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  • 51.
    Andersson, Tony P. M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Samuel P. S.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myosin V is the rate-determinative step in Xenopus melanophore aggregationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Xenopus melanophores, melatonin induce melanosome aggregation via activation of its receptor Mel1c, coupled to inhibitory G proteins, adenylate cyclase deactivation, cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) decrease, protein kinase A inhibition, protein phophatase 2A activation, and serine/threonine dephosphorylations. Myosin V is the motor protein responsible for transporting melanosomes along actin filaments. Myosin V has been demonstrated to be necessary for melanosome dispersion and to keep the dispersed state. We have previously shown that melatonin induce activation of phosphoinositide-3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation of a 280-kDa protein. Here we characterize the kinetics of latrunculin A-induced aggregation, and show that latrunculin A aggregate melanophores with the same kinetics as melatonin. This indicates that the downstream mechanisms might be similar although their primary targets in the cells are totally different. We suggest that both drugs act by inhibiting myosin V, the rate-determinative step for melanosome aggregation. Our data suggest that dynein is not up regulated during aggregation, as previously suggested by others,

  • 52.
    Andrésen, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Yi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jarl, Anngelica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jalal, Shah
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wretlind, Bengt
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Molecular causes for deficient repression in multidrug resistant mutants in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux gene regulator MexRManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 53.
    Arbab, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evaluation of gas mixtures with high-temperature gas sensors based on silicon carbide1994In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 19, no 1-3, p. 562-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field-effect devices with a catalytic metal gate are operated as gas sensors over a large temperature range by the use of 6H-silicon carbide (bandgap 2.9 eV) instead of silicon (1.1 eV) as the semiconducting material. We have produced metal-silicon dioxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) capacitors with platinum as the gate metal that can be operated above 800-degrees-C. The sensitivity of the Pt-MOSiC devices to hydrogen and hydrocarbons was tested in various oxygen atmospheres. The response to mixtures of hydrogen and saturated hydrocarbons indicated the existence of two different sensing mechanisms.

  • 54.
    Arbab, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gas sensors for high temperature operation based on metal oxide silicon carbide (MOSiC) devices1993In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 15, no 1-3, p. 19-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic metal gate-silicon dioxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) capacitors operating to about 800-degrees-C are used as high temperature gas sensor devices. Hydrogen or hydrogen containing molecules, which are dissociated on the catalytic metal surface, create a decrease of the flat band voltage of the MOS capacitor. The MOSiC devices with a platinum gate respond to saturated hydrocarbons in air at concentrations well below the explosion limits.

  • 55.
    Artursson, Tom
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Eklov, T
    Linkoping Univ, SSENCE, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Appl Phys Lab, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Nord Sensor Technol, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden Umea Univ, Chemometr Res Grp, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Martensson, P
    Sjostrom, M
    Linkoping Univ, SSENCE, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Appl Phys Lab, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Nord Sensor Technol, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden Umea Univ, Chemometr Res Grp, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Drift correction for gas sensors using multivariate methods2000In: Journal of Chemometrics, ISSN 0886-9383, E-ISSN 1099-128X, Vol. 14, no 5-6, p. 711-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drift is one of the most serious impairments afflicting gas sensors. It can be seen as a gradual change in the sensor response over a long period of time when the external conditions an constant. This paper presents a new simple drift counteraction method based on PCA and PLS. The basic idea is to remove the drift direction component from the measurements. The direction of the drift, p, is calculated from measurements for a reference gas. Projecting the sample gas measurements on this vector gives the score vector t. The drift component tp(T) can then he removed from the sample gas data, which we call component correction (CC). The method is tested on a data set based on a reduced factorial design with four gases and a concentration gradient of hydrogen. It is found that the method works efficiently for both cases. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 56.
    Arvidsson, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations2008In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 62, p. 214-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 57.
    Arvidsson, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Blood plasma contact activation on silicon titanium and aluminium2007In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 28, p. 1346-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 58.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Berlind, Torun
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Thompson, Dan W
    Department of electrical engineering University of Nebraska.
    Tiwald, T
    Woollam, John A.
    Department of electrical engineering University of Nebraska.
    Infrared ellipsometry studies of temperature effects on multilayers of ANTI-human serum albumin and its antigen2005In: E-MRS,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thompson, Daniel W.
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, USA.
    Woollam, John A.
    J. A. Woollam Co., Inc, Lincoln, NE, USA.
    Infrared ellipsometry studies of thermal stability of protein monolayers and multilayers2008In: Physica Status Solidi. C: Current Topics in Solid State Physics, ISSN 1862-6351, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1438-1441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methodology for studies of effects of heating multilayers of human serum albumin (HSA) and anti-HSA is presented. Multilayers of anti-HSA were prepared on silicon substrates and studied with infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry equipped with a heat stage. The refractive index N = n + ik and the layer thickness are determined and the amide bands are analyzed. It is found that HSA/anti-HSA multilayers are stable for shorter times at temperatures above 100 °C, except for small thickness changes. Also pilot studies of effects of heating monolayers of proteins adsorbed on gold substrates is presented.

