liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 51 - 100 of 197
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Hassling, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Use of cultural probes for representation of chronic disease experience: Exploration of an innovative method for design of supportive technologies2005In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic diseases do not only manifest themselves as sets of pathophysiological factors. They bring about an equally important psychosocial impact. Unfortunately, it is difficult to account for this impact in the development of supportive technologies. This study describes and explores a method for elicitation of requirements on technologies supporting self-management including emotional aspects. The method takes advantage of a self-documentary media kit for collection of data from the everyday context of chronic disease. The resulting contextual data can contribute new insights to multi-disciplinary teams in the design of supporting technologies.

  • 52.
    Hatakka, Mika
    et al.
    Åbo.
    Keskinen, Esko
    Åbo.
    Gregersen, Nils-Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Glad, Alf
    Oslo.
    From control of the vehicle to personal self-control, broadening the perspectives to driver education2002In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 201-215Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective is to formulate guidelines and goals for future development in the area of driver training and education. The content of this paper is not empirical, but merely an analytical summary or review. A four-level descriptive model is presented in which driver behaviour is conceptualised as a hierarchy, in which the goals and motives of the driver play an essential role. The recent constructivist ideas in mainstream pedagogy and psychology of learning are combined with a hierarchical approach to driver behaviour. A comprehensive framework for goals and contents of driver education (GDE framework) is presented. Two main conclusions can be drawn. Firstly, the conceptual analysis points towards a need to emphasise the motivational aspects in driver education more than it is done at present. Secondly, in order to reach the goals, pedagogical methods should be re-evaluated. For example, active learning methods and use of self-reflection should be promoted in driver education.

  • 53.
    Hensing, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    The relation of adult experience of domestic harassment, violence, and sexual abuse to health and sickness absence.2000In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Hensing, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Brage, S
    Nygård, JF
    Sandanger, I
    Tellnes, G
    Sickness absence with psychiatric disorders - an increased risk for marginalisation among men?2000In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 35, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Krigsskadade flyktingar på den svenska arbetsmarknaden.2000In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Thyberg, M
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Survival with pain: an eight-year follow-up of war-wounded refugees.2001In: Medicine, conflict and survival, ISSN 1362-3699, E-ISSN 1743-9396, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 102-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of chronic pain in male war-wounded refugees and to examine the relationship between chronic pain and psychiatric symptoms. A culturally heterogeneous group of 44 war-wounded refugees were investigated during hospitalization, shortly after arrival, and followed up after two years. This study is an additional follow-up after eight years. The data collection methods used were structured interviews and physical examination. The measures of outcome were: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) grading of pain, clinical categorization of pain into nociceptive or neurogenic, Hopkins Symptom Check List (HSCL-25), Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS-10). Chronic pain was found in 32 (73%) out of 44 subjects. The pain was purely nociceptive and neurogenic in 53% and 25%, respectively. The frequency of psychiatric symptoms was significantly related to the mean intensity of pain. War-wounded refugees display psychiatric symptoms and chronic pain in a complex pattern. Further research is needed as a basis for pain rehabilitation programmes suitable for this group.

  • 57.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    How do you feel? A self-rating scale for measuring well-being in refugees. 1999In: Transcultural Psychiatry, ISSN 1363-4615, E-ISSN 1461-7471, Vol. 36, p. 317-328Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Nyce, James M
    Exploration of the life histories and future of war-wounded Salvadoran and Iranian Kurd quota refugees in Sweden: A qualitative approach2003In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 142-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the life histories of ten Salvadoran and twelve Iranian Kurd refugees. Both groups came to Sweden as war-wounded quota refugees and their migration was forced. They had spent many years in guerilla movements and were experienced soldiers despite their youth. They were interviewed during hospitalisation shortly after arrival in Sweden, and followed-up after two years. The findings suggest that repatriation is a recurrent theme in the future plans of these refugees. The reconstruction of identity may take many forms due to a background as youth soldiers as well as their different experiences of the culture in the host country. Longitudinal studies of how refugees rebuild their lives are needed, and comprehensive analysis from different theoretical perspectives is a necessary complement to general adaptation models.

  • 59.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The long-term impact of torture on the mental health of war-wounded refugees: Findings and implications for nursing programmes2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 317-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, nurses from many disciplines are expected to provide nursing care to refugees severely traumatized in war and conflict. The general aim of this study was to explore the long-term impact of torture on the mental health of war-wounded refugees. The study group consisted of 22 tortured and 22 nontortured male refugees who had been injured in war. Standardized interview schedules, exploring different background characteristics, and three instruments for assessment of mental health were used: the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale and a well-being scale. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms was high in both groups. However, there were no significant differences in mental health between the tortured and the nontortured refugees. The patterns of associations between background characteristics and mental health were different in the two groups. The strongest associations with lower level of mental health were higher education in the tortured group and unemployment in the nontortured group. Methodological difficulties in research on sequelae of prolonged traumatization remain. Further studies within the caring sciences can broaden the present understanding of the impact of torture and other war traumas. ⌐ 2003 Nordic College of Caring Sciences.

  • 60.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The Mental Health of War-wounded Refugees: An 8-year Follow-up2002In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 190, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex nature of recent wars and armed conflicts has forced many war-injured persons into exile. To investigate their long-term mental health, three instruments for assessing mental health (HSCL-25, PTSS-10, and a Well-Being scale) were presented to 44 war-wounded refugees from nine different countries 8 years after arrival in Sweden. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms was high and corresponds to findings in previous studies of refugee patient populations. A lower level of mental health was associated with higher education, unemployment, and poor physical health. The findings suggest a high psychiatric morbidity and a need for psychiatric interventions in this refugee group. Methodological issues to be considered in research on sequels of war traumas are discussed.

  • 61.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Is the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increasing among middle-aged Swedes?2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 62.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Metabolt syndrom i en svensk medelålders population, prevalens och relation till psykosociala faktorer2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psychosocial factors and health related to quality of life among middle-aged individuals with and without the metabolic syndrome2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psychosocialfactors and healthrelated quality of life among middle-aged individuals with and without the metabolic syndrome2006In: International symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Holm, E
    et al.
    Umeå.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A discrete time-space geography for epidemiology: from mixing groups to pockets of local order in pandemic simulations.2007In: MEDINFO 2007 - Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics – Building Sustainable Health Systems / [ed] Klaus A. Kuhn, James R. Warren, Tze-Yun Leong, 2007, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 464-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization urges all nations to develop and maintain national influenza preparedness plans. Important components of such plans are forecasts of morbidity and mortality based on local social and geographic conditions. Most methodologies for simulations of epidemic outbreaks are implicitly based on the assumption that the frequency and duration of social contacts that lead to disease transmission is affected by geography, i.e. the spatial distribution of physical meeting places. In order to increase the effectiveness of the present methods for simulation of infectious disease outbreaks, the aim of this study is to examine two social geographic issues related to such models. We display how the social geographic characteristics of mixing networks, in particular when these significantly deviate from the random-mixing norm, can be represented in order to enhance the understanding and prediction of epidemic patterns in light of a possible future destructive influenza pandemic. We conclude that social geography, social networks and simulation models of directly transmitted infectious diseases are fundamentally linked.

  • 66.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bahr, R
    Sports and psysical education Norwegian university, Oslo.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Methods for epidemiological study of injuries to prfessional football players: developing the UEFA model2005In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 39, p. 340-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Hörnquist, J. O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hansson, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mikaelsson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Repeated short-term sick-leave and quality of life: An evaluation of a clinical socio-medical intervention1990In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 91-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical socio-medical supportive program for repeated short-term sickleavers who exhibited no evident reason for their prolonged absence. Attention was drawn to changes in the quality of life of the participants. Ninety-nine persons took part in the full program. The sex distribution was even and the mean age was 32 years. The average number of days of sick-leave during the year preceding the entrance into the program was 28. The most common self-stated diagnosis was upper respiratory infection or gastro-intestinal problems. The evaluation showed a significant change for the better in the quality of life and well-being of the patients, although more than every other patient did not explicitly attribute any personal benefit to the intervention itself. The results coincide irrespective of measuring method and, are by and large, consistent over most areas of life and components of well-being assessed. Thus the design and the results of the evalution look very promising concerning reliability, validity and especially sensitivity. A corresponding model may be applicable more generally when evaluating health- and medical care.

  • 68.
    Irestig, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    The impact of participation in information system design2004In: PDC 2004,2004, Palo Alto: PDC , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Irestig, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Niklas, Hallberg
    FOI.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Peer-to-peer computing in health-promoting voluntary organizations: A system design analysis2005In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 425-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large part of the health promotion in today's society is performed as peer-to-peer empowerment in voluntary organisations such as sports clubs, charities, and trade unions. In order to prevent work-related illness and long-term sickness absence, the aim of this study is to explore computer network services for empowerment of employees by peer-to-peer communication. The 'technique trade-off' method was used for the analysis of the system design. A Critical Incident Technique questionnaire was distributed to a representative sample of trade union shop stewards (n = 386), and focus-group seminars were arranged where a preliminary set of requirements was discussed. Seven basic requirements were identified and matched to a set of 12 design issues for computer network services, allocating a subset of design issues to each requirement. The conclusion is that the systems design displays an inexpensive and potentially feasible method for peer-to-peer computing in voluntary health-promoting organisations. © 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  • 70.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Renstrom, Per
    Karolinska Institute.
    Design of a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies in individual sports: the Swedish Athletics injury study2010In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, ISSN 0306-3674, Vol. 44, no 15, p. 1106-1111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Epidemiological studies have mainly been performed on team sports. The authors set out to develop a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies of injuries among elite athletics athletes. Methods An argument-based method for investigation of complex design problems was used to structure the collection and analysis of data. Specification of the protocol was preceded by an examination of requirements on injury surveillance in individual sports and iterated drafting of protocol specifications, and followed by formative evaluations. Results The requirements analysis shows that the central demand on the protocol is to allow for detailed epidemiological analyses of overuse injuries, which subsequently requires regular collection of self-reported data from athletes. The resulting study protocol is centred on a web-based weekly athlete e-diary enabling continual collection of individual-level data on exposure and injuries. To be able to interpret the self-reported data on injury events, collection of a wide range of personal baseline data from the athlete, including a psychological profile, is included in the protocol. Conclusions The resulting protocol can be employed in intervention programmes that can prevent suffering among both adult elite and youth talent athletes who have made considerable life investments in their sport.

  • 71.
    Jenvald, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory.
    Morin, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Simulation as decision support in pandemic influenza preparedness and response2007In: The Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Systems for Crisis Response and Management,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Towards a new strategy for systematic screening for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary health care2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol consumption is the third largest risk factor for morbidity and mortality in developed countries. In order to counteract the negative effects of the increasing alcohol consumption in Sweden, there is an urgent need to disseminate and integrate screening for hazardous and harmful alcohol use into the existing routines of primary health care. Although the primary health care system is considered well placed to implement prevention of alcohol-related harm, this is still seldom done. This should be seen in the light of good evidence with regard to the efficacy of screening and intervention methods, which take little time to deliver.

    The primary aim of this thesis was to explore the prevailing status of alcohol preventive measures in a primary health care setting. The focus was upon the staff's knowledge, skills and attitudes concerning routine screening of patients for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption. The secondary aim was to formulate a renewed screening strategy for primary health care.

    The thesis includes five studies performed in the county of Östergötland, Sweden. Alcohol is by far disseminated into the existing routines in primary health care. Alcohol is the lifestyle factor that is most seldom raised by the health care staff. The groups of patients who receive some advice about their alcohol consumption are mainly those in least need of screening and advice such as older men with advanced illness on recurring scheduled visits, in contrast to younger persons with hazardous drinking.

    The health care staff are mainly screening patients in whom they expect to find excessive alcohol consumption, in one sense making screening unnecessary. Both primary health care nurses and physicians are uncertain and reluctant to screen for hazardous alcohol consumption when there are no established medical symptoms. The staff mainly fmd alcohol screening to be practical and justified when a patients' complaint is perceived to be related to alcohol consumption, i.e. when the patient is thought to have harmful consumption. The great proportion of patients with hazardous drinking, i.e. above recommended limits but with no developed harm, are thus mostly not screened and therefore not identified. However, this group of individuals has the best potential to respond positively to brief alcohol intervention when delivered by a nurse or physician.

