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  • 51.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Bäckman, L.
    Herlitz, A.
    Nilsson, L-G.
    Winblad, B.
    Österlind, P-O.
    Memory improvement at different stages of Alzheimer's disease1989In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 27, p. 737-742Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Börjesson, A.
    Adolfsson, R.
    Nilsson, L-G.
    Successive memory test performance and priming in Alzheimer's disease: Evidence from the word-fragment completion task2002In: Cortex, ISSN 0010-9452, E-ISSN 1973-8102, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 341-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the performance of patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls in a successive memory test paradigm. Subjects studied lists of words. Following study, tests of recognition (an explicit memory task) and primed word fragment completion (an implicit memory task) were administered. Since the same words were used in the two tasks, we were able to calculate the degree of dependence between recognition performance and primed word fragment completion. AD patients evidenced impaired recognition memory. In contrast, priming was intact. The pattern of correlation between the two tasks was similar in healthy controls and in AD. Independence between recognition and fragment completion was obtained when recognition preceded the fragment completion task, but not when fragment completion preceded recognition.

  • 53.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Johansson, I.
    Adolfsson, R.
    Nilsson, L-G.
    Dubuc, S.
    A demonstration of a remarkable memory capacity in Alzheimer's Disease2003In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, ISSN 1420-8008, E-ISSN 1421-9824, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Keus van de Poll, Marijke
    et al.
    University of Gavle, Sweden .
    Ljung, Robert
    University of Gavle, Sweden .
    Odelius, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden .
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Disruption of writing by background speech: The role of speech transmission index2014In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, E-ISSN 1872-910X, Vol. 81, p. 15-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech transmission index (STI) is an objective measure of the acoustic properties of office environments and is used to specify norms for acceptable acoustic work conditions. Yet, the tasks used to evaluate the effects of varying STIs on work performance have often been focusing on memory (as memory of visually presented words) and reading tasks and may not give a complete view of the severity even of low STI values (i.e., when speech intelligibility is low). Against this background, we used a more typical office-work task in the present study. The participants were asked to write short essays (5 min per essay) in 5 different STI conditions (0.08; 0.23; 0.34; 0.50; and 0.71). Writing fluency dropped drastically and the number of pauses longer than 5 s increased at STI values above 0.23. This study shows that realistic work-related performance drops even at low STI values and has implications for how to evaluate acoustic conditions in school and office environments.

  • 55. Kristensen, B.
    et al.
    Malm, J.
    Fagerlund, M.
    Hiettala, S-O.
    Johansson, B.
    Ekstedt, J.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Regional cerebral blood-flow in the adult hydrocephalus syndrom1996In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 60, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Laberg, Kari
    et al.
    Eikelund kompetansesenter, Bergen, Norge.
    Nordøen, Bodil
    Eikelund kompetansesenter, Bergen, Norge.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitative interaction as intervention for children with autism: Feedback to practice2005In: 4th Nordic Conf of Research on Autism Spectrum Disorders,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 57.
    Levin, Britta
    et al.
    FOI.
    Andersson, Jan
    FOI.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Memory performance during G exposure as assessed by a word recognition task2007In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 587-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pilots of modern fighter aircraft are exposed to substantial physiological and mental stressors. The objective of this study was to investigate how memory performance, in terms of encoding and/or retrieval processes, was affected by sustained +Gz exposure. Method: There were 18 healthy men ranging from experienced fighter pilots to novice riders who participated. A word continuous recognition task (CRT) was employed as a memory test. The task consisted of three consecutive phases: 1) encoding of familiar words at 1 G, 2) encoding and retrieval of words at 70% of the subject's relaxed G-tolerance level, equivalent to +3.7 ± 0.54 Gz, and 3) encoding and retrieval of words at 1 G. In addition, each subject performed the CRT in a 1-G-only control condition. Physiological and psycho-physiological measures included continuous monitoring of ECG, arterial oxygen saturation, arterial BP at head level, and response time. Results: Data analysis showed that the capability to recognize words encoded at 1 G did not differ between conditions, indicating that the retrieval process was insensitive to increased Gz load. However, the ability to recognize words previously encoded during G exposure was reduced by approximately 10% as compared with control. Since the analysis revealed that the words were perceived, this result suggests that the encoding process was impaired in hypergravity. Conclusion: The results indicate that memory encoding, but not retrieval, was affected negatively when exposed to substantial and sustained +Gz loads. Copyright © by Aerospace Medical Association.