  • 60.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Bakker, Jimmy
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Computer screen photo-assisted measurement of intensity or polarization change of light upon interaction with a sample2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Bakker, Jimmy
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    A computer as imaging ellipsometer: biosensing at home2006In: Europtrode VIII,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Gavutis, M
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Phys & Measurement Technol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Vilnius State Univ, Dept Phys, Vilnius, Lithuania Univ Nebraska, Ctr Microelect & Opt Mat Res, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA Univ Nebraska, Dept Elect Engn, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Gustafsson, J
    Schultzberg, M
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Phys & Measurement Technol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Vilnius State Univ, Dept Phys, Vilnius, Lithuania Univ Nebraska, Ctr Microelect & Opt Mat Res, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA Univ Nebraska, Dept Elect Engn, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Zangooie, S
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Phys & Measurement Technol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Vilnius State Univ, Dept Phys, Vilnius, Lithuania Univ Nebraska, Ctr Microelect & Opt Mat Res, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA Univ Nebraska, Dept Elect Engn, Lincoln, NE 68588 USA.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Protein adsorption in thin porous silicon layers2000In: Physica status solidi. A, Applied research, ISSN 0031-8965, E-ISSN 1521-396X, Vol. 182, no 1, p. 515-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous silicon layers with thicknesses in the range 100-400 nm and average porosities in the range 38-71% were prepared by electrochemical anodization. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the microstructure of the layers before protein adsorption. In-situ ellipsometry was then employed tr, monitor the kinetics of fibrinogen and human serum albumin adsorption. At steady state new ellipsometric spectra were recorded to determine the total amount of adsorbed protein. Under the experimental conditions used here, the protein molecules were found to adsorb in the outermost part of the porous layer. However, human serum albumin penetrated into the porous silicon matrix at low pH and high porosity. From a methodological point of view it was found that spectroscopic ellipsometry is an appropriate tool for characterization of the microstructure of porous silicon layers and for in-situ monitoring of protein adsorption in such layers including depth profiling.

  • 63.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Bakker, Jimmy
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Computer screen photo-assisted ellipsometry2006In: 4th Workshop Ellipsometry,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 64.
    Assadi, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interaction of planar polymer Schottky barrier diodes with gaseous substances1994In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 71-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers appear very attractive as sensor materials either as the gas-sensitive component or as a matrix for easy immobilization of a specific substrate. The planar Schottky barrier diode with poly(3-octylthiophene), P3OT, as the semiconductor is used as a sensor for the detection of different gas species. The shifts in the current-voltage (C-V) characteristics as well as the C-V characteristics of the diodes due to water and ethanol vapour, ammonia gas and nitric oxide gases are studied. Nitric oxide and ammonia give the largest and most specific changes of the C-V characteristics. Nitric oxide has a doping effect, which increases the reverse current, while ammonia is the only gas that causes a negative change in the forward bias current of the I-V curve. The planar configuration of the Schottky barrier diode facilitates the absorption of gaseous species in the environment, and provides a simple method for production of gas sensors.

  • 65.
    Bakker, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Biosensor for home use: using the computer as ellipsometer2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Konferensbidrag (muntligt-1:a pris) vid "EUROPT(R)ODE VIII, Tübingen, Germany, 2-5 april

  • 66.
    Bakker, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Fluorescence based sensing in a CSPT setup2005In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Bakker, Jimmy W. P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enhancing classification capabilities of computer screen photo-assisted fluorescence fingerprinting2005In: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 190-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The separation of emission from transmitted light for the fingerprinting of fluorescent substances using a computer screen photo-assisted technique (CSPT) is demonstrated. CSPT is a technique for optical evaluation using a simple cell with just a standard computer set and a web camera as instrumentation. It has been demonstrated to be a versatile system for colorimetric and fluorescent fingerprinting. Here the omnidirectional property of fluorescent emission is utilized to separate it from the background, using a simple optical arrangement compatible with CSPT purposes. This enhances the classification capabilities and makes classification at sub-μM concentrations possible.

  • 68.
    Bakker, Jimmy W.P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Computer screen photo-assisted off-null ellipsometry2006In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 45, no 30, p. 7795-7799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ellipsometric measurement of thickness is demonstrated using a computer screen as a light source and a webcam as a detector, adding imaging off-null ellipsometry to the range of available computer screen photoassisted techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with a simplified theoretical model and a thickness resolution in the nanometer range is achieved. The presented model can be used to optimize the setup for sensitivity. Since the computer screen serves as a homogeneous large area illumination source, which can be tuned to different intensities for different parts of the sample, a large sensitivity range can be obtained without sacrificing thickness resolution.

  • 69.
    Bakker, Jimmy W.P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Immunodetection using computer screen photo-assisted ellipsometry2008In: Physica Status Solidi. C: Current Topics in Solid State Physics, ISSN 1862-6351, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1431-1433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of antibody-antigen reactions is demonstrated by measuring changes in reflectance of light polarized parallel to the plane of incidence, using a computer screen as light source and a web camera as detector, giving results similar to traditional off-null ellipsometry and in accordance with a simplified theoretical model.

  • 70.
    Bakker, Jimmy W.P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Two-dimensional micro array fluorescence fingerprinting with a computer screen photo-assisted technique2005In: Spectral Imaging: Instrumentation, Applications, and Analysis III, 2005, p. 9-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection and classification of fluorescent dyes are demonstrated using a computer screen photo-assisted technique (CSPT). This technique has previously been demonstrated for analyzing fluorescence from 96 wells microtiterplates (200 µl per well) and from a single cuvette with some optics to enhance sensitivity. In this work a custom designed array of wells with a volume of approximately 1 mu;l is used. In order to measure such small volumes without saturating the detector, the transmitted light is masked by placing the sample between two crossed polarizers. This arrangement blocks nearly all the transmitted light, while the emitted light, which is nearly unpolarized, can still be detected. The lowest amount (concentration x volume) of analyte detectable in this setup is about 40 times smaller than in the previous setups.

  • 71.
    Ballem, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Johansson, Emma M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Córdoba, José M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low Temperature Nanocasting of Ultrafine Hematite Nanoparticles using Mesoporous Silica Molds2012In: Powder Technology, ISSN 0032-5910, E-ISSN 1873-328X, Vol. 217, p. 269-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles with very small size, high crystallinity, and narrow size distribution were synthesized by infiltration of Fe(NO3)3.9H2O as an oxide precursor into mesoporous silica (SBA-15 and SBA-16) molds using a wetimpregnation technique. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that during the hydrothermal treatment of the precursor at 140 °C for 2 days, stable α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles inside the silica pores are formed. Subsequent leaching out of the silica template by NaOH resulted in well dispersed nanoparticles with an average diameter of ~ 4 nm.

  • 72.
    Bantikassegn, W.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dannetun, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Salaneck, William R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Absence of Schottky barrier formation in junctions of Al and polypyrrole-polyelectrolyte polymer complexes1993In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 224, no 2, p. 232-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of conducting polypyrrole doped with large polymeric anions of polystyrene-sulphonate are electrochemically prepared to study the metal/polymer junctions. Aluminium and gold contacts are vacuum deposited to form metal/polymer/gold sandwich structures for current-voltage characterization. Photoelectron spectroscopy, using UV and X-ray photons, is carried out to investigate the possible causes of current limitation in the Al/PPy(PSS) junction.

