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  • 51.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    et al.
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ortali, Giorgio Alberto
    Casa Cura Villa della Querce Nemi, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    RELATIONSHIPS AMONG MEASURES OF PHYSICAL FITNESS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 607-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe the relationships among 3 measures of physical fitness (exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity) in patients with heart failure, and to determine whether these measures are influenced by impairment of movement. Methods: Secondary analysis of baseline data from the Italian subsample (n= 96) of patients with heart failure enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, the HF-Wii study. Exercise capacity was measured with the 6-min walk test, muscle function was measured with the unilateral isotonic heel-lift, bilateral isometric shoulder abduction and unilateral isotonic shoulder flexion, and functional capacity was measured with the Duke Activity Status Index. Principal component analysis was used to detect covariance of the data. Results: Exercise capacity correlated with all of the tests related to muscle function (r=0.691-0.423, pamp;lt; 0.001) and functional capacity (r = 0.531). Moreover, functional capacity correlated with muscle function (r=0.482-0.393). Principal component analysis revealed the bidimensional structure of these 3 measures, thus accounting for 58% of the total variance in the variables measured. Conclusion: Despite the correlations among exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity, these measures loaded on 2 different factors. The use of a wider range of tests will help clinicians to perform a more tailored assessment of physical fitness, especially in those patients with heart failure who have impairment of movement.

  • 52.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    et al.
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Vellone, Ercole
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ortali, Giorgio Alberto
    Cardiopulm Rehabil Casa Cura Villa Querce Nemi, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in patients with heart failure2018In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment are common in heart failure (HF) patients, but there are inconsistencies in the literature regarding their relationship and effects on exercise capacity. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between exercise capacity and anxiety, depression, and cognition in HF patients. Methods: This was a secondary analysis on the baseline data of the Italian subsample (n = 96) of HF patients enrolled in the HF-Wii study. Data was collected with the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Results: The HF patients walked an average of 222 (SD 114) meters on the 6MWT. Patients exhibited clinically elevated anxiety (48%), depression (49%), and severe cognitive impairment (48%). Depression was independently associated with the distance walked on the 6MWT. Conclusions: The results of this study reinforced the role of depression in relation to exercise capacity and call for considering strategies to reduce depressive symptoms to improve outcomes of HF patients. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 53.
    Cider, Asa
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pihl, Emma
    Halmstad University, Sweden .
    Letter: Response to Exercise programmes and quality of life in the elderly: important facts2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 128-128Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 54. de Geest, S
    et al.
    Fridlund, B
    Heikkilä, J
    Jaarsma, T
    Mårtinson, J
    Moons, P
    Scholte op Reimer, W
    Smith, K
    Stewart, S
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    A survey of coronary risk factors in a cohort of cardiac nurses from Europe: do nurses....2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55. de Geest, S
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Heikkilä, J
    Jaarsma, T
    Martinsson, J
    Moons, P
    Scholte of Reimer, W
    Smith, K
    Stewart, S
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Undertaking nursing interventions throughout Europe: Research activities of the working group on cardiovascular nursing of the European Society of cardiology2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 167-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing is actively involved in international research though the UNITE (Undertaking Nursing Research Throughout Europe) research program, a new initiative for the WGCN. A group of cardiovascular nursing researchers from a number of different European countries committed themselves to a research group that is designed to promulgate international research in the field of cardiac nursing. The first study was a survey on coronary risk factors in a cohort of cardiac nurses from Europe. At this moment four additional studies are planned aimed at the development of the nursing profession in Europe and improvement of care for patients with chronic cardiac disease. If, as hoped, these studies prove to be successful, it will provide the seed for other international collaborations of this type.

  • 56.
    De Geest, Sabina
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Dunbar, Sandra
    Emory University, Atlanta.
    Froelicher, Erika
    School of Nursing, UCSF, San Francisco.
    Grady, Kathleen
    Rush University, Chicago.
    Hayman, Laura
    New York University.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Building bridges: the American Heart Association-European Society of Cardiology's International Nursing Collaboration2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 251-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper described the formal collaboration between the American Heart Association's Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and the European Society of Cardiology's Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing. This collaboration comprises following dimensions: (1). further expansion on collaboration on annual conferences; (2). development of mentoring initiatives; (3). initiation of research collaboration; (4). development of joint guidelines; and (5). appointment of liaison persons of AHA to ESC and vice versa.