    A truly preventive measure would be to screen all patients for excessive alcohol consumption including both hazardous and harmful drinkers, but the current organisation of the primary health care does not allow this approach. Instead, both nurses and physicians in the studies suggest a more selective strategy to mainly not include hazardous drinkers without symptoms. In order to establish which patient groups are the most appropriate to select for screening, taking into account the demands from the health care staff, as well as ensuring that even hazardous drinkers are included, a model was developed and empirically tested in order to identify such groups of patients. The model appears to be a reasonable means to identify groups of patients who should be included in a selective screening strategy by their presenting complaint. However, the hazardous drinkers were distributed within the various complaints fairly evenly and thus there was not enough strength in the study to identify specific patient groups despite the inclusion of all consecutive patients during a 2-week period.

    The criteria for a selective screening strategy suggested in this thesis take into consideration the demands from primary health care staff as well as the need for a truly preventive approach that includes hazardous drinkers with no established alcohol-related harm. The suggested model for identifying groups of patients fulfilling these preconditions can be used in future research in order to identify relevant groups of patients to be included in a selective screening strategy that has the potential to be integrated into the existing routines of primary health care.

    List of papers
    1. Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other lifestyle habits: how patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other lifestyle habits: how patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation
    2005 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle advice given by general practitioners (GPs) may be a cost-effective means of health promotion; however, it is not fully put into routine practice. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent GPs' patients expect and receive advice concerning alcohol, tobacco, exercise and diet in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, type of visit and patient satisfaction.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9750) of patients who had consulted GPs in a county in Sweden. The response rate was 69% (n = 6734).

    Results: Exercise was the most (16%) and alcohol the least (5%) common type of advice. The patients received advice more often than they expected in all areas except alcohol. The patients reported the highest rate of unfulfilled advice expectation and the lowest rate of unexpected advice in the case of alcohol. Male gender, poorer self-rated health and scheduled appointment were independent predictors of all types of advice. Continuity of GP contact was only favourable for exercise and diet advice. The patients who received advice were more satisfied with their visit to the doctor.

    Conclusions: A tertiary preventive perspective guides GPs' practice of giving advice. Male patients with advanced illnesses are given priority. Women and patients with long-term risk habits are more neglected. The GPs tend to misjudge the expectations and needs of their patients and are too restrained in their counselling practice. Alcohol is the most disregarded area of advice in proportion to the patients' expectations and needs.

    Keywords
    alcohol drinking, counselling, health behaviour, patient satisfaction, primary health care
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29717 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cki046 (DOI)15111 (Local ID)15111 (Archive number)15111 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Early intervention for problem drinkers: readiness to participate among general practitioners and nurses in Swedish primary health care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early intervention for problem drinkers: readiness to participate among general practitioners and nurses in Swedish primary health care
    2002 (English)In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An exploration was made of attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GPs) and nurses concerning early identification of, and intervention for, alcohol-related problems. Sixty-five GPs and 141 nurses in 19 primary health centres in a county in southern Sweden answered a 28-item questionnaire before implementation of an intervention programme. The questionnaire covered experiences with patients with alcohol-related health problems, knowledge and perceived capacity concerning early identification and intervention, attitudes towards the role of primary care staff in early identification and intervention and current intervention methods in use at the health centre. Self-reported frequency of asking about alcohol use was higher among GPs than nurses. Both groups reported more frequently asking about alcohol consumption in cases where they believed that the health status was influenced by alcohol. For both professions, knowledge and skills concerning identification were rated as better understood than that concerning intervention methods. Nurses rated their knowledge and skills less confidently than GPs. The overall attitude was fairly positive towards early identification and intervention, but nurses were more worried than GPs that patients would react negatively to questions about alcohol. Attitudes, self-rated capacity, and practice were related. The low level of early identification and intervention in primary care appears to be related more to insufficient practical skills than to attitudes. Nurses appear to be an unexploited resource, in need of training and support. Nurses may need to be convinced that an active role does not interfere with the nurse-patient relationship. Building teams of GPs and nurses in primary care might enhance the dissemination of alcohol prevention into regular practice.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26254 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/37.1.38 (DOI)10760 (Local ID)10760 (Archive number)10760 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Under what circumstances are nurses willing to engage in brief alcohol interventions?: a qualitative study from primary care in Swedena
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Under what circumstances are nurses willing to engage in brief alcohol interventions?: a qualitative study from primary care in Swedena
    2005 (English)In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1049-1053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To improve alcohol prevention in primary health care, it has been suggested that primary care nurses are an under-utilised resource. The aim of this study was to identify under what circumstances primary care nurses in Sweden are willing to engage in alcohol prevention. All nurses at three primary health care centres in Östergötland, Sweden were invited to participate in focus group interviews; 26 nurses participated. The nurses considered primary health care to be just one among other sectors within the community with responsibility for alcohol prevention. The role of health care in alcohol prevention was perceived to be important but mainly secondary preventive. The nurses felt justified screening all patients' alcohol habits only when they could refer to an obligation or a time-limited project. Otherwise, they mainly wanted to engage in screening patients with alcohol-related symptoms or diagnoses and other risk groups. Reasons for refraining from alcohol screening and intervention included lack of self-efficacy, time consumption and fear of harming their relationship with the patient. New strategies for alcohol prevention in primary care are discussed.

    Keywords
    Primary care, nurses, alcohol prevention, dissemination strategies, focus groups
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29733 (URN)10.1016/j.addbeh.2004.09.008 (DOI)15132 (Local ID)15132 (Archive number)15132 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Factors influencing GPs' decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption: a focus group study in Swedish primary care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing GPs' decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption: a focus group study in Swedish primary care
    2005 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 119, no 9, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore factors that influence general practitioners' (GPs') decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption.

    Methods GPs working at three primary healthcare centres in Sweden participated in focus group interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a deductive framework approach was used for the analysis.

    Results The majority of the participating GPs did not believe in asking all patients about their alcohol consumption. Reported factors that influenced how many and which patients were questioned about alcohol consumption were time, age of the patient, consultation setting, patient–physician relationship, what symptoms the patient presented with, and knowledge of measures if patients appear to have a high alcohol consumption. Thus, alcohol screening and intervention were not performed in all patient groups as was originally intended, but were performed in limited groups of patients such as those with alcohol-related symptoms.

    Conclusions Although the number of participants in this study was small and the conclusions cannot be generalized, the results provide some valuable insights into why GPs are hesitant to engage in screening for high alcohol consumption. Since prevention of alcohol-related health problems is an important public health issue, many different screening and intervention strategies have to be formulated and evaluated in order to reach patients with both hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption within the healthcare system. Screening all consecutive patients for a limited period or screening patient groups known to include a fairly high frequency of high alcohol consumers are two ways of limiting the time requirements and increasing role legitimacy. Still, there is a need for a broader public health strategy involving many players in the community in alcohol preventive measures, especially in more primary preventive approaches.

    Keywords
    Alcohol, screening, primary health care, dissemtion, GPs attitudes
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29718 (URN)10.1016/j.puhe.2004.12.006 (DOI)15112 (Local ID)15112 (Archive number)15112 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Towards implementation of alcohol preventive interventions into primary health care: testing a new model for selection of clinically meaningful patient groups for alcohol screening
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards implementation of alcohol preventive interventions into primary health care: testing a new model for selection of clinically meaningful patient groups for alcohol screening
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to explore alcohol consumption and drinking patterns among primary health care patients in relation to their complaints as presented to the nurse in the reception at the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful groups of patients to be included in systematic screening for hazardous alcohol consumption was empirically tested.

    Methods : The study was conducted at two primary health care centres in a large city in the county of Ostergiitland in southern Sweden. All patients 16 years or older visiting the health care centres during a 2-week period, received a questionnaire concerning their complaints and alcohol habits when registering at the reception. The patients returned the completed questionnaires in sealed boxes before leaving the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in systematic alcohol screening was developed and applied on the results from the questionmrire.

    Results: Among 358 female respondents 10.6% (38 patients) were hazardous drinkers and among the 203 male respondents 20.2% (41 patients). When applying the model on the questionnaire results, it was possible to identify the most optimal patient groups for systematic alcohol screening on basis of the patient's complaints. Among the female respondents the most optimal patient groups to screen were those presenting skin, stomach/bowel, psychological, lung, or urinary tract complaints. Among the males were the patient groups presenting complaints concerning lungs, psychological problems, back, neck or shoulder problems, hypertension or injuries found to be the most optimal. There were, however, no significant differences in the proportion of hazardous drinkers for the different complaints, with the exception of male respondents with lung complaints, where 100% were hazardous drinkers.

    Conclusions: As the proportion of hazardous drinkers among primary health care patients within each presented complaint was found to be rather low during the two week study period, it was not possible to make any definite conclusion about an optimal screening strategy. However the model presented may be useful in future research to identify clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in selective screening, although this requires a much larger data collection

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-82032 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-09-28 Created: 2012-09-28 Last updated: 2012-09-28Bibliographically approved
  • 73.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Towards implementation of alcohol preventive interventions into primary health care: testing a new model for selection of clinically meaningful patient groups for alcohol screeningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to explore alcohol consumption and drinking patterns among primary health care patients in relation to their complaints as presented to the nurse in the reception at the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful groups of patients to be included in systematic screening for hazardous alcohol consumption was empirically tested.

    Methods : The study was conducted at two primary health care centres in a large city in the county of Ostergiitland in southern Sweden. All patients 16 years or older visiting the health care centres during a 2-week period, received a questionnaire concerning their complaints and alcohol habits when registering at the reception. The patients returned the completed questionnaires in sealed boxes before leaving the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in systematic alcohol screening was developed and applied on the results from the questionmrire.

    Results: Among 358 female respondents 10.6% (38 patients) were hazardous drinkers and among the 203 male respondents 20.2% (41 patients). When applying the model on the questionnaire results, it was possible to identify the most optimal patient groups for systematic alcohol screening on basis of the patient's complaints. Among the female respondents the most optimal patient groups to screen were those presenting skin, stomach/bowel, psychological, lung, or urinary tract complaints. Among the males were the patient groups presenting complaints concerning lungs, psychological problems, back, neck or shoulder problems, hypertension or injuries found to be the most optimal. There were, however, no significant differences in the proportion of hazardous drinkers for the different complaints, with the exception of male respondents with lung complaints, where 100% were hazardous drinkers.

    Conclusions: As the proportion of hazardous drinkers among primary health care patients within each presented complaint was found to be rather low during the two week study period, it was not possible to make any definite conclusion about an optimal screening strategy. However the model presented may be useful in future research to identify clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in selective screening, although this requires a much larger data collection

  • 74.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other lifestyle habits: how patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle advice given by general practitioners (GPs) may be a cost-effective means of health promotion; however, it is not fully put into routine practice. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent GPs' patients expect and receive advice concerning alcohol, tobacco, exercise and diet in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, type of visit and patient satisfaction.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9750) of patients who had consulted GPs in a county in Sweden. The response rate was 69% (n = 6734).

    Results: Exercise was the most (16%) and alcohol the least (5%) common type of advice. The patients received advice more often than they expected in all areas except alcohol. The patients reported the highest rate of unfulfilled advice expectation and the lowest rate of unexpected advice in the case of alcohol. Male gender, poorer self-rated health and scheduled appointment were independent predictors of all types of advice. Continuity of GP contact was only favourable for exercise and diet advice. The patients who received advice were more satisfied with their visit to the doctor.

    Conclusions: A tertiary preventive perspective guides GPs' practice of giving advice. Male patients with advanced illnesses are given priority. Women and patients with long-term risk habits are more neglected. The GPs tend to misjudge the expectations and needs of their patients and are too restrained in their counselling practice. Alcohol is the most disregarded area of advice in proportion to the patients' expectations and needs.