  • 73.
    Baradaran-Heravi, A.
    et al.
    Division of Human Genetics, Immunology Research Centre, Bu-Ali Research Institute, Mashhad, Iran.
    Vakili, R.
    Department of Paediatrics, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.
    Robins, T.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Centre of Molecular Medicine (CMM) L8:02, Karolinska Institutet/Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Ghaemi, N.
    Department of Paediatrics, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran.
    A'Rabi, A.
    Division of Human Genetics, Immunology Research Centre, Bu-Ali Research Institute, Mashhad, Iran.
    Abbaszadegan, M.R.
    Division of Human Genetics, Bu-Ali Research Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 9196773117, Mashhad, Iran, Division of Human Genetics, Immunology Research Centre, Bu-Ali Research Institute, Mashhad, Iran.
    Three novel CYP21A2 mutations and their protein modelling in patients with classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency from northeastern Iran2007In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 335-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) refers to a group of autosomal recessive disorders frequently caused by mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). We describe three novel CYP21A2 mutations in CAH patients. Design and methods: Sequence analysis of the entire CYP21A2 gene followed by molecular modelling was performed in three unrelated classical CAH patients of northeastern Iranian origin. The active (CYP21A2) and pseudogene (CYP21A1P) alleles were screened for the presence of the new variations in controls. Results: Two novel missense mutations, F404S in exon 9 and T450P in exon 10, were found in homozygous forms in two female patients with a salt-wasting (SW) phenotype. These novel variants were screened by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and excluded in 100 unrelated normal alleles. Prediction of clinical severity, based on molecular modelling and sequence conservation, correlates well with the clinical diagnosis of the patients carrying these mutations. The third novel mutation, a small 10-bp deletion in exon 1, g.19_28del, was found in a female patient with a simple virilizing phenotype in a compound heterozygous form with the common intron 2 splice mutation (IVS2-13A/C>G). This frameshift mutation causes a premature stop codon at amino acid position 48, L48X, resulting in a nonfunctional protein. The CYP21A1P pseudogene alleles were also screened and none of these novel mutations could be detected. Conclusions: Three novel mutations were found in the CYP21A2 gene and predicted to drastically impair enzyme activity resulting in severe classic CAH. None of these mutations occurs in the CYP21A1P pseudogene. © 2007 The Authors.

  • 74.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Glavmo, M
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, C
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nytomt, J
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salomonsson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jobson, E
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haggendal, B
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martensson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Response of metal-oxide-silicon carbide sensors to simulated and real exhaust gases1997In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 43, no 1-3, p. 52-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field effect devices based on catalytic metal-oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structures can be used as high temperature gas sensors. The devices are sensitive to hydrocarbons and hydrogen and can be operated up to at least 900 degrees C, which make them suitable for several combustion applications, Simulated and real exhaust gases from a car engine have been studied at sensor temperatures from 200 to 650 degrees C, and it was round that the sensor signal is high for excess hydrocarbon and low for excess oxygen. The response time is less than 100 ms and only a small degradation of the devices was observed after several days of operation. The devices also react to changes of the gas composition In the fuel-rich and fuel-lean region. The devices show an interesting temperature dependence in the fuel rich region.

  • 75.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reversible hydrogen annealing of metal‐oxide‐silicon carbide devices at high temperatures1995In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 67, no 21, p. 3203-3205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a reversible hydrogen annealing effect observed in platinum-silicon dioxide-silicon carbide structures at temperatures above about 650 degrees C. It appears as a decrease of the inversion capacitance in the presence of hydrogen. This phenomenon is shown to depend on hydrogen atoms, created on the catalytic metal, that pass through the oxide and interact with charge generation sites at the oxide-silicon carbide interface. The consequence of the observation for chemical sensors based on silicon carbide is discussed. The results are phenomenological, since no details of the annealing chemistry could be developed from the present experiments. We find, however, that the annealing process and its reversal have activation energies of about 0.9 eV and 2.9 eV/site,respectively.

  • 76.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chemical sensors with catalytic metal gates - Switching behavior and kinetic phase transitions1998In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 145, no 10, p. 3401-3406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid transitions in the response of platinum-based chemical sensors occurring at given hydrogen-oxygen concentration ratios are explained by kinetic phase transitions or switching phenomena on the catalytic metal surface. Below the transition point the response of platinum-insulator silicon carbide devices is small and above the transition it is large. It is found that the critical ratio depends on the operation temperature and the properties of the device. Three different cases are identified, namely, injection-, diffusion-, and reaction-rate-determined transitions. At sufficiently large temperatures the transition is injection limited and occurs at the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen and oxygen in the gas mixture. The implications of the experimental observations on the applications of chemical sensors with catalytic sensing layers are discussed.

  • 77.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kinectic phase transitions and chemical sensors with catalytic metal gates1997In: Chemical & Biological Sensors & Analytical Electrochemical Methods, 1997, Electrochemical Society , 1997, Vol. 97, no 19, p. 1-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid transitions in the response of platinum based chemical sensors occurring at given hydrogen-oxygen concentration ratios are explained by kinetic phase transitions or switching phenomena on the catalytic metal surface. Below the transition point the response of platinum-insulator silicon carbide devices is small and above the transition large and almost saturated. It is found that the critical ratio depends on the operation temperature and the properties of the device. Three different cases are identified, namely injection-, diffusion- and reaction rate determined transitions. At sufficiently large temperatures the transition is injection limited and occurs at the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen and oxygen in the gas mixture. The implications of the experimental observations on the applications of chemical sensors with catalytic sensing layers are discussed.

  • 78. Barkå, Jonas
    et al.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Background compensation in computer screen photo-assisted reflectance fingerprinting2006In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The computer screen photo-assisted technique (CSPT) is a method for the classification of colorimetric assays utilizing ordinary computer sets and web cameras as instrumentation. In CSPT measurements the web camera captures the image of the assay under the screen illumination, and typically a spurious spatial distribution of intensities is overlapped on the image. This issue is examined here, focusing on the effect of the sample and illuminating colors on the spatial modulation of intensity. A method for the selection of colors composing an illuminating sequence that minimizes the spatial variability is proposed. The approach is tested for the classification of different color substances showing improvements up to 53% of the intra/inter cluster distance ratio measured in a PCA space, when compared to randomly chosen colors. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 79.
    Basu, P. K.
    et al.
    Jadavpur University.
    Saha, N.
    Jadavpur University.
    Jana, S. K.
    Jadavpur University.
    Saha, H.
    Jadavpur University.
    Spetz Lloyd, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Basu, S.
    Jadavpur University.
    Schottky Junction Methane Sensors using Electrochmically Grown Nanocrystalline-Nanoporous ZnO Thin Films2009In: Journal of Sensors, Vol. 2009, no 790476, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystalline-nanoporous ZnO thin films were prepared by an electrochemical anodization method, and the films were tested as methane sensors. It was found that Pd-Ag catalytic contacts showed better sensing performance compared to other noble metal contacts like Pt and Rh. The methane sensing temperature could be reduced to as low as 100°C by sensitizing nanocrystalline ZnO thin films with Pd, deposited by chemical method. The sensing mechanism has been discussed briefly.

  • 80.
    Becker, Elin
    et al.
    Competence Centre for Catalysis and the Department Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers, University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglundh, Magnus
    Competence Centre for Catalysis and the Department Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers, University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Study of the Sensing Mechanism Towards Carbon Monoxide of Platinum-Based Field Effect Sensors2011In: IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, ISSN 1530-437X, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 1527-1534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the temperature dependence and the effect of hydrogen on the CO response of MISiC field effect device sensors. The evolution of adsorbates on a model sensor was studied by in situ DRIFT spectroscopy and correlated to sensor response measurements at similar conditions. A strong correlation between the CO coverage of the sensor surface and the sensor response was found. The temperature dependence and hydrogen sensitivity are partly in agreement with these observations, however at low temperatures it is difficult to explain the observed increase in sensor response with increasing temperature. This may be explained by the reduction of a surface oxide or removal of oxygen from the Pt/SiO2 interface at increasing temperatures. The sensing mechanism of MISiC field effect sensors is likely complex, involving several of the factors discussed in this paper.

  • 81.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    CTAB promoted synthesis of Au nanorods - Temperature effects and stability consideration2010In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 343, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic study is performed of the influence of surfactant and temperature on the aspect ratio and monodispersity of Au nanorods, synthesized by a seed-mediated growth technique in water using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The changes in aspect ratio with temperature show an "anomalous" behaviour, where the aspect ratio first decreases with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum at about 55oC, and after that increases again reaching a maximum at about 80oC. A physical explanation of the observed behaviour is proposed. It has also been studied how the CTAB concentration in the cleansing water used in the post-synthesis treatment of the samples affected the stability of the gold suspension. It was found that without the presence of a surfactant such as CTAB in the washing medium, only very few centrifugations can be carried out without considerable loss of product. Characterization of prepared samples was performed with UV-Vis and TEM.

  • 82.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Quantification of adsorbed human serum albumin at solid interfaces: A comparison between radioimmunoassay (RIA) and simple null ellipsometry2000In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 71-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) and null ellipsometry are two common methods to quantify adsorbed proteins. However, the accuracy of null ellipsometry with a constant protein refractive index (n=1.465, k=0) at ?=632.8 nm has this far not been explored. The present study compared the methods, and the degree of agreement between the simplified single wavelength null ellipsometry and RIA to quantify adsorbed proteins was explored on different surfaces. The quantification methods agreed well when Angstrom smooth hydrophilic or hydrophobic silicon surfaces, and freshly radio-labelled proteins were used. Some discrepancies were noted when either rough surface or stored and aged labelled proteins were used. The differences decreased when the aged protein solution was equilibrated with freshly dissolved proteins at room temperature (RT) for a few hours prior to the surface incubations. Significant differences were also noted between the methods when albumin was adsorbed at it's iso-electric point (pH 4.8). Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 83.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    The determination of thickness and surface mass density of mesothick immunoprecipitate layers by null ellipsometry and protein 125Iodine labeling2002In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 249, no 1, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to ellipsometrically determine the thickness and surface mass density in air for up to 110-nm-thick organic layers made of alternatingly deposited layers of HSA and polyclonal anti-HSA on hydrophobic silicon. The ellipsometrically determined thickness was compared to that obtained by AFM and the deposited surface mass density calibrated with 125I-labeled proteins. The results indicate a good agreement in protein layer thickness between AFM and ellipsometry when the protein film refractive index Nfilm = 1.5 -0i, although then the calculated surface mass density from the ellipsometry data became grossly overestimated by the Cuypers one-component formula. A good agreement in the surface mass density was obtained when the M/A ratio in this formula was lowered from 4.14 to 2.35. This approach indicates a convenient means of determining the refractive indices and surface mass densities of mesothick organic layers proteins on solid supports. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  • 84.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Svedhem, S.
    Svensson, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Valiokas, Ramunas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Protein adsorption to oligo(ethylene glycol) self-assembled monolayers: Experiments with fibrinogen, heparinized plasma, and serum2001In: Journal of Biomaterials Science. Polymer Edition, ISSN 0920-5063, E-ISSN 1568-5624, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 581-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low protein adsorption is believed advantageous for blood-contacting materials and ethylene glycols (EG)-based polymeric compounds are often attached to surfaces for this purpose. In the present study, the adsorption of fibrinogen, serum, and plasma were studied by ellipsometry on a series of well-defined oligo(EG) terminated alkane-thiols self-assembled on gold. The layers were prepared with compounds of the general structure HS-(CH2)15-CONH-EGn, where n = 2, 4, and 6. Methoxy-terminated tri(EG) undecanethiol and hydroxyl-terminated hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as references. The results clearly demonstrate that the adsorption depends on the experimental conditions with small amounts of fibrinogen adsorbing from a single protein solution, but larger amounts of proteins from serum and plasma. The adsorption of fibrinogen and blood plasma decreased with an increasing number of EG repeats and was temperature-dependent. Significantly less serum adsorbed to methoxy tri(EG) than to hexa(EG) and more proteins remained on the latter surface after incubation in a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, indicating a looser protein binding to the methoxy-terminated surface. All surfaces adsorbed complement factor 3(C3) from serum and plasma, although no surface-mediated complement activation was observed. The present study points to the importance of a careful choice of the protein model system before general statements regarding the protein repellant properties of potential surfaces can be made.

  • 85.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Blood protein adsorption onto chitosan2002In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 2561-2568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitosan was recently indicated to enhance osteogenesis, improve wound healing but to activate the coagulation and the complement systems. In the present study approximately 10nm thick chitosan film were prepared on aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) coated silicon. The surfaces were incubated in serum or plasma and subsequently in antibodies towards key complement and contact activation of coagulation proteins. The deposited amounts were compared with those on hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon, APTES and IgG coated reference samples. Although large amounts of serum deposited to chitosan only a weak transient activation of the complement system and no activation of the intrinsic pathway was observed. Upon acetylation the chitosan layer became a strong activator of the alternative pathway of the complement. After incubation in human plasma anti-fibrinogen deposited onto chitosan but not onto the acetylated chitosan, a finding that may explain previous observations of procoagulant activity by chitosan. Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 86.
    Berg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Herbertsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindström, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderström, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Platelet-induced growth of human fibroblasts is associated with an increased expression of 5-lipoxygenase2006In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 652-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proliferation of fibroblasts is vital for adequate wound healing but is probably also involved in different hyperproliferative disorders such as atherosclerosis and cancer. The regeneration of tissue usually starts with coagulation, involving release of mitogenic and inflammatory factors from activated platelets. This study focuses on the role of eicosanoids in the proliferative effects of platelets on human fibroblasts. We show that the phospholipase A2 inhibitor 7,7-dimethyl-5,8-eicosadienoic acid (DMDA), the combined cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitor 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) and the LOX inhibitor 5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid (ETI) block the platelet-induced proliferation of serum starved subconfluent human fibroblasts. Anti-proliferative effects were also obtained by specific inhibition of 5-LOX with 5,6-dehydro arachidonic acid (5,6-dAA), whereas the 12-LOX inhibitor cinnamyl-3,4-dihydroxy-α-cyanocinnamate (CDC) did not affect the platelet-stimulated growth of fibroblasts. The expression of 5-LOX was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR (RT-PCR), Western blotting and HPLC. 5-LOX message and protein was detected in fibroblasts but not in platelets. Incubation with platelets markedly increased, already after one hour, the expression of 5-LOX in the fibroblast culture. The increased 5-LOX activity was associated with an elevated level of the 5-LOX metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) reaching its maximum after 1-2 hours of co-incubation of fibroblasts and platelets. The 5-HETE production was reduced by the inhibitors DMDA, ETYA and ETI. In conclusion, this study suggests that platelet-stimulated proliferation of fibroblasts is mediated by an increased 5-LOX activity, which supports recent findings indicating a crucial role for this enzyme in proliferative disorders such as atherosclerosis. © 2006 Schattauer GmbH, Stuttgart.

