liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 70 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51. Nowak, G
    et al.
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wernerson, A
    Herlenius, G
    Sletten, K
    Ericzon, BG
    Liver transplantation as rescue treatment in a patient with primary AL kappa.2000In: Transplant International, ISSN 0934-0874, E-ISSN 1432-2277, Vol. 13, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Olsen, Karen Ege
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Localized and systemic AL-amyloidosis: Aspects on protein structure, fibril formation and analytical methods1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AL-amyloidosis is a protein storage disease and one of the most common types of amyloidosis. The precursor protein is a monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain which originates from plasma cell dyscrasia in systemic AL-amyloidosis and is probably produced by a local plasma cell clone in localized AL-amyloidosis. Systemic AL-amyloidosis is a fatal disease, but the prognosis is improved by early diagnosis. The process leading to AL-amyloid fibril formation is not clear, but changes in the primary protein structure, associated substances and local tissue factors play a role. In order to interfere with amyloid deposition, it is necessary to understand the factors implicated in amyloid fibril formation.

    In this work, biochemical and immunological methods have been used to analyze AL-proteins and other factors involved in amyloid fibril formation. Conventional analytical methods have been extended, and a new method for typing of systemic amyloidosis has been developed. With our finding of immunoglobulin light chain of subgroup ')..V as anAL-protein, it has now been shown that the subgroups Ki-N and AI-VI of immunoglobulin light chains are capable of amyloid formation. By amino acid sequence analysis of several AL-proteins, unique amino acid substitutions were found, in addition to a remarkable pattern of amino acid substitutions in pairs. In localized AL-amyloidosis, giant cells were constantly associated with the amyloid deposits, in contrast to systemic AL-amyloidosis where giant cells only occurred in some lymph nodes with a different amyloid deposition pattern. The constant region of the light chain was found as the main component in an AL-protein as frequent constituent of ALamyloid. These fragments were found in gel filtration fractions generally not expected to contain protein material. An ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) method was developed for typing of systemic amyloidoses from amyloid material extracted from subcutaneous adipose tissue, a simple method with no risk and little discomfort for the patient. In addition, it was shown that the subcutaneous tissue is a source for material for further AL-protein studies.

    Amyloid fibril formation is probably a process involving the interaction of many factors, some of which have been studied, and better understood as a result of these experiments. The interpretation of the results is discussed in the context of a multifactorial pathogenesis of AL-amyloidosis.

  • 53.
    Olsen, KE
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sletten, K
    Sandgren, O
    Olsson, H
    Myrvold, K
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    What is the role of giant cells in AL-amyloidosis?1999In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 6, p. 89-97Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Olsen, KE
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sletten, K
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The use of subcutaneous fat tissue for amyloid typing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.1999In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0002-9173, E-ISSN 1943-7722, Vol. 111, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55. Peng, Siwei
    et al.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Näslund, Jan
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Glennert, Johanna
    Westermark, Per
    Medin and medin-amyloid in ageing inflamed and non-inflamed temporal arteries2002In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 196, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56. Pollard, K Michael
    et al.
    Arnush, Marc
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Costimulation requirements of induced murine systemic autoimmune disease2004In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 173, no 9, p. 5880-5887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Costimulation between T cells and APC is required for productive immune responses. A number of receptor/ligand pairs have been shown to mediate costimulation, including CD28/B7 molecules (CD80 and CD86), CD40/CD40 ligaad (CD40L, CD154), and LFA-1 (CD18)/ICAM-1 (CD54). T-B cell Costimulation also plays a significant role in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Murine HgCl2-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA) is a T cell-dependent systemic autoimmune disease that shares a number of common pathogenic mechanisms with idiopathic lupus. In this report, the significance of costimulation in mHgIA is examined by attempting to induce disease in mice deficient in either CD40L, CD28, or ICAM-1. Unlike absence of ICAM-1, homozygous deficiencies in either CD40L or CD28 significantly reduced the development of mHgIA. CD40L displayed a gene dosage effect as heterozygous mice also showed reduction of autoantibody responses and immunopathology. Markers of T cell activation such as CD44 and CTLA-4 were associated with disease expression in wild-type and ICAM-1-deficient mice but not in CD40L- or CD28-deficient mice. Absence of CTLA-4 expression in CD40L-/- mice suggests that signaling via both CD28 and CD40L is important for T cell activation and subsequent autoimmunity in mHgIA. Attempts to circumvent the absence of CD40L by increasing CD28 signaling via agonistic Ab failed to elicit CTLA-4 expression. These findings indicate that breaking of self-tolerance in mHgIA requires signaling via both the CD28/B7 and CD40/CD40L pathways.

  • 57. Pollard, K Michael
    et al.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fibrillarin autoantibodies2007In: Autoantibodies / [ed] Shoenfeld, Yehuda,Gershwin, M. Eric och Meroni, Pier-Luigi, Elsevier Science , 2007, p. 317-323Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Pollard, K. Michael
    et al.
    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Skin-lightening creams are a possible exposure risk for systemic lupus erythemato sus: comment on the article by Finckh et al.2007In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 1721-1721Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 59.
    Pollard, K Michael
    et al.
    USA .
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kono, Dwight H
    USA .
    Immunology and genetics of induced systemic autoimmunity2005In: Autoimmunity Reviews, ISSN 1568-9972, E-ISSN 1873-0183, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multigenic disorder of unknown etiology. To investigate the role of specific genes in lupus, we have examined the effects of single gene deletions on mercury-induced autoimmunity. Deficiency of certain genes abrogated induction of autoimmunity, while absence of others had little effect. The most interesting observations were obtained with genes related to interferon-γ. Genes involved in upregulation of IFN-γ expression did not significantly influence autoimmunity whereas absence of IFN-γ or IFN-γ receptor led to greatly reduced autoantibody responses and immunopathology. Absence of IRF-1, a gene expressed in response to IFN-γ, resulted in selective retention of anti-chromatin autoantibodies demonstrating that specific defects in signaling pathways and gene expression subsequent to IFN-γ/IFN-γ receptor interaction influence specific disease parameters. These studies show that single gene deletions can have various outcomes ranging from no effect, suppression of one or more features of disease, to suppression of all features of disease, and that all three outcomes can be observed in the IFN-γ pathway. IFN-γ influences the expression and function of other lupus relevant genes such as IL-6 and β2microglobulin, therefore the effects of these gene deletions on disease expression may also reflect responses downstream of IFN-γ function. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 60. Pollard, K Michael
    et al.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Using single-gene deletions to identify checkpoints in the progression of systemic autoimmunity2003In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 987, p. 236-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multigenic disorder of unknown etiology. To investigate the roles that specific genes play in lupus, we have examined the disease profiles in mice with single-gene deletions. In total, some 17 genes have been studied. Absence of certain genes, such as CD40L, CD28, or Igh6, abrogated induction of autoimmunity. Other genes, such as Igh5, IL-4, or ICAM-1, had little effect on the development of disease. Intermediate effects were observed in IL-6-deficient mice, while absence of β2-microglobulin resulted in loss of hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG1 autoantibodies, but produced little change in anti-chromatin antibodies or glomerular deposits. The most interesting observations were obtained with genes related to the expression or function of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Reductions in IFN-γ levels in murine lupus are associated with reductions in both autoantibody levels and immune-complex- mediated pathology. Genes involved in up-regulation of IFN-γ expression, such as IL-12, STAT-4, or ICE, did not significantly influence autoimmunity, whereas absence of IFN-γ or IFN-γ receptor led to greatly reduced autoantibody response and immunopathology. Absence of IRF-1, a gene ex-pressed in response to IFN-γ, resulted in selective retention of anti-chromatin antibodies but little glomerular pathology. These studies suggest that the presence of a baseline level of IFN-γ, rather than increased expression, is important for autoimmunity. Furthermore, as the IRF-1 knockout demonstrates, specific defects in signaling pathways and gene expression subsequent to IFN-γ/IFN-γ receptor interaction may influence only certain disease parameters. It has not escaped our attention that IFN-γ influences the expression and function of other immunologically relevant genes, such as IL-4, IL-6, and β2-microglobulin. Thus, these genes may be part of the downstream events following IFN-γ/IFN-γ receptor interaction that promote the development of autoimmunity.

  • 61. Pollard, KM
    et al.
    Pearson, DL
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Deane, TN
    Lindh, U
    Kono, DH
    Xenobiotic acceleration of idiopathic systemic autoimmunity in lupus-prone BXSB mice.2001In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 109, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62. Pollard, KM
    et al.
    Pearson, DL
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hildebrandt, B
    Kono, DH
    Lupus-prone mice as models to study xenobiotic-induced acceleration of systemic autoimmunity. 1999In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 107, p. 729-735Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Qvarnström, Johanna
    et al.
    Lambertsson, Lars
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Frech, Wolfgang
    Determination of methylmercury, ethylmercury, and inorganic mercury in mouse tissues, following administration of thimerosal, by species-specific isotope dilution GC-inductively coupled plasma-MS2003In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 75, no 16, p. 4120-4124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isotopically enriched HgO standards were used to synthesize CH 3200Hg+ and C2H5199Hg+ using Grignard re-agents. These species were employed for isotope dilution GC-ICPMS to study uptake and biotransformation of ethylmercury in mice treated with thimerosal, (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate) 10 mg L-1 in drinking water ad libitum for 1, 2.5, 6, or 14 days. Prior to analysis, samples were spiked with aqueous solutions of CH3200Hg+, C2H 5199Hg+, and 201Hg2+ and then digested in 20% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and extracted at pH 9 with DDTC/toluene. Extracted mercury species were reacted with butylmagnesium chloride to form butylated derivatives. Absolute detection limits for CH 3Hg+, C2H5Hg+, and Hg2+ were 0.4, 0.2, and 0.6 pg on the basis of 3s of five separate blanks. Up to 9% of the C2H5Hg+ was decomposed to Hg2+ during sample preparation, and it is therefore crucial to use a species-specific internal standard when determining ethylmercury. No demethylation, methylation, or ethylation during sample preparation was detected. The ethylmercury component of thimerosal was rapidly taken up in the organs of the mice (kidney, liver, and mesenterial lymph nodes), and concentrations of C2H5Hg+ as well as Hg2+ increased over the 14 days of thimerosal treatment. This shows that C2H5Hg+ in mice to a large degree is degraded to Hg2+. Increased concentrations of CH3Hg + were also observed, which was found to be due to impurities in the thimerosal.

  • 64. Samdahl, IA
    et al.
    Sletten, K
    Olsen, KE
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    AL 366 - a glycosylated protein of kappa 1b origin in a patient with systemic amyloidosis of predominantly non-parenchymatous distribution.2001In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 8, p. 111-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65. Torous, DK
    et al.
    Hall, NE
    Dertinger, SD
    Diehl, MS
    Illi-Love, AH
    Cederbrant, K
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Sandelin, K
    Bolcsfoldi, G
    Ferguson, LR
    Pearson, A
    Majeska, JB
    Tarca, JP
    Hewish, DR
    Doughty, L
    Fenech, M
    Weaver, JL
    Broud, D
    Gatehouse, DG
    Hynes, GM
    Kwanyuen, P
    McLean, J
    McNamee, P
    Parenteau, M
    Van Hoof, V
    Vanparys, P
    Lenarczyk, M
    Siennicka, J
    Litwinska, B
    Slowikowska, MG
    Harbach, PR
    Johnson, CW
    Zhao, S
    Aaron, CS
    Lynch, AM
    Marshall, IC
    Rodgers, B
    Tometsko, CR
    Flow cytometric enumeration of micronucleated reticulocytes: High transferability among 14 laboratories.2001In: Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, ISSN 0893-6692, E-ISSN 1098-2280, Vol. 38, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Unemo, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Olcén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Molecular typing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates by pyrosequencing of highly polymorphic segments of the porB gene2004In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 2926-2934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For prevention and control of gonorrhea, an objective, highly discriminating, and reproducible molecular epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is essential. In the present study, in pursuance of providing such qualities, pyrosequencing technology, a fast real-time DNA sequence analysis, was applied to six short, highly polymorphic porB gene segments, with subsequent genetic variant (genovar) determination of the bacterial isolates. The sequencing templates were obtained by real-time PCR amplification, which also included fluorescence melting curve analysis of the entire porB gene in order to determine the genogroup (porB1a or porB1b allele) prior to pyrosequencing analysis. The PSQ 96 MA system used allowed rapid (in approximately 1.5 h) determination of 96 sequences of 20 to 65 correct nucleotides each. The results were reproducible and mostly in concordance with the results of conventional Sanger dideoxy sequencing, with the exception of shorter read lengths and some uncertainty in determining the correct number of identical nucleotides in homopolymeric segments. The number of sequence variants identified in each of the six highly polymorphic segments of the porB1a and porB1b alleles (encoding surface-exposed amino acid loops of the mature PorB protein) ranged from 5 to 11 and from 8 to 39, respectively. Among porB1a isolates (n = 22) and porB1b isolates (n = 65), 22 and 64 unique genovars, respectively, were identified. All isolates were typeable. The present results provide evidence of a high discriminatory ability, practically the same as that for sequencing of the entire porB gene. In conclusion, the fast and high-throughput pyrosequencing technology can be used for molecular epidemiological characterization of N. gonorrhoeae.

  • 67.
    Velin, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Herder, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Johansson, Kenth
    Trulsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: endokir.
    Telomerase is not activated in human hyperplastic and adenomatous parathyroid tissue2001In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 161-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Telomerase is a specific enzyme that appears to have a key role in cellular senescence and the progression of neoplastic tissue. High telomerase activity has been found in several cancers, but not in most normal and benign tissue. Little is known about the influence of telomerase on the abnormal growth associated with hyperparathyroidism. Objective: To analyse telomerase activity in parathyroid tissue obtained from 29 patients undergoing surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism. Design: Tissue for telomerase activity measurements was collected from six hyperplastic, 20 adenomatous and 22 normal parathyroid glands. Methods: The highly sensitive PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol, TRAP, combined with ELISA, was used to detect telomerase activity in tissue extracts containing 3.0 ╡g protein. Result: Telomerase was not activated in any of the analysed tissue by 3 ╡g protein. Reassay of 12 samples containing 6.0 ╡g protein verified these negative TRAP results. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that telomerase is not a part of the mechanism promoting parathyroid proliferation and the underlying conditions remain to be determined.

  • 68.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Johnson, KH
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Staining methods for identification of amyloid in tissue.  1999In: Methods in Enzymology, ISSN 0076-6879, E-ISSN 1557-7988, Vol. 309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pipeleers, D
    Eizirik, D
    Hellerström, C
    Fox, N
    Steiner, DF
    Andersson, A
    Differences in amyloid deposition in islets of transgenic mice expressing human islet amyloid polypeptide versus human islets implanted into nude mice. 1999In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 48, p. 448-454Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Westermark, P
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Araki, S
    Benson, MD
    Cohen, A
    Frangione, B
    Masters, CL
    Saraiva, MJ
    Sipe, JD
    Husby, G
    Kyle, RA
    Selkoe, D
    Nomenclature of amyloid fibril proteins. Report from the meeting of the international nomenclature committee on amyloidosis, August 8-9, 1998. Part 1.1999In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 6, p. 63-66Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 70 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf