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  • 51.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of quality of life among patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Living with a genetic predisposition to disease may influence quality of life. The presence of premature disease can lead to an increased focus on family history and genetic predisposition.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe quality of life in patients with the genetic disease, familial hypercholesterolemia, who are at an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease.

    Methods: Interviews from 12 adult patients with FH were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The findings of this qualitative study revealed that for patients, quality of life was equated with harmony in life, the core category. Attaining harmony in life presumes satisfaction and togetherness. Cognizance of the threat of coronary heart disease and impending mortality is balanced by the support of togetherness and satisfaction that builds harmony in life.

    Conclusion: When caring for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, it is important to meet each patient on his or her own level, and to support balance and their choices for maintaining or regaining harmony in life.

  • 52.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Achievement of treatment goals2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in family members in families with familial hypercholesterolemia2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Centre for Metabolism Endocrinology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia2002In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 251, no 4, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives.  The primary aim of this study was to analyse quality of life in adult patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a genetic disorder with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Secondary aims were to find explanatory factors for quality of life and anxiety.

    Design. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used.

    Setting.  Outpatients from lipid clinics at two university hospitals in Sweden were included. Patients with heterozygous FH and a randomly selected control group participated by filling out questionnaires.

    Subjects.  Two hundred and eighty patients with heterozygous FH above 18 years of age were asked, and 212 of whom 185 were free of overt CHD, participated. Of a control group of 2980 persons 1485 were included for comparison.

    Methods. We used Likert-type questionnaires: the Quality of Life Index (QLI) consisting of four subscales, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), the Mastery Scale measuring coping and a questionnaire on health and lipids constructed for FH patients.

    Results.  Patients with FH were significantly more satisfied with overall quality of life 21.8 ± 0.3 (SEM) vs. controls 21.1 ± 0.1 and this was also the case in three of four subscales, all differences P < 0.05. Anxiety about getting CHD was expressed amongst 86% of the patients with FH.

    Conclusions. Quality of life amongst patients with FH was at least as good as in controls but they were worried about getting CHD.

  • 55.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Is the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increasing among middle-aged Swedes?2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 56.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Metabolt syndrom i en svensk medelålders population, prevalens och relation till psykosociala faktorer2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psychosocial factors and health related to quality of life among middle-aged individuals with and without the metabolic syndrome2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psychosocialfactors and healthrelated quality of life among middle-aged individuals with and without the metabolic syndrome2006In: International symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in a middle-aged Swedish population - mainly a function of overweight?2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of obesity, one risk factor for developing the metabolic syndrome (MS), has increased during the last decades. It has therefore been assumed that the prevalence of MS would also increase.

    Aims: The aim was to analyse the prevalence of MS and its risk factors in a middle-aged Swedish population.

    Methods: Data were obtained between 2003 and 2004 from a random population based sample of 502 men and 505 women, 45-69 years old. Measures of plasma glucose, serum lipids, blood pressure, weight, height, waist circumference and self-reported data concerning presence of disease, medication and lifestyle were obtained.

    Results: The prevalence of MS was 14.8 % among men and 15.3 % among women, with an increase by age among women only, 10 % to 25 % (p=0.029). Among individuals with MS the most frequent risk factor was large waist circumference, present in 85 % of men and 99 % of women, followed by high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high glucose and HDL cholesterol (38 % and 47 % respectively).

    Conclusion: The prevalence of MS was 15 %, increasing with age only among women.

    Overweight was a dominant characteristic, and only half of the individuals with MS had glucose/HDL cholesterol levels beyond defined cut points of the syndrome.