  • 87.
    Berggren, Karl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cederwall, Martin
    Chalmers.
    Forssell-Aronsson, Eva
    Sahlgrenska akademin.
    Fredriksson, Billy
    Vetenskapsrådets ämnesråd för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Goksör, Mattias
    Göteborgs universtitet.
    Häggström, Olle
    Chalmers.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Ann-Sofie
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Sandelius, Anna Stina
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wennberg, Ann-Marie
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Stärk matematiken och naturvetenskapen i nya gymnasiet2010In: NyTeknikArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fagerström, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Weman, Helge
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stafström, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wennerström, O
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, T
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Controlling inter-chain and intra-chain excitations of a poly(thiophene) derivative in thin films1999In: Chemical Physics Letters, ISSN 0009-2614, E-ISSN 1873-4448, Vol. 304, no 1-2, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The decay of photoexcitations in polythiophene chains has been studied in solid solutions of the polymer from room temperature to 4 K. A strong blue shift of the emission spectrum is observed in the polymer blend, as compared to the homopolymer. Dispersion of the polythiophene suppresses the non-radiative processes, which are suggested to be correlated to close contacts of polymer chains. Quantum chemistry modeling of the excited state distributed on two chains corroborate this conclusion.

  • 89.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Ultraviolet electroluminescence from an organic light emitting diode1995In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 900-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extension of the emission region for organic LEDs into the ultraviolet region is reported. Emission at 394 nm is achieved by modifying the geometry of a device based on poly(octylphenyl)bithiophene (PTOPT) and poly(octylphenyl)oxadiazole (PBD) which had previously been shown to emit white light. Through changing the geometry the red and green emission peaks have been suppressed and the UV band (from the PBD) enhanced.

  • 90.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, Olof
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, Thomas
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Green Electroluminescence in Poly-(3-cyclohexylthiophene) light-emitting diodes1994In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 488-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electoluminescent devices based on polythiophene-system this films have been demonstrated that together span the entire visible range, steric hindrance being used to vary the bandgap between compunds. Poly-(3-cyclohexylthiophene), see Figures, exhibits green electoluminescence. Possible interpretations of this observation are proposed.

  • 91.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, Olof
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, Thomas
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Thermal control of near‐infrared and visible electroluminescence in alkyl‐phenyl substituted polythiophenes1994In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 65, no 12, p. 1489-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report electroluminescence from a regioregular alkyl-phenyl substituted polythiophene. The polymer film exists in two forms, giving widely different optical absorption, as well as photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra. In the low-bandgap form, we observe high emission intensity centered at 1.55 eV (800 nm), well into the infrared, while the high-bandgap form gives a maximum at 1.85 eV (670 nm). The conversion from the high-bandgap form to the low-bandgap form can be done by thermal treatment of the polymer light emitting diodes.

  • 92.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Granlund, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Guo, S,
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    IMC, Linköping.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Polymer light-emitting diodes placed in microcavities1996In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 76, no 1-3, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of resonant optical microcavities to influence the emission properties of conjugated polymer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is reported. The microcavities, which are built using metallic mirrors and polymeric spacers, incorporate polymer LEDs in between the mirrors. We report experimental results of polymer LEDs based on substituted polythiophenes. The effects include substantial narrowing of the spectral width of the emitted light, enhancement of the emission at the microcavity resonance, and coupling of two emission processes to different resonance modes in the same cavity.