  • 57. Del Sindaco, D
    et al.
    Pulignano, G
    Jaarsma, T
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mårtensson, J
    Dracup, K
    Leggio, M
    Leggio, F
    Translation and validation of the Italian version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale.2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Norway.
    Cohen-Solal, Alain
    France.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Greece.
    McMurray, John J.V.
    UK.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Poland.
    Poole-Wilson, Philip Alexander
    UK.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    The Netherlands.
    Atar, Dan
    Norway.
    Hoes, Arno W
    The Netherlands.
    Keren, Andre
    Israel.
    Mebazaa, Alexandre
    France.
    Nieminen, Markku
    Finland.
    Priori, Silvia Giuliana
    Italy.
    Swedberg, Karl
    Sweden.
    ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 2008.2008In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 933-989Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Norge.
    Cohen-Solal, Alain
    Frankrike.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Grekland.
    McMurray, John J.V.
    Storbritannien.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Polen.
    Poole-Wilson, Philip Alexander
    Storbrittanien.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Nederländerna.
    Atar, Dan
    Norge.
    Hoes, Arno W.
    Nederländerna.
    Keren, Andre
    Israel.
    Mebazaa, Alexandre
    Frankrike.
    Nieminen, Markku
    Finland.
    Priori, Silvia Giuliana
    Italien.
    Swedberg, Karl
    Sverige.
    ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 20082008In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 29, p. 2388-2442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 60.
    Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas
    et al.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Hooker, Stephanie A.
    University of Colorado, CO 80217 USA.
    Bekelman, David
    University of Colorado, CO 80220 USA.
    Ejem, Deborah
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    McGhan, Gwen
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Kitko, Lisa
    Penn State University, PA 16802 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wells, Rachel
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Astin, Meka
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Gok Metin, Zehra
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Mancarella, Gisella
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Pamboukian, Salpy V.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Buck, Harleah G.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Bakitas, Marie A.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Family caregiving for persons with heart failure at the intersection of heart failure and palliative care: a state-of-the-science review2017In: Heart Failure Reviews, ISSN 1382-4147, E-ISSN 1573-7322, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 543-557Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the 23 million individuals with heart failure (HF) worldwide receive daily, unpaid support from a family member or friend. Although HF and palliative care practice guidelines stipulate that support be provided to family caregivers, the evidence base to guide care for this population has not been comprehensively assessed. In order to appraise the state-of-the-science of HF family caregiving and recommend areas for future research, the aims of this review were to summarize (1) how caregivers influence patients, (2) the consequences of HF for caregivers, and (3) interventions directed at HF caregivers. We reviewed all literature to December 2015 in PubMed and CINAHL using the search terms "heart failure" AND "caregiver." Inclusion criteria dictated that studies report original research of HF family caregiving. Articles focused on children or instrument development or aggregated HF with other illnesses were excluded. We identified 120 studies, representing 5700 caregivers. Research on this population indicates that (1) caregiving situations vary widely with equally wide-ranging tasks for patients to help facilitate their health behaviors, psychological health and relationships, and quality of life (QoL); (2) caregivers have numerous unmet needs that fluctuate with patients unpredictable medical status, are felt to be ignored by the formal healthcare system, and can lead to distress, burden, and reduced QoL; and (3) relatively few interventions have been developed and tested that effectively support HF family caregivers. We provide recommendations to progress the science forward in each of these areas that moves beyond descriptive work to intervention development and clinical trials testing.

  • 61.
    Ericsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Angerud, Karin H.
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Brannstrom, Margareta
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Interaction between tele-nurses and callers with an evolving myocardial infarction: Consequences for level of directed care2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 545-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rapid contact with emergency medical services is imperative to save the lives of acute myocardial infarction patients. However, many patients turn to a telehealth advisory nurse instead, where the delivery of urgent and safe care largely depends on how the interaction in the call is established. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the interaction between tele-nurses and callers with an evolving myocardial infarction after contacting a national telehealth advisory service number as their first medical contact. Method: Twenty men and 10 women (aged 46-89 years) were included. Authentic calls were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings: One overall category, Movement towards directed level of care, labelled the whole interaction between the tele-nurse and the caller. Four categories conceptualised the different interactions: a distinct, reasoning, indecisive or irrational interaction. The interactions described how tele-nurses and callers assessed and elaborated on symptoms, context and actions. The interaction was pivotal for progress in the dialogue and affected the achievement of mutual understanding in the communicative process. An indecisive or irrational interaction could increase the risk of failing to recommend or call for acute care. Conclusion: The interaction in the communication could either lead or mislead the level of care directed in the call. This study adds new perspectives to the communicative process in the acute setting in order to identify a myocardial infarction and the level of urgency from both individuals experiencing myocardial infarction and professionals in the health system.

  • 62.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Cacciata, Marysol
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dracup, Kathleen
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dose-Response Relationship Between Exercise Intensity, Mood States, and Quality of Life in Patients With Heart Failure2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We conducted a secondary analysis to (1) compare changes in mood disorders and quality of life (QOL) among 4 groups of patients with heart failure in a home-based exercise program who had varying degrees of change in their exercise capacity and (2) determine whether there was an association between exercise capacity, mood disorders, and QOL. Methods: Seventy-one patients were divided into 4 groups based on changes in exercise capacity from baseline to 6 months: group 1showed improvements of greater than 10% (n = 19), group 2 showed improvements of 10% or less (n = 16), group 3 showed reductions of 10% or less (n = 9), and group 4 showed reductions of greater than 10% (n = 27). Results: Over time, patients in all 4 groups demonstrated significantly lower levels of depression and hostility (P amp;lt; .001) and higher levels of physical and overall quality of life (P = .046). Group differences over time were noted in anxiety (P = .009), depression (P = .015), physical quality of life (P amp;lt; .001), and overall quality of life (P = .002). Greater improvement in exercise capacity was strongly associated with lower depression scores (r = -0.49, P = .01). Conclusions: An improvement in exercise capacity with exercise training was associated with a decrease in depression and anxiety and an increase in QOL in patients with heart failure.

  • 63.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    et al.
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nicholas Dionne-Odom, J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL USA.
    An integrated review of interventions to improve psychological outcomes in caregivers of patients with heart failure2016In: CURRENT OPINION IN SUPPORTIVE AND PALLIATIVE CARE, ISSN 1751-4258, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 24-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of reviewThis article examines interventions aimed at improving psychological outcomes (e.g., caregiver burden, quality of life, anxiety, depression, perceived control, stress mastery, caregiver confidence and preparedness, and caregiver mastery) in family caregivers of patients with heart failure.Recent findingsEight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. The most common intervention involved psychoeducation facilitated by a nurse (6/8) and supplemented with a combination of follow-up face-to-face sessions (2/6), home visits (2/6), telephone calls (3/6), and telemonitoring (3/6). Two studies used a support group intervention of four to six sessions. Half of the interventions reported a significant effect on one or more primary outcomes, including caregiver burden (n=4), depressive symptoms (n=1), stress mastery (n=1), caregiver confidence and preparedness (n=1), and caregiver mastery (n=1).SummaryCompared with dementia and cancer family caregiving, few interventions have been evaluated in caregivers of patients with heart failure. Of the existing interventions identified in this review, considerable variability was observed in aims, intervention content, delivery methods, duration, intensity, methodological rigor, outcomes, and effects. Given this current state of the science, direct comparison of heart failure caregiver interventions and recommendations for clinical practice are premature. Thus, research priority is strongly warranted for intervention development and testing to enhance heart failure caregiver support and education.

