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  • 51.
    Tapani, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vehicle Trajectory Impacts of Adaptive Cruise Control2012In: Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems / Taylor & Francis, ISSN 1547-2450, E-ISSN 1547-2442, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 36-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) is assumed to have a potentialto improve quality-of-service and safety and to reduce the environmentalimpact of the road traffic system. This paper use vehicletrajectories from traffic simulation to study impacts of ACCon vehicle acceleration and deceleration rates. The analysis isbased on traffic simulations with car-following models includingACC functionality and driver behaviour in ACC-equipped as wellas standard non-equipped vehicles. The simulation results showthat ACC can improve the traffic situation in terms of reduced accelerationand deceleration rates even though macroscopic trafficproperties may remain uninfluenced. This supports the hypothesisedpositive road safety and environmental effects of ACC. It isalso established that the results are largely dependent on the assumptionsmade regarding driver behaviour in ACC-equipped andstandard vehicles. It is consequently crucial to include appropriateassumptions regarding driver behaviour in traffic simulation basedanalyses of ACC.

  • 52.
    Tapani, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Versatile Model for Simulation of Rural Road Traffic2005In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 1934, p. 169-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries the road mileage is dominated by rural highways.For that reason it is important to have access to efficienttools for evaluation of the performance of such roads. For otherroad types, e. g., freeways and urban street networks, a wealth ofmicro-simulation models is available. However, only a few modelsdedicated to rural roads have been developed. None of thesemodels handles traffic flows interrupted by intersections or roundabouts,nor are the models capable of describing the traffic flow onrural roads with a cable barrier between oncoming lanes. Theseare major drawbacks when Swedish roads, on which cable barriersand roundabouts are becoming increasingly important, aremodeled. Moreover, as new areas of application for rural roadsimulation arise, a flexible and detailed model is needed. Suchapplications include, among other things, simulation of driver assistancesystems and estimation of pollutant emissions. This paperintroduces a versatile traffic micro-simulation model for the ruralroads of today and of the future. The model system presented,the Rural Traffic Simulator (RuTSim), is capable of handling allcommon types of rural roads, including the effects of roundaboutsand intersections on the traffic on the main road. The purpose ofthe paper is to describe the simulation approach and the trafficmodeling used in RuTSim. A verification of the RuTSim model isalso included. RuTSim is found to produce outputs representativeof all common types of rural roads in Sweden.

  • 53.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anund, Anna
    VTI, Linköping.
    Reed, Nick
    Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), London, UK.
    Stevens, Alan
    Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), London, UK.
    Exploring Driver Behaviour Using Simulated Worlds2011In: Infrastructure and Safety in a Collaborative World: Road Traffic Safety / [ed] E. Bekiaris, M. Wiethoff och E. Gaitanidou, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, 1, p. 125-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the background, along with some illustrated examples, of simulator applications for the needs of assessing novel systems and infrastructure interventions, in terms of enhancing the forgiving and self-explanatory nature of a road. The first two, “Active traffic management” and “Non-physical motorway segregation” are designed to ease congestion but also have implications for safety, the first leading towards a self-explanatory road environment (SER), whereas the second contributing towards a more forgiving road environment (FRE). The second two “Actively illuminated road studs” and “Psychological traffic calming” are FRE types of interventions, designed for rural roads specifically to improve safety, but these may also have unanticipated consequences. For example, delineation of a road at night by actively illuminated road studs offers the driver much greater visibility of the road ahead, but this could be exploited by drivers choosing to drive at higher speeds. Finally, the pilot testing of milled vs. “virtual” rumble strips as in-vehicle information is presented (another FRE measure), as tested within IN-SAFETY, following a testing methodology which brings together methods for collecting data on individual driver behaviour and traffic simulation, building upon the traffic safety related adaptations of microsimulation models.

  • 54.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Carlsson, Arne
    VTI.
    Framkomlighet och fördröjningar på E22 Fjälkinge - Gualöv2005Report (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hegeman, Geertje
    Transport and Planning, Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology.
    Hoogendoorn, Serge
    Transport and Planning, Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology.
    On the Application of Traffic Micro-Simulation To Road Environments in Different Regions2008In: Proceedings of the 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington D.C. : Transportation Research Board , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New areas of application of traffic micro-simulation models arecurrently being explored. Examples include analysis of IntelligentTransportation Systems, safety assessments and vehicle emissionsstudies. Many of these new applications depend on reliable andrepresentative simulated vehicle trajectories. The traffic simulationmodels used for these applications must therefore modeldriver/vehicle behavior with greater detail than what is necessaryfor traditional traffic engineering applications. In this paper,we argue that this increased model complexity may reducethe applicability of the models to other situations with differentdriver/vehicle behavior. Such situations include simulation of trafficin different countries or regions as well as simulation of roadenvironments with different properties. The objective of the paperis to bring focus to modeling considerations that are important fortoday’s increasingly detailed traffic micro-simulation applications.Model application to traffic in different regions is exemplified by acase study in which the Rural Traffic Simulator developed in Swedenis applied to simulation of traffic on a Dutch two-lane highway.Simulation of traffic in different regions and new model applicationsis to a certain extent facilitated by the model calibrationand validation. The high level of detail of micro-simulation modelsmay however require use of different modeling assumptions for different applications. Advances in vehicle trajectory measurementtechniques will allow developments of more detailed traffic microsimulationmodels. It is therefore increasingly important that themodels are estimated and cross-validated using data sets that arecollected in the regions and traffic conditions that the models aredeveloped for.

  • 56.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut (VTI).
    Olstam, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut (VTI).
    Microscopic modelling of 2+1-roads2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pereyron, Florian
    Viera Turnell, Mathew
    Integrated vehicle and traffic simulation for emissions and energy efficiency estimation2012In: Proceedings of the 17th international conference of Hong Kong society for transportation studies: Transportation and Logistics Management / [ed] H-Y. Mak and H.K. Lo, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies (HKSTS), 2012, p. 359-366Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Tapani, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut (VTI).
    Rydergren, Clas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modellering av stadstrafik med resekedjor som inkluderar cykel och andra färdmedel2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Wiklund, Mats
    et al.
    Transport Analysis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Arne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Olstam, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Tapani, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of desired speeds for queuing and delay on single-lane road segments2015In: Transportmetrica A: Transport Science, ISSN 2324-9935, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 716-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve road safety on parts of the road network carrying low traffic volumes, road designs are proposed including single-lane road segments and periodic overtaking lanes. These roads have been proven to contribute to substantial benefits in terms of road safety. However, overtaking of slower vehicles is only possible on segments including an overtaking lane and not on the single-lane road segments. Driver and vehicle heterogeneity resulting in differences in desired speeds are consequently decisive for the traffic performance. Sufficient quality of service is relying on an appropriate design and distribution of single-lane segments and overtaking lanes. In this paper, we study the effect of the desired speed distribution on traffic performance on single-lane road segments. Expressions are derived for the travel time, delay and percent time spent following. The derived expressions link the desired speed distribution, the single-lane segment length and the traffic flow to the resulting traffic performance. The results are verified through comparison with measures based on microscopic traffic simulation. The conclusion is that there is a good agreement between derived measures and simulation results. The derived measures should therefore not only be of theoretical interest, but also of practical use to estimate traffic performance on single-lane road segments.

12 51 - 59 of 59
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