  • 93.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, Thomas
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, Olof
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Controlling colour by voltage in polymer light emitting diodes1995In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 71, no 1-3, p. 2185-2186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report electroluminescence using different substituted polythiophenes as the emitting mterial. Different substituents cause different sterical interacion which force the thiophene rings out of planarity. This results in different bandgaps. Colours from blue to near infrared have been demonstrated in electroluminescent devices. We also demonstrate voltage controlled electroluminescence using mixtures of these polymers.

  • 94.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. null.
    Rasmusson, J.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Andersson, Mats R.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Hjertberg, T.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Wennerström, O.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Light-emitting diodes with variable colours from polymer blends1994In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 372, no 6505, p. 444-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    THE range of materials now available for polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is such that electroluminescence can be obtained throughout the visible spectrum(1-12). Here we show that, by blending polymers with different emission and charge-transport characteristics, LEDs can be fabricated in which the emission colour varies as a function of the operating voltage. This phenomenon arises from the self-organizing properties of the blends, in which entropy drives phase separation of the constituent polymers and gives rise to submicrometre-sized domains having a range of compositions and emission characteristics. Emission from domains of different composition is controlled by the ease with which charge is injected, which in turn depends on the applied voltage.

  • 95.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Adsorption of human serum albumin on carbon nitride films studied with in-situ ellipsometry2005In: American Vacuum Society 52 Int Symposium and Exhibition,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Bioadsorption studies on carbon nitride films using in-situ ellipsometry2005In: E-MRS spring meeting,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Protein Adsorption on Carbon Nitride Films Studied with in situ Ellipsometry2007In: 4th International Conference on Spectroscopic Ellipsometry,2007, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2007, p. 246-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinski, Michal
    Roxen IS AB, S-581 05 Linköping, Sweden.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Formation and cross-linking of fibrinogen layers monitored with in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry2010In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 410-417Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thick matrices of fibrinogen with incorporation of a matrix metalloproteinaseinhibitor were covalently bonded on functionalized silicon surfaces using an ethyl-3-dimethyl-aminopropyl-carbodiimide and N-hydroxy-succinimide affinity ligand couplingchemistry. The growth of the structure was followed in situ using dynamic ellipsometryand characterized at steady-state with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The growth wascompared with earlier work on ex situ growth of fibrinogen layers studied by singlewavelength ellipsometry. It is found that in situ growth and ex situ growth yield differentstructural properties of the formed protein matrix. Fibrinogen matrices with thicknessesup to 58 nm and surface mass densities of 1.6 μg/cm2 have been produced.

  • 99.
    Bertilsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interaction of dimethyl methylphosphonate with alkanethiolate monolayers studied by temperature-programmed desorption and infrared spectroscopy1997In: JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, ISSN 1089-5647, Vol. 101, no 31, p. 6021-6027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on well-defined organic surfaces consisting of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of omega-substituted alkanethiolates on gold has been studied. Three different surfaces were examined: one terminated with -OH groups (Au/S-(CH2)(16)-OH), one with -CH3 (Au/S-(CH2)(15)-CH3), and one mixed surface with approximately equal amounts of -OH and -CH3 terminated thiols. Detailed information about the nature and strength of the interaction was gathered by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. It is found that the outermost functional groups of the thiol monolayer have a pronounced impact on the interaction with DMMP at low coverage. The -OH surface, allowing for hydrogen bonds with the P=O part of the DMMP molecule, increases the strength of interaction by approximately 3.8 kJ/mol as compared to the -CH3 surface. A preadsorbed layer of D2O leads to stronger interaction on all surfaces. This is explained by additional hydrogen bond formation between free O-D at the ice-vacuum interface and DMMP.

  • 100.
    Bjorklund, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Christiansson, Anneli
    Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB.
    Ek, Anders E. W.
    Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB.
    Ejlertsson, Jorgen
    Tekniska Verken Linkoping AB.
    Electrode specific information from voltammetric monitoring of biogas production2010In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 81, no 04-May, p. 1578-1584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sensor employing pulse voltammetry monitored the liquid phase of a biogas reactor during 32 days of gas production An electrode allay consisting of stainless steel, platinum and rhodium electrodes generated current responses for a sequence of voltage pulses Plots of individual current responses against time indicated the electrochemical changes occurring in the broth from the perspective of each electrode. The responses from stainless steel had a pronounced diurnal oscillation which followed the daily introduction and consumption of substrate The current responses for platinum were in a narrow range whereas those for rhodium exhibited several minima A disturbance in the reactor caused by omission of substrate led to decreases in both gas production and current responses for all the electrodes Multivariate data evaluation of all the current responses by principal component analysis indicated the daily fluctuations for concentrations of ions and redox active compounds in the broth

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