  • 64. Evangelista, L.S.
    et al.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Westlake, C
    Ter-Galstanyan, A
    N, Andersson
    Dracup, K
    Developing a Web-Based education and Counseling Program for Heart Failure Patients2006In: Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-7204, E-ISSN 1751-7117, Vol. 21, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 65.
    Flemme, I
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hallberg, U
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with uncertainty - main concern for recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillator - a qualitative study.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Flemme, I
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Johansson, I
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life and coping strategies in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Uncertainty is a major concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators2011In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 420-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to explore the main concern of individuals living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and how they handle this in daily life. For improved management and follow-up, it is important to understand how the ICD affects the recipients daily life. METHODS: A grounded theory method was used. Sixteen Swedish recipients (9 men) living with an ICD for 6 to 24 months were interviewed. RESULTS: The core category labeled, "Incorporating uncertainty in daily life," illuminates the main concern. To handle uncertainty, recipients used the following strategies: restricting activities, distracting oneself, accepting being an ICD recipient, and reevaluating life. CONCLUSION: Recipients were not paralyzed by uncertainty. Instead, they incorporated uncertainty in life by using strategies to handle their daily life. Questions, comments, and plans for supportive communication were provided, which can be used by healthcare professionals in cardiac rehabilitation.

  • 68.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    "Striving to resume command" - main concern for recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillator2009Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Earlier studies have shown that individuals with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) experience fear, stress, anxiety, and depression in their daily life, but also feelings of gratitude, safety, and belief in the future. Uncertainty and restrictions in physical, psychological and social functioning are common responses to their experiences. Aim: The aim of the study was to illuminate the main concern of individuals living with an ICD and how they handle this in their daily life.

    Method: Sixteen Swedish recipients (9 men) who had lived with a defibrillator for 6 to 24 months were interviewed during 2007. Data was collected and analyzed in a simultaneous process according to guidelines for classical grounded theory.

    Results: In the analysis, a substantive theory was generated explaining the main concern of ICD recipients and how they handle this in their daily life. The core category, labelled “Striving to resume command” illuminates the main concern of ICD recipients. To manage this main concern, the recipients used the following strategies: Economizing resources, Distracting oneself, Submitting to one’s fate and Re-evaluating life.

    Conclusions: Based on empirical data, a substantive theory was generated illuminating the main concern for ICD recipients and strategies they used to manage this in daily life. The theory deepens the understanding of the recipients´ striving to resume command over their lives in an ongoing adjustment process which they have to face. This knowledge has clinical relevance and suggests that nurses should support the ICD recipients in this respect and thereby contribute to optimizing their sense of control in daily life. Future research could focus on the role of family members of ICD recipients and in what way they can support rather than overprotect their closely related.

  • 69.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Living with life-saving technology - coping strategies in implantable cardioverter defibrillators recipients2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 311-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims.  To describe coping strategies and coping effectiveness in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and to explore factors influencing coping.

    Background.  Implantable cardioverter defibrillators are documented as saving lives and are used to treat ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Despite the implantable cardioverter defibrillator not evidently interfering with everyday life, there is conflicting evidence regarding the psychosocial impact of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation such as anxiety, depression, perceived control and quality of life and how these concerns may relate to coping.

    Design.  Cross-sectional multicentre design.

    Methods.  Individuals (n = 147, mean age 63 years, 121 men) who had lived with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator between 6–24 months completed the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Control Attitude Scale and Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version.

    Results.  Implantable cardioverter defibrillators recipients seldom used coping strategies, and the coping strategies used were perceived as fairly helpful. Optimism was found to be the most frequently used (1·8 SD 0·68) and most effective (2·1 SD 0·48) coping strategy, and recipients perceived moderate control in life. Anxiety (β = 3·5, p ≤ 0·001) and gender (β = 12·3, p = 0·046) accounted for 26% of the variance in the total use of coping strategies, suggesting that the more symptoms of anxiety and being women the greater use of coping strategies.

    Conclusions.  Most recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator did not appraise daily concerns as stressors in need of coping and seem to have made a successful transition in getting on with their lives 6–24 months after implantation.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses working with recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator should have a supportive communication so that positive outcomes such as decreased anxiety and increased perceived control and quality of life can be obtained. Through screening for anxiety at follow-up in the outpatient clinic, these recipients perceiving mental strain in their daily life can be identified.

  • 70.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Quality of life and coping strategies in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2009Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore relationships between quality of life (QOL), coping strategies, anxiety, depression and perceived control in recipients living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and compare those having received an ICD less or more than one year ago and those with a primary or secondary preventive indication.

    Methods: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used, and 147 individuals (mean age 63 years, 121 men) who had lived with an ICD between 6 to 24 months completed Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Control Attitude Scale.

    Results: Anxiety, depression and perceived control were predictors of QOL. Anxiety was also a predictor of the use of coping strategies with optimism being the most used coping strategy. No relationship was found between QOL and the use of different coping strategies. No differences were found in QOL, coping, anxiety, depression and perceived control between ICD recipients having the device less or more than one year and treated either on a primary or secondary preventive indication.