  • 58.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Utformning av syntetiska ansikten som kommunikationsstöd.2002In: Vardagsliv ¿ livskvalitet ¿ habilitering: Åttonde forskningskonferensen,2002, Örebro: Örebro läns landsting , 2002, p. 57-59Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Lidestam, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Beskow, Jonas
    TMH KTH.
    Motivation and appraisal in perception of poorly specified speech2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal-hearing students (n=72) performed sentence, consonant, and word identification in either A (auditory), V (visual), or AV (audiovisual) modality. The auditory signal had difficult speech-to-noise relations. Talker (human vs. synthetic), topic (no cue vs. cue-words), and emotion (no cue vs. facially displayed vs. cue-words) were varied within groups. After the first block, effects of modality, face, topic, and emotion on initial appraisal and motivation were assessed. After the entire session, effects of modality on longer-term appraisal and motivation were assessed. The results from both assessments showed that V identification was more positively appraised than A identification. Correlations were tentatively interpreted such that evaluation of self-rated performance possibly depends on subjective standard and is reflected on motivation (if below subjective standard, AV group), or on appraisal (if above subjective standard, A group). Suggestions for further research are presented. © 2006 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 60.
    Ljung, Robert
    et al.
    University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Marsh, John E.
    University of Gavle, Sweden; University of Central Lancashire, England.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Distraction of Counting by the Meaning of Background Speech: Are Spatial Memory Demands a Prerequisite?2015In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 584-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reexamines the effects of background speech on counting. Previous studies have shown that background sound disrupts counting in comparison with silence, but the magnitude of disruption is no larger for spoken numbers compared with that for non-number speech (there is no effect of the meaning of background speech). The typical task used previously has been to count the number of sequentially presented visual events. We replicated the general finding in Experiment 1that there is no effect of the meaning of background speechin the context of the classic sequence counting task. In Experiment 2, the task was changed by having to-be-counted dots presented simultaneously and randomly across the visual field. Here, an effect attributable to the meaning of background speech emerged. Background speech that is similar in meaning to the focal task process contributes to the magnitude of disruption, but apparently only when spatial memory processes are a task prerequisite. Copyright (c) 2015 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  • 61. Lundqvist, A-K.
    et al.
    Thors, A.
    Bäckman, L.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, L-G.
    Maintenance of acquired memory skills in older adults1988In: Cognitive Psychotherapy: An Update / [ed] Carlo Perris, Martin Eisemann, Umeå: Dopuu Press , 1988Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62. Malm, J.
    et al.
    Kristensen, B.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Carlberg, B.
    Fagerlund, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Cognitive impairment in young adults with infratentorial infarcts1998In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 51, p. 433-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Malm, J.
    et al.
    Kristensen, B.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Fagerlund, M.
    Elfverrson, J.
    Ekstedt, J.
    The predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid dynamic tests in patients with the idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome1995In: Archives of Neurology, ISSN 0003-9942, E-ISSN 1538-3687, Vol. 52, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Marsh, John E.
    et al.
    University of Central Lancashire, England; University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Hodgetts, Helen M.
    University of Laval, Canada; Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales.
    Philip Beaman, C.
    University of Reading, England.
    Jones, Dylan M.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Distraction Control Processes in Free Recall: Benefits and Costs to Performance2015In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 118-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is semantic memory influenced by individual differences under conditions of distraction? This question was addressed by observing how participants recalled visual target words-drawn from a single category-while ignoring spoken distractor words that were members of either the same or a different (single) category. Working memory capacity (WMC) was related to disruption only with synchronous, not asynchronous, presentation, and distraction was greater when the words were presented synchronously. Subsequent experiments found greater negative priming of distractors among individuals with higher WMC, but this may be dependent on targets and distractors being comparable category exemplars. With less dominant category members as distractors, target recall was impaired-relative to controlonly among individuals with low WMC. The results highlight the role of cognitive control resources in target-distractor selection and the individual-specific cost implications of such cognitive control.

  • 65. Nilsson, L-G.
    et al.
    Bäckman, L.
    Herlitz, A.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Österlind, P-O.
    Winblad, B.
    Patterns of memory performance in young-old and old-old adults: A selective review1987In: Comprehensive gerontology. Section B, Behavioural, social and applied sciences, ISSN 0902-008X, Vol. 1, p. 49-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66. Nilsson, L-G.
    et al.
    Bäckman, L.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Priming and cued recall in elderly, alcohol intoxicated and sleep deprived subjects: a case of functionally similar memory deficits1989In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 19, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Nostl, Anatole
    et al.
    University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Marsh, John E.
    University of Gavle, Sweden; University of Central Lancashire, England.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    What We Expect Is Not Always What We Get: Evidence for Both the Direction-of-Change and the Specific-Stimulus Hypotheses of Auditory Attentional Capture2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, p. e111997-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participants were requested to respond to a sequence of visual targets while listening to a well-known lullaby. One of the notes in the lullaby was occasionally exchanged with a pattern deviant. Experiment 1 found that deviants capture attention as a function of the pitch difference between the deviant and the replaced/expected tone. However, when the pitch difference between the expected tone and the deviant tone is held constant, a violation to the direction-of-pitch change across tones can also capture attention (Experiment 2). Moreover, in more complex auditory environments, wherein it is difficult to build a coherent neural model of the sound environment from which expectations are formed, deviations can capture attention but it appears to matter less whether this is a violation from a specific stimulus or a violation of the current direction-of-change (Experiment 3). The results support the expectation violation account of auditory distraction and suggest that there are at least two different expectations that can be violated: One appears to be bound to a specific stimulus and the other would seem to be bound to a more global cross-stimulus rule such as the direction-of-change based on a sequence of preceding sound events. Factors like base-rate probability of tones within the sound environment might become the driving mechanism of attentional capture-rather than violated expectations-in complex sound environments.

  • 68. Rasmussen, A.G.
    et al.
    Adolfsson, R.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    New method specific for acetylcholinesterase in cerebrospinal fluid: application to Alzheimer's disease1988In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 2, p. 571-572Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada; University of Health Network, Canada; Baycrest Hospital, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users, the n200 study2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 623-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION and aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications of these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. Study sample: Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of 60.8 years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the better ear was 37.4dB HL. Design: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one factor per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The more abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three classes of test variables. Results: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL 2 factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the COGNITIVE variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent than the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R-2 = 0.40). Conclusions: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for clinical assessment.

  • 70.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Speech in Noise and Ease of Language Understanding: When and how working memory capacity plays a role2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about the role of working memory capacity in speech understanding under challenging listening conditions. The theoretical model that has driven most of the research reported in this paper is called the Ease-of-Language understanding model (Ronnberg, 2003; Ronnberg et al., 2008). The Ease-of-Language understanding model is part of a larger scientific endeavor called cognitive hearing science.

  • 71.
    Saetrevik, Bjorn
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between substitution processes, which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and exclusion processes, which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees.

  • 72. Salander, P.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Bergenheim, A.T.
    Henriksson, R.
    Comment on Weitzner and Meyers1998In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 7, p. 141-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73. Salander, P.
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Bergenheim, T.
    Henriksson, R.
    Long-Term Memory Deficits in Patients with Malignant Gliomas1995In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 25, p. 227-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Are all children with autism impaired in joint attention and what about their recall memory capacity?2007In: The 13th European Conference on Developmental Psychology,,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 75.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    GU.
    Tjus, Tomas
    GU.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Differences in nonverbal social communication between children with autism and typically developing children2005In: European Conference on Developmental Psychology,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 76.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Pretend play in autism - relation to language and cognition.2007In: The 13th European Conference on Developmental Psychology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    GU.
    Tjus, Tomas
    GU.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Recall memory, recognition memory and social communication in infancy: Their relation to language and cognition2006In: The XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 78.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    GU.
    Tjus, Tomas
    GU.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Social communication and deferred imitation in autism: Their relation to language development2006In: the Annual British Psychological Society Developmental Section Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

          

  • 79.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    GU.
    Tjus, Tomas
    GU.
    Meltzoff, Andrew N
    Univ of Washington, USA.
    Smith, Lars
    Univ i Oslo.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Recall memory, joint attention and later cognitive functioning2005In: Fourth Biennial Conf Cognitive Development Society,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Smith, Lars
    Universitetet i Oslo, Norge.
    Meltzoff, Andrew N
    University of Washington, USA.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Infant recall memory and communication predicts later cognitive development2006In: Infant Behavior and Development, ISSN 0163-6383, E-ISSN 1879-0453, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 545-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal study investigates the relation between recall memory and communication in infancy and later cognitive development. Twenty-six typically developing Swedish children were tested during infancy for deferred imitation (memory), joint attention (JA), and requesting (nonverbal communication), they also were tested during childhood for language and cognitive competence. Results showed that infants with low performance on both deferred imitation at 9 months and joint attention at 14 months obtained a significantly lower score on a test of cognitive abilities at 4 years of age. This long-term prediction from preverbal infancy to childhood cognition is of interest both to developmental theory and to practice. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 81. Svenmarker, S.
    et al.
    Engström, K.G.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Jansson, E.
    Lindholm, R.
    Åberg, T.
    Influence of pericardial suction blood retransfusion on memory function and release of protein S100B2004In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 337-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To study the influence of pericardial suction blood (PSB) on postoperative memory disturbances and release patterns of protein S100B during and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods: Sixty male patients admitted for coronary artery bypass surgery were prospectively randomized to receive PSB either by using conventional cardiotomy suction retransfusion or after cell-saver processing. Results: The concentration of S100B rose during the period of CPB from 0.065 ± 0.004 to 0.24 ± 0.001 μg/L (p <0.001). PSB contained 18.0 ± 1.7 μg/L of S100B. Direct retransfusion from the cardiotomy reservoir made the systemic level increase to 1.42 ± 0.19 μg/L compared to 0.25±0.02 μg/L using a cell-saver. Signs of postoperative memory dysfunction (>1 SD) were discovered in one of three tests, but were unrelated to technique of retransfusion. No associations were found between serum concentrations of S100B and memory function. Conclusion: In this study, retransfusion of PSB during cardiac surgery appeared not to cause memory disturbances. PSB contained high concentrations of protein S100B making its use as a marker of cerebral injury unsuitable. © Arnold 2004.

  • 82. Svenmarker, S.
    et al.
    Sandström, E.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Häggmark, S.
    Jansson, E.
    Appelblad, M.
    Lindholm, R.
    Åberg, T.
    Neurological and general outcome in low-risk coronary artery bypass patients using heparin coated circuits2001In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 19, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83. Svenmarker, S.
    et al.
    Sandström, E.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Jansson, E.
    Häggmark, S.
    Lindholm, R.
    Appelblad, M.
    Åberg, T.
    Clinical effects of the heparin coated surface in cardiopulmonary bypass1997In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 11, p. 957-964Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84. Svenmarker, S.
    et al.
    Sandström, E.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Åberg, T.
    Is there an association between release of protein S100B during cardiopulmonary bypass and memory disturbances?2002In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-The use of protein S100B as a marker of brain cell injury in conjunction with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has recently been questioned. The present study investigates functional brain injury based on the relation between S100B and memory disturbances. Methods-Four hundred and fifteen low-risk coronary artery bypass patients exposed to CPB were examined. The protein S100B was sampled during and after surgery. Explicit and implicit memory function was assessed preoperatively and at discharge from hospital. Possible associations between the release of the protein S100B and memory function were studied. Results-Serum concentration of S100B peaked at termination of CPB (0.895 ▒ 0.84 ╡g/l) and decreased gradually, 7 h post CPB (0.436 ▒ 0.59 ╡g/l), day 1 (0.149 ▒ 0.27 ╡g/l) and day 2 (0.043 ▒ 0.15 ╡g/l). High levels of S100B (> 1.5 ╡g/l) 7 h post CPB were associated with a significant (-1 SD) decline of explicit memory function (p = 0.006), this was not seen at termination of CPB (p = 0.834). Predictors of memory decline were S100B 7 h post CPB, length of stay in hospital and concomitant neurological disorders. Postoperative S100B concentration was higher among patients with atrial fibrillation (p = 0.022). Conclusion-Only high levels of protein S100B found 7 h post CPB were associated with decline of explicit memory function, not the release seen during CPB. Thus, when using protein S100B, only values several hours remote from surgery should be used as a brain cell injury marker.

  • 85.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Concentration: The Neural Underpinnings of How Cognitive Load Shields Against Distraction2016In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 10, no 221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether cognitive load and other aspects of task difficulty increases or decreases distractibility is subject of much debate in contemporary psychology. One camp argues that cognitive load usurps executive resources, which otherwise could be used for attentional control, and therefore cognitive load increases distraction. The other camp argues that cognitive load demands high levels of concentration (focal task engagement), which suppresses peripheral processing and therefore decreases distraction. In this article, we employed an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol to explore whether higher cognitive load in a visually-presented task suppresses task-irrelevant auditory processing in cortical and subcortical areas. The results show that selectively attending to an auditory stimulus facilitates its neural processing in the auditory cortex, and switching the locus-of-attention to the visual modality decreases the neural response in the auditory cortex. When the cognitive load of the task presented in the visual modality increases, the neural response to the auditory stimulus is further suppressed, along with increased activity in networks related to effortful attention. Taken together, the results suggest that higher cognitive load decreases peripheral processing of task-irrelevant information which decreases distractibility as a side effect of the increased activity in a focused-attention network.

  • 86.
    Zeedyk, M Suzanne
    et al.
    Dept of psychology Univ of Dundee, Scotland.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-221Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Zeedyk, M Suzanne
    et al.
    Dept. of psychology University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Heimann, MikaelLinköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes: Implications for commmunicative development and interventions2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imitation is a phenomenon that seems to have engaged developmental psychologists throughout their century-long history. In 1906, Baldwin argued, in his seminal text, that the development of self and other was so interconnected that humans are essentially ‘imitative creations’ (Baldwin, 1906). By the 1960s, Piaget’s theory about the development of memory and representation, and imitation’s role within that, had begun to fundamentally re-shape the field’s conception of infant development (e.g. Piaget, 1962). In the 1970s, the discovery that neonates could imitate adults’ facial expressions when only minutes old sparked heated debate about humans’ innate social endowment (e.g. Maratos, 1973; Meltzoff & Moore, 1977). The beginning of the 21st century finds the field turning to questions about robotic and computer-generated imitation (e.g. Bailenson & Yee, 2005; Nadel, Revel, Andry, & Gaussier, 2004). What can a special issue on imitation add to this extensive history?

    The aim of this volume is to extend current conceptions of imitation by bringing together two domains that are generally confined to separate literatures: those relating to infancy and to communicative interventions. All the contributors are interested in the role that imitation plays in socio-emotional processes, and they seek to better understand how knowledge about infants and interventions can be mutually informative. Such connections are expected to yield insights that will be helpful to the field at both theoretical and applied levels.

    The origins of this special issue lie in a series of three specialist seminars, held during 2003 (Dundee, Scotland) and 2004 (Bergen, Norway and Leeds, England), which brought together researchers and practitioners whose work focuses on socio-emotional aspects of imitation. Participants were 13 in number, drawn from the UK, Norway, and Sweden, all of whom feature as authors in this issue (Astell, Braarud, Caldwell, Ellis, Hart, Heimann, Laberg, Nagy, Nord en, O’Neill, Stormark, Strid, Zeedyk). We hoped that this group would be able to find common ground, even within the diversity in their approaches (experimental designs, naturalistic observations, case studies, practice) and their domains of expertise (infancy, autism, global delay, deafblindness, dementia). We were more than successful, for we found that the outcomes of our discussions were compelling enough to cause us to reflect anew on the very bases of human intersubjectivity.

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