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  • 51.
    Lundberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Hearing Clinic, Hearing and Deafness Organization, Borås Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A randomized controlled trial of the short-term effects of a book- and telephone-based educational program for hearing aid users2011In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 654-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Audiologic rehabilitation aims to improve communication for people with hearing impairment. Education is widely regarded as an integral part of rehabilitation, but the effect of the delivery method of an educational program on the experience of hearing problems has rarely been investigated in controlled trials.

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the short-term effects of complementing an educational program for hearing aid users with telephone consultations, delivered through weekly discussions with the subjects about information obtained from a book on hearing and hearing aids.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:

    This study used a randomized, controlled design.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 69 hearing aid users were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 33) or a control group (n = 36).

    INTERVENTION:

    The intervention group had access to a book and received weekly topic-based reading instructions related to the different chapters of the book. Five telephone calls were made to the members of the intervention group. During the calls, an audiologist discussed new information with the participant as needed. The control participants also read the book, but they did not discuss the contents of the book with a professional.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

    The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) were used to measure the outcomes of this study.

    RESULTS:

    Participants in the intervention group had a reduction in self-reported hearing handicap, while there were no significant changes in the control group. In the intervention group, 45% of the participants showed an improvement of ≥36% on the HHIE, while only 17% of the control group showed an improvement of ≥36%. There were also improvements on the HADS total and the depression subscale for the intervention group. No changes occurred on the IOI-HA.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Reading about hearing and hearing aids can reduce the hearing handicap and reported anxiety in hearing aid users. In this study, discussing the content of the book that was provided with a professional during weekly telephone consultations and having weekly home assignments further improved emotional well-being, as demonstrated by the HHIE (emotional scale) and HADS (depression scale), but these activities had no effect on hearing aid outcomes as measured by the IOI-HA.

  • 52.
    Lundberg, Milijana
    et al.
    Borås Hospital.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Short-Term Effects of Complementing an Educational Program for Hearing Aid Users with Telephone Consultations2011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 654-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Audiologic rehabilitation aims to improve communication for people with hearing impairment. Education is widely regarded as an integral part of rehabilitation, but the effect of the delivery method of an educational program on the experience of hearing problems has rarely been investigated in controlled trials.

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the short-term effects of complementing an educational program for hearing aid users with telephone consultations, delivered through weekly discussions with the subjects about information obtained from a book on hearing and hearing aids.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:

    This study used a randomized, controlled design.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 69 hearing aid users were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 33) or a control group (n = 36).

    INTERVENTION:

    The intervention group had access to a book and received weekly topic-based reading instructions related to the different chapters of the book. Five telephone calls were made to the members of the intervention group. During the calls, an audiologist discussed new information with the participant as needed. The control participants also read the book, but they did not discuss the contents of the book with a professional.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

    The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) were used to measure the outcomes of this study.

    RESULTS:

    Participants in the intervention group had a reduction in self-reported hearing handicap, while there were no significant changes in the control group. In the intervention group, 45% of the participants showed an improvement of ≥36% on the HHIE, while only 17% of the control group showed an improvement of ≥36%. There were also improvements on the HADS total and the depression subscale for the intervention group. No changes occurred on the IOI-HA.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Reading about hearing and hearing aids can reduce the hearing handicap and reported anxiety in hearing aid users. In this study, discussing the content of the book that was provided with a professional during weekly telephone consultations and having weekly home assignments further improved emotional well-being, as demonstrated by the HHIE (emotional scale) and HADS (depression scale), but these activities had no effect on hearing aid outcomes as measured by the IOI-HA.

  • 53.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    A hearing aid system comprising EEG electrodes.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The invention relates to a hearing aid system for obtaining an ambulatory electroencephalogram, EEG, comprising two or more electric terminals in the surface of a hearing instrument shell where it contacts the skin inside or outside the ear canal. The electrical terminals may all serve the same purpose (e.g. measuring EEG) or different purposes (e.g. three for measuring EEG and one for measuring body temperature).

  • 54.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    A Swedish tele-audiology research program from detection to intervention: experiences and future perspectives2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss 2 questions concerning how hearing aids interact with hearing and cognition: Can signal processing in hearing aids improve memory? Can attention be used for top-down control of hearing aids? Method: Memory recall of sentences, presented at 95% correct speech recognition, was assessed with and without binary mask noise reduction. A short literature review was performed on recent findings on new brain-imaging techniques showing potential for hearing aid control. Conclusions: Two experiments indicate that it is possible to show improved memory with an experimental noise reduction algorithm at ecological signal-to-noise ratios and that it is possible to replicate these findings in a new language. The literature indicates that attention-controlled hearing aids may be developed in the future.

