genes and integrons are part of the environmental gene pool, low concentrations of antibiotics do not seem to immediately impact their prevalence. However, aquatic environments exposed to anthropogenic waste do exhibit elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. Aquatic environments heavily polluted with antibiotics also clearly display correspondingly high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. These results clearly indicate the necessity to keep down pollution levels as well as the need to establish the range of antibiotic concentrations which do promote resistance. This must be done in order to enable risk assessments and to establish acceptable levels of antibiotic pollution. It should also be stressed that more research is required to elucidate what effect low levels of antibiotic exposure has on environmental bacterial communities.

    List of papers
    1. Occurrence and Abundance of Antibiotics and Resistance Genes in Rivers, Canal and near Drug Formulation Facilities – A Study in Pakistan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence and Abundance of Antibiotics and Resistance Genes in Rivers, Canal and near Drug Formulation Facilities – A Study in Pakistan
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a global phenomenon that has severe epidemiological ramifications world-wide. It has been suggested that antibiotics that have been discharged into the natural aquatic environments after usage or manufacture can promote the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). These environmental ARGs could serve as a reservoir and be horizontally transferred to human-associated bacteria and thus contribute to AR proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the anthropogenic load of antibiotics in Northern Pakistan and study the occurrence of ARGs in selected samples from this region. 19 sampling sites were selected; including six rivers, one dam, one canal, one sewage drain and four drug formulation facilities. Our results show that five of the rivers have antibiotic levels comparable to surface water measurements in unpolluted sites in Europe and the US. However, high levels of antibiotics could be detected in the downstream river in close vicinity of the 10 million city Lahore, 1100, 1700 and 2700 ng L−1 for oxytetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole respectively. Highest detected levels were at one of the drug formulation facilities, with the measured levels of 1100, 4100, 6200, 7300, 8000, 27000, 28000 and 49000 ng L−1 of erythromycin, lincomycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, oxytetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole respectively. ARGs were also detected at the sites and the highest levels of ARGs detected, sulI and dfrA1, were directly associated with the antibiotics detected at the highest concentrations, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Highest levels of both antibiotics and ARGs were seen at a drug formulation facility, within an industrial estate with a low number of local residents and no hospitals in the vicinity, which indicates that the levels of ARGs at this site were associated with the environmental levels of antibiotics.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96426 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0062712 (DOI)000321148400001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning FORMAS|210-2006-2132|Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (MISTRA)||

    Available from: 2013-08-20 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem which threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. It is becoming increasingly clear that the dynamics of antibiotic resistance are not confined to clinical settings. The environment is likely to play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from and to both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river which flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stångån River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent wastewater treatment plant over three months. Seven antibiotic resistance genes and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using realtime PCR. Furthermore, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of ten different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the wastewater treatment plant as compared to upstream. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from Stångån River, suggesting that selection for antibiotic resistance genes did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in antibiotic resistance genes is likely to be due to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the wastewater treatment plant.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105869 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2014-04-11
    3. Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 476-477, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Antibiotic resistance genes; Antibiotics; Quantitative real-time PCR; Constructed wetlands
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105870 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.12.128 (DOI)000333772500004 ()24448029 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108151-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intL1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.86x10(4) copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105871 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0108151 (DOI)000342351800068 ()25247418 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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    Deliberations on the impact of antibiotic contamination on dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in aquatic environments
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  • 62.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bich Hoang, Ngoc Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kien Le, Ngai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Svartström, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Khanh Khu, Dung Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thanh Le, Hai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Olson, Linus
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mattias
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam.
    Insertion sequence transpositions and point mutations in mgrB causing colistin resistance in a clinical strain of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Vietnam2018In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 789-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae to the last-resort antibiotics carbapenems and colistin is increasing worldwide. In this study, whole-genome sequencing was used to determine the colistin resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of carbapenem-and colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae from Vietnam. Alterations in the regulatory gene mgrB, via mutations and insertion sequence transpositions, were found in 30 of 31 isolates, emphasising the importance of this resistance mechanism in colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 63.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chen, Baoli
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Liuchen
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Li, Yan
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Bi, Zhenwang
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Characterization of extended-spectrum -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli harboring mcr-1 and toxin genes from human fecal samples from China2018In: FUTURE COMPUTING ... the ... International Conference on Future Computational Technologies and Applications, ISSN 1746-0913, E-ISSN 1999-5903, Vol. 13, no 15, p. 1647-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To characterize extended-spectrum -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli harboring the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 from human fecal samples collected in 2012 in a rural area of Shandong province, PR China. Materials amp; methods: Whole-genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 25 mcr-1-positive isolates to determine carriage of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, diversity and antibiotic resistance profiles. Results: The isolates were highly genetically diverse and carried a large variety of different antibiotic resistance genes. The multidrug-resistance rate was high (96%). Virulence genes associated with intestinal pathogenic E. coli were carried by 32% of the isolates. Conclusion: Further monitoring of the epidemiological situation is necessary to ensure a preparedness for potential emergence of novel, difficult-to-treat strains and awareness of available treatment options.

  • 64.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Claesson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Letter: High Prevalence of Heterogeneously Glycopeptide-Intermediate Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci in Sternal Wounds in ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, vol 60, issue 8, pp 5097-50982016In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 5097-5098Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 65.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dienus, Olaf
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Sokolova, Ekaterina
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Berglind, Emma
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden; Karolinska University of Lab, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Thomas
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Occurrence and removal efficiency of parasitic protozoa in Swedish wastewater treatment plants2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 598, p. 821-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica and Dientamoeba fragilis are parasitic protozoa and causative agents of gastroenteritis in humans. G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in particular are the most common protozoa associated with waterborne outbreaks in high-income countries. Surveillance of protozoan prevalence in wastewater and evaluation of wastewater treatment removal efficiencies of protozoan pathogens is therefore imperative for assessment of human health risk. In this study, influent and effluent wastewater samples from three wastewater treatment plants in Sweden were collected over nearly one year and assessed for prevalence of parasitic protozoa. Quantitative real-time PCR using primers specific for the selected protozoa Cryptosporidium spp., G, intestinalis, E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and D. fragilis was used for protozoan DNA detection and assessment of wastewater treatment removal efficiencies. Occurrence of G. intestinalis, E. dispar and D. fragilis DNA was assessed in both influent (44, 30 and 39 out of 51 samples respectively) and effluent wastewater (14, 9 and 33 out of 51 samples respectively) in all three wastewater treatment plants. Mean removal efficiencies of G. intestinalis, E. dispar and D. fragilis DNA quantities, based on all three wastewater treatment plants studied varied between 67 and 87%, 37-75% and 20-34% respectively. Neither E. histolytica nor Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in any samples. Overall, higher quantities of protozoan DNA were observed from February to June 2012. The high prevalence of protozoa in influent wastewater indicates the need for continued monitoring of these pathogens in wastewater-associated aquatic environments to minimise the potential risk for human infection. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 66.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Medical Services, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem which threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. It is becoming increasingly clear that the dynamics of antibiotic resistance are not confined to clinical settings. The environment is likely to play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from and to both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river which flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stångån River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent wastewater treatment plant over three months. Seven antibiotic resistance genes and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using realtime PCR. Furthermore, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of ten different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the wastewater treatment plant as compared to upstream. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from Stångån River, suggesting that selection for antibiotic resistance genes did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in antibiotic resistance genes is likely to be due to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the wastewater treatment plant.

  • 67.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    URBAN WASTEWATER EFFLUENT INCREASES ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENE CONCENTRATIONS IN A RECEIVING NORTHERN EUROPEAN RIVER2015In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 192-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem that threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. The environment is likely to play an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) among both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river that flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stangan River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent WWTP over 3 mo. Seven ARGs and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of 10 different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the WWTP. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from the Stangan River, suggesting that selection for ARGs did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in ARGs is likely to be attributable to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the WWTP. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:192-196. (c) 2014 SETAC

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  • 68.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoang, Ngoc Thi Bich
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Le, Ngai Kien
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khu, Dung Thi Khanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Le, Hai Thanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Larsson, Mattias
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Colistin- and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying mcr-1 and bla(OXA-48) isolated at a paediatric hospital in Vietnam2018In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1100-1102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 69.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Khan, Ghazanfar Ali
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Richard
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108151-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intL1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.86x10(4) copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 70.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Khan, Ghazanfar Ali
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Weisner, Stefan E B
    Wetland Research Centre, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Wetland Research Centre, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 476-477, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

  • 71.
    Bi, Z.
    et al.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Sun, C.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Borjesson, S.
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, Sweden.
    Chen, B.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Ji, X.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, M.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yin, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Q.
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China; Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hulth, A.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Sweden.
    Wang, Y.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, C.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bi, Z.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Identical genotypes of community-associated MRSA (ST59) and livestock-associated MRSA (ST9) in humans and pigs in rural China2018In: Zoonoses and Public Health, ISSN 1863-1959, E-ISSN 1863-2378, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 367-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the prevalence of MRSA in samples taken in households, with and without backyard pigs in villages in a rural area of Shandong Province, China. Community-associated MRSA and livestock-associated MRSA, belonging to ST59 and ST9, respectively, were identified in both humans and pigs. The genotypic and phenotypic comparison of isolates indicates that bidirectional transmission of MRSA has occurred between humans and pigs in the villages.

  • 72.
    Bi, Zhenwang
    et al.
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong University, Peoples R China; Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chen, Baoli
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ding, Lilu
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Stalsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bi, Zhenqiang
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tomson, Goran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yao, Jingjing
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Gu, Zhanying
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Xiao
    Jinan Central Hospital, Peoples R China.
    Kou, Zengqiang
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of the mcr-1 colistin resistance gene in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from human faecal samples collected in 2012 in rural villages in Shandong Province, China2017In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 493-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its initial discovery in China in 2015, the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has been reported in Escherichia coli isolated from clinical samples, animals and meat worldwide. In this study, 706 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli from 411 persons were detected in a collection of faecal samples from 1000 rural residents in three counties in Shandong Province, China. These isolates were screened for mcr-1 and phenotypic colistin resistance. The gene was found in 3.5% of the isolates (from 4.9% of persons) from all three counties. All isolates with phenotypic colistin resistance carried mcr-1. These data indicate that commensal carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli with mcr-1 among persons in rural China was already present in 2012 and that mcr-1 was the most important colistin resistance mechanism. Interventions are necessary to minimise further dissemination of mcr-1, which would limit the future usefulness of colistin as a last-resort antibiotic. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 73.
    Bialowas, Sonja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagbom, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Thommie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Sumit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-­Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intracellularly expressed rotavirus NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin (5-HT) from human enterochromaffin cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotavirus (RV) is associated with diarrhoea and vomiting, but the mechanisms behind these symptoms remain unresolved. While RV have been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice, it remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein (VP) being responsible for this novel property.

    To address this issue, human EC cells were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the structural (VP4, VP6 and VP7) and the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) followed by infection with Rhesus rotavirus (RRV). siRNA specific to NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of 5-HT compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 , siRNAVP7 and non-targeting (Nt) siRNAnt. Intracellular calcium clamping with BABTA/AM showed that intracellularly expressed NSP4-stimulated secretion of 5-HT from EC cells was calcium-dependent. Furthermore RV down-regulated the 5-HT transporter (SERT) mRNA in ileum but not tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) mRNA the rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT synthesis. The unaffected expression of TPH1 mRNA in the intestinal segments suggests that release of 5- HT primarily originates from pre-made 5-HT rather than from newly synthesised 5-HT mRNA. Moreover, down-regulation of SERT mRNA in ileum presumably resulted in reduced re- uptake of 5-HT by SERT to EC cells and thus increased extracellular 5-HT in the small intestine. Moreover, 7/7 infant mice responded following intraperitoneal administration of 5-HT with rapid (<30 min) diarrhoea in dose-dependent manner. In the light of these results and the fact that both 5-HT and NSP4 can induce diarrhoea in mice, a disease mechanism to RV diarrhoea is proposed.

  • 74.
    Bialowas, Sonja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagbom, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Thommie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Sumit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, p. e0159660-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNA(NSP4)) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNA(VP4), siRNA(VP6) and siRNA(VP7). Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p amp;lt; 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p amp;lt; 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p amp;lt; 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 75.
    Bivik, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bahrampour, Shahrzad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulvklo, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Angel, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fransson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    Lundin, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Renhorn, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells2015In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, E-ISSN 1943-2631, Vol. 200, no 4, p. 1229-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system.

  • 76.
    Bivik, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Macdonald, Ryan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Cambridge, England.
    Gunnar, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mazouni, Khalil
    Institute Pasteur, France; CNRS, France.
    Schweisguth, Francois
    Institute Pasteur, France; CNRS, France.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling2016In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e1005984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Notch pathway controls proliferation during development and in adulthood, and is frequently affected in many disorders. However, the genetic sensitivity and multi-layered transcriptional properties of the Notch pathway has made its molecular decoding challenging. Here, we address the complexity of Notch signaling with respect to proliferation, using the developing Drosophila CNS as model. We find that a Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade specifically controls daughter, but not progenitor proliferation. Additionally, we find that different E(spl)-HLH genes are required in different neuroblast lineages. The Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade alters daughter proliferation by regulating four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String/Cdc25, E2f and Dacapo (mammalian p21(CIP1)/p27(KIP1)/p57(Kip2)). ChIP and DamID analysis of Su(H) and E(spl)-HLH indicates direct transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle genes, and of the Notch pathway itself. These results point to a multi-level signaling model and may help shed light on the dichotomous proliferative role of Notch signaling in many other systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 77. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bivik Stadler, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Genetic pathways controlling CNS development: The role of Notch signaling in regulating daughter cell proliferation in Drosophila2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The human central nervous system (CNS) displays the greatest cellular diversity of any organ system, consisting of billions of neurons, of numerous cell sub-types, interconnected in a vast network. Given this enormous complexity, decoding the genetic programs controlling the multistep process of CNS development remains a major challenge. While great progress has been made with respect to understanding sub-type specification, considerably less is known regarding how the generation of the precise number of each sub-type is controlled.

    The aim of this thesis was to gain deeper knowledge into the regulatory programs controlling cell specification and proliferation. To address these questions I have studied the Drosophila embryonic CNS as a model system, to thereby be able to investigate the genetic mechanisms at high resolution. Despite the different size and morphology between the Drosophila and the mammalian CNS, the lineages of their progenitors share similarity. Importantly for this thesis, both species progenitors show elaborate variations in their proliferation modes, either giving rise to daughters that can directly differentiate into neurons or glia (type 0), divide once (type I), or multiple times (type II).

    The studies launched off with a comprehensive chemical forward genetic screen, for the very last born cell in the well-studied lineage of progenitor NB5-6T: the Ap4 neuron, which expresses the neuropeptide FMRFa. NB5-6T is a powerful model to use, because it undergoes a programmed type I>0 daughter cell proliferation switch. An FMRF-eGFP transgenic reporter was utilized as readout for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4/FMRFa and thereby proper lineage progression of the ∼20 cells generated. The strongest mutants were mapped to genes with both known and novel essential functions e.g., spatial and temporal patterning, cell cycle control, cell specification and chromatin modification. Subsequently, we focused on some of the genes that showed a loss of function phenotype with an excess of lineage cells. We found that Notch is critical for the type I>0 daughter cell proliferation switch in the NB5-6T lineage and globally as well. When addressing the broader relevance of these findings, and to further decipher the Notch pathway, we discovered that selective groups of E(spl) genes is controlling the switch in a close interplay with four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String, E2F and Dacapo, in most if not all embryonic progenitors. The Notch mediation of the switch is likely to be by direct transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, another gene identified in the screen, sequoia, was investigated. The analysis revealed that sequoia is also controlling the daughter cell switch in the CNS, and this partly through context dependent interactions with the Notch pathway.

    Taken together, the findings presented in this thesis demonstrate that daughter cell proliferation switches in Drosophila neural lineages are genetically programmed, and that Notch contributes to the triggering of these events. Given that early embryonic processes is frequently shown to be evolutionary conserved, you can speculate that changeable daughter proliferation programs could be applied to mammals, and contribute to a broader understanding of proliferation processes in humans as well.

     

    List of papers
    1. Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Genetics, ISSN 0016-6731, E-ISSN 1943-2631, Vol. 200, no 4, p. 1229-1244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Genetics Society of America, 2015
    Keywords
    Drosophila; CNS development; neural cell fate specification; forward genetic screening; FMRFamide
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121318 (URN)10.1534/genetics.115.178483 (DOI)000359917000020 ()26092715 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-09-16 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Control of neuronal cell fate and number by integration of distinct daughter cell proliferation modes with temporal progression
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control of neuronal cell fate and number by integration of distinct daughter cell proliferation modes with temporal progression
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 139, no 4, p. 678-689Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    During neural lineage progression, differences in daughter cell proliferation can generate different lineage topologies. This is apparent in the Drosophila neuroblast 5-6 lineage (NB5-6T), which undergoes a daughter cell proliferation switch from generating daughter cells that divide once to generating neurons directly. Simultaneously, neural lineages, e.g. NB5-6T, undergo temporal changes in competence, as evidenced by the generation of different neural subtypes at distinct time points. When daughter proliferation is altered against a backdrop of temporal competence changes, it may create an integrative mechanism for simultaneously controlling cell fate and number. Here, we identify two independent pathways, Prospero and Notch, which act in concert to control the different daughter cell proliferation modes in NB5-6T. Altering daughter cell proliferation and temporal progression, individually and simultaneously, results in predictable changes in cell fate and number. This demonstrates that different daughter cell proliferation modes can be integrated with temporal competence changes, and suggests a novel mechanism for coordinately controlling neuronal subtype numbers.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Company of Biologists, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74790 (URN)10.1242/dev.074500 (DOI)000300259800005 ()
    Note

    funding agencies|Swedish Research Council||Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation||Swedish Cancer Foundation||

    Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2019-03-13
    3. Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e1005984Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Notch pathway controls proliferation during development and in adulthood, and is frequently affected in many disorders. However, the genetic sensitivity and multi-layered transcriptional properties of the Notch pathway has made its molecular decoding challenging. Here, we address the complexity of Notch signaling with respect to proliferation, using the developing Drosophila CNS as model. We find that a Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade specifically controls daughter, but not progenitor proliferation. Additionally, we find that different E(spl)-HLH genes are required in different neuroblast lineages. The Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade alters daughter proliferation by regulating four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String/Cdc25, E2f and Dacapo (mammalian p21(CIP1)/p27(KIP1)/p57(Kip2)). ChIP and DamID analysis of Su(H) and E(spl)-HLH indicates direct transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle genes, and of the Notch pathway itself. These results point to a multi-level signaling model and may help shed light on the dichotomous proliferative role of Notch signaling in many other systems.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128759 (URN)10.1371/journal.pgen.1005984 (DOI)000375231900032 ()27070787 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [KAW2012.0101]; Swedish Research Council [621-2010-5214]; Swedish Cancer Foundation [120531]

    Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2019-03-13
    4. sequoia controls the type I>0 daughter proliferation switch in the developing Drosophila nervous system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>sequoia controls the type I>0 daughter proliferation switch in the developing Drosophila nervous system
    2016 (English)In: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 143, no 20, p. 3774-3784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Neural progenitors typically divide asymmetrically to renew themselves, while producing daughters with more limited potential. In the Drosophila embryonic ventral nerve cord, neuroblasts initially produce daughters that divide once to generate two neurons/glia (type I proliferation mode). Subsequently, many neuroblasts switch to generating daughters that differentiate directly (type 0). This programmed type I&gt;0 switch is controlled by Notch signaling, triggered at a distinct point of lineage progression in each neuroblast. However, how Notch signaling onset is gated was unclear. We recently identified Sequoia (Seq), a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor with homology to Drosophila Tramtrack (Ttk) and the positive regulatory domain (PRDM) family, as important for lineage progression. Here, we find that seq mutants fail to execute the type I&gt;0 daughter proliferation switch and also display increased neuroblast proliferation. Genetic interaction studies reveal that seq interacts with the Notch pathway, and seq furthermore affects expression of a Notch pathway reporter. These findings suggest that seq may act as a context-dependent regulator of Notch signaling, and underscore the growing connection between Seq, Ttk, the PRDM family and Notch signaling.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    The Company of Biologists Ltd, 2016
    Keywords
    Lineage tree, Cell cycle, Asymmetric division, Combinatorial control, Notch
    National Category
    Cell and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell Biology Medical Biotechnology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132739 (URN)10.1242/dev.139998 (DOI)000393452500013 ()27578794 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsradet); Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse); Swedish Cancer Foundation (Cancerfonden)

    Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
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    Genetic pathways controlling CNS development: The role of Notch signaling in regulating daughter cell proliferation in Drosophila
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  • 78.
    Björnström-Karlsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Turina, Dean
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strid, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0097129-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The intravenous anaesthetic propofol retracts neurites and reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. Orexin A (OA) is an endogenous neuropeptide regulating wakefulness and may counterbalance anaesthesia. We aim to investigate if OA interacts with anaesthetics by inhibition of the propofol-induced neurite retraction. Methods: In primary cortical cell cultures from newborn rats brains, live cell light microscopy was used to measure neurite retraction after propofol (2 mu M) treatment with or without OA (10 nM) application. The intracellular signalling involved was tested using a protein kinase C (PKC) activator [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] and inhibitors of Rho-kinase (HA-1077), phospholipase D (PLD) [5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)], PKC (staurosporine), and a PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. Changes in PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation were detected with Western blot. Results: The neurite retraction induced by propofol is blocked by Rho-kinase and PMA. OA blocks neurite retraction induced by propofol, and this inhibitory effect could be prevented by FIPI, staurosporine and PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. OA increases via PLD and propofol decreases PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation, a crucial step in the activation of PKC epsilon. Conclusions: Rho-kinase is essential for propofol-induced neurite retraction in cortical neuronal cells. Activation of PKC inhibits neurite retraction caused by propofol. OA blocks propofol-induced neurite retraction by a PLD/PKC epsilon-mediated pathway, and PKC epsilon maybe the key enzyme where the wakefulness and anaesthesia signal pathways converge.

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  • 79.
    Blockhuys, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Chalmers, Sweden.
    Liu, Na
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rani Agarwal, Nisha
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Enejder, Annika
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Loitto, Vesa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    X-radiation enhances the collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of colon cancer cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 71390-71399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer treatment still fails with local and distant relapses of the disease. It is hypothesized that radiotherapy could stimulate cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of X-radiation on collagen type I strap formation potential, i.e. matrix remodeling associated with mesenchymal cell migration, and behaviors of SW480, SW620, HCT116 p53(+/+) and HCT116 p53(-/-) colon cancer cells. We determined a radiation-induced increase in collagen type I strap formation and migration potentials of SW480 and HCT116 p53(+/+). Further studies with HCT116 p53(+/+), indicated that after X-radiation strap forming cells have an increased motility. More, we detected a decrease in adhesion potential and mature integrin beta 1 expression, but no change in non-muscle myosin II expression for HCT116 p53(+/+) after X-radiation. Integrin beta 1 neutralization resulted in a decreased cell adhesion and collagen type I strap formation in both sham and X-radiated conditions. Our study indicates collagen type I strap formation as a potential mechanism of colon cancer cells with increased migration potential after X-radiation, and suggests that other molecules than integrin beta 1 and non-muscle myosin II are responsible for the radiation-induced collagen type I strap formation potential of colon cancer cells. This work encourages further molecular investigation of radiation-induced migration to improve rectal cancer treatment outcome.

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  • 80.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 29824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and T-reg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and T-reg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the T-reg cell fraction was lower (p amp;lt; 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more T-reg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger.

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  • 81.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Cox-2 inhibition and the composition of inflammatory cell populations during early and mid-time tendon healing2017In: Muscles, ligaments and Tendons journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During early tendon healing, the cells within the regenerating tissue are, to a large part, inflammatory leukocytes (CD45+). In a rat Achilles tendon healing model, the inflammation resolves between 5 and 10 days. In the same model, Cox inhibitors (NSAIDs) impair healing when given during the first 5 days, but have a positive effect if given later. We tested the hypothesis that a Cox inhibitor would exert these effects by influencing inflammation, and thereby the composition of the inflammatory cell subpopulations.Methods: Achilles tendon transection was performed in 44 animals. Animals were randomized to either parecoxib or saline injections. Healing was evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 after surgery and by flow cytometry day 3 and 10.Results: Cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness were reduced by parecoxib 31, 33, and 25% respectively (p=0.005, p=0.002, and p=0.005). By flow cytometry, there was a strong effect of time (p<0.001) on virtually all inflammatory cell subpopulations (CD45, CD11b, CD68, CCR7, CD163, CD206, CD3, CD4), but no significant effect of parecoxib at any time point.Conclusion: The results suggest that the negative effects of Cox inhibitors on tendon healing might be exerted mainly via mechanisms not directly related to inflammatory cells.

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  • 82.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Sander
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    The Role of MicroRNA-200 in Progression of Human Colorectal and Breast Cancer2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 84815-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer has been studied extensively in vitro, but involvement of the EMT in tumorigenesis in vivo is largely unknown. We investigated the potential of microRNAs as clinical markers and analyzed participation of the EMT-associated microRNA-200 ZEB E-cadherin pathway in cancer progression. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was quantified by real-time RT-PCR analysis of fresh-frozen and microdissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary colorectal tumors, normal colon mucosa, and matched liver metastases. MicroRNA expression was validated by in situ hybridization and after in vitro culture of the malignant cells. To assess EMT as a predictive marker, factors considered relevant in colorectal cancer were investigated in 98 primary breast tumors from a treatment-randomized study. Associations between the studied EMTmarkers were found in primary breast tumors and in colorectal liver metastases. MicroRNA-200 expression in epithelial cells was lower in malignant mucosa than in normal mucosa, and was also decreased in metastatic compared to non-metastatic colorectal cancer. Low microRNA-200 expression in colorectal liver metastases was associated with bad prognosis. In breast cancer, low levels of microRNA-200 were related to reduced survival and high expression of microRNA-200 was predictive of benefit from radiotheraphy. MicroRNA-200 was associated with ER positive status, and inversely correlated to HER2 and overactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, that was associated with high ZEB1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that the stability of microRNAs makes them suitable as clinical markers and that the EMT-related microRNA-200 - ZEB - E-cadherin signaling pathway is connected to established clinical characteristics and can give useful prognostic and treatment-predictive information in progressive breast and colorectal cancers.