    Conclusions: Recipients with an ICD did not use a multitude of coping strategies, but anxiety increased the use of coping. Perceived control was the most influential predictor of QOL. Practice implications: Supportive long term follow up interventions should be tailored to the recipients that have problems adapting to the device and perceive poor control in everyday life and a decreased psychological well-being.

  • 71.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Quality of life and coping strategies in recipients with an implantablecardioverter defibrillator2010In: 10th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing / European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing 9 Suppl. 1 (2010), 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Patients' experiences of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD); with a focus on battery replacement and end-of-life issues2013In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 202-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    ICD deactivation at end-of-life is technically uncomplicated. However, it may present a psychological challenge to healthcare professionals, patients, and next-of-kin.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study explored patients' experiences of complex issues of battery replacement and deactivation of the ICD.

    METHODS:

    Semistructured interviews were administered to 37 medically stable ICD-recipients.

    RESULTS:

    The ICD-recipients lived with an uncertain illness trajectory, but the majority had not reflected on battery replacement or elective ICD deactivation. Healthcare professionals had rarely discussed these issues with patients. However, this was consistent with the ICD-recipients' wishes. Many patients had misconceptions about the lifesaving capacity of the ICD and the majority stated that they would not choose to deactivate the ICD, even if they knew they were terminally ill, and it meant they would receive multiple shocks.

    CONCLUSION:

    The ICD-recipients tended not to think about end-of-life issues, which imply that many patients reach the final stages of life unaware of the option of ICD deactivation.

  • 73.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Spouses' reflections om implantable cardioverter defibrillator treatment with focus on the future and the end-of-life: a qualitative content analysis2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 1758-1769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore future reflections of spouses living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient with focus on the end-of-life phase in an anticipated palliative phase.

    Background

    A history of or risk for life-threatening arrhythmias may require an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Despite the life-saving capacity of the device, eventually life will come to an end. As discussion about preferences of shock therapy at end-of-life phase seldom takes place in advance, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients may face defibrillating shocks in the final weeks of their lives, adding to stress and anxiety in patients and their families.

    Design

    Qualitative study with in-depth interviews analysed with a content analysis.

    Methods

    Interviews were performed with 18 spouses of medically stable implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients during 2011–2012.

    Results

    The spouses described how they dealt with changes in life and an uncertain future following the implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation. Six subcategories conceptualized the spouses’ concerns: Aspiring for involvement; Managing an altered relationship; Being attentive to warning signs; Worries for deterioration in the partner's health; Waiting for the defibrillating shock; and Death is veiled in silence.

    Conclusion

    Despite the partner's serious state of health; terminal illness or death and the role of the device was seldom discussed with healthcare professionals or the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient. Open and honest communication was requested as important to support coping with an unpredictable life situation and to reduce worries and uncertainty about the future and end-of-life.

  • 74.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Initial psychometric evaluation of the council of nutrition apetite queestionnaire (QNAC)2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Design and methodology of the NutriHeart study: an interdisciplinary approach to investigate nutrition and cardiac cachexia in patients with chronic heart failure.2009In: 9th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, CCNAP., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flemme, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Control Attitude Sclae for patients with heart disease and their family members2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Hagglund, Eva
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Response to the Letter to the Editor on: Effect of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 94-94Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 78.
    Hendriks, Jeroen M. L.
    et al.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Editorial Material: Sleep disordered breathing - A hidden co-morbidity in patients with atrial fibrillation? in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 13, issue 6, pp 480-4822014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 480-482Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 79.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: E-health in patients with atrial fibrillation in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 15, issue 4, pp 200-2022016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 200-202Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 80.
    Hill, Loreena
    et al.
    Queens Univ, North Ireland.
    McIlfatrick, Sonja
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland; All Ireland Inst Hosp and Palliat Care, Ireland.
    Taylor, Brian J.
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mary MacKillop Inst Hlth Res, Australia.
    Moser, Debra
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA; Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Slater, Paul
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    McAloon, Toni
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    Dixon, Lana
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    Donnelly, Patrick
    South Eastern Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Fitzsimons, Donna
    Queens Univ, North Ireland; All Ireland Inst Hosp and Palliat Care, Ireland.
    Patient and Professional Factors That Impact the Perceived Likelihood and Confidence of Healthcare Professionals to Discuss Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Deactivation in Advanced Heart Failure Results From an International Factorial Survey2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 527-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rate of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantations is increasing in patients with advanced heart failure. Despite clear guideline recommendations, discussions addressing deactivation occur infrequently. Aim: The aim of this article is to explore patient and professional factors that impact perceived likelihood and confidence of healthcare professionals to discuss ICD deactivation. Methods and Results: Between 2015 and 2016, an international sample of 262 healthcare professionals (65% nursing, 24% medical) completed an online factorial survey, encompassing a demographic questionnaire and clinical vignettes. Each vignette had 9 randomly manipulated and embedded patient-related factors, considered as independent variables, providing 1572 unique vignettes for analysis. These factors were determined through synthesis of a systematic literature review, a retrospective case note review, and a qualitative exploratory study. Results showed that most healthcare professionals agreed that deactivation discussions should be initiated by a cardiologist (95%, n = 255) or a specialist nurse (81%, n = 215). In terms of experience, 84% of cardiologists (n = 53) but only 30% of nurses (n = 50) had previously been involved in a deactivation decision. Healthcare professionals valued patient involvement in deactivation decisions; however, only 50% (n = 130) actively involved family members. Five of 9 clinical factors were associated with an increased likelihood to discuss deactivation including advanced age, severe heart failure, presence of malignancy, receipt of multiple ICD shocks, and more than 3 hospital admissions during the previous year. Furthermore, nationality and discipline significantly influenced likelihood and confidence in decision making. Conclusions: Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals discuss ICD deactivation; however, practice is suboptimal with multifactorial factors impacting on decision making. The role and responsibility of nurses in discussing deactivation require clarity and improvement.

  • 81.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University.
    Dahl, Anna
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Factors Associated With Increased Risk for Dementia in Individuals Age 80 Years or Older With Congestive Heart Failure2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND RESEARCH OBJECTIVE:: An increasing body of evidence shows that individuals diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF) are at a higher risk for dementia. However, the prevalence rate of dementia among persons with CHF in very old individuals has not been previously reported, and little is known about the comorbidities that place old persons with CHF at a higher risk for dementia. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of dementia in individuals 80 years or older who have CHF with that in individuals without CHF and to identify factors related to dementia in individuals diagnosed with CHF.

    METHODS:: A total of 702 participants from a Swedish population-based longitudinal study (Octogenerian Twin) were included. The group consisted of same-sex twin pairs, age 80 years or older, and 138 participants had CHF. Dementia was diagnosed according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised. Generalized estimating equations including gender, age and educational level, waist circumference, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, depression, and blood values were used in a case-control analysis.

    RESULTS:: Individuals with CHF had a significantly higher prevalence of vascular dementia, 16% vs 6% (P < 0.001), and of all types of dementia, 40% vs 30% (P < 0.01), than those not diagnosed with CHF. The generalized estimating equation models showed that depression, hypertension, and/or increased levels of homocysteine were all associated with a higher risk for dementia in individuals with CHF. Diabetes was specifically associated with an increased risk for vascular dementia.

    CONCLUSIONS:: The prevalence of dementia was higher among individuals with CHF than in those without CHF. Diabetes, depression, and hypertension in patients with CHF require special attention from healthcare professionals because these conditions are associated with an elevated risk for dementia. Higher levels of homocysteine were also found to be a marker of dementia in patients with CHF. Further research is needed to identify the factors related to dementia in individuals 80 years or older diagnosed with CHF.

  • 82.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The association between cognitive function and self-care in patients with chronic heart failure2015In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To test the relationship between cognitive function and self-care in patients with heart failure after adjusting for the contribution of age, education, functional status, myocardial stress, sleep and depression. Further, the relationship between cognitive function and self-care was explored with depression and sleep as moderators.

    Background: Self-care can significantly impact functional capacity, well-being, morbidity, and prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). However, self-care requires the cognitive ability to learn, perceive, interpret and respond. The influence of demographics and clinical symptoms on the relationship between cognition and self-care needs to be further understood.

    Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    Methods: The study included 142 patients with chronic HF (68% male, median age 72 years, 61% in NYHA II). Self-care was measured with the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale. Cognitive function was evaluated with neuropsychological tests measuring global cognitive dysfunction, psychomotor speed, executive function, visual-spatial perception/construct, spatial performance, semantic and episodic memory.

    Findings: Psychomotor function (speed and attention) measured with the Trail Making A was the only dimension of cognitive function significantly associated with self-care. Neither depressive symptoms, nor sleep disturbances  moderated the relation between cognitive function and selfcare.

    Conclusion: Deficits in psychomotor speed have implications for how patients should be educated and supported to perform self-care. A decrease in sustained attention and ability to carry out more than one task at a same time could lead to difficulties in self-care. Screening for psychomotor speed is therefore advocated for patients with HF.

  • 83.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahl, A
    n/a.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mårtensson, J
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Profile of cognitive impairment in chronic heart failure among octogenerians in Sweden.2009In: 9th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, CCNAP., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The influence of heart failure on longitudinal changes in cognition among individuals 80 years of age and older2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 7-8, p. 994-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between heart failure and specific cognitive abilities in octogenarians with regard to level and change over time.

    Background.  Cognitive impairment is influenced by many factors, and the impact of heart failure is debated. Intact cognitive ability is crucial for successful self-care in patients with heart failure. Middle-aged patients with heart failure seem to have an increased risk of cognitive impairment. No studies have examined the association between heart failure and longitudinal cognitive changes in octogenarians (individuals 80 years and older).

    Design.  A prospective longitudinal design.

    Methods.  Cognitive tests were carried out five times (1991–2002) in 702 octogenarians from the Swedish Twin Registry, including same-sex twin pairs. The test battery included the measurement of processing speed, visuospatial ability, short-term, episodic and semantic memory. Latent growth curve modelling was employed to measure change and performance over time and compares the group diagnosed with heart failure to individuals without a heart failure diagnosis.

    Results.  At baseline, the participants’ mean age was 83·5 years, 67% were women and 13% suffered from heart failure. Individuals diagnosed with heart failure scored significantly lower in spatial abilities and episodic memory than participants not diagnosed with heart failure. Moreover, measures of episodic memory declined more over time in individuals diagnosed with heart failure. There were no significant differences between the groups in other cognitive tests.

    Conclusion.  Spatial problems and episodic memory have implications for everyday life. This might contribute to decreased adherence to prescribed therapy and self-care management and lead to socio-behavioural problems because of an impaired capacity to drive, read and write.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses should take into account in their assessment that cognitive impairment may restrain elderly heart failure patient’s ability to make decisions and perform self-care actions. Patient education strategies should also be adapted to cognitive ability.

  • 85.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Arestedt, K
    University of Kalmar.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep-disordered breathing and cognitive impairment among patients with heart failure in JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, vol 21, issue SI, pp 256-2572012In: JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, Wiley-Blackwell , 2012, Vol. 21, no SI, p. 256-257Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 86.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Jönköping University .
    Association between sleep-disordered breathing, sleep–wake pattern, and cognitive impairment among patients with chronic heart failure2013In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 496-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Chronic heart failure (CHF) and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are often co-existing problems among the elderly. Apnoeic events may cause cognitive impairment. The aim of the study was to compare sleep and wake patterns, insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and cognitive function in community-dwelling CHF patients, with and without SDB, and to investigate the association between sleep-related factors and cognitive dysfunction.