  • 56.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Cognition and hearing aids2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Cognition and hearing aids - Working memory, EarEEG, Pupillometry2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Cognitive function in relation to hearing aid use2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, p. S49-S58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate possible relationships between cognitive function and hearing aid use. In Experiment 1. 72 first-time hearing aid users were tested for speech recognition in noise (Hagerman sentence test) with and without hearing aids. Cognitive function was assessed by tests of working memory (reading span test) and verbal information-processing speed. The results indicate that. after controlling for age and hearing loss, significant correlations exist between the measures of cognitive performance and speech recognition in noise, both with and without hearing aids. High cognitive performance was associated with high performance in the speech recognition task. In Experiment 2, 17 first-time hearing aid users with either high or low working-memory capacity tested ail experimental hearing aid which processed the sound differently depending on whether or not speech was detected. The results revealed that those with high working-memory capacity were better than those with low capacity at identifying and reporting the specific processing effects of the aid. This may have implications for how reported results should be interpreted in a research context, how a person's rehabilitation needs are formulated, and how hearing aid controls should be supervised. In conclusion, careful attention should be paid to the cognitive status of listeners, as it can have a significant influence on their ability to utilize their hearing aids.

  • 59.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Cognitive Hearing Aids2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Cognitive hearing aids and top-down/bottom-up issues2014In: Abstract book, 2014, p. 39-40Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing in a dialogue. We use it to store, to inhibit or ignore what is not relevant, and to attend to things selectively. lt is our way of keeping track while taking tums or following the gist of the dialogue. The Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU) model describes the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in sound and speech processing and attempts to explain findings on e.g. the relationship between WMC and speech signal processing and short-term retention and the effects of hearing impairment on memory.

    In a given listening situation, the mental/cognitive state may be different in the same acoustic environment if the cognitive tasks differ including e.g. single task versus dual task, time of the day, fatigue, or attention to different sources. Hearing aids include automatics to control signal processing schemas like noise reduction and beamforming/directional microphones. The different mental states during listening indicates that for a hearing aid it might not be enough with just measuring acoustics, it might be necessary to monitor cognitive parameters and make decisions on hearing aid settings, i.e. cognition-driven hearing aids. New technological developments relevant for auditory processing include physiological monitoring via e.g. the electroencephalogram (EEG), and via pupillometry. In the presentation some ideas will be reviewed and some preliminary work will be presentad on (a) cognitive load monitoring for hearing aid control, and (b) attention modulation, i.e. which source is attended to?

  • 61.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Cognitive-driven hearing aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Cognitive-driven hearing aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Delivering on the expectations of today's user: Cognition and Hearing loss2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Designing HA signal processing to reduce demand on working memory2010In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 28-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Don’t Forget the Brain: Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids2014In: Audiology Today, ISSN 1535-2609, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Don’t Forget the Brain: Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Framtidens hörapparat - är den redan här?2008In: När sinnet sviktar, Stockholm: Svenska läkaresällskapet :Gothia , 2008, 1, p. 95-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hard of Hearing Association2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hearing device with brain-wave dependent audio processing.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing device (1) adapted to be worn by an individual and comprising: a housing (2) arranged at an ear; an input means (3, 4, 5, 6) providing one or more input audio signals; a signal processing circuit (7, 8) processing at least one of said one or more input audio signals to provide a processed audio signal; an output transducer (10) providingt an audible signal to the individual in dependence on the processed audio signal; two or more electrodes (13, 14, 20) detecting electric brain potentials of the individual; and a brain-wave measurement circuit (15, 21, 25) determining one or more EEG signals from electric signals received from the two or more electrodes (13, 14, 20), wherein the hearing device (1) further comprises: a first spectrum analyser (11, 12) adapted to repeatedly determine first audio spectra of at least one signal from the group of signals consisting of said one or more audio input signals and the audible signal; a reconstructor (16) adapted to repeatedly reconstruct second audio spectra from the one or more EEG signals; a first correlator (17, 18) adapted to repeatedly determine a first coherence between the first and the second audio spectra; and a control unit (19) adapted to alter said processing in dependence on the first coherence.

  • 70.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Hearing loss and cognitive load2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Keynote: The future hearing aid - a communicator2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kognitiv bevsisthed, hörelse og höreapprater2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kognitiva hörapparater2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kognitiva hörapparater2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kognitiva hörapparater2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kognitiva Hörapparater och Internet rehabilitering, Översikt över två forskningsområden i samarbete mellan Eriksholm och Linköpings universitet2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Kognitiva Hörapprater2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lika villkor för den hörselskadade? Den kognitiva vinkeln.2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Memory systems and hearing aid use: In Expert Roundtable: Issues in Audition, Cognition and Amplification2012In: The Hearing Review, ISSN 1074-5734, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 16-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 80.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Method of operating a hearing instrument based on an estimation of present cognitive load of a user and a hearing aid system.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The invention relates to a method of operating a hearing instrument for processing an input sound and to provide an output stimulus according to a user's particular needs. The invention further relates to a system, a computer readable medium and a data processing system. The object of the present invention is to provide an improved customization of a hearing instrument. The problem is solved in that the method comprises the steps a) providing an estimate of the present cognitive load of the user; b) providing processing of an input signal originating from the input sound according to a user's particular needs; and c) adapting the processing in dependence of the estimate the present cognitive load of the user. This has the advantage that the functionality of the hearing aid system is adapted to the current mental state of the user. The estimate of the present cognitive load of a user is produced by in-situ direct measures of cognitive load (e.g. based on EEG-measurements, body temperature, etc.) or by an on-line cognitive model in the hearing aid system whose parameters have been preferably adjusted to fit to the individual user. An estimate of a user's cognitive status or cognitive load can e.g. be based on an estimate of the user's working memory capacity. The invention may e.g. be used in applications where a hearing impaired user's current mental resources are challenged.

  • 81.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Research on Psychoacustics, Audiology, Hearing Aids and Fitting2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    State-of-the art and new trends in hearing aids2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    System and Method for Eliminating Feedback and Noise In a Hearing Device.2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This invention relates to a system (100) and method for synthesizing an audio input signal of a hearing device. The system (100) comprises a microphone unit (102) for converting the audio input signal to an electric signal, a filter unit (110) for removing a selected frequency band of the electric signal and pass a filtered signal, a synthesizer unit (118) for synthesizing the selected frequency band of the electric signal based on the filtered signal thereby generating a synthesized signal, a combiner unit (120) for combining the filtered signal and the synthesized signal so as to generate a combined signal, and finally an output unit (122, 124, 126) for converting the combined signal to an audio output signal.

  • 84.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Time for ear pill intake determined by noise dosimetry in wearable devices.2010Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The invention relates to a portable processing system adapted for being worn by a user and comprising an input transducer for converting an input sound to an electric input signal, and a signal processing unit adapted for processing an SPU-input signal originating from the electric input signal. The invention further relates to use of such system. The object of the present invention is to provide an alerting device aiding a user in administering the dose of a hearing protecting agent. The problem is solved in that the signal processing unit comprises a monitoring part for monitoring and determining an accumulated sound dose AccD in the electric input signal from a start time t0 and for generating an alarm output at a threshold time t0+Δtth when a predefined dose threshold Dth is reached, wherein the predefined dose threshold Dth is set in relation to a recommended intake of a predefined hearing protecting agent to ensure an intended effect of the hearing protecting agent. An advantage of the present invention is that it helps a user to follow a prescribed dose administration scheme. The invention may e.g. be used in applications where a user taking hearing protecting medicine is exposed to acoustically different or noisy or loud environments.

  • 85.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Using auditory recall in hearing aid outcome evaluation under ecological listening conditions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Using measures of “listening effort” (memory) in hearing aid fitting and outcome evaluation2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin Rune
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Replication of experiments on the ability to benefit from temporal fine-structure information in speech among persons with moderate cochlear hearing loss2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The FAS-IT program. From detection to intervention. Reaching and treating persons with hearing disorders using modern technology2012In: AHS 2012 Conference: Book of abstracts, 2012, p. 49-49Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a program grant from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research we are investigating the use of modern information technology in hearing rehabilitation in a broad sense. We use the Internet in this research when we study hearing impaired persons from when the loss is detected to whe  intervention is implemented. In the research we intend to survey online resources, implement selfscreening both in terms of self-assessments and actual hearing screening on the Internet, use online cognitive tests, use the Internet for medical support system aimed to be integrated in health care, test if motivational interviewing methods can be used to facilitate the decision process when seeking treatment, develop and test online counselling for hearing impaired persons, use more open-ended qualitative methods to probe the experiences of acceptance versus experiential avoidance, and finally develop and test web resources for significant others (e.g. parents of children, adult children of older adults without access to the Internet). The program is divided into nine subprojects that are at different stages of their execution. This presentation will give an overview of the activities and outcomes so far in the FAS-IT program.

  • 89.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elisabeth, Sundewall-Thorén
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization.2007In: Aging and speech communication: An International and Interdisciplinary research conference.,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 90.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Grube Sorgenfrei, Maria
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vatti, Marianna
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Gusatovic, Dragan
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Naylor, Graham
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Grube Sorgenfrei, Maria
    Vatti, Marianna
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Gusatovic, Dragan
    Naylor, Graham
    Ngt, Elaine
    Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Predicting user preference and performance for two signal processing algorithms1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Three digital signal processing algorithms-User preference and performance1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 373-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 94.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom.
    Effect of speech material on the benefit of temporal fine structure information in speech for young normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired participants2012In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 95.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Effect of speech material on the benefit of temporal fine structure information in speech for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 96.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje K.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Effect of Speech Material on the Benefit of Temporal Fine Structure Information in Speech for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Participants2012In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 377-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the type of speech material on the benefit obtained from temporal fine structure (TFS) information in speech for young normal-hearing (YNH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) participants.

    DESIGN:

    The design was based on the work of . They measured the speech reception thresholds for a target talker in a background talker as a function of the frequency range over which TFS information was available. The signal was split into 32 channels, each with a bandwidth equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the "normal" auditory filter at the same center frequency. Above a cutoff (CO) channel, channels were vocoded and contained only temporal envelope information. Channels up to and including CO were not processed. Hopkins et al. found that, as CO was increased, speech reception thresholds decreased more for normal-hearing participants than for participants with cochlear hearing loss, suggesting that the latter were less able to use TFS information. We used the same design, but compared results when the target speech materials were open-set sentences, as used by Hopkins et al., and when they were more predictable sentences with a closed word set (Danish Dantale 2).

    RESULTS:

    With the open-set material, YNH listeners benefited more from TFS information than OHI listeners, replicating . For the YNH participants, the benefit of adding TFS was greater for the open-set material than for the closed-set material, while no difference in TFS benefit across speech materials was found for the OHI participants.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The choice of speech material is important when assessing the benefit of TFS. Several factors may facilitate recognition in the absence of TFS cues, including small set size, predictable temporal structure of the target speech, and contextual effects. We speculate that TFS information is useful for reducing informational masking, by providing cues for the perceptual segregation of the target and background. When the target speech is highly predictable, informational masking may be minimal, rendering TFS cues unnecessary.

  • 97.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Stephen
    System for acquiring and processing data pertaining to a shot of an object, such as a puck or a ball, on a goal ona playing field.2012Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    According to the present inventive concept there is provided a system for acquiring and processing data pertaining to a shot of an object, such as a puck or a ball, on a goal on a playing field, the goal being guarded by a goalkeeper, the system comprising: an acquisition device configured to acquire position data of the object during a time interval ΔTP preceding the shot on goal, and a processing device configured to process the acquired position data of the object to estimate if an unobstructed path between the goalkeeper and the object is maintained throughout said time interval ΔTP, and configured to register the shot on goal as a first type of shot at least on a condition that an unobstructed path between the goalkeeper and the object not was maintained throughout said time interval ΔTP.

  • 98.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Oldenburg University, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Automatic Real-Time Hearing Aid Fitting Based on Auditory Evoked Potentials.2013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A hearing aid includes at least one electrode located at a surface of a housing of the hearing aid to allow the electrodes to contact the skin of a user during use of the hearing aid, at least one electrode being adapted to pick up a low voltage signal from the user's brain, an amplifier unit operationally connected to the electrode(s) and adapted for amplifying the low voltage signal(s) to provide amplified brain signal(s), and a signal processing unit adapted to process the amplified brain signal(s) to provide a processed brain signal as well as to apply a time and frequency dependent gain to an input audio signal and to provide a processed audio output signal. Also a method of operating a hearing aid and a hearing aid system.

  • 99.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hopkins, Kathryn
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Moore, Brian C. J.
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Sensitivity to low-frequency temporal fine structure is correlated with aided spatial release from masking2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Binaural hearing is necessary for localizing sounds accurately, and for making sense of complex listeningenvironments with many sound sources.• It is important to understand which binaural cues are beneficial for spatial hearing in hearing aid users toinform hearing aid design.• Temporal fine structure, TFS, is thought to be important for voice recognition, segregation of competingtalkers, and listening in the dips of a fluctuating background (Hopkins et al., 2008; Zeng et al., 2005; Lorenzi etal., 2006). Hearing-impaired listeners have a reduced ability to use TFS information (Moore et al., 2006;Hopkins and Moore, 2007; Hopkins and Moore, 2010).• Hopkins and Moore (2010) developed a fast method for measuring sensitivity to binaural TFS (the ability to detectinteraural phase differences, IPD, of pure tones) at low frequencies: the TFS-LF test.• To investigate possible correlations between binaural TFS abilities and spatial hearing, the opportunity wastaken to make use of some earlier data on aided spatial release from masking (Neher et al., 2009). In thatstudy, large inter-subject variation in spatial release from masking was observed, and it was hypothesized thatthis variation could be related to binaural TFS abilities. The TFS-LF test was used with the same subjects as tested byNeher et al.

  • 100.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    NG, Elaine
    How cognition influences hearing aid use2014In: ENT & Audiology News, ISSN 2042-2156, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 90-91Article in journal (Refereed)
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