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  • 83.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Haiying
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Costa da Silva, Bruno
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vincent, Theresa
    Departments of Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA / Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lyden, David
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    miR-18a is regulated between progressive compartments of cancers, and incorporated in exosomes with the potential of creating premetastatic niches and predict cancer outcome2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of death for many cancer patients is the spread of the cancer via metastasis. Even so, there are still a lack of knowledge regarding the metastasis process. This study was performed to investigate the role of metastamirs in exosomes and their metastatic patterns. We used the well-established isogeneic murine cancer model of low metastatic 67NR cells, mimicking luminal/basal breast tumors, and highly metastatic 4T1 cells with characteristics of basal breast  tumors. We studied the exosomal properties and pre-metastatic effects in this metastasis model and compared human materials and exosomes of several other tumor types. Our data clearly demonstrated that exosomes from the highly metastatic cells home to the metastatic organs of their parental cells whereas exosomes from cells with low metastatic potential mostly located to lymph nodes. The exosome protein cargos also resembled their parental cells and potentially affects their target organs, and cells, differently. Furthermore, the exosomes from the highly metastatic cells had a more pronounced effect on tumor growth and pre-metastatic changes than the low metastatic exosomes. The microRNA-18a, a predictor of metastasis, was present to a higher extent in metastatic exosomes as compared to low metastatic exosomes, and altered the tumor progressive properties. Our findings support the role of exomirs as important players in the metastatic process, the value as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 84. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Studies on interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our conceptual understanding of hemostasis is still heavily influenced by outdated experimental models wherein the hemostatic activity of platelets and coagulation factors are understood and studied in isolation. Although perhaps convenient for researchers and clinicians, this reductionist view is negated by an ever increasing body of evidence pointing towards an intimate relationship between the two phases of hemostasis, marked by strong interdependence. In this thesis, I have focused on factual and proposed interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis, and on how these interfaces can be studied.

    In my first project, we zoomed in on the mechanisms behind the well-known phenomenon of thrombin-induced platelet activation, an important event linking secondary to primary hemostasis. In our study, we examined how thrombin makes use of certain domains for high-affinity binding to substrates, called exosite I and II, to activate platelets via PAR4. We show that thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4 is critically dependent on exosite II, and that blockage of exosite II with different substances virtually eliminates PAR4 activation. Apart from providing new insights into the mechanisms by which thrombin activates PAR4, these results expand our knowledge of the antithrombotic actions of various endogenous proteins such as members of the serpin superfamily, which inhibit interactions with exosite II. Additionally, we show that inhibition of exosite II could be a feasible pharmacological strategy for achieving selective blockade of PAR4.

    In my second project, we examined the controversial issue of whether platelets can initiate the coagulation cascade by means of contact activation, a hypothesis which, if true, could provide a direct link between primary and secondary hemostasis. In contrast to previous results, our findings falsify this hypothesis, and show that some of the erroneous conclusions drawn from earlier studies can be explained by inappropriate experimental models unsuitable for the study of plateletcoagulation interfaces.

    My third project comprised an assessment of the methodological difficulties encountered when trying to measure the ability of platelets to initiate secondary hemostasis by the release of microparticles expressing tissue factor. Our study shows that the functional assays available for this purpose are highly susceptible to error caused by artificial contact activation. These results could help to improve the methodology of future research and thus pave the way for new insights into the roles of tissue factor-bearing microparticles in the pathophysiology of various thrombotic disorders.

    From a personal perspective, my PhD project has been a fascinating scientific odyssey into the largely unexplored interfaces between primary and secondary hemostasis. Looking forward, my ambition is to continue our work exploring platelet-coagulation interactions and to translate these insights into clinically meaningful information, which may someday improve the treatment of patients with bleeding and/or thrombosis.

    List of papers
    1. Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4: pivotal role for exosite II
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4: pivotal role for exosite II
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    2014 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR1 and PAR4 is an important event in haemostasis. Although the underlying mechanisms responsible for ensuring efficient PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied, the potential involvement of recognitions sites outside the active site of the protease in thrombin-induced PAR4 activation is largely unknown. In this study, we developed a new assay to assess the importance of exosite I and II for PAR4 activation with alpha- and gamma-thrombin. Surprisingly, we found that exosite II is critical for activation of PAR4. We also show that this dependency on exosite II likely represents a new mechanism, as it is unaffected by blockage of the previously known interaction between thrombin and glycoprotein Ib alpha.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Schattauer Gmbh, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111269 (URN)10.1160/TH13-12-1013 (DOI)000341547000015 ()24990072 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [K2010-65X-15060-07-3, K2013-65X-15060-10-3]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [20100219, 20120263]

    Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII
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    2013 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 23, p. 3818-3824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The recent claim that stimulated platelets activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation by the release of polyphosphates has been considered a breakthrough in hemostasis research. In little more than 3 years, the original publication by Muller et al has been cited greater than100 times. However, none of the citing articles has sought to independently validate this potentially paradigm-shifting concept. To this end, we performed extensive experimentation in vitro and in vivo in an attempt to verify the claim that factor XII (FXII) is primarily activated by stimulated platelets. In contrast to the original assertion, platelet-derived polyphosphates were found to be weak activators of FXII, with a FXIIa-generating activity of less than10% compared with equivalent concentrations of kaolin. Using different coagulation assays, it was shown that platelet contribution to whole blood coagulation was unrelated to the generation of activated FXII in vitro. Additionally, key results used to verify the hypothesis in the original study in vivo were found to be irreproducible. We conclude that platelet-derived polyphosphates are not physiologically relevant activators of FXII.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society of Hematology, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104301 (URN)10.1182/blood-2013-05-499384 (DOI)000329735000021 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2020-01-23
    3. Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions
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    2014 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 10, p. 1692-1694Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Society of Hematology, 2014
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111531 (URN)10.1182/blood-2014-04-566067 (DOI)000342762300027 ()25190755 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Contact activation: important to consider when measuring the contribution of tissue factor-bearing microparticles to thrombin generation using phospholipid-containing reagents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact activation: important to consider when measuring the contribution of tissue factor-bearing microparticles to thrombin generation using phospholipid-containing reagents
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 515-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background A commercial MP reagent containing phospholipids is used for thrombin generation (TG) measurements to estimate the procoagulant activity of microparticles (MPs). Previous reports have shown that contact activation affects TG when TF levels are low, and that addition of phospholipids might augment this effect. Objectives To quantify the impact of contact activation on TG in the presence of phospholipids and low/no TF, as is the case using a commercially available MP-reagent. Methods Thrombin generation was analyzed using MP- or platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-reagent in the presence and absence of corn trypsin inhibitor and anti-TF antibodies, respectively. To quantify the impact of different experimental parameters on contact activation, microparticle-depleted plasma was analyzed in the presence of different concentrations of phospholipids, TF and/or contact activating agents (kaolin). Results Even with low contact activating blood collection tubes, substantial thrombin generation was observed with the MP-reagent, but this was completely inhibited by addition of corn trypsin inhibitor. Control experiments illustrate that the phospholipids in the reagent play a major role in enhancing TG initiated by FXIIa. Even with the PRP-reagent, which is recommended for determining the content of phospholipids from MPs, TG was partly dependent on contact activation. Conclusions Contact activation plays a major role in TG when using reagents/samples containing phospholipids but little or no tissue factor. This needs to be considered and accounted for in future clinical studies using TG to assess the procoagulant activity of MPs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley, 2014
    Keywords
    cell-derived microparticles; thromboplastin; blood coagulation; thrombin; factor XII
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106682 (URN)10.1111/jth.12503 (DOI)000334157000012 ()
    Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-19 Last updated: 2020-01-23
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  • 85.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Contact activation: important to consider when measuring the contribution of tissue factor-bearing microparticles to thrombin generation using phospholipid-containing reagents2014In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 515-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A commercial MP reagent containing phospholipids is used for thrombin generation (TG) measurements to estimate the procoagulant activity of microparticles (MPs). Previous reports have shown that contact activation affects TG when TF levels are low, and that addition of phospholipids might augment this effect. Objectives To quantify the impact of contact activation on TG in the presence of phospholipids and low/no TF, as is the case using a commercially available MP-reagent. Methods Thrombin generation was analyzed using MP- or platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-reagent in the presence and absence of corn trypsin inhibitor and anti-TF antibodies, respectively. To quantify the impact of different experimental parameters on contact activation, microparticle-depleted plasma was analyzed in the presence of different concentrations of phospholipids, TF and/or contact activating agents (kaolin). Results Even with low contact activating blood collection tubes, substantial thrombin generation was observed with the MP-reagent, but this was completely inhibited by addition of corn trypsin inhibitor. Control experiments illustrate that the phospholipids in the reagent play a major role in enhancing TG initiated by FXIIa. Even with the PRP-reagent, which is recommended for determining the content of phospholipids from MPs, TG was partly dependent on contact activation. Conclusions Contact activation plays a major role in TG when using reagents/samples containing phospholipids but little or no tissue factor. This needs to be considered and accounted for in future clinical studies using TG to assess the procoagulant activity of MPs.

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  • 86.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sanchez Centellas, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallstedt, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR4: pivotal role for exosite II2014In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation via PAR1 and PAR4 is an important event in haemostasis. Although the underlying mechanisms responsible for ensuring efficient PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied, the potential involvement of recognitions sites outside the active site of the protease in thrombin-induced PAR4 activation is largely unknown. In this study, we developed a new assay to assess the importance of exosite I and II for PAR4 activation with alpha- and gamma-thrombin. Surprisingly, we found that exosite II is critical for activation of PAR4. We also show that this dependency on exosite II likely represents a new mechanism, as it is unaffected by blockage of the previously known interaction between thrombin and glycoprotein Ib alpha.

  • 87.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Response: platelets do not generate activated factor XII--how inappropriate experimental models have led to misleading conclusions2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 10, p. 1692-1694Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Macwan, Ankit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Södergren, Anna L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Platelet function testing at low platelet counts: When can you trust your analysis?2019In: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, ISSN 2475-0379, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 285-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although flow cytometry is often brought forward as a preferable method in the setting of thrombocytopenia, the relative effects of low sample counts on results from flow cytometry-based platelet function testing (FC-PFT) in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) has not been reported. Objectives: To compare the effects of different sample platelet counts (10, 50, 100, and 200x10(9)L(-1)) on platelet activation measured with FC-PFT, LTA, and MEA using the same anticoagulant and agonist concentrations as for the commercial MEA test. Methods: Platelets were stimulated with two commonly used platelet agonists (ADP [6.5 mu molL(-1)] and PAR1-AP [TRAP, 32 mu molL(-1)]). The specified sample platelet counts were obtained by combining platelet-rich and platelet poor hirudinized plasma in different proportions with or without red blood cells. Results: For FC, P-selectin exposure and PAC-1 binding was reduced at 10x10(9)L(-1) after stimulation with PAR1-AP (by approximately 20% and 50%, respectively), but remained relatively unchanged when ADP was used as agonist (n=9). The platelet count-dependent effects observed with PAR1-AP were eliminated when samples were pre-incubated with apyrase, implying that reduced purinergic signaling was the main underlying factor (n=5). Both aggregometry-based PFTs showed a 50% reduction at 50x10(9)L(-1) and more than 80% reduction at 10x10(9)L(-1), irrespective of agonist used (n=7). Conclusions: Although FC-PFT is generally preferable to aggregometry-based PFTs in situations with low sample platelet counts, a careful optimization of experimental parameters is still required in order to eliminate platelet count-related effects.

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  • 89.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Flow cytometry-based platelet function testing is predictive of symptom burden in a cohort of bleeders2018In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 512-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelet function disorders (PFDs) are common in patients with mild bleeding disorders (MBDs), yet the significance of laboratory findings suggestive of a PFD remain unclear due to the lack of evidence for a clinical correlation between the test results and the patient phenotype. Herein, we present the results from a study evaluating the potential utility of platelet function testing using whole-blood flow cytometry in a cohort of 105 patients undergoing investigation for MBD. Subjects were evaluated with a test panel comprising two different activation markers (fibrinogen binding and P-selectin exposure) and four physiologically relevant platelet agonists (ADP, PAR1-AP, PAR4-AP, and CRP-XL). Abnormal test results were identified by comparison with reference ranges constructed from 24 healthy controls or with the fifth percentile of the entire patient cohort. We found that the abnormal test results are predictive of bleeding symptom severity, and that the greatest predictive strength was achieved using a subset of the panel, comparing measurements of fibrinogen binding after activation with all four agonists with the fifth percentile of the patient cohort (p=0.00008, hazard ratio 8.7; 95% CI 2.5-40). Our results suggest that whole-blood flow cytometry-based platelet function testing could become a feasible alternative for the investigation of MBDs. We also show that platelet function testing using whole-blood flow cytometry could provide a clinically relevant quantitative assessment of platelet-related hemostasis.

  • 90.
    Bolshakova, Anastayia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Russian Academic Science, Russia; St Petersburg State Polytech University, Russia.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pinaev, George
    Russian Academic Science, Russia.
    Petukhova, Olga
    Russian Academic Science, Russia.
    EGF-induced dynamics of NF-kappa B and F-actin in A431 cells spread on fibronectin2015In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 144, no 3, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate the role of actin cytoskeleton in the regulation of NF-kappa B transcription factor, we analyzed its involvement in the intracellular transport and nuclear translocation of the NF-kappa B RelA/p65 subunit in A431 epithelial cells stimulated with fibronectin and EGF. Live cell imaging and confocal microscopy showed that EGF activated the movement of RelA/p65 in the cytoplasm. Upon cell adhesion to fibronectin, RelA/p65 concentrated onto stress fibers, and EGF stimulated its subsequent allocation to membrane ruffles, newly organized stress fibers, and discrete cytoplasmic actin-rich patches. These patches also contained alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4, vinculin, paxillin, alpha-tubulin, and PI3-kinase. Cytochalasin D treatment resulted in RelA/p65 redistribution to actin-containing aggregates, with the number of cells with RelA/p65-containing clusters in the cytoplasm increasing under the effect of EGF. Furthermore, EGF proved to induce RelA/p65 accumulation in the nucleus after cell pretreatment with actin-stabilizing and actin-destabilizing agents, which was accompanied by changes in its DNA-binding activity after either EGF stimulation or cytochalasin D treatment. Thus, EGF treatment of A431 cells results in simultaneous nuclear RelA/p65 translocation and cytoplasmic redistribution, with part of RelA/p65 pool forming a very tight association with actin-rich structures. Apparently, nuclear transport is independent on drug stabilization or destabilization of the actin.

  • 91.
    Boman, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. CBD Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boxer, Adam
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Rojas, Julio C.
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Seeley, William W.
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Karydas, Anna
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Miller, Bruce
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svenningsson, Per
    Translational Neuropharmacology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Distinct lysosomal network protein profiles in parkinsonian syndrome cerebrospinal fluid2016In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of biomarkers for diagnosis, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that levels and profiles of lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be changed in these parkinsonian syndromes.

    Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from Parkinson’s disease patients (n=18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients, corticobasal syndrome (n=6) and progressive supranuclear palsy (n=5), pathologically diagnosed progressive supranuclear palsy (n=8) and corticobasal degeneration patients (n=7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of the same number of age and gender matched individuals. Lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting.

    Results: Lysosomal network proteins have markedly different cerebrospinal fluid protein levels and profiles in Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in Parkinson´s disease; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in progressive supranuclear palsy; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in corticobasal degeneration.

    Conclusions: Lysosomal network proteins hold promise of being interesting novel candidates for biomarker studies and for elucidating disease mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, but further validation studies will be needed to assess the specificity and the predictive value of these proteins in CSF.

  • 92.
    Bonkoungou, Isidore Juste O.
    et al.
    Univ Ouaga, Burkina Faso; Natl Publ Hlth Lab, Burkina Faso.
    Ouedraogo, Nafissatou
    Univ Ouaga, Burkina Faso.
    Tamini, Laure
    Univ Ouaga, Burkina Faso; Charles de Gaulle Pediat Univ Hosp, Burkina Faso.
    Teguera, Rabieta Kouboura
    Natl Publ Hlth Lab, Burkina Faso.
    Yameogo, Pouire
    Natl Publ Hlth Lab, Burkina Faso.
    Drabo, Maxime Koine
    Natl Publ Hlth Lab, Burkina Faso.
    Medah, Isaie
    Minist Hlth, Burkina Faso.
    Barro, Nicolas
    Univ Ouaga, Burkina Faso.
    Sharma, Sumit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rotavirus and norovirus in children with severe diarrhea in Burkina Faso before rotavirus vaccine introduction2018In: Journal of Medical Virology, ISSN 0146-6615, E-ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 90, no 9, p. 1453-1460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burkina Faso introduced rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) to the national immunization program in November 2013. This study describes the detection rates, clinical profiles, and molecular epidemiology of rotavirus and norovirus (NoV) infections among children amp;lt;5 years hospitalized (n=154) because of acute diarrhea in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, from December 2012 to November 2013, just before the start of vaccination. Overall, 44% and 23% of fecal samples were positive for rotavirus and NoV, respectively, most of them detected during the cold dry season (December-March). The predominant G/P combinations were G12P[8] (47%) and G6P[6] (30%). G2P[4] (n=3), G12P[6] (n=3), and G6P[8] (n=1) werealso detected. Nearly all (94%) successfully genotyped NoV strains belonged to genotype GII.4. The predominance of rotavirus and NoV was noteworthy in the age group 6 months, with 67% rotavirus and 22% NoV, respectively. Vomiting was significantly more common among rotavirus-infected children. To conclude, this study shows high detection rates of both rotavirus and NoV in children with severe diarrhea in Burkina Faso just before the introduction of rotavirus group A vaccination. The results can be used for estimating the impact of rotavirus group A vaccination, which started in the end of 2013. Furthermore, this study shows that the G6P[6] rotavirus strains emerging in Burkina Faso in 2010 is now established as a regionally important genotype.

  • 93.
    Borg, O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wille, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjellander, P.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Bergvall, U. A.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Chirico, J.
    SVA, Sweden.
    Lundkvist, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Expansion of spatial and host range of Puumala virus in Sweden: an increasing threat for humans?2017In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 8, p. 1642-1648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hantaviruses are globally distributed and cause severe human disease. Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is the most common species in Northern Europe, and the only hantavirus confirmed to circulate in Sweden, restricted to the northern regions of the country. In this study, we aimed to further add to the natural ecology of PUUV in Sweden by investigating prevalence, and spatial and host species infection patterns. Specifically, we wanted to ascertain whether PUUV was present in the natural reservoir, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) further south than Dalalven river, in south-central Sweden, and whether PUUV can be detected in other rodent species in addition to the natural reservoir. In total, 559 animals were collected at Grimso (59 degrees 43 N; 15 degrees 28 E), Sala (59 degrees 55 N; 16 degrees 36 E) and Bogesund (59 degrees 24 N; 18 degrees 14 E) in south-central Sweden between May 2013 and November 2014. PUUV ELISA-reactive antibodies were found both in 2013 (22/295) and in 2014 (18/264), and nine samples were confirmed as PUUV-specific by focus reduction neutralization test. Most of the PUUV-specific samples were from the natural host, the bank vole, but also from other rodent hosts, indicating viral spill-over. Finally, we showed that PUUV is present in more highly populated central Sweden.

  • 94.
    Braian, Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hogea, Valentin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Activate Human Macrophages2013In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, E-ISSN 1662-8128, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 591-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  • 95.
    Braian, Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Mattias
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brighenti, Susanna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parasa, Venkata R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A 3D Human Lung Tissue Model for Functional Studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection2015In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 104, p. 1-9, article id e53084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis (TB) still holds a major threat to the health of people worldwide, and there is a need for cost-efficient but reliable models to help us understand the disease mechanisms and advance the discoveries of new treatment options. In vitro cell cultures of monolayers or co-cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) environment and tissue responses. Herein, we describe an innovative in vitro model of a human lung tissue, which holds promise to be an effective tool for studying the complex events that occur during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). The 3D tissue model consists of tissue-specific epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which are cultured in a matrix of collagen on top of a porous membrane. Upon air exposure, the epithelial cells stratify and secrete mucus at the apical side. By introducing human primary macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis to the tissue model, we have shown that immune cells migrate into the infected-tissue and form early stages of TB granuloma. These structures recapitulate the distinct feature of human TB, the granuloma, which is fundamentally different or not commonly observed in widely used experimental animal models. This organotypic culture method enables the 3D visualization and robust quantitative analysis that provides pivotal information on spatial and temporal features of host cell-pathogen interactions. Taken together, the lung tissue model provides a physiologically relevant tissue micro-environment for studies on TB. Thus, the lung tissue model has potential implications for both basic mechanistic and applied studies. Importantly, the model allows addition or manipulation of individual cell types, which thereby widens its use for modelling a variety of infectious diseases that affect the lungs.

  • 96.
    Brighenti, S.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Toward the understanding of human tuberculosis2018In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 284, no 2, p. 113-115Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 97.
    Bucardo, F.
    et al.
    National Autonomous University of Leon UNAN Leon, Nicaragua.
    Gonzalez, F.
    National Autonomous University of Leon UNAN Leon, Nicaragua.
    Reyes, Y.
    National Autonomous University of Leon UNAN Leon, Nicaragua.
    Blandon, P.
    National Autonomous University of Leon UNAN Leon, Nicaragua.
    Saif, L.
    Ohio State University, OH USA.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Seroprevalence in Household Raised Pigs Indicate High Exposure to GII Noroviruses in Rural Nicaragua2016In: Zoonoses and Public Health, ISSN 1863-1959, E-ISSN 1863-2378, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 600-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about porcine norovirus (PoNoV), genetically similar to human NoV (HuNoV), is limited from rural areas where household-raised pigs are heavily exposed to faecal material which could facilitate transmission. Histoblood group antigens (HBGAs) are known susceptibility factors to NoV in humans and in a germfree piglet model but their role in susceptibility in the porcine population remains unknown. This study reports: (i) the seroprevalence and antibody titres to human norovirus (NoV) VLPs in household raised pigs; (ii) the distribution of HBGAs in relation to NoV IgG antibody titres and further characterization by blocking of GII. 4 VLP binding to pig gastric mucins (PGM). The majority of pigs were seropositive to all three VLPs tested (58-70%) with seropositivity and cross-reactivity increasing significantly with age. However, pig sera could not block the binding of NoV GII. 4 VLPs (Dijon) to PGM suggesting no previous infection with this genotype. The majority of the pigs were H-positive (84%), a susceptibility factor for human infections. IgG antibody titres were however higher in H-negative (GMT = 247) as compared with H-positive (GMT = 57) pigs, but after age stratification, this difference in antibody titres was only observed in pigs = 1 month of age. In conclusion, serological data show that the porcine population of Nicaragua is highly exposed to NoV infections, and the association to HBGAs warrants further investigation.

  • 98.
    Bucardo, Filemon
    et al.
    National Autonomous University of Leon, Nicaragua.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Impact of vaccination on the molecular epidemiology and evolution of group A rotaviruses in Latin America and factors affecting vaccine efficacy2015In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 34, p. 106-113Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite high rotavirus (RV) vaccine coverage (similar to 83%) and good effectiveness (similar to 77%) against RV-diarrhea hospitalization, RV is still contributing to the burden of diarrhea that persists in hospital settings in several Latin American countries, where RV vaccination is being implemented. Due to the extensive genomic and antigenic diversity, among co-circulating human RV, a major concern has been that the introduction of RV vaccination could exert selection pressure leading to higher prevalence of strains not included in the vaccines and/or emergence of new strains, thus, reducing the efficacy of vaccination. Here we review the molecular epidemiology of RV in Latin America and explore issues of RV evolution and selection in light of vaccination. We further explore etiologies behind the large burden of diarrhea remaining after vaccination in some countries and discuss plausible reasons for vaccine failures. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 99.
    Bucardo, Filemon
    et al.
    Natl Autonomous Univ Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reyes, Yaoska
    Natl Autonomous Univ Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Gonzalez, Fredman
    Natl Autonomous Univ Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Sharma, Sumit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The Lewis A phenotype is a restriction factor for Rotateq and Rotarix vaccine-take in Nicaraguan children2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) and the Lewis and secretor antigens are associated with susceptibility to rotavirus infection in a genotype-dependent manner. Nicaraguan children were prospectively enrolled in two cohorts vaccinated with either RotaTeq RV5 (n = 68) or Rotarix RV1 (n = 168). Lewis and secretor antigens were determined by saliva phenotyping and genotyping. Seroconversion was defined as a 4-fold increase in plasma IgA antibody titer 1 month after administration of the first dose of the vaccine. Regardless of the vaccine administered, significantly fewer of the children with Lewis A phenotype (0/14) seroconverted after receiving the first vaccine dose compared to 26% (45/175) of those with the Lewis B phenotype and 32% (15/47) of the Lewis negative individuals (P amp;lt; 0.01). Furthermore, following administration of the RV1 vaccine, secretor-positive ABO blood group B children seroconverted to a significantly lesser extent (5%) compared to secretor-positive children with ABO blood groups A (26%) and O (27%) (P amp;lt; 0.05). Other factors such as pre-vaccination titers, sex, breastfeeding, and calprotectin levels did not influence vaccine-take. Differences in HBGA expression appear to be a contributing factor in the discrepancy in vaccine-take and thus, in vaccine efficacy in different ethnic populations.

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  • 100.
    Bucardo, Filemon
    et al.
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Reyes, Yaoska
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Bowman, Natalie
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Gruber, Joann F.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Vinje, Jan
    National Centre Immunizat and Resp Disease, GA USA.
    Espinoza, Felix
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Paniagua, Margarita
    National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua.
    Balmaseda, Angel
    Minist Heatlh, Nicaragua.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pediatric norovirus GII.4 infections in Nicaragua, 1999-20152017In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 55, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Investigate clinical and epidemiological factors of pediatric GII.4 norovirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in Nicaragua between 1999 and 2015. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed laboratory and epidemiologic data from 1,790 children amp;lt;= 7 years with AGE from 6 hospitals in Nicaragua (n = 538), and 3 community clinics (n = 919) and households (n = 333) in Leon, between 1999 and 2015. Moreover, asymptomatic children from community clinics (n = 162) and households (n = 105) were enrolled. Norovirus was detected by real-time PCR and genotyped by sequencing the N-terminal and shell region of the capsid gene. Results: Norovirus was found in 19% (n = 338) and 12% (n = 32) of children with and without AGE, respectively. In total, 20 genotypes including a tentatively new genotype were detected. Among children with AGE, the most common genotypes were GII.4 (53%), GII.14 (7%), GII.3 (6%) and GI.3 (6%). In contrast, only one (1.4%) GII.4 was found in asymptomatic children. The prevalence of GII.4 infections was significantly higher in children between 7 and 12 months of age. The prevalence of GII.4 was lowest in households (38%), followed by community clinics (50%) and hospitals (75%). Several different GII.4 variants were detected and their emergence followed the global temporal trend. Conclusions: Overall our study found the predominance of pediatric GII.4 norovirus infections in Nicaragua mostly occurring in children between 7 and 12 months of age, implicating GII.4 as the main norovirus vaccine target.

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