    Methods and results In this cross-sectional observational study, SDB was measured with an ApneaLink device and defined as an apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥15/h of sleep. Sleep and wake patterns were measured with actigraphy for 1 week. Insomnia was measured with the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale, daytime sleepiness with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and cognitive function with a neuropsychological test battery. A total of 137 patients (68% male, median age 72 years, 58% NYHA functional class II) were consecutively included. Forty-four per cent had SDB (AHI ≥15). The SDB group had significantly higher saturation time below 90%, more difficulties maintaining sleep, and lower levels of daytime sleepiness compared with the non-SDB group. Cognitive function and sleep and wake patterns did not differ between the SDB and the non-SDB group. Insomnia was associated with decreased global cognition.

    Conclusion The prevalence of cognitive dysfunction was low in this population with predominantly mild to moderate CHF. This might have influenced the lack of associations between cognitive function and SDB. Insomnia was the only sleep-related factor significantly influencing cognition.

  • 87.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Effects of sleep disordered breathing, insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness on cognitive function among patients with heart failure2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    I was told that I would not die from heart failure2018In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 41, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To describe patients experiences of communication about their heart failure prognosis and explore how these experiences affected their preferences for future communication about the prognosis. Background: Professionals need to discuss about the heart failure prognosis with patients in order to improve their understanding of their illness and address palliative care needs. Methods: An inductive and exploratory design was used. A total of 24 patients (75% men, 52-87 years of age) in New York Heart Association class I-III from primary outpatient care participated in focus group-, or individual semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify and interpret patterns in the data. Findings: Two overarching themes, "The message sent" and "Hoping for the best or preparing for the worst", each with three sub-themes, were discovered during the thematic analysis. Many patients described that professionals had not provided them with any prognosis information at all. Other patients described professional information about prognosis that was given in an either very optimistic or very negative way. However, patients also described situations where professionals had given information in a way that they thought was perfect for them to handle, and in accordance with their preferences. Conclusion: This study shows that patients have different experiences and preferences for communication about prognosis and uses different approaches in order to cope living with a chronic illness such as heart failure.

  • 89.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Communicating prognosis and end-of-life care to heart failure patients: a survey of heart failure nurses' perspectives2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 152-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many heart failure (HF) patients have palliative care needs, but communication about prognosis and end-of-life care is lacking. HF nurses can play an important role in such communication, but their views on this have rarely been sought.

    AIMS:

    This study aims to describe HF nurses' perspectives on, and daily practice regarding, discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with HF patients in outpatient care. It further aims to explore barriers, facilitators and related factors for discussing these issues.

    METHODS:

    A national survey including nurses from outpatient clinics and primary health care centres was performed. Data was collected using a questionnaire on communication with HF patients about prognosis and end-of-life care.

    RESULTS:

    In total, 111 (82%) of the HF nurses completed the questionnaire. Most of them reported that physicians should have the main responsibility for discussing prognosis (69%) and end-of-life care (67%). Most nurses felt knowledgeable to have these discussions, but 91% reported a need for further training in at least one of the areas. Barriers for communication about prognosis and end-of-life care included the unpredictable trajectory of HF, patients' comorbidities and the opinion that patients in NYHA class II-III are not in the end-of-life.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although HF nurses feel competent discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with the HF patient, they are hesitant to have these conversations. This might be partly explained by the fact that they consider the physician to be responsible for such conversations, and by perceived barriers to communication. This implies a need for clinical policy and education for HF nurses to expand their knowledge and awareness of the patients' possible needs for palliative care.

  • 90.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Using co-design to develop an intervention to improve communication about the heart failure trajectory and end-of-life care2018In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 17, article id 85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this paper was to describe the development of an intervention that is developed to improve communication about the heart failure (HF) trajectory and end-of-life care. We also present data that provides a first insight in specific areas of feasibility of the intervention. Methods: Co-design was used and patients, family members and health care professionals were constructive participants in the design process of the intervention. Feasibility of the intervention was tested in two areas; acceptability and limited efficacy. Results: Two communication tools were designed and evaluated; 1) a Question Prompt List (QPL) for patients and family members and 2) a communication course for professionals which was web -based with one face-to-face training day with simulation. Data on feasibility was collected with questionnaires that were developed for this study, from the 13 participants who completed the course (all nurses). They reported improved knowledge, confidence and skills to discuss the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The QPL was evaluated to be a useful tool in communication with patients and family members. Conclusions: In a co-design process, future users identified the need for a QPL and a communication course. These communication tools can be used as a dual intervention to improve communication about the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The QPL can help patients and families to ask questions about the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The communication course can prepare the professionals to be knowledgeable, confident and skilled to discuss the questions in the QPL. Before the tools are ready for implementation in clinical practice, further studies testing the feasibility of the intervention are needed, including also patients and their families.

  • 91.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Simulation to Teach Nursing Students About End-of-Life Care2016In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 512-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is minimal education on death and dying in undergraduate nursing programs, leaving the students unprepared to provide sufficient care to dying patients and their families. This article describes a teaching innovation on how end-of-life care simulation can provide a successful and appreciated learning situation for nursing students, teaching them communication skills in challenging situations. Modifications in the setup of the simulation might help the students to focus more on communication and existential issues instead of mostly practical ones.

  • 92.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient-Nurse Communication about Prognosis and End-of-Life Care2015In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 865-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although several studies advise that discussions about prognosis and end-of-life care should be held throughout the whole heart failure (HF) trajectory, data is lacking on the prevalence and practice of such discussions in HF care. Objective: The study objective was to explore how often and why HF nurses in outpatient clinics discuss prognosis and end-of-life care in the context of patient education. Methods: This was a descriptive and comparative study. Participants were HF nurses from Swedish and Dutch HF outpatient clinics. Measurements were taken via a survey for both quantitative and qualitative data. Additional data was collected via open-ended questions and analyzed with content analysis. Results: Two hundred seventy-nine nurses registered 1809 patient conversations using a checklist. Prognosis and end-of-life care were among the least frequently discussed topics, whereas symptoms of HF was discussed most often. Prognosis was discussed with 687 patients (38%), and end-of-life care was discussed with 179 patients (10%). Prognosis and end-of-life care were discussed more frequently in The Netherlands than in Sweden (41% versus 34%, pless than0.001, 13% versus 4%, pless than0.001). The nurses did not always recognize prognosis and end-of-life care discussions as a part of their professional role. Conclusions: Currently, patient-nurse communication about prognosis and end-of-life care does not seem to be routine in patient education in HF clinics, and these discussions could be included more often. The reasons for nurses to discuss these topics were related to clinical routines, the patients situation, and professional responsibilities. To improve future care, communication with patients needs to be further developed.

  • 93. Holst, M
    et al.
    Strömberg, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willenheimer, R
    Fluid restriction in heart failure patients: Is it useful?2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö Universitet.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindholm, Maud
    Malmö universitet.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lunds universitet.
    Description of self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, symptoms, quality of life and physical capacity in patients with stable chronic heart failure2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 2318-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe the self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, signs and symptoms of heart failure, quality of life, physical capacity and thirst, in patients with stabilised chronic heart failure. Background. Patients with chronic heart failure are often recommended a fluid restriction of 1.5 l/day but there is no evidence in the literature for this recommendation and little is known about the fluid intake consequences. Design. Crossover study. Methods. Chronic heart failure patients, clinically stabilised after an unstable state, were randomised to a 32-week cross-over study assessing the clinical importance of fluid prescription. In a secondary analysis of 63 patients, efficacy variables were analysed in relation to the self-reported median fluid intake of 19 ml/kg body weight/day. Results. The mean fluid intake was 16 ml/kg/day in the below-median group and 24 ml/kg/day in the above-median group. No between-group differences were found in change in body weight, signs and symptoms, diuretic use, quality of life or physical capacity. However, the above-median group significantly decreased sense of thirst and difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription compared with the below-median group. Conclusion. In clinically stabilised chronic heart failure patients on optimal pharmacological treatment, a larger fluid intake was associated with decreasing thirst without any measurable negative effects on signs and symptoms of heart failure, diuretic use or physical capacity. Thus, a more liberal fluid intake may be advisable in chronic heart failure patients who have been stabilised after an initial unstable clinical state. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses involved in the care for patients with heart failure known how troublesome thirst can be and how difficult it can be to follow a restricted fluid intake. This study indicates that it is possible to reassess and recommend a less strict fluid intake in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure. © 2008 The Authors.

  • 95.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö universitet.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindholm, Maud
    Malmö Universitet.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lunds universitet.
    Liberal versus restricted fluid prescription in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure: Result of a randomised cross-over study of the effects on health-related quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and morbidity2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 316-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To compare the effects of a restrictive versus a liberal fluid prescription, on quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and hospital admissions, in patients who had improved from NYHA class (III-)IV CHF to a stable condition without clinical signs of significant fluid overload. Design. The present study is a randomised cross-over study. Seventy-four patients (mean age 70±10 years, 16% women) - with mild-moderate CHF - were randomised 1:1 to either of two 16-week interventions. Intervention 1 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 L/day. Intervention 2 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 30-35 ml/kg body weight/day. Sixty-five patients completed the study. Results. There were no significant between-intervention differences in end-of-intervention quality of life, physical capacity or hospitalisation. However, there was a significant favourable effect on thirst and less difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription during the liberal fluid prescription intervention. Conclusion. The results from this study indicate that it may be beneficial and safe to recommend a liberal fluid prescription, based on body weight, in stabilised CHF patients. These results warrant further investigation of the effects of fluid advice in CHF. © 2008 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 96. Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Lindholm, Maud
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Telephone follow-up of self-care behaviour after a single session education of patients with heart failure in primary health care2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 153-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Improved self-care behaviour is a goal in educational programmes for patients with heart failure, especially in regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction. Aims: The objectives of the present study were to: (1) describe self-care with special regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction in patients with heart failure in primary health care, during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education, (2) to describe gender differences in regard to self-care and (3) to investigate if self-care was associated with health-related quality of life. Methods: The present analysis is a subgroup analysis of a larger randomised trial. After one intensive educational session, a primary health care nurse evaluated 60 patients (mean age 79 years, 52% males, 60% in New York Heart Association class III-IV) by monthly telephone follow-up during 12 months. Results: The intervention had no effect on quality of life measured by EuroQol 5D and no significant associations were found between quality of life and self-care behaviour. Self-care behaviour measured by The European Self-care Behaviour Scale remained unchanged throughout the study period. No significant gender differences were shown but women had a tendency to improve adherence to daily weight control between 3- and 12 months. Conclusion: The self-care behaviour and quality of life in patients with heart failure did not change during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education and this indicates a need for more extensive interventions to obtain improved self-care behaviour in these patients. © 2006 European Society of Cardiology.

  • 97.
    Humphrey, Louise
    et al.
    Adelphi Values, UK.
    Kulich, Karoly
    Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland.
    Deschaseaux, Celine
    Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland.
    Blackburn, Steven
    Adelphi Values, UK.
    Maguire, Laura
    Adelphi Values, UK.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The Caregiver Burden Questionnaire for Heart Failure (CBQ-HF): face and content validity2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 84-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A new caregiver burden questionnaire for heart failure (CBQ-HF v1.0) was developed based on previously conducted qualitative interviews with HF caregivers and with input from HF clinical experts. Version 1.0 of the CBQ-HF included 41 items measuring the burden associated with caregiving in the following domains: physical, emotional/psychological, social, and impact on caregiver’s life. Following initial development, the next stage was to evaluate caregivers’ understanding of the questionnaire items and their conceptual relevance.

    Methods

    To evaluate the face and content validity of the new questionnaire, cognitive interviews were conducted with caregivers of heart failure patients. The cognitive interviews included a “think aloud” exercise as the patient completed the CBQ-HF, followed by more specific probing questions to better understand caregivers’ understanding, interpretation and the relevance of the instructions, items, response scales and recall period.

    Results

    Eighteen caregivers of heart failure patients were recruited. The mean age of the caregivers was 50 years (SD = 10.2). Eighty-three percent of caregivers were female and most commonly the patient was either a spouse (44%) or a parent (28%). Among the patients 55% were NYHA Class 2 and 45% were NYHA Class 3 or 4. The caregiver cognitive interviews demonstrated that the CBQ-HF was well understood, relevant and consistently interpreted. From the initial 41 item questionnaire, fifteen items were deleted due to conceptual overlap and/or item redundancy. The final 26-item CBQ-HF (v3.0) uses a 5-point Likert severity scale, assessing 4 domains of physical, emotional/psychological, social and lifestyle burdens using a 4-week recall period.

    Conclusions

    The CBQ-HF (v3.0) is a comprehensive and relevant measure of subjective caregiver burden with strong content validity. This study has established that the CBQ-HF (v3.0) has strong face and content validity and should be valuable as an outcomes measure to help understand and monitor the relationship between patient heart failure severity and caregiver burden. A Translatability AssessmentSM of the measure has since been performed confirming the cultural appropriateness of the measure and psychometric validation is planned for the future to further explore the reliability, and validity of the new questionnaire in a larger caregiver sample.

  • 98.
    Hägglund, Ewa
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. University of Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Effects of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this study were to determine whether yoga and hydrotherapy training had an equal effect on the health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure and to compare the effects on exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression between and within the two groups. Methods: The design was a randomized controlled non-inferiority study. A total of 40 patients, 30% women (meanSD age 64.98.9 years) with heart failure were randomized to an intervention of 12 weeks, either performing yoga or training with hydrotherapy for 45-60 minutes twice a week. Evaluation at baseline and after 12 weeks included self-reported health-related quality of life, a six-minute walk test, a sit-to-stand test, clinical variables, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results: Yoga and hydrotherapy had an equal impact on quality of life, exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Within both groups, exercise capacity significantly improved (hydrotherapy p=0.02; yoga p=0.008) and symptoms of anxiety decreased (hydrotherapy p=0.03; yoga p=0.01). Patients in the yoga group significantly improved their health as rated by EQ-VAS (p=0.004) and disease-specific quality of life in the domains symptom frequency (p=0.03), self-efficacy (p=0.01), clinical summary as a combined measure of symptoms and social factors (p=0.05), and overall summary score (p=0.04). Symptoms of depression were decreased in this group (p=0.005). In the hydrotherapy group, lower limb muscle strength improved significantly (p=0.01). Conclusions: Yoga may be an alternative or complementary option to established forms of exercise training such as hydrotherapy for improvement in health-related quality of life and may decrease depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

  • 99.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Persson, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årested, Kristofer Franzén
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?2014In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 510-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) events with regard to sex and to investigate if sex is associated with survival. Background: Previous studies exploring differences between sexes are incongruent with regard to clinical outcomes. In order to provide equality and improve care, further investigations into these aspects are warranted. Methods: This registry study included 286 CAs. To investigate if sex was associated with survival, logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: The proportion of CA with a resuscitation attempt compared to CA without resuscitation was higher among men. There were no associations between sex and survival when controlling for previously known predictors and interaction effects. Conclusions: Sex does not appear to be a predictor for survival among patients suffering CA where resuscitation is attempted. The difference regarding proportion of resuscitation attempts requires more attention. It is important to consider possible interaction effects when studying the sex perspective.

  • 100.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bremer, Anders
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Factors associated with health-related quality of life among cardiac arrest survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator2018In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 132, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among cardiac arrest (CA) survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in relation to gender, and to compare their HRQoL with a general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 990 adults treated with an ICD after suffering CA. All participants received a questionnaire including demographics, comorbidities and instruments to measure HRQoL (EQ-5D-3L and HADS), ICD-related concerns (ICDC), perceived control (CAS), and type D personally (DS-14). HRQoL (EQ-5D-3L) was compared to a general Swedish population, matched for age and gender. Linear regression analyses were used to explore factors associated with HRQoL. Results: The CA survivors reported better HRQoL in EQ index and less pain/discomfort compared to the general population (p amp;lt; 0.001). In contrast, they reported more problems in mobility and usual activities (p amp;lt; 0.01). Problems with anxiety and depression were reported by 15.5% and 7.4% respectively. The following factors were independently associated with all aspects of worse HRQoL: being unemployed, suffering more comorbidity, perceiving less control, and having a type D personally. Further, being female and suffering ICD-related concerns were independently associated with worse HRQoL in three of the four final regression models. Conclusions: This extensive population-based study showed that most CA survivors living with an ICD rate their HRQoL as acceptable. In addition, their HRQoL is similar to a general population. Women reported worse HRQoL compared to men. Several factors associated with HRQoL were identified, and might be used when screening patients for health problems and when developing health promoting interventions.

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