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  • 60.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2006In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is one of the most common genetic metabolic disorders and is associated with a high risk of premature coronary heart disease. Primary prevention directed at lifestyle changes, combined with preventive medical treatment, is the most important way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with FH. Knowledge about the condition and adherence to drug treatment may facilitate reaching treatment goals. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with FH. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four patients, more than 18 years of age, with FH were asked to participate. A questionnaire on disease knowledge about FH and adherence to drug treatment was sent to the patients. Response rate was 92% (n = 68). Drug treatment, laboratory results, blood pressure, and smoking were also documented. RESULTS: Most patients knew about cholesterol, prevention, and the reason for drug treatment but were less informed about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. No significant correlation was found between knowledge and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. A significant, negative correlation between adherence and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found (r = -.354, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with FH had scant understanding about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. High adherence to drug prescription has significant correlation to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 61.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Familial hypercholesterolaemia and quality of life in family members2003In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 569-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Awareness of genetic disease in the family may influence quality of life. The purpose of this study was to describe quality of life among nonaffected members of families with familial hypercholesterolaemia. All were aware of the risk for coronary heart disease. Their quality of life was compared with a reference group and with the patients with familial hypercholesterolesterolaemia themselves.

    Methods

    Names of family members (n = 129) were given by the patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia. A randomly selected reference group (n = 1485) and patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (n = 185) were included for comparison. They all completed the questionnaire Quality of Life Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Mastery Scale measuring coping. Family members and patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia also completed a questionnaire on health and lipids.

    Results

    Family members were more satisfied with family life, mean 22.1 ± 3.5 (SD), and psychological/spiritual life, 22.9 ± 4.0, than the reference group, 21.4 ± 4.3 and 21.1 ± 4.8, respectively; this was particularly expressed among partners, P < 0.05. Of family members, 91% were anxious about the patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia developing coronary heart disease.

    Conclusions

    Family members have as good a quality of life as members of the reference group, but they were anxious about the patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia developing coronary heart disease.

  • 62.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, EMK-endokrin.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Quality of life in non affected family members of familial hypercholesterolemia families2002In: Konferens Familjefokuserad omvårdnad, Kalmar,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of quality of life among patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Landström, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rehn, Ing-Marie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perceptions of registered and enrolled nurses on thirst in mechanically ventilated adult patients in intensive care units-a phenomenographic study.2009In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Thirst is a commonly experienced source of discomfort among patients receiving mechanical ventilation during intensive care. Dehydration, endotracheal tubes, electrolyte disturbances and the use of various medicines can contribute to the feeling of thirst. At present, the knowledge of nurses' perceptions of the feelings of thirst in mechanically ventilated patients are limited. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe registered and enrolled intensive care nurses' perceptions of the feelings of thirst in mechanically ventilated adult patients and to investigate the interventions to reduce thirst. METHOD: Ten registered intensive care nurses and 10 enrolled nurses, aged 32-59 years, were interviewed. They all had at least one year's experience in caring for adult, mechanically ventilated patients. The data were analysed using a phenomenographic methodology. FINDINGS: Four categories of perceptions among registered and enrolled nurses, regarding thirst in mechanically ventilated patients were identified: reasons for thirst, signs of thirst, preventing or reducing thirst and the perception that patients had no feelings of thirst. CONCLUSIONS: Registered and enrolled nurses wish to reduce sources of discomfort among their patients but they do not always realise that patients feel thirst and therefore relieving it has a low priority among staff. Relieving thirst is a human need that must be recognised in nursing education and on intensive care units.

  • 65.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    County Hospital Ryhov, County Council of Jonkoping, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study2016In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25-66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD.

  • 67.
    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, USA.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease - an interview study2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Nielsen, Elinor
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Wåhlin, Ingrid
    Research Section, Kalmar County Council, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and life Sciences, Sweden.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Evaluating Pictures of Nature and Soft Music on Anxiety and Well-Being During Elective Surgery2018In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 12, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients going through surgery being awake often have a sense of anxiety and need support to relax. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether looking at pictures of natural scenery could reduce anxiety and pain and increase relaxation and well-being being awake during the elective surgery. Methods: This three-arm, randomized intervention study consisted of one group viewing pictures of natural scenery, one group listening to soft instrumental music, and one control group without distraction, all adult patients (n=174). The State Trait Anxiety Inventory short form and a visual analogue scale on well-being were used as well as sedation treatment if necessary. Results: No differences related to anxiety after surgery were found among the three groups. When controlling for the effect of sedative treatment, however, patients without sedation had a lower degree of anxiety postoperatively (p=0.014). Younger patients had a higher degree of anxiety and lower degree of postoperative relaxation and well-being. Conclusion: Viewing pictures of natural scenery while being awake during elective surgery is as relaxing as listening to soft instrumental music. Offering nature scenery pictures for patients to view could be relaxing during the elective surgery.

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  • 69. Nilsson, E
    et al.
    Svensson, G
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Perioperativ information till barn och personer med kommunikationssvårigheter eller kognitiv funktionsnedsättning2014In: Ventilen: sektionsblad för SSF:s rikssektion för anestesi och intensivvård, ISSN 0348-6257, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    What do patients need to know? Living with inflammatory bowel disease2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 11-12, p. 1718-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the need for knowledge as expressed by patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease.

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease has a major impact on physical and emotional well-being, placing considerable demands on patients' management of daily activities. Although inflammatory bowel disease patients' level of knowledge about their disease has been previously studied, it is necessary to learn more about their self-expressed needs.

    DESIGN: The study was designed to explore patients' need for knowledge; therefore, an inductive method was chosen.

    METHODS: Thirty patients with inflammatory bowel disease were interviewed. Content analysis was used to describe their need for knowledge.

    RESULTS: The analysis generated three categories and eight subcategories: (1) knowledge related to the course of the disease (subcategories: understanding causal relationships between symptoms and the disease, complications related to the disease and understanding treatment), (2) knowledge related to managing everyday life (subcategories: behaviour that enhances well-being and managing social life) and (3) difficulty understanding and assimilating information (subcategories: shifting knowledge needs, help to understand information and reasons for wanting or not wanting knowledge).

    CONCLUSION: Knowledge needs were related to what to expect when living with inflammatory bowel disease in order to manage everyday life. There was a great variation in the need for knowledge, which was greatest immediately following diagnosis and during relapse.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important for healthcare providers to ascertain the patients' individual knowledge needs and together with them formulate an individual care plan that gives the patient the necessary knowledge to manage their health and social life.

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  • 71.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    What do patients want to know? Living with inflammatory bowel disease2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patients' Perspective of Factors Influencing Quality of Life While Living With Crohn Disease2010In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The chronic, relapsing nature of Crohn disease produces physical, psychological, and social stress. The disease occurs early in life, and the effects of Crohn disease on daily life are associated with symptom burden; thus, managing their disease and coping with its impact is a lifelong process for sufferers. This study was undertaken to identify and describe the meaning of quality of life in patients with Crohn disease. Using a grounded theory methodology, 11 interviews were performed with 6 men and 5 women, 29–83 years of age, all suffering from Crohn disease. The experience of quality of life was associated with limitations in daily activity, the major theme that emerged from the analysis. Quality of life varied depending on how the patient managed limitations related to the symptoms of the disease. The categories of self-image, confirmatory relations, powerlessness, attitude toward life, and sense of well-being were conceptualized as the dominant themes derived from the data. When caring for these patients, it is important to identify limitations and provide support so that patients are able to maintain a daily life that can be perceived as normal and routine.

  • 73.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Critical situations in daily life as experienced by patients with inflammatory bowel disease2016In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

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    fulltext
  • 74.
    Pihl-Lesnovska, K
    et al.
    n/a.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life among individuals with Crohn's disease.2008In: Conference on Transition, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75. Svensson, G
    et al.
    Nilsson, E
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Perioperative information to children and individuals with communication difficulties or cognitive disability2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Vestala, Hanna
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman-Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Can participation in documentation influence experiences of involvement in care decision-making?2013In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Patients have the right to influence the care they receive, but their wish to participate in care decision-making is unclear.

    AIM:

    This study investigates whether participation in nursing documentation influences patient participation in care decision-making, mastery, self-esteem, empowerment and depressive feelings among adult in-patients with chronic disease.

    MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY:

    Adult patients (n=39) with chronic diseases were randomized. The intervention group participated in nursing documentation. Upon departure, patients filled in questionnaires about participation in care decision-making, mastery, self-esteem, empowerment and depressive feelings.

    RESULTS:

    The majority of the patients preferred a collaborative or passive role regarding care decision-making. Lack of knowledge was one reason for non-participation. Having been diagnosed more than five years previously meant stronger empowerment.

    CONCLUSION:

    It is a challenge for nurses to find strategies to assess patients' wishes regarding participation in care decision-making. Nurses must support patients' knowledge of their disease and empowerment.

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  • 77.
    Wallström, Åsa
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Facilitating early recovery of bowel motility after colorectal surgery: a systematic review2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 24-44Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To determine how restored gastrointestinal motility can be accelerated after colorectal surgery.

    BACKGROUND:

    Regaining normal bowel functions after surgery is described as unexpectedly problematic. Postoperative ileus is expected after all surgery where the peritoneum is entered, and the length of surgery has little or no impact in terms of the duration of Postoperative ileus. There is some speculation about the best way to facilitate bowel motility after colorectal surgery.

    DESIGN:

    A systematic review.

    METHOD:

    The computerised databases Medline, Scopus and CINAHL were searched to locate randomised, controlled trials by using the following keywords: colorectal surgery, postoperative ileus, recovery of function and gastrointestinal motility. The systematic search was limited to studies published between January 2002-January 2012. Reference lists were also searched manually.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 34 randomised, controlled trials were included in the review. Recovery of gastrointestinal motility was accelerated when one of the following forms of treatment was administered: probiotics, early feeding in combination with multimodal regimens, pentoxifylline, flurbiprofen, valdecoxib, ketorolac, clonidine, ropivacaine, lidocaine or spinal analgesia. Gum chewing, preoperative carbohydrate loading, bisacodyl and Doppler-guided fluid management have an uncertain effect on bowel motility. The use of nonpharmacological interventions, intrathecal morphine, restricted fluid therapy and choline citrate yielded no significant acceleration in bowel motility.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    A multimodal treatment, where the use of morphine is restricted, seems to be the best way to accelerate the recovery of gastrointestinal bowel motility. However, more studies are required to optimise the multimodal protocol.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    The early return of bowel functions leads to quicker overall postoperative recovery, which may ease patient discomfort and decrease hospitalisation costs.

  • 78.
    Wenemark, Marika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, T
    n/a.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Respondent burden and satisfaction in a health related survey.2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Wenemark, Marika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Respondent Satisfaction and Respondent Burden among Differently Motivated Participants in a Health-Related Survey2010In: Field Methods, ISSN 1525-822X, E-ISSN 1552-3969, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 378-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Response rates in surveys have declined in many countries over the last decade. Reasons for refusal by nonrespondents have been discussed in many studies, but less attention has been paid to motivation among respondents who do take part. One theoretical framework for studying motivation is self-determination theory, which distinguishes between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation. This article describes respondents' experiences of participating in a self-administered health-related survey. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze data from semistructured telephone interviews with 30 Swedish respondents aged 45–64 years. The results show a broad spectrum of positive as well as negative aspects of survey participation.

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  • 80. Wiethege, J
    et al.
    Hikmat, N
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Patienter med utländsk bakgrund - Upplevelse av primärvården i Sverige2014In: Allmän Medicin, Vol. 1, p. 17-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Addressing spouses unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure2009In: HEART and LUNG, ISSN 0147-9563, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.

    METHODS: Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.

    RESULTS: During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.

    CONCLUSIONS: By identifying spouses needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses needs are important because they are vital to the patients recovery.

  • 82.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Addressing spouses' unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.

    METHODS: Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.

    RESULTS: During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.

    CONCLUSIONS: By identifying spouses’ needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses’ needs are important because they are vital to the patients’ recovery.

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