  • 75.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Early intervention for problem drinkers: readiness to participate among general practitioners and nurses in Swedish primary health care2002In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An exploration was made of attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GPs) and nurses concerning early identification of, and intervention for, alcohol-related problems. Sixty-five GPs and 141 nurses in 19 primary health centres in a county in southern Sweden answered a 28-item questionnaire before implementation of an intervention programme. The questionnaire covered experiences with patients with alcohol-related health problems, knowledge and perceived capacity concerning early identification and intervention, attitudes towards the role of primary care staff in early identification and intervention and current intervention methods in use at the health centre. Self-reported frequency of asking about alcohol use was higher among GPs than nurses. Both groups reported more frequently asking about alcohol consumption in cases where they believed that the health status was influenced by alcohol. For both professions, knowledge and skills concerning identification were rated as better understood than that concerning intervention methods. Nurses rated their knowledge and skills less confidently than GPs. The overall attitude was fairly positive towards early identification and intervention, but nurses were more worried than GPs that patients would react negatively to questions about alcohol. Attitudes, self-rated capacity, and practice were related. The low level of early identification and intervention in primary care appears to be related more to insufficient practical skills than to attitudes. Nurses appear to be an unexploited resource, in need of training and support. Nurses may need to be convinced that an active role does not interfere with the nurse-patient relationship. Building teams of GPs and nurses in primary care might enhance the dissemination of alcohol prevention into regular practice.

  • 76.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors influencing GPs' decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption: a focus group study in Swedish primary care2005In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 119, no 9, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore factors that influence general practitioners' (GPs') decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption.

    Methods GPs working at three primary healthcare centres in Sweden participated in focus group interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a deductive framework approach was used for the analysis.

    Results The majority of the participating GPs did not believe in asking all patients about their alcohol consumption. Reported factors that influenced how many and which patients were questioned about alcohol consumption were time, age of the patient, consultation setting, patient–physician relationship, what symptoms the patient presented with, and knowledge of measures if patients appear to have a high alcohol consumption. Thus, alcohol screening and intervention were not performed in all patient groups as was originally intended, but were performed in limited groups of patients such as those with alcohol-related symptoms.

    Conclusions Although the number of participants in this study was small and the conclusions cannot be generalized, the results provide some valuable insights into why GPs are hesitant to engage in screening for high alcohol consumption. Since prevention of alcohol-related health problems is an important public health issue, many different screening and intervention strategies have to be formulated and evaluated in order to reach patients with both hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption within the healthcare system. Screening all consecutive patients for a limited period or screening patient groups known to include a fairly high frequency of high alcohol consumers are two ways of limiting the time requirements and increasing role legitimacy. Still, there is a need for a broader public health strategy involving many players in the community in alcohol preventive measures, especially in more primary preventive approaches.

  • 77.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Kartläggning av alkoholvanor bland patienter på vårdcentral i relation till besöksorsak2004In: Svenska läkarsällskapets riksstämma,2004, Katrineholm: Sörmlands grafiska Quebecor AB , 2004, p. 46-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Under what circumstances are nurses willing to engage in brief alcohol interventions?: a qualitative study from primary care in Swedena2005In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1049-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve alcohol prevention in primary health care, it has been suggested that primary care nurses are an under-utilised resource. The aim of this study was to identify under what circumstances primary care nurses in Sweden are willing to engage in alcohol prevention. All nurses at three primary health care centres in Östergötland, Sweden were invited to participate in focus group interviews; 26 nurses participated. The nurses considered primary health care to be just one among other sectors within the community with responsibility for alcohol prevention. The role of health care in alcohol prevention was perceived to be important but mainly secondary preventive. The nurses felt justified screening all patients' alcohol habits only when they could refer to an obligation or a time-limited project. Otherwise, they mainly wanted to engage in screening patients with alcohol-related symptoms or diagnoses and other risk groups. Reasons for refraining from alcohol screening and intervention included lack of self-efficacy, time consumption and fear of harming their relationship with the patient. New strategies for alcohol prevention in primary care are discussed.

  • 79.
    Kallings, L V
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiologi KI.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hellénius, M L
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Ståhle, A
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity on prescription in primary health care: a follow-up of physical activity level and quality of life.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 80.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Acceptability of a computerized alcohol screening and advice routine in a emergency department setting- a patient perspective2005In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 30, p. 767-776Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Feasibility of a computorized alcohol screening and personalized written advice in the ED: opportunities and obstacles2005In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, E-ISSN 1532-9267, Vol. 13, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borg (Festin), Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Section of Personal Injury Prevention, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mortality adjusted risk of disability pension in relation to sex and age in a Swedish county 1985-1996; A 12-year prospective cohort study.2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Gjesdal, Sturla
    Personskadeprevention Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Mortality in relation to disability pension: findings from a 12-year prospective population-based cohort study in Sweden.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksen, H R
    Biological and Medical Psychology University of Bergen.
    Sluiter, J K
    Academic Medical Center University of Amsterdam.
    Starke, D
    Medical Sociology University of Duesseldorf.
    Ursin, H
    Biological and Medical Psychology University of Bergen.
    Psychobiological mechanisms of socioeconomic differences in health2004In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1511-1522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between low socioeconomic status and poor health is well established. Empirical studies suggest that psychosocial factors are important mediators for these effects, and that the effects are mediated by psychobiological mechanisms related to stress physiology. The objective of this paper is to explore these psychobiological mechanisms. Psychobiological responses to environmental challenges depend on acquired expectancies (learning) of the relations between responses and stimuli. The stress response occurs whenever an individual is faced with a challenge. It is an essential element in the total adaptive system of the body, and necessary for adaptation, performance and survival. However, a period of recovery is necessary to rebalance and to manage new demands. Individuals with low social status report more environmental challenges and less psychosocial resources. This may lead to vicious circles of learning to expect negative outcomes, loss of coping ability, strain, hopelessness and chronic stress. This type of learning may interfere with the recovery processes, leading to sustained psychobiological activation and loss of dynamic capacity to respond to new challenges. Psychobiological responses and health effects in humans and animals depend on combinations of demands and expected outcomes (coping, control). In studies of humans with chronic psychosocial stress, and low SES, cortisol baseline levels were raised, and the cortisol response to acute stress attenuated. Low job control was associated with insufficient recovery of catecholamines and cortisol, and a range of negative health effects. Biological effects of choice of lifestyle, which also depends on the acquired outcome expectancies, reinforce these direct psychobiological effects on health. The paper concludes that sustained activation and loss of capacity to respond to a novel stressor could be a cause of the higher risk of illness and disease found among people with lower SES.

  • 85.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Kucinskiené, Zita
    Schäfer-Elinder, Liselotte
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lower serum levels of beta-carotene in Lithuanian men are accompanied by higher urinary excretion of the oxidative DNA adduct, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine: The LiVicordia study.2003In: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), ISSN 0899-9007, E-ISSN 1873-1244, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In 1995, middle-aged Lithuanian men had a four-fold higher risk than Swedish men of dying from coronary heart disease. The cross-sectional LiVicordia study had reported significantly lower levels of the lipid-soluble antioxidants lycopene, ▀-carotene, and ?-tocopherol among Lithuanian men than among Swedish men. We examined whether there were differences in urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a marker of oxidative stress, between these groups of men. METHODS: Using automated coupled column high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we examined 50-y-old men randomly sampled from Link÷ping, Sweden (n = 99) and Vilnius, Lithuania (n = 109) with regard to urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG. RESULTS: Levels of 8-OHdG were higher in the Lithuanian men than in the Swedish men (20.9 ▒ 0.91 versus 14.9 ▒ 0.75 nM/L, P < 0.001), and this difference was evident in smokers (P < 0.01) and non-smokers (P < 0.001). Serum levels of a- and ▀-carotene were inversely correlated to urinary 8-OHdG levels (P < 0.05 in both cases). Habitual smoking and low levels of ▀-carotene contributed significantly to higher oxidative DNA damage expressed as urinary 8-OHdG. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that increased urinary 8-OHdG levels accompany lower serum levels of antioxidants in Lithuanian men. They supported previous suggestions that increased oxidative stress may be one factor behind the higher mortality in Lithuanian men. ⌐ Elsevier Science Inc. 2003.

  • 86.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Nikku, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sociology.
    Ethics and opportunistic health promotion. The example of alcohol information at the emergency clinic1995In: Health Gain Measurements as a Tool for Hospital Management and Health Policy,1995, Linköping: Health Promoting Hospitals , 1995, p. 148-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kucinskiene, Zita
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Good self-rated health is related to psychosocial resources and a strong cortisol response to acute stress: The LiVicordia study of middle-aged men2005In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-rated health (SRH) is a strong predictor for disease and death. The relations among SRH, psychosocial factors, and cortisol dynamics were tested using pooled data from the LiVicordia study of 50-year-old men in Lithuania (n = 94) and Sweden (n = 89), controlling for effect of residence. SRH was assessed by " How would you assess your own health?" A standardized laboratory stress test included measures of cortisol in serum and saliva. Good SRH related to high scale scores of decision latitude, social support at work, coping, self-esteem, and sense of coherence, to low scores of overcommitment (all p < .01) and vital exhaustion (r = -0.40, p < 0.001), to low concentrations of saliva baseline cortisol (r = -.26, p = .001), and to a strong cortisol response to stress (r = .27, p = .001). Findings that good SRH related to favorable psychosocial characteristics and to a dynamic cortisol stress response indicate a possible explanation for observed lower risk for disease and death in this state. Copyright © 2005 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

  • 88.
    Kvarnström, Susanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Discursive patterns of we and the others in multiprofessionals health care teams2004In: Comet Communication, medicine and ethics,2004, 2004, p. 29-29Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hjalmarsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    The risk for multiple sclerosis in female nurse anaesthetists: A register based study2006In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 387-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that exposure to organic solvents, including volatile anaesthetic agents, may be a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), possibly in combination with genetic and other environmental factors. Aims: To further investigate the role of volatile anaesthetic agents having similar acute toxic effects to other organic solvents. Methods: Female nurse anaesthetists, other female nurses, and female teachers from middle and upper compulsory school levels were identified and retrieved from the 1985 census, Statistics Sweden. By means of the unique personal identity number in Sweden, these individuals were linked with the disability pension registers at The National Social Insurance Board and also with data on hospital care 1985-2000 at The National Board of Health and Welfare. Results: The cumulative incidence rate ratio of MS was found to be increased in female nurse anaesthetists in relation to other nurses (statistically not significant) and teachers (statistically significant), respectively. Conclusions: These findings give some support to previous findings of an increased risk for MS in nurse anaesthetists. This is interesting in the context of previous observations of organic solvents in general as a potential risk factor in MS.

  • 90.
    Larsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Obstetricians' attitudes and opinions on sickness absence and benefits during pregnancy2006In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background . In Sweden, sick leave is taken more frequently by pregnant women than by nonpregnant women. This led us to ask if the taking of sick leave during pregnancy could possibly be explained by attitudes to sickness absence held among obstetricians working in antenatal care. Methods . All obstetricians ( n =45) engaged in public antenatal care and at work in May 2001 in seven hospitals in South Eastern Sweden were asked to anonymously respond to questions/statements concerning their work, 87% participated. The results were presented as percent (the median value) on a visual analog scale. Results . In 60% of all contacts with pregnant women issues such as working conditions, sickness absence or benefit programs were discussed besides the actual pregnancy. In 46% the obstetricians stated that they could not exactly pinpoint a correct medical diagnosis motivating a sickness certificate asked for by the pregnant woman. As the majority of the obstetricians (74%) often did not like to conform to the pregnant women's wishes, unpleasant situations were not uncommon (56%). A conflict was experienced in the dual role that the obstetrician had as the patient's confidant on the one hand and as a representative or gatekeeper for the social security system on the other. Male and female obstetricians did not differ in their opinions on their handling of pregnant women with regard to taking sick leave but for one issue, back pain. Conclusions . The high degree of work dealing with sickness absence and social benefits at the Antenatal Care Centers seems to have a negative effect on the obstetrician's evaluation of their work environment. The obstetricians' opinion is that pregnant women are sick-listed too frequently, but obstetricians comply as a rule to the women's wishes in order to avoid conflict. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.

  • 91. Larsson, E
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    First-aid training and bystander actions at traffic crashes - A population study2003In: Prehospital and disaster medicine : the official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the World Association for Emergency and Disaster Medicine in association with the Acute Care Foundation, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 17, p. 134-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Larsson, E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Mårtensson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    First-aid training and bystander actions taken at traffic crashes a population study2002In: Prehospital and disaster medicine : the official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the World Association for Emergency and Disaster Medicine in association with the Acute Care Foundation, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Leijon, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Integrating perspectives in social medicine2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis sickness absence was studied from a socio-medical perspective using both epidemiological and clinical data and methods of analysing. The specific aim of the epidemiological studies was to analyse sickness absence patterns and its changes in the total population of Östergötland. Furthermore, variations with gender, age and occupation were analysed. Gender trends in sickness absence concerning musculoskeletal diagnoses, its changes from 1985 to 1987 and association of numerical gender segregation in occupational categories with sickness absence due to musculoskeletal diagnoses was also investigated.

    The specific aim of the clinical studies was to estimate the frequency and character of psycho-social problems in a population with repeated short-term sickness absence. A clinical socio-medical supportive program for this patient-group was assessed. Finally, the vocational activity, program costs and possible benefits to society of a clinical, socio-medical case management program was evaluated.

    The results showed that women had much higher sickness absence than men generally and in particular in male-dominated occupational categories. The cumulative incidence percentage of siclmess absence in all diagnoses increased for both genders from 1985 to 1987. There were large variations between different occupational categories; blue-collar occupations were high-risk for sickness absence while white-collar occupations were low risk.

    Women had higher cumulative incidence than men in musculoskeletal diagnoses and also longer duration of sick leave days per sick leave insured person and per sick-listed person. The cumulative incidence for the diagnostic sub-group "neck/shoulder diagnoses" showed the highest percentage increase from 1985-87. The cumulative incidence in all musculoskeletal diagnostic groups was highest for both genders in extremely male-dominated occupational categories (>90% men).

    The study of repeated short-tenn sick leave showed that the underlying reasons were less medical and more of a socio-medical origin for 2/3 of the patients in comparison with an age- and sex-matched sample of patients at the general practitioner's surgery in the same area. A majority of patients, who had taken part in a socio-medical supportive program reported a better quality of life, although they did not specifically ascribe this to the socio-medical intervention.

    When investigating the long-term economic effect of a clinical case management program for patients with chronic minor disease, the benefit-cost ratio of the program was 4.9. Fifty per cent of the patients had been absent from working life for more than two years on admission to the program. The rehabilitation rate of patients back to work was 20.5% after one year and 11 .7% after five years.

    List of papers
    1. Epidemiology of sickness absence in a Swedish county in 1985, 1986 and 1987: A three year longitudinal study with focus on gender, age and occupation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of sickness absence in a Swedish county in 1985, 1986 and 1987: A three year longitudinal study with focus on gender, age and occupation
    Show others...
    1994 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 0300-8037, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In order to get a better epidemiological base for preventive intervention in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, a comprehensive study of sickness absence was done. During the years 1985, 1986 and 1987, all new periods of sick-leave exceeding seven days were registered with demographic variables. This information was related to data about the total population of Östergötland. Each year approx. 45,000 persons had approx. 61,000 sickness spells. These figures were stable over the years while the number of sick-leave days increased. Blue-collar occupations had the highest sick-leave rates and the female sick-leave rate was higher in general and much higher in most male-dominated occupations. The male rate was lower within female-dominated areas, except among secretaries and textile workers. Females in extremely male-dominated groups had the highest rates, while both male and female sick-leave rates were lower in more gender-integrated occupations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 1994
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81533 (URN)10.1177/140349489402200105 (DOI)8029663 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2016-02-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Gender trends in sick-listing with musculoskeletal symptoms in a Swedish county during a period of rapid increase in sickness absence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender trends in sick-listing with musculoskeletal symptoms in a Swedish county during a period of rapid increase in sickness absence
    1998 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 204-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Sickness absence and disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses has increased in Sweden.

    Study objective — To study gender trends in sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses and its changes in 1985—87.

    Design — A prospective population-based study of all new sick-leave spells exceeding seven days in 1985—87. Sickness absence with "all diagnoses'' was compared to "all musculoskeletal diagnoses'', the latter group was also divided into three sub-groups.

    Setting — The county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Participants — All sick-leave insured aged 16—65; 107,000 women and 100,000 men.

    Results — More women than men were sick-listed in "all diagnoses'' in 1985. There were corresponding gender differences in sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses except with the diagnosis "low back pain''. Sick-listing with musculoskeletal diagnoses increased for both women and men from 1985 to 1987, but the increase was consistently much higher for women, especially for younger women.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81534 (URN)10.1177/14034948980260031101 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2012-09-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Sickness absence due to musculoskeletal diagnoses: association with occupational gender segregation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness absence due to musculoskeletal diagnoses: association with occupational gender segregation
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 94-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders represent a considerable public health problem and the most common diagnoses behind sickness absence and disability pensions. However, little is known about how sickness absence with these diagnoses varies with the strong gender segregation of the labour market.

    Aims: A study was undertaken to investigate the association between musculoskeletal-related sickness absence and occupational gender segregation.

    Methods: The study was population based, and included all new sick-leave spells exceeding seven days due to musculoskeletal diagnoses, comprising neck/ shoulder pain, low back pain, and osteoarthritis in Östergötland county, Sweden, which has 393,000 inhabitants (5% of the national population). The participants were all sick-leave insured employed persons in Östergötland (n=182,663) in 1985.

    Results: Cumulative incidence of musculoskeletal-related sickness absence (>7 days) was higher for women (7.5%, 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 7.3-7.7) than for men, (5.8%, C.I. 5.6-5.9), and the same was true for the mean number of sick-leave days (women 81, C.I. 78-83; men 65, C.I. 63-68). Grouping occupations according to degree of numerical gender segregation revealed the highest incidence and duration of sickness absence for women in male-dominated occupations. For both genders, the lowest cumulative incidence and duration occurred in gender-integrated occupations.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate a strong association between occupational gender segregation and musculoskeletal-related sickness absence. Further studies are needed to elucidate gender segregation of the labour market in relation to health and rehabilitation measures.

    Keywords
    Gender, Gender segregation, Men, Musculoskeletal diagnoses, Sick-leave, Women
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45572 (URN)10.1080/14034940310006195 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Repeated short-term sick-leave as a possible symptom of psycho-social problems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated short-term sick-leave as a possible symptom of psycho-social problems
    1984 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 165-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a research project concerning repeated short-term sick-leave an intensive study has been performed aiming at estimating the frequency and character of psycho-social problems in a population with a minimum of six short sick spells during a 12-month period, in comparison with an age- and sex-matched sample of patients who went to the local general practitioner in the same area. The results show that psycho-social problems are twice as common in the group with repeated short-term sick-leave.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81536 (URN)10.1177/140349488401200406 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2012-09-18Bibliographically approved
    5. Repeated short-term sick-leave and quality of life: An evaluation of a clinical socio-medical intervention
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated short-term sick-leave and quality of life: An evaluation of a clinical socio-medical intervention
    1990 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 91-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical socio-medical supportive program for repeated short-term sickleavers who exhibited no evident reason for their prolonged absence. Attention was drawn to changes in the quality of life of the participants. Ninety-nine persons took part in the full program. The sex distribution was even and the mean age was 32 years. The average number of days of sick-leave during the year preceding the entrance into the program was 28. The most common self-stated diagnosis was upper respiratory infection or gastro-intestinal problems. The evaluation showed a significant change for the better in the quality of life and well-being of the patients, although more than every other patient did not explicitly attribute any personal benefit to the intervention itself. The results coincide irrespective of measuring method and, are by and large, consistent over most areas of life and components of well-being assessed. Thus the design and the results of the evalution look very promising concerning reliability, validity and especially sensitivity. A corresponding model may be applicable more generally when evaluating health- and medical care.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81537 (URN)10.1177/140349489001800202 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2012-09-18Bibliographically approved
    6. Long-term economic effects of team-based clinical case management of patients with chronic minor disease and long-term absence from working life
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term economic effects of team-based clinical case management of patients with chronic minor disease and long-term absence from working life
    Show others...
    1997 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 0300-8037, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the socio-economic effects of team-based clinical case management of patients with chronic minor disease bound for early retirement.

    Design: Marginal analysis of programme costs and benefits to society compared with no-programme baseline of costs occurring in society due to productivity loss. Prospective patient data collection on admission, discharge, and at one year and five years after discharge to determine programme effectiveness.

    Setting: Out-patient clinic at the department of social medicine in tertiary care hospital.

    Subjects: 239 patients with minor disease and long-term vocational absence consecutively admitted to the study. At the one-year evaluation, 17 patients had been readmitted to the team, 7 could not be found, 6 declined the interview and 2 were deceased. At the five-year evaluation of 49 patients who were active after one year, one was deceased and 10 were unable to be found.

    Main outcome measures: Vocational activity. Programme costs. Benefits to society measured by decrease in indirect costs.

    Results: The one-year vocational rehabilitation rate from the program was 20.5% and the five-year rehabilitation rate was 11.3%. The total discounted cost for case management of the 239 patients was 7.6 MSEK (£600,000). The decrease in the indirect costs to society from the 28 patients found active after five years was 35.1 MSEK (£2,500,000). The net present value of the programme at the 1991 price level was 27.5 MSEK (£2,365,000).

    Conclusions: Tertiary care level team-based clinical case management for vocational rehabilitation of patients with chronic minor disease has a positive cost-benefit ratio. A cross-boundary awareness at a health policy level is needed of the societal costs involved for this group of patients who fall between the traditional services in health care and social work.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81538 (URN)10.1177/140349489702500402 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2013-09-05Bibliographically approved
  • 94.
    Leijon, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gender trends in sick-listing with musculoskeletal symptoms in a Swedish county during a period of rapid increase in sickness absence1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 204-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sickness absence and disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses has increased in Sweden.

    Study objective — To study gender trends in sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses and its changes in 1985—87.

    Design — A prospective population-based study of all new sick-leave spells exceeding seven days in 1985—87. Sickness absence with "all diagnoses'' was compared to "all musculoskeletal diagnoses'', the latter group was also divided into three sub-groups.

    Setting — The county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Participants — All sick-leave insured aged 16—65; 107,000 women and 100,000 men.

    Results — More women than men were sick-listed in "all diagnoses'' in 1985. There were corresponding gender differences in sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses except with the diagnosis "low back pain''. Sick-listing with musculoskeletal diagnoses increased for both women and men from 1985 to 1987, but the increase was consistently much higher for women, especially for younger women.

  • 95.
    Leijon, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mikaelsson, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Repeated short-term sick-leave as a possible symptom of psycho-social problems1984In: Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 165-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a research project concerning repeated short-term sick-leave an intensive study has been performed aiming at estimating the frequency and character of psycho-social problems in a population with a minimum of six short sick spells during a 12-month period, in comparison with an age- and sex-matched sample of patients who went to the local general practitioner in the same area. The results show that psycho-social problems are twice as common in the group with repeated short-term sick-leave.

  • 96.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Sennfält, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    En introduktion i hälsoekonomi2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97. Lindfors, Sara
    et al.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Gotthard, Ricci
    Nordström, Louise
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Stressande faktorer bland disputerade specialistläkare anställda på ett universitetssjukhus2005Report (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Economic impact of injuries according to type of injury2002In: Croatian Medical Journal, ISSN 0353-9504, E-ISSN 1332-8166, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 386-389Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. Analysis of the economic impact of injuries that occurred within a year in Motala district - a World Health Organization Safe Community. Method. A survey of all types of injury that occurred in an area with the total population of over 41,000 within a 12-month period (October 1, 1983, to September 30, 1984). All injuries that required medical care were noted. Included in the costs of injuries were the marginal costs to medical care, companies, and the health insurance system. Results. There were 4,926 injuries that required medical care. The costs of injuries were SEK 23.7 million (US$3.59 million) for the health care service (outpatient care, including primary health care and hospital care), SEK 79.7 million (US$12.08 million) for trade and industry, and SEK 9.1 million (US$1.38 million) for health insurance system. Home injuries accounted for the largest share of community costs (29%). Men accounted for the highest share of both the cost to the community (59%) and health insurance expenditures (70%) for injuries. In case of home injuries, the cost of medical care dominated among women (46%), whereas company costs dominated among men (77%). Serious injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale-AIS-3) accounted for 16% of the total cost to the community, but constituted only 3% of all injuries. Moderate injuries (AIS-2) accounted for 69% of the cost and made up 48% of the injuries, whereas minor injuries (AIS-1) accounted for 12% of the cost and constituted 49% of all injuries. Injuries to the extremities accounted in all for 74% of the cost to the community. Conclusion. The cost of injuries can be analyzed in relation to different characteristics of injuries, which can provide a comprehensive view of the injury profile and its economic impact according to the type of injury.

  • 99.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schelp, L
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Gender aspects of work-related injuries in a Swedish minicipality.2000In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 31, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schelp, L
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Home injuries in a Swedish municipality - consequences and costs. 1999In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 31, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
1234 51 - 100 of 197
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf