liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Letter: Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation. Are studies always adequately powered and analyzed? Response2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 948-950Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 52.
    Nilsson, Evalill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borgstedt Risberg, Madeleine
    Public Health Centre, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impact of comorbidity on health-related quality of life: a population-based study using the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the new Health-Related Quality of Life Comorbidity Index, with data from the Swedish National Inpatient RegisterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the impact of comorbidity on general health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a Swedish normal population using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), designed for mortality outcomes, and the new Health-Related Quality of Life Comorbidity Index (HRQL-CI, with physical and psychosocial subindexes) designed for HRQoL outcomes, and comorbidity analyses based on data from the Swedish national inpatient register.

    Study design and setting:L In 1999, 6083 women (54%) and men aged 20-74 (mean 46, SD 15) responded to a public health survey in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, including measures of general HRQoL (the SF-36 and the EQ-5D).

    Results: During 1987-1999, 478 (15 %) and 664 (21 %)/418 (13 %) persons had been registered with ≥1 hospital admission ICD-code included in the CCI and the HRQL-CI physical/psychosocial dimensions, respectively. Both indices discriminated between persons with different degrees of comorbidity regarding their HRQoL. The HRQL-CI received somewhat higher R2 values (e.g. SF-36 scales Physical Functioning 0.161 vs 0.067 and Mental Health 0.026 vs 0.004).

    Conclusions: The new HRQL-CI, created on the basis of self-reports, proved to be a valid measure of comorbidity in a Swedish normal population using national register data.

  • 53.
    Nilsson, Heléne
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonson, Carl-Oscar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikström, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Kildal, Morten
    Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Simulation-assisted burn disaster planning2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 1122-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the Swedish medical systems response to a mass casualty burn incident in a rural area with a focus on national coordination of burn care. Data were collected from two simulations of a mass casualty incident with burns in a rural area in the mid portion of Sweden close to the Norwegian border, based on a large inventory of emergency resources available in this area as well as regional hospitals, university hospitals and burn centres in Sweden and abroad. The simulation system Emergo Train System (R) (ETS) was used and risk for preventable death and complications were used as outcome measures: simulation I, 18.5% (n = 13) preventable deaths and 15.5% (n = 11) preventable complications; simulation II, 11.4% (n = 8) preventable deaths and 11.4% (n = 8) preventable complications. The last T1 patient was evacuated after 7 h in simulation I, compared with 5 h in simulation II. Better national coordination of burn care and more timely distribution based on the experience from the first simulation, and possibly a learning effect, led to a better patient outcome in simulation II. The experience using a system that combines both process and outcome indicators can create important results that may support disaster planning.

  • 54.
    Norjavaara, Ensio
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden .
    Ericsson, Hans
    AstraZeneca, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Leonsson-Zachrisson, Maria
    AstraZeneca, Sweden .
    Sjostrand, Mikaela
    AstraZeneca, Sweden .
    A Morrow, Linda
    Profil Institute Clin Research, USA .
    Hompesch, Marcus
    Profil Institute Clin Research, USA .
    Glucokinase Activators AZD6370 and AZD1656 Do Not Affect the Central Counterregulatory Response to Hypoglycemia in Healthy Males2012In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 97, no 9, p. 3319-3325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Glucokinase is expressed in the hypothalamus, but effects of glucokinase activators (GKAs) on counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia are unknown. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: Two separate studies assessed the counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycemia induced by the GKAs, AZD6370 and AZD1656, compared with insulin infusion. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign and Setting: Both studies were randomized, open, two-way crossover studies, conducted in separate clinical research centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants: Both studies involved 12 healthy adult male volunteers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanInterventions: Each subject received two treatments in randomized order, separated by a washout. In the AZD6370 study, overnight-fasted subjects received either a single oral AZD6370 dose (300 mg) or insulin infusion (0.8 mU/kg . min). In the AZD1656 study, overnight-fasted subjects received either a single oral dose of AZD1656 (80 mg) plus supporting insulin (1 mU/kg . min) or insulin alone (1 mU/kg . min). Insulin was added to support AZD1656 because AZD1656 alone did not produce the desired hypoglycemia. Plasma glucose was lowered during a stepwise hypoglycemic clamp with a glycemic nadir of 2.7 mmol/liter for 30 min. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measures: Epinephrine, norepinephrine, GH, cortisol, and glucagon plasma levels were assessed. Results: No safety issues were raised. AZD6370 and AZD1656 had no effect on counterregulatory responses for norepinephrine, GH, or cortisol, but epinephrine increased slightly with AZD1656. Glucagon responses were reduced by approximately 30% with both GKAs vs. insulin. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: These data suggest the central nervous system-mediated counterregulatory response during GKA-induced hypoglycemia was preserved, whereas the glucagon response was attenuated; the latter was possibly mediated by a local pancreatic effect (intraislet hyperinsulinemia) rather than by impairment of the central nervous system-mediated response.

  • 55.
    Nyman, Erika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nyman, Torbjörn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Junker, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hyaluronic acid, an important factor in the wound healing properties of amniotic fluid: In vitro studies of re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 89-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foetal wounds are unique in their ability to heal rapidly without forming scars. The amniotic fluid, rich in nutrients, growth factors, and hyaluronic acid, surrounds the foetus and is essential to foetal wound healing. The wound healing properties of foetal wounds may be the result of high concentrations of hyaluronic acid. This study aimed to verify that amniotic fluid induces re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds in vitro and to study whether this ability is dependent on hyaluronic acid. Standard deep dermal wounds were produced in vitro in human skin. The skin samples, with a central wound, were incubated in different culture media. Varying concentrations of amniotic fluid and amniotic fluid with added hyaluronidase were tested, and re-epithelialisation was assessed at 3, 7, and 12 days using light microscopy, after staining with haematoxylin and eosin. Amniotic fluid 50% resulted in a significantly higher (p andlt; 0.05) grade of re-epithelialisation than Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium and 10% amniotic fluid at all time points. When 50% amniotic fluid was compared with 10% foetal calf serum, no significant difference was found in grades of re-epithelialisation on days 3 and 12 and significantly higher grades of re-epithelialisation on day 7 (p andlt; 0.05). Degradation of hyaluronic acid in the medium that contained 50% amniotic fluid gave significantly impaired re-epithelialisation (p andlt; 0.05) on culture days 3 and 7. In conclusion, amniotic fluid promotes accelerated re-epithelialisation and hyaluronic acid is an important ingredient.

  • 56.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Physical effects of trauma and the psychological consequences of preexisting diseases account for a significant portion of the health-related quality of life patterns of former trauma patients2012In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, ISSN 2163-0755, E-ISSN 2163-0763, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 504-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is known to be significantly affected in former trauma patients. However, the underlying factors that lead to this outcome are largely unknown. In former intensive care unit (ICU) patients, it has been recognized that preexisting disease is the most important factor for the long-term HRQoL. The aim of this study was to investigate HRQoL up to 2 years after trauma and to examine the contribution of the trauma-specific, ICU-related, sociodemographic factors together with the effects of preexisting disease, and further to make a comparison with a large general population.

    Methods: A prospective 2-year multicenter study in Sweden of 108 injured patients. By mailed questionnaires, HRQoL was assessed at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after the stay in ICU by Short Form (SF)-36, and information of preexisting disease was collected from the national hospital database. ICU-related factors were obtained from the local ICU database. Comorbidity and HRQoL (SF-36) was also examined in the reference group, a random sample of 10,000 inhabitants in the uptake area of the hospitals.

    Results: For the trauma patients, there was a marked and early decrease in the physical dimensions of the SF-36 (role limitations due to physical problems and bodily pain). This decrease improved rapidly and was almost normalized after 24 months. In parallel, there were extensive decreases in the psychologic dimensions (vitality, social functioning, role limitations due to emotional problems, and mental health) of the SF-36 when comparisons were made with the general reference population.

    Conclusions: The new and important finding in this study is that the trauma population seems to have a trauma-specific HRQoL outcome pattern. First, there is a large and significant decrease in the physical dimensions of the SF-36, which is due to musculoskeletal effects and pain secondary to the trauma. This normalizes within 2 years, whereas the overall decrease in HRQoL remains and most importantly it is seen mainly in the psychologic dimensions and it is due to preexisting diseases

  • 57.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    COPING STRATEGY AND PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS ARE IMPORTANT FOR HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER CRITICAL ILLNESS in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S392-S3922010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S392-S392Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 58.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS AFTER ICU CARE IS A PREDICTOR OF LONG TERM SURVIVAL in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S385-S3852010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S385-S385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 59.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness2011In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, ISSN 0342-4642, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine to what extent availability of social integration affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in former intensive care unit (ICU) patients and how it relates to corresponding findings in a general reference group. Controlled, multicenter, prospective, explorative study. HRQoL data (SF-36) were collected from three combined medical and surgical ICUs in the south-east of Sweden. Social integration was assessed by the Availability of Social Integration (AVSI) instrument (seven questions related to the social interaction of the patient). As reference group, a random sample (n = 6,093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals was used. Social integration (AVSI), HRQoL (SF-36), and comorbidity were examined also in the reference group. None. The level of social integration significantly affected HRQoL for the former ICU patients, whereas no such effect was seen for the general reference group. For the ICU patients, social integration affected HRQoL to a larger extent than age, sex, and the ICU-related factors examined, but to a lower extent than the pre-existing diseases. For a comprehensive assessment of HRQoL in former ICU patients, it is mandatory to include the effect of social integration.

  • 60.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Health-related quality of life scores after intensive care are almost equal to those of the normal population: a multicenter observational study2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R236-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients treated in intensive care has been reported to be lower compared with age- and sex-adjusted control groups. Our aim was to test whether stratifying for coexisting conditions would reduce observed differences in HRQoL between patients treated in the ICU and a control group from the normal population. We also wanted to characterize the ICU patients with the lowest HRQoL within these strata.

    METHODS:

    We did a cross-sectional comparison of scores of the short-form health survey (SF-36) questionnaire in a multicenter study of patients treated in the ICU (n = 780) and those from a local public health survey (n = 6,093). Analyses were in both groups adjusted for age and sex, and data stratified for coexisting conditions. Within each stratum, patients with low scores (below -2 SD of the control group) were identified and characterized.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustment, there were minor and insignificant differences in mean SF-36 scores between patients and controls. Eight (n = 18) and 22% (n = 51) of the patients had low scores (-2 SD of the control group) in the physical and mental dimensions of SF-36, respectively. Patients with low scores were usually male, single, on sick leave before admission to critical care, and survived a shorter time after being in ICU.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After adjusting for age, sex, and coexisting conditions, mean HRQoL scores were almost equal in patients and controls. Up to 22% (n = 51) of the patients had, however, a poor quality of life as compared with the controls (-2 SD). This group, which more often consisted of single men, individuals who were on sick leave before admission to the ICU, had an increased mortality after ICU. This group should be a target for future support.

  • 61.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, P
    Jonkoping, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    IS HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFFECTED BY AN EARLY (andlt; 3 YEARS) DEATH AFTER ICU CARE AS COMPARED WITH SURVIVING ICU PATIENTS? in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S393-S3932010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S393-S393Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 62.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Nordlund, Anders
    TFS Trial Form Support AB, Lund.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Pre-existing disease: the most important factor for health related quality of life long-term after critical illness: a prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial2010In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of the present multicenter study was to assess long term (36 months) health related quality of life in patients after critical illness, compare ICU survivors health related quality of life to that of the general population and examine the impact of pre-existing disease and factors related to ICU care on health related quality of life.

    Methods

    Prospective, longitudinal, multicentre trial in three combined medical and surgical intensive care units of one university and two general hospitals in Sweden. By mailed questionnaires, health related quality of life was assessed at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the stay in ICU by EQ-5D and SF-36, and information of pre-existing disease was collected at the 6 months measure. ICU related factors were obtained from the local ICU database. Comorbidity and health related quality of life (EQ-5D; SF-36) was examined in the reference group. Among the 5306 patients admitted, 1663 were considered eligible (>24 hrs in the intensive care unit, and age ≥ 18 yrs, and alive 6 months after discharge). At the 6 month measure 980 (59%) patients answered the questionnaire. Of these 739 (75%) also answered at 12 month, 595 (61%) at 24 month, and 478 (47%) answered at the 36 month measure. As reference group, a random sample (n = 6093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals were used in which concurrent disease was assessed and adjusted for.

    Results

    Only small improvements were recorded in health related quality of life up to 36 months after ICU admission. The majority of the reduction in health related quality of life after care in the ICU was related to the health related quality of life effects of pre-existing diseases. No significant effect on the long-term health related quality of life by any of the ICU-related factors was discernible.

    Conclusions

    A large proportion of the reduction in the health related quality of life after being in the ICU is attributable to pre-existing disease. The importance of the effect of pre-existing disease is further supported by the small, long term increment in the health related quality of life after treatment in the ICU. The reliability of the conclusions is supported by the size of the study populations and the long follow-up period.

     

  • 63.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Gren, H
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Mårdh, C
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Karlström, G
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessing outcome after critical illness by use of a nation intensive care registry (SIR)2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessing patient reported outcome measures (PROM) after critical illness using a nationwide intensive care registry2012In: Proceedings of the 20th International Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willebrand, M
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gerdin, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Long term health-related quality of life after burns is strongly dependent on pre-existing disease and psychosocial issues and less due to the burn itself2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is reduced after a burn, and is affected by coexisting conditions. The aims of the investigation were to examine and describe effects of coexisting disease on HRQoL, and to quantify the proportion of burned people whose HRQoL was below that of a reference group matched for age, gender, and coexisting conditions.

    Method

    A nationwide study covering 9 years and examined HRQoL 12 and 24 months after the burn with the SF-36 questionnaire. The reference group was from the referral area of one of the hospitals.

    Results

    The HRQoL of the burned patients was below that of the reference group mainly in the mental dimensions, and only single patients were affected in the physical dimensions. The factor that significantly affected most HRQoL dimensions (n = 6) after the burn was unemployment, whereas only smaller effects could be attributed directly to the burn.

    Conclusion

    Poor HRQoL was recorded for only a small number of patients, and the decline were mostly in the mental dimensions when compared with a group adjusted for age, gender, and coexisting conditions. Factors other than the burn itself, such as mainly unemployment and pre-existing disease, were most important for the long term HRQoL experience in these patients.

  • 66.
    Oster, Caisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hensing, Ida
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lojdstrom, Therese
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Parents Perceptions of Adaptation and Family Life After Burn Injuries in Children2014In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 606-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore parents experiences after their childs burn injury, focusing on how the burn had influenced family life and child adjustment. Six semi-structured interviews with parents of children treated at burn centers 2 to 7 years previously revealed the theme, "Feeling quite alone in striving to regain family wellbeing". Identification of difficulties perceived by the parents during rehabilitation and up until the present is useful when developing pediatric burn care and support for parents of children with burns.

  • 67.
    Persson, Kristin M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna Lönnqvist
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, David
    Department of Printed Electronics, Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selective Detachment of Human Primary Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Using an Addressable Conjugated Polymer Matrix2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymers have been used in several applications for electronic control of cell cultures over the last years. We have shown detachment of human endothelial cells using a thin film of a self-doped water-soluble conjugated polymer. Upon electrochemical oxidation, the film swells, cracks and finally detaches taking cells cultured on top along with it. The polymer can be patterned using standard photolithography. The detachment only occurs above a threshold potential of +0.7 V and this fact has been used to create a simple actively addressed matrix, based on a resistor network placed in an encapsulated back plane. The matrix has individually detachable pixels. In this paper we have evaluated detachment of human primary keratinocytes and fibroblasts using PEDOT-S:H. In addition, we have studied effects of serum proteins, added as nutrients to the cell culture medium, on the detachment properties. It was found that at prolonged incubation times protein adhesion effectively stopped the detachment. Using shorter incubation times before detachment, both keratinocytes and fibroblasts can be detached using a regular planar device as well as the matrix device for selective detachment. Spatial control of detachment could be of use when selecting cells for clonal expansion and in order to obtain a homogeneous starting population of cells aimed for tissue engineering purposes.

  • 68.
    Pettersson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Biomaterials, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on macroporous gelatine scaffolds: — impact of micro carrier selection on cell proliferation2011In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 065001-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates human chondrocyte expansion on four macroporous gelatine microcarriers (CultiSpher) differing with respect to two manufacturing processes—the amount of emulsifier used during initial preparation and the gelatine cross-linking medium. Monolayer-expanded articular chondrocytes from three donors were seeded onto the microcarriers and cultured in spinner flask systems for a total of 15 days. Samples were extracted every other day to monitor cell viability and establish cell counts, which were analysed using analysis of variance and piecewise linear regression. Chondrocyte densities increased according to a linear pattern for all microcarriers, indicating an ongoing, though limited, cell proliferation. A strong chondrocyte donor effect was seen during the initial expansion phase. The final cell yield differed significantly between the microcarriers and our results indicate that manufacturing differences affected chondrocyte densities at this point. Remaining cells stained positive for chondrogenic markers SOX-9 and S-100 but extracellular matrix formation was modest to undetectable. In conclusion, the four gelatine microcarriers supported chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation over a two week period. The best yield was observed for microcarriers produced with low emulsifier content and cross-linked in water and acetone. These results add to the identification of optimal biomaterial parameters for specific cellular processes and populations.

  • 69.
    Povlsen, Bo
    et al.
    London Bridge Hospital, England.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Povlsen, Sebastian D.
    University of Oxford, England.
    Treatment for thoracic outlet syndrome2014In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, Vol. 26, no 11, p. CD007218-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is one of the most controversial diagnoses in clinical medicine. Despite many reports of operative and non-operative interventions, rigorous scientific investigation of this syndrome leading to evidence-based management is lacking. This is the first update of a review first published in 2010.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of the available operative and non-operative interventions for the treatment of TOS a minimum of six months after the intervention.

    SEARCH METHODS:

    On 23 June 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register, CENTRAL, The Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus and AMED. We also searched reference lists of the identified trials.

    SELECTION CRITERIA:

    We selected randomized or quasi-randomized studies involving participants with the diagnosis of TOS of any type (neurogenic, vascular, and 'disputed'), without limitations as to language of publication.We accepted studies that examined any intervention aimed at treating TOS.The primary outcome measure was change in pain rating, measured on a validated visual analog or similar scale at least six months after the intervention.The secondary outcomes were change in muscle strength, disability, experiences of paresthesias (numbness and tingling sensations), and adverse effects of the interventions.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

    Three authors independently selected the trials to be included and extracted data. Authors rated included studies for risk of bias, according to the methods recommended in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions.

    MAIN RESULTS:

    This review was complicated by a lack of generally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of TOS and had to rely exclusively on the diagnosis of TOS by the investigators in the reviewed studies. We identified one study comparing natural progression with an active intervention. We found three randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but only two of them had a follow-up of six months or more, which was the minimum required follow-up for inclusion in the review. The first trial that met our requirements involved 55 participants with the 'disputed type' of TOS and compared transaxillary first rib resection (TFRR) with supraclavicular neuroplasty of the brachial plexus (SNBP). The trial had a high risk of bias. TFRR decreased pain more than SNBP. There were no adverse effects in either group. The second trial that met these requirements analyzed 37 people with TOS of any type, comparing treatment with a botulinum toxin (BTX) injection into the scalene muscles with a saline placebo injection. This trial had a low risk of bias. There was no significant effect of treatment with the BTX injection over placebo in terms of pain relief or improvements in disability, but it did significantly improve paresthesias at six months' follow-up. There were no adverse events of the BTX treatment above saline injection.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

    This review was complicated by a lack of generally accepted diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of TOS. There was very low quality evidence that transaxillary first rib resection decreased pain more than supraclavicular neuroplasty, but no randomized evidence that either is better than no treatment. There is moderate evidence to suggest that treatment with BTX injections yielded no great improvements over placebo injections of saline. There is no evidence from RCTs for the use of other currently used treatments. There is a need for an agreed definition for the diagnosis of TOS, especially the disputed form, agreed outcome measures, and high quality randomized trials that compare the outcome of interventions with no treatment and with each other

  • 70.
    Rakar, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sommar, Pehr
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Junker, Johan
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA .
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Interpreted gene expression of human dermal fibroblasts after adipo-, chondro- and osteogenic phenotype shifts2012In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 305-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autologous cell-based therapies promise important developments for reconstructive surgery. In vitro expansion as well as differentiation strategies could provide a substantial benefit to cellular therapies. Human dermal fibroblasts, considered ubiquitous connective tissue cells, can be coaxed towards different cellular fates, are readily available and may altogether be a suitable cell source for tissue engineering strategies. Global gene expression analysis was performed to investigate the changes of the fibroblast phenotype after four-week inductions toward adipocytic, osteoblastic and chondrocytic lineages. Differential gene regulation, interpreted through Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, highlight important similarities and differences of induced fibroblasts compared to control cultures of human fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteoblasts and articular chondrocytes. Fibroblasts show an inherent degree of phenotype plasticity that can be controlled to obtain cells supportive of multiple tissue types.

  • 71.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Prostaglandins and Radical Oxygen Species Are Involved in Microvascular Effects of Hyperoxia2010In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, ISSN 1018-1172, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyperoxia causes vasoconstriction in most tissues, by mechanisms that are not fully understood. We investigated microvascular effects of breathing 100% oxygen in healthy volunteers, using iontophoresis to deliver acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Aspirin and vitamin C were used to test for involvement of prostaglandins and radical oxygen species. Forearm skin perfusion was measured using laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Results were analysed using dose-response modelling. The response to ACh was reduced by 30% during oxygen breathing compared to air breathing [0.98 (0.81-1.15) PU vs. 1.45 (1.30-1.60) PU, p andlt; 0.001]. ED50 values were unchanged [2.25 (1.84-2.75) vs. 2.21 (1.79-2.74), not significant]. Aspirin pre-treatment abolished the difference in response between oxygen breathing and air breathing [maximum: 1.03 (0.90-1.16) vs. 0.89 (0.77-1.01), not significant; ED50: 1.83 (1.46-2.30) vs. 1.95 (1.65-2.30), not significant]. ACh-mediated vasodilatation during 100% oxygen breathing was partially restored after pre-treatment with vitamin C. Breathing 100% oxygen did not change the microvascular response to SNP [1.45 (1.28-1.62) vs. 1.40 (1.26-1.53), not significant]. These results favour the hypothesis that hyperoxic vasoconstriction is mediated by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Radical oxygen species may be involved as vitamin C, independently of aspirin, partially restored ACh-mediated vasodilatation during hyperoxia.

  • 72.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Implications for burn shock resuscitation of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique (microdialysis) for dermal administration of noradrenaline2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 975-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion such as during burn shock resuscitation. However, little is known about the blood flow and metabolic consequences seen in the dermis secondary to the use vasoactive drugs (i.e. noradrenaline) for circulatory support. The aims of this study were therefore: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on dermal microdialysis; and in this model to investigate effects on blood flow and metabolism by local application of noradrenaline and nitroglycerin by the microdialysis system simulating drug induced circulatory support. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: Nine healthy volunteers had microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. The catheters were perfused with noradrenaline 3 or 30 mmol/L and after an equilibrium period all catheters were perfused with nitroglycerine (2.2 mmol/L). Dermal blood flow was measured by the urea clearance technique and by laser Doppler imaging. Simultaneously changes in dermal glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Noradrenaline and nitroglycerine delivered to the dermis by the microdialysis probes induced large time- and dose-dependent changes in all variables. We particularly noted that tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained higher than zero. Furthermore, vasoconstriction remained after the noradrenaline administration implicating vasospasm and an attenuated dermal autoregulatory capacity. The changes in glucose and lactate by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) remained until vasodilatation was actively induced by nitroglycerine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: These findings, i.e., compromised dermal blood flow and metabolism are particularly interesting from the burn shock resuscitation perspective where noradrenaline is commonly used for circulatory support. The importance and clinical value of the results obtained in this in vivo dermal model in healthy volunteers needs to be further explored in burn-injured patients.

  • 73.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Fluid therapy in burns2012In: Acta Medica Lituanica, ISSN 1392-0138, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 213-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome after burn injury, as also paralleled by other trauma, has been improving steadily over the years. In this aspect a significant improvement was seen especially in the 1970-ties when the 50% survival chance from a burn injury increased from 45% total body surface area burned (TBSA%) in a 21 year old patient up to almost 80% (TBSA%). Although this improvement may be claimed to have many reasons, a significant one that needs to be stressed is the introduction of more thorough use of protocolized fluid treatment strategies

  • 74.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Focus on early Phase Studies in Humans: A New Concept for the Conduct of Phase 0/1/IIaStudies2005In: Global Outsourcing Review, ISSN 1344-8439, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 36-38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidents Caused by Fire and Toxic Gas2012In: Medical Response to Major Incidents and Disasters: A Practical Guide for All Medical Staff / [ed] Sten Lennquist, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for major incidents includes knowledge of and routines for mastering the effects of thermal injury. It is important to realize that such skills are not only needed in large isolated fires but are important in other types of incidents as well because burn injuries may be present among other injuries. When describing modern planning for response to major burn incidents, it is important to be aware that modern burn care has changed significantly as medical progress has been made within this field, especially during the last decades. This implies that modern management of major burn injuries also has changed, which underlines the need for proper planning, management, and training. Addressing such issues, this chapter also describes other facts with implications for burn disaster management. One is that the incidence and prevalence of burns are declining and have been approximately 30% for the last 20 years, and burn care is concomitantly being centralized in many parts of the western world. Consequently, medical staff at different levels of care throughout various countries will have less practical experience in the field of burns. The described changes have implications for the modern management of major burn incidents. Lastly, an increased international cooperation and exchange of ideas have made burn care more global, especially when those injured in recent accidents have been transported between countries over long distances.

  • 76.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Pre-hospital, fluid and early management, burn wound evaluation2012In: Handbook of Burns: Acute Burn Care Volume 1 / [ed] Jeschke, Marc G; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Sjöberg, Folke; Wolf, Steven E, Wien: Springer, 2012, p. 105-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Skoldningsskader hos barn2008In: Tidskrift for Norsk Anestesiologisk forening, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 51-53Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Data visar att hyperbar syrgasbehandling kan vara skadlig2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 32-33, p. 1506-1506Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Brännskadecentrum, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hyperbar syrgasbehandling kan vara skadlig vid kolmonoxidförgiftning2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 32-33, p. 1506-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Singer, M
    Bloomsbury Institute of Intensive Care Medicine, University College of London, London, UK.
    The medical use of oxygen: a time for critical reappraisal2013In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 274, no 6, p. 505-528Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen treatment has been a cornerstone of acute medical care for numerous pathological states. Initially, this was supported by the assumed need to avoid hypoxaemia and tissue hypoxia. Most acute treatment algorithms, therefore, recommended the liberal use of a high fraction of inspired oxygen, often without first confirming the presence of a hypoxic insult. However, recent physiological research has underlined the vasoconstrictor effects of hyperoxia on normal vasculature and, consequently, the risk of significant blood flow reduction to the at-risk tissue. Positive effects may be claimed simply by relief of an assumed local tissue hypoxia, such as in acute cardiovascular disease, brain ischaemia due to, for example, stroke or shock or carbon monoxide intoxication. However, in most situations, a generalized hypoxia is not the problem and a risk of negative hyperoxaemia-induced local vasoconstriction effects may instead be the reality. In preclinical studies, many important positive anti-inflammatory effects of both normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen have been repeatedly shown, often as surrogate end-points such as increases in gluthatione levels, reduced lipid peroxidation and neutrophil activation thus modifying ischaemia-reperfusion injury and also causing anti-apoptotic effects. However, in parallel, toxic effects of oxygen are also well known, including induced mucosal inflammation, pneumonitis and retrolental fibroplasia. Examining the available strong clinical evidence, such as usually claimed for randomized controlled trials, few positive studies stand up to scrutiny and a number of trials have shown no effect or even been terminated early due to worse outcomes in the oxygen treatment arm. Recently, this has led to less aggressive approaches, even to not providing any supplemental oxygen, in several acute care settings, such as resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns, during acute myocardial infarction or after stroke or cardiac arrest. The safety of more advanced attempts to deliver increased oxygen levels to hypoxic or ischaemic tissues, such as with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, is therefore also being questioned. Here, we provide an overview of the present knowledge of the physiological effects of oxygen in relation to its therapeutic potential for different medical conditions, as well as considering the potential for harm. We conclude that the medical use of oxygen needs to be further examined in search of solid evidence of benefit in many of the current clinical settings in which it is routinely used.

  • 81.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Könsperspektiv på traumatologin - män skadar sig oftare och blir sjukare av ett fysiskt trauma2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin- och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Barbro Wijma, Goldina Smirthwaite och Katarina Swahnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1, p. 416-426Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor och män är delvis lika, delvis olika. Det innebär att kvinnor och män både har behov av likadan behandling och av behandling som är anpassad till det egna könets förutsättningar. Denna antologi belyser kvinnors och mäns förutsättningar och behov inom en rad olika medicinska områden och tar upp både biologiska och sociala faktorer som påverkar hälsa och behandling. Den behandlar även den roll som kön spelar inom vårdens arbetsliv samt hur köns- och genusperspektiv kan integreras inom olika typer av medicin- och vårdutbildningar. Ett av bokens teman är våld, kränkningar och diskriminering, och inom ramen för detta behandlas några av de olika maktordningar som kommer till uttryck vid behandlingar inom hälso- och sjukvården. Antologin har en stor spännvidd när det gäller ämnen och författare. Förhoppningsvis ska den bredd som antologin uppvisar, leda fram till frågeställningar där läsaren utmanar sina förgivettaganden inom både genusvetenskap och mer traditionell medicin samt väcka nya frågor: Om könet snarare ses som en konstruktion än en fysisk realitet - kan då kvinnor lika gärna äta mediciner som är utprovade på män och opereras med metoder och verktyg anpassade till mäns fysiologi? Å andra sidan - hur objektiv är den naturvetenskapligt inriktade medicinska forskningen egentligen om man börjar granska den utifrån frågeställningar om perspektivval och genus? Antologin vänder sig till lärare på utbildningar inom medicin, hälsa och vård. Andra målgrupper är studenter på sådana utbildningar, vårdpersonal och en intresserad allmänhet.

  • 82.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Editorial Material: How do we know when patients sleep properly or why they do not?2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of adequate sleep for good health and immune system function is well documented as is reduced sleep quality experienced by ICU patients. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Elliot and co-workers present a well done, largest of its kind, single-center study on sleep patterns in critically ill patients. They base their study on the gold standard, the polysomnography technique, which is resource demanding to perform and often difficult to evaluate. The results are especially interesting as the authors not only used polysomnography in a large sample but also, in contrast to others, excluded patients with prior sleep problems. They also recorded patients subjective sleep experiences in the ICU and thereafter in the ward (validated questionnaires) with simultaneous data collection of factors known to affect sleep in the ICU (mainly treatment interventions, light and sound disturbances). Interestingly, but not surprisingly, sleep was both quantitatively and qualitatively poor. Furthermore, there seemed to be little or no improvement over time when compared to earlier studies. This study stresses the magnitude of the sleep problem despite interventions such as earplugs and/or eyeshades. Sound disturbance was found to be the most significant but improvable factor. The study highlights the challenge and the importance of evaluating sleep in the critical care setting and the present need for alternative methods to measure it. All that in conjunction can be used to solve an important problem for this patient group.

  • 83.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Intensive care registries and the evolution of the concept of quality of care - reflections from the 10-year anniversary symposium of the Swedish Intensive Care Registry2012In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 1073-1077Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Sommar, Pehr
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Junker, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strandenes, Eivind
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway .
    Ness, Charlotte
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway .
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Johnson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Osteogenically-induced human dermal fibroblasts as a tool to regenerate bone2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering of bone tissue could help to overcome the need for extensive reconstruction and associated donor site morbidity, and it has been proposed that osteogenic biomaterials, which are scaffolds that contain osteocompetent cells, could be used to fill large bone defects. This study investigated the potential of osteogenically-induced human dermal fibroblasts cultured on gelatin microcarriers combined with platelet-rich plasma in a model of a femoral defect in athymic rats. Defects were transplanted with one of the following six combinations: 1 = sodium chloride, 2 = platelet-rich plasma, 3 = microcarriers + platelet-rich plasma, 4 = human dermal fibroblasts on microcarriers + platelet-rich plasma, 5 = human osteoblasts on microcarriers + platelet-rich plasma, and 6 = osteogenically induced human dermal fibroblasts on microcarriers + platelet-rich plasma. The femoral defects were assessed 4 weeks postoperatively with computed tomography (CT), routine histological staining, fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and polyclonal antibodies directed towards osteocalcin and osteonectin. Radiographs of all groups taken 4 weeks postoperatively showed unhealed defects. Femoral defects transplanted with osteogenically-induced human dermal fibroblasts on microcarriers (group 6) contained dense clusters of cells with large quantities of extracellular matrix. These clusters were exclusive to this group and stained strongly for osteocalcin and osteonectin. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation showed viable human cells in femoral defects that had been transplanted with microcarriers seeded with cells, which confirmed the survival of implanted cells. In conclusion, osteogenically-induced human dermal fibroblasts survived in this new niche, and bone-like structures were apparent in the defects.

  • 85.
    Sondergaard, S
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fagerberg, A
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Orman, J
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Viksten, J L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Hallen, K
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Einarsson, H
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Aneman, A
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    ORIGIN OF IMPEDANCE CHANGES RELATED TO LUNG PERFUSION IN ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S95-S952010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S95-S95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 86. Stattin, K
    et al.
    Linder, A
    Wickerts, C J
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    An obeservational study of percutaneous vs. surgical tracheostomy in the critically ill. A comparison of outcome in Swedish intensive care units2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Brännskadad2005In: Sjukdomsvärldar: om människors erfarenhet av kroppslig ohälsa / [ed] Bengt Richt och Gunilla Tegern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2005, p. 197-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En stor andel av befolkningen i de västerländska samhällena och en växande andel världen över lever med långvarig kroppslig ohälsa. Den utbredda förekomsten har en djupgående påverkan på sättet att leva, både bland de redan sjuka och bland dem som är friska. Kunskap om den kroppsliga ohälsans personliga, sociala och kulturella dimensioner är därför av grundläggande betydelse för förståelsen av tendenser och processer i samtiden. Boken bygger på berättelser från personer som själva lever med olika former av långvarig och ibland svår kroppslig ohälsa. Några kapitel är rättframt rapporterande, medan andra ansluter till sådana förståelseramar som fenomenologi, symbolisk interaktionism och analytisk filosofi. Texten ansluter sig till den internationella vetenskapliga tradition som under senare tid har försökt ge den levda erfarenheten av ohälsa ett språk och en röst, i opposition mot eller som komplement till ett rent biomedicinskt perspektiv. Den är utpräglat tvärvetenskaplig och skriven av personer med olika ämnesbakgrund, alltifrån omvårdnadsvetenskap, filosofi, sociologi och pedagogik till sjukgymnastik och arbetsterapi. Sjukdomsvärldar vänder sig till alla med intresse för vad det kan innebära att leva med kroppslig ohälsa i vardagslivet och för hur de möjliga innebörderna formas av mer övergripande sociala och kulturella omständigheter. Den tvärvetenskapliga inriktningen gör boken väl användbar på såväl olika vårdutbildningar som kurser i både samhällsvetenskap och humaniora.

  • 88.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Organ dysfunction among patients with major burns2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of patients who are admitted for in-hospital care in Sweden because of burns is about 12/100,000, and only a small proportion of these have larger burns. Among them, and particularly among those who die in hospital, a condition referred to as “organ dysfunction” is common and an important factor in morbidity and mortality. The fact that the time of the initial event is known, and the magnitude of the insult is quantifiable, makes the burned patient ideal to be studied. In this doctoral thesis organ dysfunction and mortality were studied in a descriptive, prospective, exploratory study (no interventions or control groups) in patients admitted consecutively to a national burn centre in Sweden.

    The respiratory dysfunction that is seen after burns was found to be equally often the result of acute respiratory distress syndrome and inhalation injury. We found little support for the idea that this early dysfunction is caused by pneumonia, ventilator-induced lung injury, or sepsis. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was also common, and mortality was associated with severity. Importantly, renal dysfunction recovered among the patients who survived. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome developed before the onset of AKI. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor for AKI in 48% of 31 patients; but we could find no support for the idea that late AKI was mainly associated with sepsis. We found that older age (over 60 years), greater TBSA%, and respiratory dysfunction were associated with increased mortality, but there was no association between the overall mortality and sex. We also found that early transient liver dysfunction was common, and recorded early hepatic “hyper”- function among many young adults. Persistent low values indicating severe liver dysfunction were found among patients who eventually died.

    We conclude from this investigation that overall organ dysfunction is an early and common phenomenon among patients with severe burns. Our data suggest that the prognosis of organ dysfunction among these patients is good, and function recovers among most survivors. Multiple organ failure was, however, the main cause of death. The findings of the early onset in respiratory dysfunction and a delay in signs of sepsis are congruous with the gutlymphatic hypothesis for the development of organ dysfunction, and the idea of the lung as an inflammatory engine for its progression. We think that the early onset favours a syndrome in which organ dysfunction is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis.

    Our data further suggest that clinical strategies to improve burn care further should be focused on early interventions, interesting examples of which include: selective decontamination of the gastrointestinal tract to prevent translocation of gut-derived toxic and inflammatory factors; optimisation of fluid replacement during the first 8 hours after injury by goal-directed resuscitation; and possible improvement in the fluid treatment given before admission.

    List of papers
    1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

    Keywords
    Burns, Inflammation, Leukocytes, Organ dysfunction, Permeability, Viscoelastic properties
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43096 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.007 (DOI)71559 (Local ID)71559 (Archive number)71559 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    2008 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16218 (URN)10.1186/cc7032 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-27 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 530 WALNUT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA, 2011
    Keywords
    Burns, Outcome, Dimorphism, Age, Total body surface area
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67966 (URN)10.1097/TA.0b013e3181e59dbe (DOI)000289558700039 ()
    Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2012-03-25
    4. Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    2012 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Burns, organ dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green, age, cardiac index, sepsis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70059 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2011.08.017 (DOI)000301621500010 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was "Manuscript".

    Funding agencies|Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linkoping University Hospital||PULSION Medical Systems AG, Munich, Germany||

    Available from: 2011-08-17 Created: 2011-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
  • 89.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

  • 90.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

  • 91.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference2011In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

  • 92.
    Sveen, J.
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oster, C.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Letter: Response to Letter to the Editor: Sleep quality implicates in life quality: An analysis about children who suffered burns.2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 775-776Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 93.
    Sveen, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Öster, C
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life in Swedish pediatric burn patients and associations with burn and family characteristics2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 987-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many children with burns recover well and have a satisfying quality of life after the burn, some children do not adjust as well. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) focuses on the impact health status has on quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL with the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ) in a nationwide Swedish sample of children with burns 0.3-9.0 years after injury. Participants were parents (n=109) of children aged up to 18 years at the time of investigation who were treated at the Linköping or Uppsala Burn Center between 2000 and 2008. The majority of children did not have limitations in physical function and they did not seem to experience much pain. However, there were indications of psychosocial problems. Parents of preschool children reported most problems with the children's behavior and family disruption, whereas parents of children aged 5-18 years reported most problems with appearance and emotional health. There were mainly burn-related variables associated with suboptimal HRQoL in children aged 5-18 years, while family-related variables did not contribute as much.

  • 94.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the Burn Outcomes Questionnaire for Children Aged 5 to 18 Years2012In: JOURNAL OF BURN CARE and RESEARCH, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E286-E294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    pediatric burn injuries are common, there is a lack of burn-specific health outcome measurements for children. The American Burn Association and the Shriners Hospitals for Children have developed the Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ), which is a parent-report questionnaire measuring the functional outcome after burn in children aged 5 to 18 years. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the BOQ, assessing feasibility, reliability, and validity aspects. Participants were parents (n = 70) of children aged 5 to 18 years who were treated at the Uppsala or Linkoping burn center between January 2000 and December 2008. For most subscales, feasibility was adequate and the internal consistency was good: Cronbachs a values were above 0.76 in all but 1 subscale, and mean interitem correlations ranged from 0.34 to 0.90. The test-retest reliability was significant in the majority of subscales. Evidence of validity was shown by associations among the BOQ subscales and between BOQ subscales and measures of burn severity, heat sensitivity, fear-avoidance beliefs, and parent reports of the childs psychological problems. In conclusion, with the exception of a few subscales, this study supports the continued evaluation of the Swedish version of BOQ as a tool to measure outcome after burn in children aged 5 to 18 years.

  • 95.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University.
    Psychometric Properties of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised in Patients One Year After Burn Injury2010In: JOURNAL OF BURN CARE and RESEARCH, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 310-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burn injury can be a life-threatening and traumatic event. Despite considerable risk for psychological morbidity, few outcome measures have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in patients 1 year after burn injury (N = 147). A principal component analysis was performed, and the results supported the three-factor structure of the IES-R. High internal consistency and intelligible associations with concurrent psychological symptoms and known risk factors for distress after trauma indicate satisfactory psychometric properties. Thus, the study supports the use of the IES-R as a screening tool for measuring traumatic distress after burn.

  • 96.
    Svernlov, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Larsson, M.
    Rehn, K.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Conservative treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome2009In: Journal of Hand Surgery: European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conservative treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome was evaluated in a randomised study of 70 patients with mild or moderate symptoms (Dellon, 1989). All patients were informed about the cause of symptoms and allocated to three groups: night splinting, nerve gliding and control. Evaluation consisted of Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, visual analogue pain scales, strength measurements and neurophysiological examination, before treatment and after six months. Fifty-seven patients were followed for six months. Fifty-one (89.5%) were improved at the follow-up. There were no significant differences between the groups in any of the recorded variables. Night splints and nerve gliding exercises did not add favourably. Routine neurophysiological examination seems unnecessary since 76% of the patients with typical symptoms had normal findings and 75% with pathological findings improved. Patients with mild or moderate symptoms have a good prognosis if they are informed of the causes of the condition and how to avoid provocation.

  • 97.
    Svernlöv, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Treatment of Epicondylalgia and Nerve Entrapments around the Elbow2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disorders causing pain in the elbow region is a common problem and is one of the most frequent forms of work-related health problems. These conditions are thus of major importance from the public health point of view, as well as from that of the suffering individual. Both sensory and motor function may be impaired, particularly in cases where a nerve is involved, resulting in severely impaired hand function.

    “Tennis elbow” (lateral epicondylalgia) has been found to be the second most frequently diagnosed musculoskeletal disorder of the upper extremity in the primary health-care setting. “Golfer’s elbow” (medial epicondylalgia) is not that commonly encountered. It has been stated that tennis or golfer’s elbow syndromes are self-limiting. Even so, clinical experience has shown that there are a few cases where symptoms have a painful and long-lasting course, resistant to many forms of therapy. The outcomes of frequently adopted management regimes for treatment of epicondylalgia or nerve entrapments around the elbow were examined in the following five studies:

    I: A randomised, prospective study of 38 patients with tennis elbow (lateral epicondylalgia). Groups were assigned to eccentric exercises or stretching. Eccentric exercise gave somewhat better results.In a second part of the study, a 4-year follow-up of 127 patients who used eccentric exercises for tennis elbow was performed. Patients showed decreased pain and increased grip-strength after 3 months treatment. At the time of publication this study was the first to examine eccentric exercises for this condition.

    II: A retrospective analysis of long-term results from 51 patients treated with surgical release of the common extensor origin because of “chronic tennis elbow”. Eighty-seven per cent of the patients rated themselves as completely recovered or improved.

    III: A randomised, prospective study of 70 patients with ulnar neuropathy in the forearm (cubital tunnel syndrome). Groups assigned the commonly recommended elbow brace at night or nerve gliding exercises were compared with a control group (information only). The majority of patients improved considerably, both subjectively and objectively, after a 3 months period, regardless of group. The study thus showed the effectiveness of information and expectance, and that orthosis or nerve gliding exercises added nothing further to the result.

    IV: A retrospective study of 205 patients treated with surgery for suspected nerve entrapment in the forearm. Followup, almost 4 years later, demonstrated a subjective improvement in two of three patients, but only 3% experienced complete relief of all symptoms.

    V: A prospective long-term study on 20 patients with golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylalgia) treated with eccentric exercises over 3 months. The results showed decreased pain and increased gripstrength. This is the first study published on the management of this disorder with eccentric exercises.

    List of papers
    1. Non-operative treatment regime including eccentric training for lateral humeral epicondylalgia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-operative treatment regime including eccentric training for lateral humeral epicondylalgia
    2001 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 328-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a pilot study 38 patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Group S (stretching) was treated with a contract-relax-stretching program while group E (eccentric exercise) underwent an eccentric exercise program. Both groups also received forearm bands and wrist support nightly. The programs were carried out daily at home during 12 weeks. Evaluation before and 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, included subjective assessment of symptoms using visual analogue scales and grip strength measurements. Thirty-five patients were available for follow-up. Five patients, three in group S and two in group E, did not complete the programs due to increased pain while 30 (86%) reported complete recovery or improvement. Reduced pain and increased grip strength were seen in both treatment groups but 12 out of 17 patients (71%) in group E rated themselves as completely recovered as compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) in group S (P=0.09), and in group E the increase in grip strength after 6 months was statistically significantly larger than in group S. In a second study the eccentric training regime was used in a consecutive series of 129 patients with lateral epicondy lalgia. The patients were divided into two groups with one group consisting of patients with less than one year duration of symtoms and the other comprised patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year. The results of treatment were evaluated in the same way as in the pilot study, and also after 3.4 years using the scoring system by Verhaar et al. At the end of the treatment period statistically significant improvements were seen in all VAS recordings and in grip strength. After 3.4 years 38% had excellent, 28% good, 25% fair and 9% poor results according to the score. In the self-rated outcome 54% regarded themselves as completely recovered, 43% improved, 2% unchanged and 2% worse. No significant differences were seen between patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year compared to patients with symptoms for less than one year. The eccentric training regime can considerably reduce symptoms in a majority of patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia, regardless of duration, and is possibly superior to conventional stretching.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25400 (URN)9843 (Local ID)9843 (Archive number)9843 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Outcome of release of the lateral extensor muscle origin for epicondylitis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of release of the lateral extensor muscle origin for epicondylitis
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 161-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-five elbows in 53 patients affected by lateral epicondylitis for more than a year were operated on with lateral extensor release. Fifty-one patients (53 elbows) were followed-up 90 months postoperatively by two independent observers using Verhaar's score and the subjective grading scheme described by Svernlöv and Adolfsson. According to Verhaar's score 26 (49%) were excellent or good and 27 (51%) fair or poor. Women had significantly worse results than men (p

    Keywords
    Epicondylitis, surgical treatment, retrospective, sex difference
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37814 (URN)10.1080/02844310500491492 (DOI)39126 (Local ID)39126 (Archive number)39126 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
    3. Conservative treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conservative treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Hand Surgery: European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Conservative treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome was evaluated in a randomised study of 70 patients with mild or moderate symptoms (Dellon, 1989). All patients were informed about the cause of symptoms and allocated to three groups: night splinting, nerve gliding and control. Evaluation consisted of Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, visual analogue pain scales, strength measurements and neurophysiological examination, before treatment and after six months. Fifty-seven patients were followed for six months. Fifty-one (89.5%) were improved at the follow-up. There were no significant differences between the groups in any of the recorded variables. Night splints and nerve gliding exercises did not add favourably. Routine neurophysiological examination seems unnecessary since 76% of the patients with typical symptoms had normal findings and 75% with pathological findings improved. Patients with mild or moderate symptoms have a good prognosis if they are informed of the causes of the condition and how to avoid provocation.

    Keywords
    Elbow; Nerve gliding; Neuropathy; Splinting; Ulnar nerve
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18739 (URN)10.1177/1753193408098480 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-06-03 Created: 2009-06-03 Last updated: 2011-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Patient-reported outcome of surgical treatment of nerve entrapments in the proximal forearm
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient-reported outcome of surgical treatment of nerve entrapments in the proximal forearm
    2011 (English)In: Advances in orthopedics, ISSN 2090-3472, Vol. 2011, p. 727689-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of decompression for long-standing symptoms of nerve entrapments in the proximal forearm was investigated in a retrospective study of 205 patients using a self-assessment questionnaire, 45 months after the operation. The questionnaire consisted of visual analogue scale recordings of pre- and postoperative pain during rest and activity, questions about remaining symptoms and appreciation of the result and the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand form (DASH). Altogether, 59% of the patients were satisfied, 58% considered themselves improved, and 3% as being entirely relieved of all symptoms. Pain decreased significantly (P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between preoperative duration and patient perceived post-operative pain. Preoperative pain was a chief complaint, and pain reduction appears to be the principal gain of the operation. Although the majority of the patients benefited from the operation, a substantial proportion was not satisfied. There is apparently room for improvement of the diagnostic and surgical methods applied in this study.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-72717 (URN)10.4061/2011/727689 (DOI)21991420 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-12-05 Created: 2011-12-05 Last updated: 2014-09-25Bibliographically approved
    5. Medial epicondylalgia (golfer’s elbow) treated by eccentric exercise
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medial epicondylalgia (golfer’s elbow) treated by eccentric exercise
    2012 (English)In: Shoulder & Elbow, ISSN 1758-5732, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Eccentric exercises have been successfully used in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, as well as lateral epicondylalgia. No studies have explored the same treatment for medial epicondylalgia (golfer’s elbow).

    Methods: Twenty consecutive adults with a clinical diagnosis of medial epicondylalgia were treated with eccentric exercise over 3 months in this prospective case series. The programme was based on home training. There were 11 women and nine men, with a mean age of 47 years, and a mean duration of symptoms of 19 months. At baseline, at 3 months and after a mean of 11 years, pain was assessed by three independent visual analogue scales (VAS) and grip strength using a Jamar dynamometer (Sammons Preston Inc., Jackson, MI, USA). At the 11-year follow-up, patients also reported their satisfaction on a 100-mm VAS and completed the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire.

    Results: Pain decreased significantly in all measured variables at both assessment occasions (all p < 0.0001). Grip strength in the affected arm/hand increased significantly after 3 months (p = 0.009).

    Discussion: Twelve weeks of eccentric training reduced pain and increased grip strength in patients with medial epicondylalgia. It is a safe, uncomplicated and cost-effective method, with only a minimum contribution from a physiotherapist.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: Sage Publications, 2012
    Keywords
    Elbow;tendinopathies;epicondylitis;golfer's elbow;conservative treatment
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-72718 (URN)10.1111/j.1758-5740.2011.00152.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-12-05 Created: 2011-12-05 Last updated: 2014-06-18Bibliographically approved
  • 98.
    Svernlöv, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Non-operative treatment regime including eccentric training for lateral humeral epicondylalgia2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 328-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a pilot study 38 patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Group S (stretching) was treated with a contract-relax-stretching program while group E (eccentric exercise) underwent an eccentric exercise program. Both groups also received forearm bands and wrist support nightly. The programs were carried out daily at home during 12 weeks. Evaluation before and 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, included subjective assessment of symptoms using visual analogue scales and grip strength measurements. Thirty-five patients were available for follow-up. Five patients, three in group S and two in group E, did not complete the programs due to increased pain while 30 (86%) reported complete recovery or improvement. Reduced pain and increased grip strength were seen in both treatment groups but 12 out of 17 patients (71%) in group E rated themselves as completely recovered as compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) in group S (P=0.09), and in group E the increase in grip strength after 6 months was statistically significantly larger than in group S. In a second study the eccentric training regime was used in a consecutive series of 129 patients with lateral epicondy lalgia. The patients were divided into two groups with one group consisting of patients with less than one year duration of symtoms and the other comprised patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year. The results of treatment were evaluated in the same way as in the pilot study, and also after 3.4 years using the scoring system by Verhaar et al. At the end of the treatment period statistically significant improvements were seen in all VAS recordings and in grip strength. After 3.4 years 38% had excellent, 28% good, 25% fair and 9% poor results according to the score. In the self-rated outcome 54% regarded themselves as completely recovered, 43% improved, 2% unchanged and 2% worse. No significant differences were seen between patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year compared to patients with symptoms for less than one year. The eccentric training regime can considerably reduce symptoms in a majority of patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia, regardless of duration, and is possibly superior to conventional stretching.

  • 99.
    Svernlöv, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Outcome of release of the lateral extensor muscle origin for epicondylitis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 161-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-five elbows in 53 patients affected by lateral epicondylitis for more than a year were operated on with lateral extensor release. Fifty-one patients (53 elbows) were followed-up 90 months postoperatively by two independent observers using Verhaar's score and the subjective grading scheme described by Svernlöv and Adolfsson. According to Verhaar's score 26 (49%) were excellent or good and 27 (51%) fair or poor. Women had significantly worse results than men (p

  • 100.
    Svernlöv, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hultgren, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Medial epicondylalgia (golfer’s elbow) treated by eccentric exercise2012In: Shoulder & Elbow, ISSN 1758-5732, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Eccentric exercises have been successfully used in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, as well as lateral epicondylalgia. No studies have explored the same treatment for medial epicondylalgia (golfer’s elbow).

    Methods: Twenty consecutive adults with a clinical diagnosis of medial epicondylalgia were treated with eccentric exercise over 3 months in this prospective case series. The programme was based on home training. There were 11 women and nine men, with a mean age of 47 years, and a mean duration of symptoms of 19 months. At baseline, at 3 months and after a mean of 11 years, pain was assessed by three independent visual analogue scales (VAS) and grip strength using a Jamar dynamometer (Sammons Preston Inc., Jackson, MI, USA). At the 11-year follow-up, patients also reported their satisfaction on a 100-mm VAS and completed the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire.

    Results: Pain decreased significantly in all measured variables at both assessment occasions (all p < 0.0001). Grip strength in the affected arm/hand increased significantly after 3 months (p = 0.009).

    Discussion: Twelve weeks of eccentric training reduced pain and increased grip strength in patients with medial epicondylalgia. It is a safe, uncomplicated and cost-effective method, with only a minimum contribution from a physiotherapist.

123 51 - 100 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf