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  • 51.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do the potential benefits outweigh the risks? An update on the use of ziconotide in clinical practice2018In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1193-1202Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ziconotide is a selective and potent blocker of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004 and by the European Medicines Agency in 2005 for the treatment of severe chronic pain in patients needing intrathecal analgesia (ITA). The aim of this paper is to provide a practitioner-oriented, educational, narrative, up-to-date review on the use of ziconotide in clinical pain medicine. Of special concern regarding safety is the partial incongruity between dosing statements in the Summary ofProduct Characteristics and novel low-dosage, slow uptitration recommendations. Even though ziconotide has obvious advantages compared to opioids, pain practitioners pondering the use of ziconotide nonetheless have to balance its proved potential analgesic effect against its neurological side effects, with special consideration being given to dosing and neuropsychiatric dangers. Using a seesaw analogy, the paper discusses what factors pain physicians should weigh in when considering ziconotide as ITA drug, the non-opioid advantages of ziconotide being counterbalanced by its potential psychiatric side effects. Ziconotide is an important part of the armamentarium of modern interventional pain medicine. If ITA is deemed necessary, ziconotide is a rational alternative, at least in chronic (neuropathic) non-cancer pain. However, in many European countries, ziconotide treatment is only available in a few (if any) centres. The safety profile of ziconotide is not fundamentally more worrying than that of opioids or cannabinoids; it is just different. This paper provides a concise, up-to-date and clinically-oriented summary of the use of ziconotide in clinical practice, not least concerning safety and dosage issues.

  • 52.
    (Chayn) Sun, Qian
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    (Cecilia) Xia, Jianhong
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Investigating the Spatial Pattern of Older Drivers Eye Fixation Behaviour and Associations with Their Visual Capacity2016In: Journal of Eye Movement Research, E-ISSN 1995-8692, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual capacity generally declines as people age, yet its impact on the visual search patterns along sections of different road during actual driving still remains undocumented. This onroad driving study simultaneously recorded 30 older drivers eye movement and precise vehicle movement trajectories. The vehicle positions were linked to every identified eye fixation for each individual driver, so that the locations of the drivers gaze origin in geospatial coordinates were obtained. Spatial distribution pattern of drivers eye fixations were then mapped and analysed. In addition, the associations between older drivers visual capacity (processing speed, divided and selective attention) and their eye fixation patterns in various driving manoeuvres were investigated. The results indicate that driving scenarios have a significant impact on older drivers visual patterns. Older drivers performed more frequent eye fixations at roundabouts, while they tended to fixate on certain objects for longer periods during straight road driving. The key findings show that the processing speed and divided attention of older drivers were associated with their eye fixations at complex right-turns; drivers with a lower capacity in selective attention performed less frequent eye fixations at roundabouts. This study has also demonstrated that visualisation and spatial statistics are effective and intuitive approaches to eye movement analysis.

  • 53.
    Chee, Derserri Y.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Patomella, Ann-Helen
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Driving Behaviour Profile of Drivers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)2017In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 2658-2670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The symptomatology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can make driving risky, but little is known about the on-road driving behaviour of individuals with ASD. This study assessed and compared the on-road driving performance of drivers with and without ASD, and explored how the symptomatology of ASD hinders or facilitates on-road driving performance. Sixteen drivers with ASD and 21 typically-developed drivers participated in the study. Drivers with ASD underperformed in vehicle manoeuvring, especially at left-turns, right-turns and pedestrian crossings. However, drivers with ASD outperformed the TD group in aspects related to rule-following such as using the indicator at roundabouts and checking for cross-traffic when approaching intersections. Drivers with ASD in the current study presented with a range of capabilities and weaknesses during driving.

  • 54.
    Chee, Derserri Yan Ting
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe Chung Yeung
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Patomella, Ann-Helen
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Investigating the driving performance of drivers with and without autism spectrum disorders under complex driving conditions2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the driving performance of drivers with autism spectrum disorders under complex driving conditions. Method: Seventeen drivers with autism spectrum disorders and 18 typically developed drivers participated in a driving simulator trial. Prior to the assessment, participants completed the Driving Behaviour Questionnaire and measurements of cognitive and visual-motor ability. The driving simulation involved driving in an urban area with dense traffic and unpredictable events. Results: In comparison with the typically developed group, drivers with autism spectrum disorders reported significantly more lapses in driving, committed more mistakes on the driving simulator, and were slower to react in challenging situations, such as driving through intersections with abrupt changes in traffic lights. However, they were also less likely to tailgate other vehicles, as measured by time-to-collision between vehicles, on the driving simulator. Conclusions: The performances of licensed drivers with autism spectrum disorders appeared to be safer in respect to car-following distance but were poorer in their response to challenging traffic situations. Driver education for individuals with autism spectrum disorders should focus on quick identification of hazards, prompt execution of responses, and effective allocation of attention to reduce lapses in driving.

  • 55.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle - A Microdialysis Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, p. e0143856-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0-100) and fatigue Borgs Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6-20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P < .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P < .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P < .001). The levels of IL-1 beta did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P < .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (Ps < .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF do not seem to play an important role in maintenance of muscle pain in fibromyalgia.

  • 56.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Chen, Janice D.
    National University of Singapore Hospital, Singapore.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Cordier, Reinie
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Managing childrens postural risk when using mobile technology at home: Challenges and strategies2015In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 51, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintaining the musculoskeletal health of children using mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) at home presents a challenge. The physical environment influences postures during ICT use and can-contribute to musculoskeletal complaints. Few studies have assessed postures of children using ICT in home environments. The present study investigated the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) scores determined by 16 novice and 16 experienced raters. Each rater viewed 11 videotaped scenarios of a child using two types of mobile ICT at home. The Grand Scores and Action Levels determined by study participants were compared to those of an ergonomist experienced in postural assessment. All postures assessed were rated with an Action Level of 2 or above; representing a postural risk that required further investigation and/or intervention. The sensitivity of RULA to assess some of the unconventional postures adopted by children in the home is questioned. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  • 57.
    Cordier, Reinie
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia; James Cook University, Australia.
    Brown, Nicole
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Chen, Yu-Wei
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Wilkes-Gillan, Sarah
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Piloting the use of experience sampling method to investigate the everyday social experiences of children with Asperger syndrome/high functioning autism2016In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This pilot study explored the nature and quality of social experiences of children with Asperger Syndrome/High Functioning Autism (AS/HFA) through experience sampling method (ESM) while participating in everyday activities. Methods: ESM was used to identify the contexts and content of daily life experiences. Six children with AS/HFA (aged 8-12) wore an iPod Touch on seven consecutive days, while being signalled to complete a short survey. Results: Participants were in the company of others 88.3% of their waking time, spent 69.0% of their time with family and 3.8% with friends, but only conversed with others 26.8% of the time. Participants had more positive experiences and emotions when they were with friends compared with other company. Participating in leisure activities was associated with enjoyment, interest in the occasion, and having positive emotions. Conclusions: ESM was found to be helpful in identifying the nature and quality of social experiences of children with AS/HFA from their perspective.

  • 58.
    Cowan, Georgia
    et al.
    Sch Occupat Therapy Social Work and Speech Pathol, Australia.
    Earl, Robyn
    Sch Occupat Therapy Social Work and Speech Pathol, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Sch Occupat Therapy Social Work and Speech Pathol, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Sch Occupat Therapy Social Work and Speech Pathol, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Fixation patterns of individuals with and without Autism Spectrum disorder: Do they differ in shared zones and in zebra crossings?2018In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 8, p. 112-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shared zones are a contemporary traffic zone that promotes equality between multiple road users and efficiently utilizes available space, while simultaneously maintaining safety and function. As this is a relatively new traffic zone, it is important to understand how pedestrians navigate a shared zone and any potential challenges this may pose to individuals with impairments. The aim of this study was to utilize eye-tracking technology to determine fixations and fixation duration on traffic relevant objects, non-traffic relevant objects, and eye contact, in 40 individuals with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in a shared zone and a zebra crossing. It was assumed that individuals with ASD would make less eye contact in the shared zone compared to the group of typically developing adults. A total of 3287 fixations across the shared zone and zebra crossing were analysed for areas of interest that were traffic relevant, non-traffic relevant, and eye contact, and for fixation duration. Individuals with ASD did not display any difference in terms of eye contact in the shared zone and the zebra crossing when compared to the controls. All pedestrians were more likely to look at traffic relevant objects at the zebra crossing compared to the shared zone. Individuals with ASD had an overall shorter fixation duration compared to the control group, indicating people with ASD either process information quickly, or they do not process it for long enough, although these findings require further investigation. While shared zones have many benefits for traffic movement and environmental quality, it appeared that pedestrians displayed safer road crossing behaviours at a zebra crossing than in a shared zone, indicating that more education and environmental adaptations are required to make shared zones safe for all pedestrians.

  • 59.
    Cuomo, Belinda M.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ai Lim Lee, Elinda
    Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia.
    Thompson, Craig
    Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia.
    Rogerson, Jessica M.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Cooperat Research Centre Living Autism Spectrum Disorders, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of Sleep-Based Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Synthesis2017In: Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 0277-0008, E-ISSN 1875-9114, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 555-578Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This meta-synthesis collated eight previously published systematic reviews examining the efficacy of sleep interventions in children with ASD in an attempt to present a clear analysis of trialed interventions. The collated reviews consider five major groups of sleep interventions for children with ASD: melatonin therapy, pharmacologic treatments other than melatonin, behavioral interventions, parent education/education programs, and alternative therapies (massage therapy, aromatherapy, and multivitamin and iron supplementation). These eight reviews were based on 38 original studies and address the efficacy of interventions across 17 sleep problem domains. The results of this meta-synthesis suggest that no single intervention is effective across all sleep problems in children with ASD. However, melatonin, behavioral interventions, and parent education/education program interventions appear the most effective at ameliorating multiple domains of sleep problems compared with other interventions. Due to the heterogeneous causative factors and presentations of disordered sleep, further research into the effectiveness of sleep interventions may target specific phenotypic subgroups rather than a broad analysis across the general ASD population. Similarly, future research needs to consider the efficacy of different polytherapeutic approaches in order to provide clinicians with evidence to inform best practice. In the meantime, this review supports clinicians decision making for a majority of the identified sleep problems in the ASD population.

  • 60.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Effects of Experimental Tooth Clenching on Pain and Intramuscular Release of 5-HT and Glutamate in Patients With Myofascial TMD2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 740-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Methods: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. Results: A significant effect of group (P less than 0.01), but not of time, was observed on 5-HT levels and blood flow. No significant effects of time or group occurred on glutamate, pyruvate, or lactate levels. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity (P less than 0.05 and less than 0.001). No significant correlations were identified between: (1) 5-HT, glutamate, and pain intensity; or between (2) pyruvate, lactate, and blood flow. Discussion: This experimental tooth clenching model increased jaw muscle pain levels in M-TMD patients and evoked low levels of jaw muscle pain in controls. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT than controls and significantly lower blood flow. These 2 factors may facilitate the release of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  • 61.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care. Malmö University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Malmö University, Sweden; Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Stensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Malmö University, Sweden; Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark; Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Malmö University, Sweden; Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Malmö University, Sweden; Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Dopamine in plasma - a biomarker for myofascial TMD pain?2016In: Journal of Headache and Pain, ISSN 1129-2369, E-ISSN 1129-2377, Vol. 17, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dopaminergic pathways could be involved in the pathophysiology of myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated plasma levels of dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) in patients with M-TMD and in healthy subjects. Methods: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 age-and sex-matched healthy subjects participated. The patients had received an M-TMD diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. Perceived mental stress, pain intensity (0-100-mm visual analogue scale), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT, kPa) over the masseter muscles were assessed; a venous blood sample was taken. Results: Dopamine in plasma differed significantly between patients with M-TMD (4.98 +/- 2.55 nM) and healthy controls (2.73 +/- 1.24 nM; P amp;lt; 0.01). No significant difference in plasma 5-HT was observed between the groups (P = 0.75). Patients reported significantly higher pain intensities (P amp;lt; 0.001) and had lower PPTs (P amp;lt; 0.01) compared with the healthy controls. Importantly, dopamine in plasma correlated significantly with present pain intensity (r = 0.53, n = 14, P amp;lt; 0.05) and perceived mental stress (r = 0.34, n = 28, P amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that peripheral dopamine might be involved in modulating peripheral pain. This finding, in addition to reports in other studies, suggests that dopaminergic pathways could be implicated in the pathophysiology of M-TMD but also in other chronic pain conditions. More research is warranted to elucidate the role of peripheral dopamine in the pathophysiology of chronic pain.

  • 62.
    Dincer, Fitnat
    et al.
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Kesikburun, Serdar
    Univ Hlth Sci, Turkey.
    Ozdemir, Oya
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Yasar, Evren
    Univ Hlth Sci, Turkey.
    Munoz, Susana
    Univ Complutense, Spain.
    Valero, Raquel
    Univ Complutense, Spain.
    Juocevidius, Alvydas
    Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Quittan, Michail
    Kaiser Franz Joseph Hosp, Austria.
    Lukmann, Aet
    Univ Tartu, Estonia.
    Winkelman, Andreas
    Klin and Poliklin Phys Med and Rehabil, Germany.
    Vetra, Anita
    Natl Rehabil Ctr, Latvia.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kiekens, Carlotte
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Branco, Catarina Aguiar
    Hosp Sao Sebastiao, Portugal.
    Smith, Eimear
    Natl Rehabil and Mater Misericordiae Univ Hosp, Ireland.
    Delargy, Mark
    Natl Rehabil Hosp, Ireland.
    Ilieva, Elena
    Med Univ Hosp, Bulgaria.
    Boyer, Francois Constant
    Champagne Ardenne Univ Reims, France.
    Grubisic, Frane
    Univ Zagreb, Croatia.
    Damjan, Hermina
    Inst Rehabil, Slovenia.
    Kruger, Liisamari
    Orton Orthopaed Hosp, Finland.
    Kankaanpaa, Markku
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Dimitrova, Erieta Nikolikj
    Ss Cyril and Methodius Univ Skopje, Macedonia.
    Delic, Marina
    Topla III, Montenegro.
    Lazovic, Milica
    Fac Med Belgrade, Serbia; Inst Rehabil Belgrade, Serbia.
    Tomic, Natasa
    Inst Phys Med and Rehabil Dr Miroslav Zotovic, Bosnia and Herceg.
    Roussos, Nikolaos
    Asklipe Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Michail, Xanthi
    ATEI, Greece.
    Boldrini, Paolo
    Azienda ULSS 2, Italy.
    Negrini, Stefano
    Univ Brescia, Italy.
    Takac, Peter
    Pavol Jozef Safarik Univ Kosice, Slovakia.
    Tederko, Piotr
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Angerova, Yvona
    Gen Teaching Hosp Prague, Czech Republic.
    The approach of physiatrists to low back pain across Europe2019In: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-8127, E-ISSN 1878-6324, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 131-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is the most common type of musculoskeletal pain, thus it is one of the most commonly encountered conditions in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. The physicians who are primarily responsible for the nonsurgical management of LBP are physiatrists. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to investigate the approaches of physiatrists to low back pain across Europe. Preferences, tendencies, and priorities in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of LBP, as well as the epidemiological data pertaining to LBP in PRM practice were evaluated in this Europe-wide study. METHODS: The study was conducted under the control of the European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM) Musculoskeletal Disorders Research Committee. A total of 576 physiatrists from most European countries participated in the survey. RESULTS: The results show that physiatrists frequently deal with patients with LBP in their daily practice. Most patients are not referred to other departments and are treated with various conservative methods. Less than one-fifth of patients are primarily referred for surgery. The physiatrists believe that a clear diagnosis to account for cases of low back pain is rarely established. The most common diagnosis is discopathy. History and physical examination remain the most valuable clinical evaluation tools for low back pain according to physiatrists. Less than half the patients require a magnetic resonance imaging. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the most commonly prescribed drugs for low back pain. Exercise, back care information, and physical therapy are the preferred conservative treatments. More than half of the physiatrists offer interventional treatments to patients with low back pain. CONCLUSION: The present study is a preliminary report that presents the attitudes of European physiatrists in the management of low back pain. Further researches are warranted to standardize the conservative management of LBP.

  • 63.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Is excess weight a burden for older adults who suffer chronic pain?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundObesity and chronic pain are common comorbidities and adversely influence each other. Advanced age is associated with more comorbidities and multi-morbidities. In this study, we investigated the burden of overweight/obesity and its comorbidities and their associations with chronic pain in a random population sample of Swedish older adults.MethodsThe cross-sectional analysis involved a random sample of a population65years in south-eastern Sweden (N=6243). Data were collected from a postal questionnaire that addressed pain aspects, body mass index (BMI), and health experiences. Chronic pain was defined as pain during the previous three months. According to the 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale, pain scored 7 corresponds to severe pain. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the variables associated to pain aspects.ResultsA total of 2633 (42%) reported chronic pain. More obese older adults (BMI 30kg/m(2)) experienced chronic pain (58%) than those who were low-normal weight (BMI amp;lt;25kg/m(2), 39%) or overweight (25BMI amp;lt;30kg/m(2), 41%). Obese elderly more frequently had pain in extremities and lower back than their peers. In the multivariate model, obesity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.59, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.33-1.91) but not overweight (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22) was associated with chronic pain. Obesity (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16-2.01) was also significantly related to severe pain. We also found other comorbidities - i.e., traumatic history (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.99-3.19), rheumatic diseases (OR 5.21, 95% CI 4.54-5.97), age85years (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.22-2.25), and depression or anxiety diagnosis (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32-2.53) - showed stronger associations with pain aspects than weight status. Conclusion: In older adults, excess weight (BMI 30 or above) is a potentially modifiable factor but not the only risk factor that is associated with chronic pain and severe pain. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions that treat comorbid pain and obesity in older adults.

  • 64.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Association of insomnia severity with well-being, quality of life and health care costs: A cross-sectional study in older adults with chronic pain (PainS65+)2018In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 414-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInsomnia is one of the most common complaints in chronic pain. This study aimed to evaluate the association of insomnia with well-being, quality of life and health care costs. MethodsThe sample included 2790 older individuals (median age=76; interquartile range [IQR]=70-82) with chronic pain. The participants completed a postal survey assessing basic demographic data, pain intensity and frequency, height, weight, comorbidities, general well-being, quality of life and the insomnia severity index (ISI). Data on health care costs were calculated as costs per year (Euro prices) and measured in terms of outpatient and inpatient care, pain drugs, total drugs and total health care costs. ResultsThe overall fraction of clinical insomnia was 24.6% (moderate clinical insomnia: 21.9% [95% CI: 18.8-23.3]; severe clinical insomnia: 2.7% [95% CI: 1.6-3.2]). Persons who reported clinical insomnia were more likely to experience pain more frequently with higher pain intensity compared to those reported no clinically significant insomnia. Mean total health care costs were Euro 8469 (95% CI: Euro4029-Euro14,271) for persons with severe insomnia compared with Euro 4345 (95% CI: Euro4033-Euro4694) for persons with no clinically significant insomnia. An association between severe insomnia, well-being, quality of life, outpatient care, total drugs costs and total health care costs remained after controlling for age, sex, pain intensity, frequency, body mass index and comorbidities using linear regression models. ConclusionsOur results determine an independent association of insomnia with low health-related quality of life and increased health care costs in older adults with chronic pain. SignificanceThe concurrence and the severity of insomnia among older adults with chronic pain were associated with decreased well-being and quality of life, and increased health care costs to society.

  • 65.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    A Meta-Epidemiological Appraisal of the Effects of Interdisciplinary Multimodal Pain Therapy Dosing for Chronic Low Back Pain2019In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a meta-analysis, meta-regression, and a meta-epidemiological approach, we conducted a systematic review to examine the influence of interdisciplinary multimodal pain therapy (IMPT) dosage on pain, disability, return to work, quality of life, depression, and anxiety in published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). We considered all RCTs of IMPT from a Cochrane review and searched PubMed for additional RCTs through 30 September 2018. A subgroup random-effects meta-analysis by length, contact, and intensity of treatment was performed followed by a meta-regression analysis. Using random and fixed-effect models and a summary relative odds ratio (ROR), we compared the effect sizes (ES) from short-length, non-daily contact, and low-intensity RCTs with long-length, daily contact, and high-intensity RCTs. Heterogeneity was quantified with the I-2 metric. A total of 47 RCTs were selected. Subgroup meta-analysis showed that there were larger ES for pain and disability in RCTs with long-length, non-daily contact, and low intensity of treatment. Larger ES were also observed for quality of life in RCTs with short-length, non-daily contact, and low intensity treatment. However, these findings were not confirmed by the meta-regression analysis. Likewise, the summary RORs were not significant, indicating that the length, contact, and intensity of treatment did not have an overall effect on the investigated outcomes. For the outcomes investigated here, IMPT dosage is not generally associated with better ES, and an optimal dosage was not determined.

  • 66.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Dimoliatis, Ioannis
    University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Evangelou, Evangelos
    University of Ioannina, Greece; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    A systematic appraisal of allegiance effect in randomized controlled trials of psychotherapy2015In: Annals of General Psychiatry, ISSN 1744-859X, E-ISSN 1744-859X, Vol. 14, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Experimenters allegiance (EA) refers to a personal confidence of the superiority of a specific psychotherapy treatment. This factor has been linked with larger treatment effects in favor of the preferred treatment. However, various studies have displayed contradictory results between EA and the pattern of treatment effects. Aims: Using a systematic approach followed by meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the impact of an allegiance effect on the results of psychotherapeutic studies. Method: We considered the meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of different types of psychotherapies in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Eligible articles included meta-analyses of RCTs with at least one study showing evidence of EA (i.e., allegiant study). Effect sizes in allegiant RCTs were compared with non-allegiant using random and fixed models and a summary relative odds ratio (ROR) were calculated. Heterogeneity was quantified with the I-2 metric. Results: A total of 30 meta-analyses including 240 RCTs were analyzed. The summary ROR was 1.31 [(95 % confidence interval (CI: 1.03-1.66) P = 0.30, I-2 = 53 %] indicating larger effects when allegiance exists. The impact of allegiance did not differ significantly (P greater than 0.05) when we compared psychiatric versus medical outcomes. Allegiance effect was significant for all forms of psychotherapy except for cognitive behavioral therapy. Moreover, the impact of allegiance was significant only when the treatment integrity of delivered psychotherapy was not assessed. Allegiance effect was even stronger where the experimenter was also both the developer of the preferred treatment and supervised or trained the therapists. No significant differences were found between allegiant and non-allegiant studies in terms of overall quality of studies. Conclusions: Experimenters allegiance influences the effect sizes of psychotherapy RCTs and can be considered non-financial conflict of interest introducing a form of optimism bias, especially since blinding is problematic in this kind of research. A clear reporting of EA in every single study should be given an opportunity to investigators of minimizing its overestimation effects.

  • 67.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Evangelou, Evangelos
    Univ Ioannina, Greece; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    EFFECTIVENESS OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMMES FOR CLINICAL PAIN CONDITIONS: AN UMBRELLA REVIEW2018In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 779-791Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the strength of the evidence for multimodal/multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes (MMRPs) for common pain outcomes. Data sources: PubMed, PsychInfo, PEDro and Co-chrane Library were searched from inception to August 2017. Study selection: Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials and qualitative systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials were considered eligible. Data extraction: Two independent reviewers abstracted data and evaluated the methodological quality of the reviews. The strength of the evidence was graded using several criteria. Data synthesis: Twelve meta-analyses, including 134 associations, and 24 qualitative systematic reviews were selected. None of the associations in meta-analyses and qualitative systematic reviews were supported by either strong or highly suggestive evidence. In meta-analyses, only 8 (6%) associations that were significant at p-value amp;lt;= 0.05 were supported by suggestive evidence, whereas 44 (33%) associations were supported by weak evidence. Moderate evidence was found only in 4 (17%) qualitative systematic reviews, while 14 (58%) qualitative systematic reviews had limited evidence. Conclusion: There is no evidence that MMRPs are effective for prevalent clinical pain conditions. The majority of the evidence remains ambiguous and susceptible to biases due to the small sample size of participants and the limited number of studies included.

  • 68.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Longitudinal Associations between Anatomical Regions of Pain and Work Conditions: A Study from The SwePain Cohort2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 12, article id 2167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the time-based associations between workload (physical and mechanical), psychosocial work stressors (demands, control, and support), and the number of anatomical regions with pain (ARP). This population-based study with a two-year follow-up included 11,386 responders (5125 men, 6261 women; mean age: 48.8 years; SD: 18.5) living in south-eastern Sweden. Predictive associations were assessed through generalised linear models, and changes over time were examined using a generalised estimating equation. The results of both models were reported as parameter estimates (B) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). Mean changes in the number of ARP, workload, and psychosocial work stressors were stable over time. High mechanical workload and job demands were likely associated with the number of ARP at the two-year follow-up. In the reverse prospective model, we found that the number of ARP was also associated with high physical and mechanical workload and low job control and support. In the two time-based models of changes, we found a reciprocal association between number of ARP and mechanical workload. Our results add epidemiological evidence to the associations between work conditions and the extent of pain on the body. Components of work conditions, including job demands and mechanical strain, must be considered when organisations and health policy makers plan and employ ergonomic evaluations to minimise workplace hazards in the general population.

  • 69.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Karathanos, V.
    University of Ioannina, Greece.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Evangelou, E.
    University of Ioannina, Greece; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Does psychotherapy work? An umbrella review of meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials2017In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 136, no 3, p. 236-246Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To map and evaluate the evidence across meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapies for various outcomes. Methods: We identified 173 eligible studies, including 247 meta-analyses that synthesized data from 5157 RCTs via a systematic search from inception to December 2016 in the PubMed, PsycINFO and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We calculated summary effects using random-effects models, and we assessed between-study heterogeneity. We estimated whether large studies had significantly more conservative results compared to smaller studies (small-study effects) and whether the observed positive studies were more than expected by chance. Finally, we assessed the credibility of the evidence using several criteria. Results: One hundred and ninety-nine meta-analyses were significant at P-value amp;lt;= 0.05, and almost all (n = 196) favoured psychotherapy. Large and very large heterogeneity was observed in 130 meta-analyses. Evidence for small-study effects was found in 72 meta-analyses, while 95 had evidence of excess of significant findings. Only 16 (7%) provided convincing evidence that psychotherapy is effective. These pertained to cognitive behavioural therapy (n = 6), meditation therapy (n = 1), cognitive remediation (n = 1), counselling (n = 1) and mixed types of psychotherapies (n = 7). Conclusions: Although almost 80% meta-analyses reported a nominally statistically significant finding favouring psychotherapy, only a few meta-analyses provided convincing evidence without biases.

  • 70.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    A cross-sectional study of factors associated with the number of anatomical pain sites in an actual elderly general population: results from the PainS65+cohort2017In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 10, p. 2009-2019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have illustrated that multisite pain is more frequent than single pain site, and it is associated with an array of negative consequences. However, there is limited knowledge available about the potential factors associated with multisite pain in the elderly general population. Objective: This cross-sectional study examines whether the number of anatomical pain sites (APSs) is related to sociodemographic and health-related factors in older adults including oldestold ages using a new method (APSs) to assess the location of pain on the body. Materials and methods: The sample came from the PainS65+ cohort, which included 6,611 older individuals (mean age = 76.0 years; standard deviation [SD] = 7.4) residing in southeastern Sweden. All the participants completed and returned a postal survey that measured sociodemographic data, total annual income, pain intensity and frequency, general well-being, and quality of life. The number of pain sites (NPS) was marked on a body manikin of 45 sections, and a total of 23 APSs were then calculated. Univariable and multivariable models of regression analysis were performed. Results: Approximately 39% of the respondents had at least two painful sites. The results of the regression analysis showed an independent association between the APSs and the age group of 75-79 years, women, married, high pain intensity and frequency, and low well-being and quality of life, after adjustments for consumption of analgesics and comorbidities. The strongest association was observed for the higher frequency of pain. Conclusion: Our results suggest that APSs are highly prevalent with strong relationships with various sociodemographic and health-related factors and concur well with the notion that multisite pain is a potential indicator of increased pain severity and impaired quality of life in the elderly. Our comprehensive method of calculating the number of sites could be an essential part of the clinical presentation, assessment, and treatment of multisite pain.

  • 71.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Prevalence of different pain categories based on pain spreading on the bodies of older adults in Sweden: a descriptive-level and multilevel association with demographics, comorbidities, medications, and certain lifestyle factors (PainS65+)2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, p. 1131-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: There is limited knowledge about the prevalence of pain and its relation to comorbidities, medication, and certain lifestyle factors in older adults. To address this limitation, this cross-sectional study examined the spreading of pain on the body in a sample of 6611 subjects amp;gt;= 65 years old (mean age = 75.0 years; standard deviation [SD] = 7.7) living in southeastern Sweden. Methods: Sex, age, comorbidities, medication, nicotine, alcohol intake, and physical activity were analyzed in relation to the following pain categories: local pain (LP) (24.1%), regional pain medium (RP-Medium) (20.3%), regional pain heavy (RP-Heavy) (5.2%), and widespread pain (WSP) (1.7%). Results: RP-Medium, RP-Heavy, and WSP were associated more strongly with women than with men (all pamp;lt;0.01). RP-Heavy was less likely in the 80-84 and amp;gt;85 age groups compared to the 65-69 age group (both pamp;lt;0.01). Traumatic injuries, rheumatoid arthritis/osteoarthritis, and analgesics were associated with all pain categories (all pamp;lt;0.001). An association with gastrointestinal disorders was found in LP, RP-Medium, and RP-Heavy (all pamp;lt;0.01). Depressive disorders were associated with all pain categories, except for LP (all pamp;lt;0.05). Disorders of the central nervous system were associated with both RP-Heavy and WSP (all pamp;lt;0.05). Medication for peripheral vascular disorders was associated with RP-Medium (pamp;lt;0.05), and hypnotics were associated with RP-Heavy (pamp;lt;0.01). Conclusion: More than 50% of older adults suffered from different pain spread categories. Women were more likely to experience greater spreading of pain than men. A noteworthy number of common comorbidities and medications were associated with increased likelihood of pain spread from LP to RP-Medium, RP-Heavy, and WSP. Effective management plans should consider these observed associations to improve functional deficiency and decrease spreading of pain-related disability in older adults.

  • 72.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Insomnia severity and its relationship with demographics, pain features, anxiety, and depression in older adults with and without pain: cross-sectional population-based results from the PainS65+cohort2017In: Annals of General Psychiatry, ISSN 1744-859X, E-ISSN 1744-859X, Vol. 16, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Insomnia is a major cause of concern in the elderly with and without pain. This study set out to examine the insomnia and its correlates in a large sample of community adults aged amp;gt;= 65 years. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey was completed by 6205 older individuals (53.8% women; mean age = 76.2 years; SD = 7.5). The participants also completed the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and questionnaires assessing pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, depression, and basic demographic information. The sample was divided into three groups based on the presence and duration of pain: chronic pain (CP; n = 2790), subacute pain (SP; n = 510), and no pain (NP; n = 2905). Results: A proportion of each of the groups had an ISI score of 15 or greater (i.e., clinical insomnia): CP = 24.6%; SP = 21.3%; and NP = 13.0%. The average scores of ISI differed significantly among CP, SP, and NP groups (p amp;lt; 0.001). Stratified regression analyses showed that pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, and depression were independently related to insomnia in the CP group. Anxiety and depression were independently related to insomnia in the SP group, but only anxiety was significantly associated with insomnia in the NP group. Age and sex were not associated with insomnia. Conclusions: This study confirms that insomnia is not associated with chronological aging per se within the elderly population. Although the possible associations of insomnia with pain are complex, ensuing from pain intensity, pain spreading, anxiety, and depression, our results highlighted that anxiety was more strongly associated with insomnia in all groups than the depression and pain characteristics. Therapeutic plans should consider these relations during the course of pain, and a comprehensive assessment including both pain and psychological features is essential when older people are seeking primary health care for insomnia complaints.

  • 73.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Siamouli, Melina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Moutou, Katerina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Could PANSS be a useful tool in the determining of the stages of schizophrenia? A clinically operational approach2017In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 86, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staging in schizophrenia might be an important approach for the better treatment and rehabilitation of patients. The purpose of this study was to empirically devise a staging approach in a sample of stabilized patients with schizophrenia. One hundred and seventy patients aged amp;gt;= 18 years (mean = 40.7, SD = 11.6) diagnosed by DSM-5 criteria were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Principal components analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was used. The model was examined in the total sample and separately across a hypothesized stage of illness based on three age groups and between the two sexes. The PCA revealed a six factor structure for the total sample: 1) Negative, 2) Positive, 3) Depression and anxiety, 4) Excitement and Hostility, 5) Neurocognition and 6) Disorganization. The separate PCAs by stage of illness and sex revealed different patterns and quality of symptomatology. The Negative and Positive factors were stable across all examined groups. The models corresponding to different stages differed mainly in terms of neurocognition and disorganization and their interplay. Catatonic features appear more prominent in males while in females neurocognition takes two forms; one with disorganization and one with stereotype thinking with delusions. This study suggests that the three arbitrary defined stages of illness (on the basis of age) seem to reflect a progress from a preserved insight and more coherent mental functioning to disorganization and eventually neurocognitive impairment. Sexes differ in terms of the relationship of psychotic features with neurocognition. These results might have significant research and clinical implications. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 74.
    Earl, Robyn
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Anette
    Swedish Transport Adm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Visual search strategies of pedestrians with and without visual and cognitive impairments in a shared zone: A proof of concept study2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 57, p. 327-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shared zones have gained increasing popularity in urban land use and design as a means of incorporating the needs of multiple modes of transport, while at the same time promoting social interaction between users. Interactions within shared zones are based on a set of informal social protocols, communicated via eye contact and social cues. This proof of concept study utilised eye-tracking technology to examine the visual search strategies of individuals, with and without visual and cognitive impairments as they navigated a strategically chosen shared zone. In total 3960 fixations were analysed and the fixations were distributed across the shared zone and a pedestrian crossing. Those with impairments were more likely to fixate on traffic specific areas and objects compared to those without, suggesting that they required more input ascertaining when and where it was safe to perform tasks. However, the duration of fixation was not significantly different for an object whether it was traffic related or not, indicating a global need for increased processing time of the surrounding environment. Shared zones are claimed to increase driver awareness and safety and reduce congestion, but the implications on participation and safety for those with visual and cognitive impairments is yet to be extensively explored. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 75.
    Earl, Robyn
    et al.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Morris, Susan L.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Viewpoints of pedestrians with and without cognitive impairment on shared zones and zebra crossings2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Shared zones are characterised by an absence of traditional markers that segregate the road and footpath. Negotiation of a shared zone relies on an individuals ability to perceive, assess and respond to environmental cues. This ability may be impacted by impairments in cognitive processing, which may lead to individuals experiencing increased anxiety when negotiating a shared zone. Method Q method was used in order to identify and explore the viewpoints of pedestrians, with and without cognitive impairments as they pertain to shared zones. Results Two viewpoints were revealed. Viewpoint one was defined by "confident users" while viewpoint two was defined by users who "know what [they] are doing but drivers might not". Discussion Overall, participants in the study would not avoid shared zones. Pedestrians with intellectual disability were, however, not well represented by either viewpoint, suggesting that shared zones may pose a potential barrier to participation for this group.

  • 76.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do pain characteristics guide selection for multimodal pain rehabilitation?2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported painmeasures are associated with selection for multimodalor multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MMR) andwhether this selection is influenced by sex.Design: Cross-sectional cohort study.Subjects: A total of 1,226 women and 464 men withchronic pain conditions from 2 university hospitals.Methods: Drawing from the Swedish Quality Registryfor Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), data on pain, psychologicalsymptoms, function, health, and activity/participation were collected. Multiple logistic regressionwas used to investigate association of painmeasures with selection for MMR (no/yes) aftermultidisciplinary assessment. Covariates were: age,educational level, anxiety, depression, working status,and several pain measures.Results: High pain intensity in the previous week(odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI)0.86–0.99) and high pain severity (MultidimensionalPain Inventory) (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.74–0.95)were negatively associated with selection for MMR,whereas higher number of pain quadrants was positivelyassociated with selection for MMR. Similarresults were obtained for women, but none of themeasures was predictive for men.Conclusion: This practice-based study showed thathigher scores on self-reported pain were not associatedwith selection for MMR, and in women therewas a negative association for higher pain intensityand pain severity. Thus, other factors than pain determinewhether patients are selected for MMR.

  • 77.
    Ericsson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Monika
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Danderyd Hospital Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Resistance exercise improves physical fatigue in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) affects approximately 1-3 % of the general population. Fatigue limits the work ability and social life of patients with FM. A few studies of physical exercise have included measures of fatigue in FM, indicating that exercise can decrease fatigue levels. There is limited knowledge about the effects of resistance exercise on multiple dimensions of fatigue in FM. The present study is a sub-study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial in women with FM. The purpose of the present sub-study was to examine the effects of a person-centered progressive resistance exercise program on multiple dimensions of fatigue in women with FM, and to investigate predictors of the potential change in fatigue. Methods: A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multicenter trial examining the effects of person-centered progressive resistance exercise compared with an active control group. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks. Outcomes were five dimensions of fatigue measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Information about background was collected and the women also completed several health-related questionnaires. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to analyze predictors of change in fatigue in the total population. Results: A higher improvement was found at the post-treatment examination for change in the resistance exercise group, as compared to change in the active control group in the MFI-20 subscale of physical fatigue (resistance group Delta -1.7, SD 4.3, controls Delta 0.0, SD 2.7, p = 0.013), with an effect size of 0.33. Sleep efficiency was the strongest predictor of change in the MFI-20 subscale general fatigue (beta = -0.54, p = 0.031, R-2 = 0.05). Participating in resistance exercise (beta = 1.90, p = 0.010) and working fewer hours per week (beta = 0.84, p = 0.005) were independent significant predictors of change in physical fatigue (R-2 = 0.14). Conclusions: Person-centered progressive resistance exercise improved physical fatigue in women with FM when compared to an active control group.

  • 78.
    Ernberg, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Lofgren, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjersing, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, K.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Ctr, Sweden.
    Plasma Cytokine Levels in Fibromyalgia and Their Response to 15 Weeks of Progressive Resistance Exercise or Relaxation Therapy2018In: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, article id 3985154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to compare circulating cytokines between FM and healthy controls and to investigate the effect on cytokine levels by 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise or relaxation therapy in FM. Baseline plasma cytokine levels and clinical data were analyzed in 125 women with FM and 130 age-matched healthy women. The FM women were then randomized to progressive resistance exercise (n = 49) or relaxation (n = 43). Baseline IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IP-10, and eotaxin were higher in FM than in healthy controls (P amp;lt; 0.041), whereas IL-beta was lower (P amp;lt; 0.001). There were weak correlations between cytokine levels and clinical variables. After both interventions, IL-1ra had increased (P=0.004), while IL-1 beta had increased in the relaxation group (P = 0.002). Changes of IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17A were weakly correlated with changes of PPT, but there were no significant correlations between changes of cytokine and changes in other clinical variables. The elevated plasma levels of several cytokines supports the hypothesis that chronic systemic inflammation may underlie the pathophysiology of FM even if the relation to clinical variables was weak. However, 15 weeks of resistance exercise, as performed in this study, did not show any anti-inflammatory effect on neither FM symptoms nor clinical and functional variables.

  • 79.
    Ernberg, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjersing, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Effects of 15 weeks of resistance exercise on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the vastus lateralis muscle of patients with fibromyalgia2016In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aimed at investigating the effect of a resistance exercise intervention on the interstitial muscle levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in fibromyalgia (FMS) and healthy controls (CON). Methods: Twenty-four female patients with FMS (54 +/- 8 years) and 27 female CON (54 +/- 9 years) were subjected to intramuscular microdialysis of the most painful vastus lateralis muscle before and after 15 weeks of progressive resistance exercise twice per week. Baseline dialysates were sampled in the resting muscle 140 min after insertion of the microdialysis catheter. The participants then performed repetitive dynamic contractions (knee extension) for 20 min, followed by 60 min rest. Pain intensity was assessed with a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), and fatigue was assessed with Borgs RPE throughout microdialysis. Dialysates were sampled every 20 min and analyzed with Luminex for interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Results: At both sessions and for both groups the dynamic contractions increased pain (P amp;lt; 0.012) and fatigue (P amp;lt; 0.001). The levels of TNF were lower in the FMS group than the CON group at both sessions (P amp;lt; 0.05), but none of the other cytokines differed between the groups. IL-6 and IL-8 increased after the dynamic contractions in both groups (P amp;lt; 0.010), while TNF increased only in CON (P amp;lt; 0.05) and IL-1 beta did not change. Overall pain intensity was reduced after the 15 weeks of resistance exercise in FMS (P amp;lt; 0.05), but there was no changes in fatigue or cytokine levels. Conclusion: Progressive resistance exercise for 15 weeks did not affect the interstitial levels of IL-1 beta, TNF, IL-6, and IL-8 in the vastus lateralis muscle of FMS patients or CON.

  • 80.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Ohberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    A new way of assessing arm function in activity using kinematic Exposure Variation Analysis and portable inertial sensors - A validity study2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Portable motion systems based on inertial motion sensors are promising methods, with the advantage compared to optoelectronic cameras of not being confined to a laboratory setting. A challenge is to develop relevant outcome measures for clinical use. The aim of this study was to characterize elbow and shoulder motion during functional tasks, using portable motion sensors and a modified Exposure Variation Analysis (EVA) and evaluate system accuracy with optoelectronic cameras. Ten healthy volunteers and one participant with sequel after stroke performed standardised functional arm tasks. Motion was registered simultaneously with a custom developed motion sensor system, including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and an optoelectronic camera system. The EVA was applied on elbow and shoulder joints, and angular and angular velocity EVA plots was calculated. The EVA showed characteristic patterns for each arm task in the healthy controls and a distinct difference between the affected and unaffected arm in the participant with sequel after stroke. The accuracy of the portable system was high with a systematic error ranging between -1.2 degrees and 2.0 degrees. The error was direction specific due to a drift component along the gravity vector. Portable motion sensor systems have high potential as clinical tools for evaluation of arm function. EVA effectively illustrates joint angle and joint angle velocity patterns that may capture deficiencies in arm function and movement quality. Next step will be to manage system drift by including magnetometers, to further develop clinically relevant outcome variables and apply this for relevant patient groups. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 81.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Viewpoints of working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists on role balance strategies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 366-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational therapists need to be cognizant of evidence-based role balance advice and strategies that women with multigenerational caring responsibilities can implement independently or with minimal assistance, as role balance may not be the primary goal during many encounters with this population. Hence, this study aimed to identify the viewpoints on the most helpful role balance strategies for working sandwich generation women, both from their own perspectives and from the perspective of occupational therapists. This was achieved through a Q methodology study, where 54 statements were based on findings from interviews, sandwich generation literature and occupational therapy literature. In total, 31 working sandwich generation women and 42 occupational therapists completed the Q sort through either online or paper administration. The data were analysed using factor analysis with varimax rotation and were interpreted through collaboration with experts in the field. The findings revealed similarities between working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists, particularly in terms of advocating strategies related to sleep, rest and seeking practical assistance from support networks. Differences were also present, with working sandwich generation women viewpoints tending to emphasize strategies related to coping with a busy lifestyle attending to multiple responsibilities. In contrast, occupational therapy viewpoints prioritized strategies related to the occupational therapy process, such as goal setting, activity focused interventions, monitoring progress and facilitating sustainable outcomes.

  • 82.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Telethon Kids Inst, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

  • 83.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Municipal Council Norrkoping, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Anderson, Katie
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Joosten, Annette
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; La Trobe University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Parents Perspectives on Inclusive Schools for Children with Autism Spectrum Conditions2015In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 62, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) increasingly participate in inclusive education. The present study reviewed studies of children with ASC for parents perceptions of aspects they believed contributed to inclusive mainstream school settings. Understanding the parental perspective on the facilitators for inclusion of their child with ASC in mainstream schools is likely to improve inclusive practice. Twenty-eight empirical articles revealed that parents perceived teachers as playing a vital role in the inclusion of their children with ASC. The school was considered important in creating an environment that enabled inclusion, particularly through positive peer relations, prevention of bullying and help from support staff. At the societal level, funding and legislative policies were considered important. By understanding these aspects, policy-makers, teachers, school administrators and therapists may better be able to address parents inclusion concerns and thereby develop strategies to improve inclusion in mainstream schools.

  • 84.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Barnett, Tania
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Olov
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Siljehav, Jessica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Chee, Derserri Y.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden; K2 Swedish National Knowledge Centre Public Transport, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Viewpoints of adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders on public transport2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 163-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Public transport is low cost, allows for independence, and facilitates engagement and participation for non-drivers. However, the viewpoints of individuals with cognitive disabilities are rarely considered. In Australia, the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is approximately 1% and increasing. Many individuals with ASD do not possess a drivers licence, indicating that access to public transport is crucial for their independence. However, at present, there is no research on the opinions of adults with ASD on public transport. Aim: To identify the viewpoints of adults with ASD regarding the barriers and facilitators of public transport usage and their transportation preferences, and to contrast these against the viewpoints of neurotypical adults. Methods: Q. method was used to identify the viewpoints of both participant groups on public transport. Participants consisted of 55 adults with a diagnosis of ASD and a contrast group of 57 neurotypical adults. Both groups completed a Q sort task which took place in either Perth or Melbourne, Australia. Results: The most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to use public transport over driving and believed that it supported their independence. This viewpoint also indicated that both groups preferred to use electronic ticketing when using public transport. Interestingly, the second most prominent viewpoint indicated that both groups preferred to drive themselves by private car rather than use public transport. Discussion: It appears that the viewpoints of adults with and without ASD regarding public transportation were largely similar. However, questions arose about whether the preference for public transport in the ASD group may be more a result of difficulties obtaining a driving licence than a deliberate choice. The only barrier specified by adults with ASD related to crowding on public transport. Safety and convenience in relation to location and timing of services were barriers reported by neurotypical adults. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 85.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Black, Melissa
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Tang, Julia
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Fitzgerald, Patrick
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Leung, Denise
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Not Found:Linkoping Univ Pain and Rehabil Ctr, Dept Med and Hlth Sci IMH, Rehabil Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Tan, Tele
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Jahan, Ishrat
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia.
    Local visual perception bias in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders; do we have the whole picture?2016In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: While local bias in visual processing in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been reported to result in difficulties in recognizing faces and facially expressed emotions, but superior ability in disembedding figures, associations between these abilities within a group of children with and without ASD have not been explored. Methods: Possible associations in performance on the Visual Perception Skills Figure-Ground test, a face recognition test and an emotion recognition test were investigated within 25 8-12-years-old children with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome, and in comparison to 33 typically developing children. Results: Analyses indicated a weak positive correlation between accuracy in Figure-Ground recognition and emotion recognition. No other correlation estimates were significant. Conclusion: These findings challenge both the enhanced perceptual function hypothesis and the weak central coherence hypothesis, and accentuate the importance of further scrutinizing the existance and nature of local visual bias in ASD.

  • 86.
    Falkmer, Marita
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Municipal Council Norrkoping, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Oehlers, Kirsty
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Can you see it too? Observed and self-rated participation in mainstream schools in students with and without autism spectrum disorders2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 365-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the degree to which observations can capture perception of participation, observed and self-rated levels of interactions for students with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were explored.Methods: Frequencies and levels of involvement in interactions with classmates were observed and compared in 22 students with ASD and 84 of their classmates in mainstream schools, using a standardized protocol. Self-reported participation measurements regarding interactions with classmates and teachers from five questionnaire items were correlated with the observations. In total, 51516 data points were coded and entered into the analyses, and correlated with 530 questionnaire ratings.Results: Only one weak correlation was found in each group. Compared with classmates, students with ASD participated less frequently, but were not less involved when they actually did.Conclusions: Observations alone do not capture the individuals perception of participation and are not sufficient if the subjective aspect of participation is to be measured.

  • 87.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Akerblom, Sophia
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jansen, Gunilla Brodda
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; SCON, Sweden.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stalnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ang, Bjorn O.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Dalarna Univ, Sweden.
    Boersma, Katja
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Who benefits from multimodal rehabilitation - an exploration of pain, psychological distress, and life impacts in over 35,000 chronic pain patients identified in the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation2019In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 12, p. 891-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pain patients frequently suffer from psychological symptoms. There is no consensus concerning the prevalence of severe anxiety and depressive symptoms and the strength of the associations between pain intensity and psychological distress. Although an important aspect of the clinical picture is understanding how the pain condition impacts life, little is known about the relative importance of pain and psychological symptoms for individuals life impact. The aims of this study were to identify subgroups of pain patients; to analyze if pain, psychological distress, and life impact variables influence subgrouping; and to investigate how patients in the subgroups benefit from treatments. Methods: Background variables, pain aspects (intensity/severity and spreading), psychological distress (depressive and anxiety symptoms), and two life impact variables (pain interference and perceived life control) were obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation for chronic pain patients and analyzed mainly using advanced multivariate methods. Results: Based on amp;gt;35,000 patients, 35%-40% had severe anxiety or depressive symptoms. Severe psychological distress was associated with being born outside Europe (21%-24% vs 6%-8% in the category without psychological distress) and low education level (20.7%-20.8% vs 26%-27% in the category without psychological distress). Dose relationships existed between the two psychological distress variables and pain aspects, but the explained variances were generally low. Pain intensity/severity and the two psychological distress variables were significantly associated (R-2 =0.40-0.48; Pamp;gt;0.001) with the two life impact variables (pain interference and life control). Two subgroups of patients were identified at baseline (subgroup 1: n=15,901 16,119; subgroup 2: n=20,690-20,981) and the subgroup with the worst situation regarding all variables participated less in an MMRP (51% vs 58%, Pamp;lt;0.001) but showed the largest improvements in outcomes. Conclusion: The results emphasize the need to assess both pain and psychological distress and not take for granted that pain involves high psychological stress in the individual case. Not all patients benefit from MMRP. A better matching between common clinical pictures and the content of MMRPs may help improve results. We only partly found support for treatment resistance in patients with psychological distress burden.

  • 88.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function / Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Section of Physiotherapy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Osher Centre for Integrative Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function / Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Increased Interstitial Concentrations of Glutamate and Pyruvate in Vastus Lateralis of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Are Normalized after an Exercise Intervention: a Case-Control Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 14article id e0162010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is associated with central alterations, but controversies exist regarding the presence and role of peripheral factors. Microdialysis (MD) can be used in vivo to study muscle alterations in FMS. Furthermore for chronic pain conditions such as FMS, the mechanisms for the positive effects of exercise are unclear. This study investigates the interstitial concentrations of algesics and metabolites in the vastus lateralis muscle of 29 women with FMS and 28 healthy women before and after an exercise intervention. Methods All the participants went through a clinical examination and completed a questionnaire. In addition, their pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in their upper and lower extremities were determined. For both groups, MD was conducted in the vastus lateralis muscle before and after a 15-week exercise intervention of mainly resistance training of the lower limbs. Muscle blood flow and interstitial muscle concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, glucose, and glycerol were determined. Results FMS was associated with significantly increased interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate. After the exercise intervention, the FMS group exhibited significant decreases in pain intensity and in mean interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and glucose. The decrease in pain intensity in FMS correlated significantly with the decreases in pyruvate and glucose. In addition, the FMS group increased their strength and endurance. Conclusion This study supports the suggestion that peripheral metabolic and algesic muscle alterations are present in FMS patients and that these alterations contribute to pain. After an exercise intervention, alterations normalized, pain intensity decreased (but not abolished), and strength and endurance improved, all findings that suggest the effects of exercise are partially peripheral.

  • 89.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function / Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Section of Physiotherapy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Osher Centre for Integrative Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function / Scandinavian Centre for Orofacial Neuroscience (SCON), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Increased Interstitial Concentrations of Glutamate and Pyruvate in Vastus Lateralis of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Are Normalized after an Exercise Intervention: a Case-Control Study2016Data set
  • 90.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Signs of ongoing inflammation in female patients with chronic widespread pain A multivariate, explorative, cross-sectional study of blood samples2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 9, article id e6130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study investigates the plasma inflammatory profile of chronic widespread pain CWP) patients compared to healthy controls CON). Rather than analyzing a relatively few substances at a time, we used a new multiplex proximity extension assay PEA) panel that enabled the simultaneous analysis of 92 inflammation-related proteins, mainly cytokines and chemokines. Seventeen women with CWP and 21 female CON participated and a venous blood sample was drawn from all subjects. Pain intensity and pain thresholds for pressure, heat, and cold were registered. A PEA panel 92 proteins) was used to analyze the blood samples. Multivariate data analysis by projection was used in the statistical analyses. Eleven proteins significantly differentiated the CON and CWP subjects R-2=0.58, Q(2)=0.37, analysis of variance of cross-validated predictive residuals P=0.006). It was not possible to significantly regress pain thresholds within each group CON or CWP). Positive significant correlations existed between several proteins and pain intensities in CWP, but the model reliability of the regression was poor. CWP was associated with systemic low-grade inflammation. Larger studies are needed to confirm the results and to investigate which alterations are condition-specific and which are common across chronic pain conditions. The presence of inflammation could promote the spreading of pain, a hallmark sign of CWP. As it has been suggested that prevalent comorbidities to pain (e.g., depression and anxiety, poor sleep, and tiredness) also are associated with inflammation, it will be important to determine whether inflammation may be a common mediator.

  • 91.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Muscle2018In: Fibromyalgia syndrome and widespread pain: from Construction to relevant Recognition / [ed] Winifried Häuser & Serge Perrot, Wolters Kluwer, 2018, p. 215-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 5 Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Weak outcome predictors of multimodal rehabilitation at one-year follow-up in patients with chronic pain-a practice based evidence study from two SQRP centres.2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pain, the heterogeneity of clinical presentations makes it difficult to identify patients who would benefit from multimodal rehabilitation programs (MMRP). Yet, there is limited knowledge regarding the predictors of MMRP's outcomes. This study identifies predictors of outcome of MMRPs at a 12-month follow-up (FU-12) based on data from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

    METHODS: Patients with chronic pain from two clinical departments in Sweden completed the SQRP questionnaires-background, pain characteristics, psychological symptoms, function, activity/participation, health and quality of life-on three occasions: 1) during their first visit; 2) immediately after the completion of their MMRP; and 3) 12 months after completing the MMRP (n = 227). During the FU-12, the patients also retrospectively reported their global impressions of any changes in their perception of pain and their ability to handle their life situation in general.

    RESULTS: Significant improvements were found for pain, psychological symptoms, activity/participation, health, and quality of life aspects with low/medium strong effects. A general pattern was observed from the analyses of the changes from baseline to FU-12; the largest improvements in outcomes were significantly associated with poor situations according to their respective baseline scores. Although significant regressors of the investigated outcomes were found, the significant predictors were weak and explained a minor part of the variation in outcomes (15-25%). At the FU-12, 53.6% of the patients reported that their pain had decreased and 80.1% reported that their life situation in general had improved. These improvements were associated with high education, low pain intensity, high health level, and work importance (only pain perception). The explained variations were low (9-11%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Representing patients in real-world clinical settings, this study confirmed systematic reviews that outcomes of MMRP are associated with broad positive effects. A mix of background and baseline variables influenced the outcomes investigated, but the explained variations in outcomes were low. There is still a need to develop standardized and relatively simple outcomes that can be used to evaluate MMRP in trials, in clinical evaluations at group level, and for individual patients.

  • 93.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Microdialysis in Profiling Cytokines and Other Macromolecules in the Skin in Health and Disease: A Comment to Falcone et al.2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1269-1269Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 94.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. PAINOMICS Lab, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Proteomics in chronic pain; investigating mechanistic markers of pain2019In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 190, p. III-IIIArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 95.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Carlsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Department Research and Dev, Sweden.
    Thelin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Biomarkers of lsystemic inflammation in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders; a plasma proteomic study2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Farmers have an increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) such as osteoarthritis of the hip, low back pain, and neck and upper limb complaints. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Workrelated exposures and inflammatory responses might be involved. Our objective was to identify plasma proteins that differentiated farmers with MSD from rural referents. Methods: Plasma samples from 13 farmers with MSD and rural referents were included in the investigation. Gel based proteomics was used for protein analysis and proteins that differed significantly between the groups were identified by mass spectrometry. Results: In total, 15 proteins differed significantly between the groups. The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D-binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in inflammation. Conclusions: Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation. It is possible that the identified differences of proteins may give clues to the biochemical changes occurring during the development and progression of MSD in farmers, and that one or several of these protein biomarkers might eventually be used to identify and prevent work-related MSD.

  • 96.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Bjork, Jonas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Comorbidities, intensity, frequency and duration of pain, daily functioning and health care seeking in local, regional, and widespread pain-a descriptive population-based survey (SwePain)2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical knowledge of factors related to the spread of pain on the body has increased and understanding these factors is essential for effective pain treatment. This population-based study examines local (LP), regional (RP), and widespread pain (WSP) on the body regarding comorbidities, pain aspects, and impact of pain and elucidates how the spread of pain varies over time. Material and methods: A postal questionnaire that addressed pain aspects (intensity, frequency, duration and anatomical spreading on a body manikin), comorbidities and implications of pain (i.e., work situation, physical activity, consumption of health care and experience of hospitality and treatment of health care) was sent to 9000 adults living in southeastern Sweden. Of these, 4774 (53 %) completed and returned the questionnaire. After 9 weeks, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to the 2983 participants who reported pain in the first questionnaire (i.e. 62 % of 4774 subjects). Of these, 1940 completed and returned the questionnaire (i.e. 65 % of 2983 subjects). The follow-up questionnaire included the same items as the first questionnaire. Results: This study found differences in intensity, frequency and duration of pain, comorbidities, aspects of daily functioning and health care seeking in three pain categories based on spreading of pain: LP, RP and WSP. Compared to the participants with RP and LP, the participants with WSP had lower education and worse overall health, including more frequent heart disease and hypertension. In addition, participants with WSP had more intense, frequent, and long-standing pain, required more medical consultations, and experienced more impact on work. The participants with RP constituted an intermediate group regarding frequency and intensity of pain, and impact on work. The participants with LP were the least affected group regarding these factors. A substantial transition to RP had occurred by the 9-week follow-up. Conclusions: This study shows an association between increased spread of pain and prevalence of heart disease, hypertension, more severe pain characteristics (i.e., intensity, frequency and duration), problems with common daily activities and increased health care seeking. The WSP group was the most affected group and the LP group was the least affected group. Regarding these factors, RP was an obvious intermediate group. The transitions between the pain categories warrant research that broadly investigates factors that increase and decrease pain.

  • 97.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Health Metrics, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Sandén, H
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Different DHEA-S Levels and Response Patterns in Individuals with Chronic Neck Pain, Compared with a Pain Free Group-a Pilot Study.2017In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 846-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To test, in this pilot study, whether DHEA-S (Dehydroepiandrosterone, sulfated form) plasma levels are lower among persons with chronic neck pain, compared to control persons, and to investigate the DHEA-S response after a physical exercise.

    SUBJECTS: Included were 12 persons with chronic neck pain and eight controls without present pain, all 18 and 65 years of age. Exclusion criteria for both groups were articular diseases or tendinosis, fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory and neuromuscular diseases, pain conditions due to trauma, or severe psychiatric diseases.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: The participants arm-cycled on an ergometer for 30 minutes. Blood samples were taken before, 60 minutes, and 150 minutes after this standardized physical exercise.

    RESULTS: The estimated plasma DHEA-S levels at baseline were 2.0 µmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00; 4.01) in the pain group and 4.1 µmol/L (95% CI2.0; 8.6) in the control group, adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), with a ratio of 0.48 (P = 0.094).The total DHEA-S (AUCG) in the pain group were 183 min*µmol/L lower than in the control group (P = 0.068). For the response to the exercise (AUCI), the difference between the pain group and the control group was 148 min*µmol/L (P = 0.011).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, the plasma DHEA-S levels appeared to be lower among the persons with chronic neck pain, compared with the control group. It was indicated that DHEA-S decreased during the physical exercise in the control group, and either increased or was unaffected in the chronic pain group.

  • 98.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Center for Sensory‐Motor Interactions, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reduced pain thresholds and signs of sensitization in women with persistent pelvic pain and suspected endometriosis2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 327-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Endometriosis is a gynecological disorder that may cause considerable pelvic pain in women of fertile age. Determining pain mechanisms is necessary in order to optimize the treatment of the disease. The objective of the study was to evaluate pain thresholds in women with persistent pelvic pain with and without confirmed endometriosis, and healthy, unaffected controls, and analyze how pain thresholds in these cohorts related to duration of pelvic pain, quality of life, and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pain thresholds for heat, cold and pressure were assessed with quantitative sensory testing on six locations on a reference group of 55 healthy women and on 37 women with persistent pelvic pain who had been admitted for diagnostic laparoscopy on the suspicion of endometriosis. Validated instruments were applied to assess quality of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data were analyzed by means of uni- and multivariate analysis of variance and Spearman's rank-order correlation.

    RESULTS: The women with persistent pelvic pain had significantly lower pain thresholds compared with the reference women. In the women with pain, no differences were observed in pain thresholds between women with (n = 13) and women without (n = 24) biopsy-proven endometriosis. The duration of pelvic pain correlated significantly positively with reduced pain thresholds, ie, the longer the duration, the more sensitization. In the persistent pelvic pain group, pain thresholds for heat correlated significantly with the Short Form Health Survey 36 dimension of bodily pain, and thresholds for cold correlated with Short Form Health Survey 36 bodily pain and with symptoms of depression.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed widespread alterations in pain thresholds in women with persistent pelvic pain that are indicative of central sensitization and a time-dependent correlation. Women with pelvic pain and suspicion of endometriosis should probably be treated more thoroughly to prevent or at least minimize the concomitant development of central sensitization.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-11-25 12:48
  • 99.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Associations between pain thresholds for heat, cold and pressure, and Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire scores in healthy women and in women with persistent pelvic pain2019In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) is a self‐rating instrument developed as a time‐ and cost‐saving alternative to quantitative sensory testing (QST). The aims of the study were to assess (a) the associations between PSQ scores and QST in women with persistent pelvic pain and in pain‐free controls and (b) to what extent demographic variables and psychological distress influenced PSQ scores.

    Methods

    Fifty‐five healthy women and 37 women with persistent pelvic pain participated. All filled in the PSQ and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and had QST (heat, cold and pressure pain thresholds) performed on six locations on the body. Information on age, body mass index, smoking habits and pain duration were collected. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least square regressions were used.

    Results

    The patients scored significantly higher on PSQ than the controls. Significant multivariate correlations between pain thresholds and PSQ scores were found only in the patient group. In the patient group, the heat and cold pain thresholds correlated more strongly with PSQ scores than the pressure pain threshold.

    Conclusions

    The PSQ score was significantly higher in pelvic pain patients, and correlations between QSTs and the PSQ were only found for patients.

    Significance

    The PSQ reflects pain sensitivity in women with PPP and can be used as a non‐invasive and painless way to assess this condition in clinical practice.

  • 100.
    Gunnarsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lemming, Dag
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Experiences from intrathecal baclofen treatment based on medical records and patient- and proxy-reported outcome: a multicentre study2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 1037-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate patient satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment, complications from the treatment, and the impact of general expectations on treatment outcome in relation to satisfaction.

    Methods: A multicentre study with cross-sectional design. Data were collected through questionnaires and patient records. Patients were recruited from six outpatient intrathecal baclofen clinics in Sweden. Eighty-three patients who had been treated with intrathecal baclofen for 1–4 years were included. For patients unable to communicate, data were collected through a proxy. The Patient Global Impression of Change was used to measure patients’ general satisfaction with change from intrathecal baclofen treatment. The Life Orientation Test – revised, was used to measure general expectations/optimism.

    Results: General satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment was high; 51/77 patients reported “much improved” or “very much improved.” There was no relationship between the two main outcomes (general satisfaction and general expectations/optimism) (rs = 0.12, p = 0.382). The two groups; those who could and those who could not communicate, did differ regarding personal characteristics and should be evaluated as such.

    Conclusions: Most patients/proxies reported a high level of satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment. The reported satisfaction with intrathecal baclofen treatment was not dependent on general expectations.

    • Implications for Rehabilitation
    • Patients with intrathecal baclofen treatment report low levels of health and quality of life at the same time as they are highly satisfied with their treatment.

    • Intrathecal baclofen should be equally offered to both optimistic and less optimistic patients.

    • Patients who are able to/not able to communicate, differs in characteristics and should be informed and followed up in different ways in daily clinical practice.

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