liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 51 - 100 of 164
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early and Late Return to Work After Sick Leave: Predictors in a Cohort of Sick-Listed Individuals with Common Mental Disorders2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 627-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aims to identify individual and workplace factors associated with early return to work (RTW)-defined as within 3 months-and factors associated with later RTW-between 3 and 12 months after being sick-listed-in a cohort of newly sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders. Methods In a prospective cohort study, a cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline measures of patients granted sick leave due to common mental disorders. A total of 533 newly sick-listed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. A baseline questionnaire was sent by post within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 354 (66 %) responded. Those who were unemployed were excluded, resulting in a study population of 319 individuals. Sick leave was recorded for each individual from the Social Insurance Office during 1 year. Analyses were made with multiple Cox regression analyses. Results Early RTW was associated with lower education, better work ability at baseline, positive expectations of treatment and low perceived interactional justice with the supervisor. RTW after 3 months was associated with a need to reduce demands at work, and turnover intentions. Conclusions Early RTW among sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders seems to be associated with the individuals need to secure her/his employment situation, whereas later RTW is associated with variables reflecting dissatisfaction with work conditions. No health measures were associated with RTW. The study highlights the importance of considering not only health and functioning, but also workplace conditions and relations at the workplace in implementing RTW interventions.

  • 52.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is Mobility in the Labor Market a Solution to Sustainable Return to Work for Some Sick Listed Persons?2011In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 355-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The study aims to identify characteristics associated with long-term expectations of professional stability or mobility among recently sick-listed workers, and to study whether expectations of professional mobility and turnover intentions were associated with duration of sick leave.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on baseline measures in a prospective cohort study of patients who were granted sick leave due to musculoskeletal (MSD) or mental (MD) disorders. A total of 1,375 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A baseline questionnaire was sent by mail within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 962 individuals responded (70%). The main diagnosis was MSD in 595 (62%) individuals and MD in 367 (38%).

    Results: Expectations of ability to remain in the present profession in 2 years was associated with better health and health-related resources, younger age, higher education, and better effort-reward balance. Effort-reward imbalance, MD, high burnout scores, and better educational and occupational position were associated with turnover intentions. Low expectations of ability to remain in the present profession defined two vulnerable groups with regard to RTW, those with no turnover intentions were older, had lower personal resources, more often had MSD, and slower RTW rate. Those with turnover intentions had a clear effort-reward imbalance and high burnout scores.

    Conclusions: The results of this explorative study underline the importance of differentiating RTW-interventions based on knowledge about the sick-listed person's resources in relation to the labor market and the work place, and their expectations of future employment and employability.

  • 53.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is mobility in the labor market a solution to sustainable return to work for some sicklisted persons?: Poster presentation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictive values for early and late return to work of the Work Ability Index (WAI), the single-item question (WAI-1), and EQ-5D among sick listed in musculoskeletal and mental disorders2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Fagerlind, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experience of work-related flow: Does high decision latitude enhance benefits gained from job resources?2013In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, ISSN 0001-8791, E-ISSN 1095-9084, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 161-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow is an experience of enjoyment, intrinsic motivation and absorption, which may occur in situations involving high challenges and high skill utilization. This study investigated the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow in relation to the job strain categories of the demand–control model, and to job resources such as social capital and an innovative learning climate. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in nine Swedish organizations (n = 3667, 57% response rate). Binary logistic regression analysis was performed. The results show that active jobs, low-strain jobs, a high degree of social capital and innovative learning climate increased the likelihood of experiencing work-related flow. In jobs with high decision latitude, regardless of demands, there was an increased likelihood to benefit from social capital and an innovative learning climate. The results emphasize the importance of autonomy and skill utilization, to enable the use of additional job resources in order to promote work-related flow and well-being at work.

  • 56.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    The effect of lean tool use and work conditions on employee health: a longitudinal multilevel study2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although lean production is an increasingly common approach to increase the efficiency of organisations, its effect on employee health is not clear. This longitudinal study investigates the effect of lean tool use and work conditions on work-related flow. Flow is a measure of health that reflects the experience of intrinsic motivation, absorption and work enjoyment.

    Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in seven organisations on two occasions with an interval of two years (n =1722). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used in order to investigate the association between the use of lean tools (i.e. standardisation, value stream mapping, visual monitoring, housekeeping and resource reduction), decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate at baseline, and work-related flow at follow-up.

    Results: In multivariate analyses, adjusted for flow at baseline, use of lean tools was positively associated with work-related flow at follow-up. When the tools were investigated separately, only value stream mapping remained significant after adjustment for work conditions and flow at baseline. Social capital and decision latitude were positively associated with flow at follow-up. Flow at baseline and follow-up were strongly associated.

    Conclusions: The extent to which lean tool use has an effect on employee health depends on which tools are used. Work conditions that support learning, such as decision latitude and social capital, are associated with a longitudinal increase in the experience of work-related flow, and are important for gaining health-promoting benefits from the use of lean tools.

  • 57.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Associations between organisation of work, work conditions, work-relatedf low and performance: a multilevel analysis2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how organisation of work in terms of sociotechnical characteristics and use of tools inspired by lean production, and psychosocial conditions at the workplace, are associated with work-related flow and performance.

    A questionnaire including questions concerning work organisation, psychosocial work conditions, work-related flow and self-rated performance was sent to employees in ten Swedish organisations; 4442 people (56%) responded. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used in order to investigate organisation of work and work conditions in relation to work-related flow and performance. In addition, the association between work-related flow and performance was investigated.

    Our results show that a high degree of lean tool use in combination with a low degree of sociotechnical characteristics was negatively associated with work-related flow but positively associated with performance. When decision latitude, social capital, and innovative learning climate were included in the model, the association was no longer significant in relation to work-related flow, but remained and was strengthen in relation to performance. Work-related flow had a positive association with performance.

    The conclusion is that work-related flow and work conditions that enable individual and collective skill use are important for increased performance. When lean tools are used to a high degree, good decision latitude, social capital and innovative learning climate buffer negative effects on health, and increase performance.

  • 58.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Lean production tools and decision latitude enable conditions for innovative learning in organizations: a multilevel analysis2015In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 47, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of lean production on conditions for learning is debated. This study aimed to investigate how tools inspired by lean production (standardization, resource reduction, visual monitoring, housekeeping, value flow analysis) were associated with an innovative learning climate and with collective dispersion of ideas in organizations, and whether decision latitude contributed to these associations. A questionnaire was sent out to employees in public, private, production and service organizations (n = 4442). Multilevel linear regression analyses were used. Use of lean tools and decision latitude were positively associated with an innovative learning climate and collective dispersion of ideas. A low degree of decision latitude was a modifier in the association to collective dispersion of ideas. Lean tools can enable shared understanding and collective spreading of ideas, needed for the development of work processes, especially when decision latitude is low. Value flow analysis played a pivotal role in the associations.

  • 59.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Barajas, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kompetensförsörjning och rehabilitering - rörlighetens två stuprör: En studie om rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med föreliggande rapport är att bidra till ökad kunskap om uppfattningar om rörlighet i arbetslivet, hur samverkan för rörlighet utformas i praktiken, och förutsättningar för rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer. I detta projekt har samverkan skett med olika praktiker, framför allt med ringsamordnare, arbetsgivarföreträdare och fackliga företrädare i de två företagsringarna från Boxholm respektive Norrköping som varit delaktiga i projektet. Den empiriska basen utgörs i huvudsak av intervjuer med aktörer som företräder företagsringarna, arbetsgivare, fackliga organisationer samt offentliga myndigheter, främst Försäkringskassan men även bl.a. Länsarbetsnämnden, Företagshälsovården och Hälso‐ och sjukvården.

    Två övergripande slutsatser om rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer dras utifrån detta forsknings‐ och utvecklingsprojekt. Den första slutsatsen är att olika aktörers arbete med att försöka stödja rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer sker i två s.k. stuprör – kompetensförsörjning och rehabilitering. Dessa stuprör kan, men behöver inte nödvändigtvis ha med varandra att göra. Så länge det inte finns ett helhetsperspektiv på rörlighet trampar varje aktör på i sitt eget stuprör.

    Öppningen kan vara att på gemensam grund utveckla nya strategier för att hantera frivillig men även påtvingad rörlighet för att stödja lärande, hälsa och verksamhetsutveckling inom och mellan organisationer Detta förutsätter ett ökat lärande om hur rörlighet kan främja såväl människors som organisationers utveckling och hälsa, samt nya samverkansformer och tydligare aktörsroller och beröringspunkter för att mer effektivt kunna hantera rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer.

    Den andra slutsatsen är att företagsringar är nödvändiga, men inte ett tillräcklig forum för rörlighet åtminstone om man inte bara vill begränsa rörlighet till rehabilitering. Företagsringar lägger fokus på rehabilitering. Företagsringar är en god resurs då inget annat har lyckats i rehabiliteringsarbetet. Om företagsringar ska vara det verktyg för rörlighet som önskas, pekar resultaten på behov av att bredda perspektivet på rörlighet och att arbeta mer med olika typer av rörlighet. Detta kan dock företagsringar inte göra själva eftersom arbetsgivare ”betalar” för de tjänster de vill att företagsringen ska utföra. Om tjänster ska utvecklas krävs att arbetsgivarna i ringen ställer krav på nya tjänster, vilket skulle innebära att företagsringar kan få en mer betydande roll vid för rörlighet. Viktiga frågor är vilket syfte ringen ska ha? Är ringen enbart en arena för rehabilitering eller ska ringen ha en annan roll i stödjandet av rörlighet inom och mellan organisationer, d.v.s. vara en arbetsmarknadsintermediär?

  • 60.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bejerot, Eva
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Den nya akutläkaren: arbetsvillkor, hälsa och vilja att stanna på akutmottagningar2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Läkare i akutsjukvård är en egen basspecialitet sedan 2015. En ny specialitet och stor efterfrågan på akutläkare innebär en omställning för akutmottagningarna, sjukhusen och gängse utbildningssystem för läkare. Föreliggande studie initierades som en konsekvens av behovet av dessa behov av förändringar – vilka är förutsättningarna på landets akutmottagningar för att den nya specialiteten ska få goda arbetsförhållanden och stanna kvar på akutmottagningarna?

    I studien genomfördes inledningsvis en intervjustudie med 14 akutläkare. Därefter utvecklades en webb-baserad enkät. Totalt 15 akutmottagningar i landet valde att deltaga i studien, och 147 läkare på akutmottagningar (51%) besvarade enkäten. Forskargruppen har erbjudit samtliga medverkande akutmottagningar återkoppling av resultaten, några akutmottagningar har deltagit i dessa möten. Tanken med återkopplingarna är att ge underlag för förbättringsarbetet inom respektive akutmottagning.

    Resultaten av intervjustudien och enkätstudien visar att det finns en stor variation mellan de olika akutmottagningarna med avseende på hur arbetet organiseras, hur arbetsmiljön blir för läkarna, hur läkarna mår och i vilken grad de vill stanna kvar på akutmottagningen.

    De tre distinkta faserna inflöde, vårdprocess och utflöde utgör ramen för arbetets förutsättningar på akutmottagningar. Hur inflödet organiseras beror dels på politiska beslut, dels på triage processen inom akutmottagningen. Ofta görs arbetet i team, ett välfungerande team ger bättre förutsättningar i arbetet än team med oerfarna medlemmar. Att arbeta i team kan vara en ny erfarenhet för många läkare och övrig vårdpersonal och ställer krav på relevant utbildning för detta. Även oklarheter i rollerna inom teamet kan försvåra arbetet.

    Många akutläkare rapporterar att vårdprocessen inom akutmottagningarna organiserats så att de får många oskäliga och onödiga arbetsuppgifter: dubbeldokumentation, att jaga vårdplatser, rutiner kring intagning eller överflyttning av patienter, administrativa uppgifter, mm. Denna typ av arbetsuppgifter fördubblar risken för arbetsrelaterad anspänning och utmattning bland akutläkarna. Många akutläkare upplever också oacceptabel tidspress och överbelastning, samtidigt som de anser sig ha måttligt inflytande över verksamhetsnära frågor om hur arbetet skall organiseras. Ett gott inflytande över arbetet kan kompensera för höga krav, men i denna studie finner vi inte belägg för att graden av inflytande kompenserar för de höga kraven. Höga krav i arbetet har starka samband med en ökad risk för trötthet bland akutläkare.

    Generellt sett har läkarna en mycket positiv inställning till den nya specialiteten och de menar att patientflödet förbättras. Akutläkare uppfattas dock ha låg status jämfört med traditionella specialiteter. Följande slutsatser dras från denna studie.

    • De flesta akutläkare mår bra, men en tredjedel av akutläkarna har symptom på arbetsrelaterad anspänning, utmattning och trötthet. Dessa symptom är vanligare bland kvinnliga akutläkare. Symptomen har starka samband med arbetets organisering. Organisering av arbetet bidrar till förekomsten av onödiga och oskäliga arbetsuppgifter och hög arbetsbelastning. Akutläkarna har inte inflytande över verksamhetsnära frågor och upplever sin autonomi och sitt inflytande som reducerat på grund av organisatoriska förändringar. Ett gott arbetsklimat innebär att risken för att utveckla dessa symptom minskar. Ett gott arbetsklimat bygger dels på ett väl fungerande teamarbete, dels på ett gott ledarskap där akutläkarna uppfattar att de får stöd och återkoppling på sitt arbete.
    • Införande av nya organisations- och flödesmodeller inspirerade av lean och teamorganisering används för att effektivisera arbetet. I denna förändringsprocess går verksamheten från en vertikal organisation som bygger på profession till en horisontell organisation som bygger på teamarbete. Detta kan skapa otydliga professionsgränser mellan läkare och annan vårdpersonal. Studien pekar på att det kan finnas vissa motsättningar mellan olika yrkesgrupper på akutmottagningarna och att det kan finnas oklarheter i vem som är teamledare. Tydlighet i roll- och ansvarsfördelning är inte alltid utvecklad, vilket kan leda till meningsmotsättningar. Akutmottagningar uppfattas ofta som sjuksköterskornas arena, medan läkare, som har det medicinska ansvaret, uppfattar sig som faktiska ledare. En viktig förutsättning för ett väl fungerande teamarbete är att de olika ingående professionerna har fått träning och utbildning i teamarbete.
    • En relativt stor andel av de läkare som arbetar på akutmottagningar, eller som avser att bli specialister i akutsjukvård, är inte helt tillfreds med sina arbetsförhållanden. Ungefär hälften av läkarna har övervägt att byta arbetsgivare eller att byta klinik. Viljan att stanna kvar inom akutmottagningen har starkt samband med om läkaren får stöd och feedback från ledningen. Andra studier har visat att symptom på utmattning ökar benägenheten att byta arbete. Majoriteten av de som svarat på enkäten är ST-läkare inom akutsjukvård vilket indikerar att det är viktigt att tidigt uppmärksamma symptom på utmattning för att förebygga att yngre läkare väljer att lämna arbetet.

    Hur arbetet på akutmottagningar organiseras har betydelse för arbetsmiljön och för om processer och flöden möjliggör för läkarna att utföra sitt arbete på ett säkert och effektivt sätt. En akutmottagning måste ses som en del i vårdkedjan i ett större system, men också att akutmottagningen är ett system i sig med lokala förutsättningar som styr in- och utflödet av patienter. Interventioner för att förbättra arbetsförhållanden kan därför inte begränsas till enskilda faktorer utan bygga på hur förutsättningar för hälsopromotiva arbets- och lärmiljöer skapas i organisationer.

  • 61.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Learning to promote health at an emergency care department: identifying expansive and restrictive conditions2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the findings of a planned workplace health promotion intervention, and the aim is to identify conditions that facilitated or restricted the learning to promote health at an emergency care department in a Swedish hospital. The study had a longitudinal design, with interviews before and after the intervention and follow-up interviews one year after the intervention. Data were collected through individual interviews with employees and managers, in total 69 interviews. In addition, data were collected from documents. The study provided insight into conditions which were found to act as expansive and restrictive reinforcements for learning to promote health. The conclusion is that the workplace health promotion intervention was shaped by conditions that existed outside the local workplace level which restricted the workplace health promotion. Nevertheless, collective employee-driven activities had the capacity to facilitate learning for change in order to create a health-promoting workplace. The advantage of combining theories of learning and workplace health promotion provided a holistic analytical view of learning to promote health at work and helped to uncover and monitor changed conditions during a planned workplace health promotion intervention.

  • 62.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, Skolan för teknik och hälsa.
    Fagerlind, Anna-Carin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reinerholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledarskap och organisering för hälsa och produktion (LOHP)2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation.
    Lokalt ledarskap i en global organisation - kvinnors och mäns möjligheter att bli chefer och utöva ledarskap inom ett verkstadsindustriföretag2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågor som rör chef- och ledarskap genererar alltid ett stort intresse såväl i arbetslivet som inom forskning. Det tema som fokuseras i den här rapporten är chef-/ledarskap och kön, särskilt könsfördelningen på ledande befattningar. I dagsläget är merparten av alla chefer i svenskt arbetsliv män. Män är överrepresenterade på chefsbefattningar i relation till samtliga anställda män i såväl privat som offentlig sektor. På de högsta chefsbefattningarna blir mansdominansen än tydligare (SCB, 2006). Mansdominansen på ledande befattningar kan sägas utgöra en utgångspunkt för de forskningsfrågor som formulerats inom forskningsområdet chef-/ledarskap och kön. Forskningsfrågorna handlar t.ex. om varför så få kvinnor är chefer samt på senare år om hur ledarskap är könsmärkt, dvs. hur ledarskap förknippas med kön. En återkommande fråga i mansdominerade organisationer är: Hur kan vi få fler kvinnor på ledande befattningar? Det är just denna problematik som fokuseras i föreliggande rapport som sammanfattar erfarenheter från ett forsknings- och utvecklingsprojekt som pågick från senhösten 2007 till senhösten 2008.

    Syftet med föreliggande rapport är att kartlägga och analysera villkor för kvinnor och män att bli chefer och att utöva chef- och ledarskap, samt varför få kvinnor har chefspositioner. Utgångspunkten för denna analys är en empirisk studie inom ett globalt verkstadsindustriföretag baserad på intervjuer med chefer, både kvinnor och män, på olika chefsnivåer och från olika divisioner. Följande mer specifika frågeställningar har formulerats:

    1. Vad karaktäriserar chefernas uppfattningar om ledarskap, chefsrekrytering, lärande och karriär, jämställdhet samt hälsa i företaget?
    2. Vilka förutsättningar finns för kvinnor och män att rekryteras till chefspositioner samt utöva chef- och ledarskap i företaget?
    3. Vilka orsaker finns till varför få kvinnor har chefspositioner i företaget?

    För att kunna diskutera skillnader mellan kvinnors och mäns uppfattningar och villkor närmar vi oss forskningsfrågorna utifrån ett genusperspektiv. Med genusperspektiv avser vi i denna rapport synsättet att vi formas till kvinnor och män genom det vi gör, och de aktiviteter vi deltar i, i samspel med andra människor i det dagliga arbetet. Våra könsidentiteter är beroende av rådande, socialt konstruerade, föreställningar i samhället och vi lär oss och lär oss att förhålla oss till dessa föreställningar i det dagliga arbetet. Vi utvecklar dessa tankar ytterligare i kapitel 2.

  • 64.
    Johansson, Gun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, KerstinLinköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Jonker, Dirk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rolander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balogh, I
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sandsjo, L
    University of Boras, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winkel, J
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark .
    Rationalisation in public dental care - impact on clinical work tasks and mechanical exposure for dentists - a prospective study2013In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 303-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish dentistry has been exposed to frequent rationalisation initiatives during the last half century. Previous research has shown that rationalisation often results in increased risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, thus reducing sustainability in the production system. In this prospective study, we assessed mechanical exposures among Swedish dentists in relation to specific rationalisations of clinical dental work during a six-year period. Body postures and movements of 12 dentists were assessed by inclinometry synchronised to video recordings of their work. No rationalisation effects could be shown in terms of a reduction in non-value-adding work (waste), and at job level, no major differences in mechanical exposure could be shown between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The present rationalisation measures in dentistry do not seem to result in rationalisation at job level, but may potentially be more successful at the overall dental system level. Practitioner summary: In contrast to many previous investigations of the mechanical exposure implications of rationalisation, the present rationalisation measures did not increase the level of risk for dentists. It is highlighted that all occupations involved in the production system should be investigated to assess production system sustainability.

  • 66.
    Jonker, Dirk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rolander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balogh, I.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sandsjö, I.
    MedTech West/School of Engineering, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winkel, J.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rationalisation in public dental care - impact on clinical work tasksand biomechanical exposure for dentists: a prospective studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive rationalisations in Swedish dentistry suggest contribute to increase risk for MSDs among dentists. This prospective study focused on assessing changes in degree of rationalisation of clinical dental work by dentists during a six years period, with particular emphasis on time aspects and mechanical exposure. Twelve dentists were followed up by the means 45 minute’s video recordings and synchronised inclinometry measurements. The video recordings were analyzed by a loss analysis technique.

    The results shows that non-VAW time proportion (waste) at the follow up was not reduced, but rather showed a trend towards an increase. Mechanical exposures during non-VAW and VAW were essentially not changed during the follow up time. The risk for MSDs for dentists due to mechanical exposure is unchanged. The used loss analysis technique has a lot to contribute in health care settings but the used concept applied needs further elaboration in the future.

  • 67.
    Jonker, Dirk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rolander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balogh, Istvan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dept of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark/Department of Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mechanical exposure among general practice dentists in Sweden and possible implications of rationalization.2011In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 953-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates dental work in terms of time distribution and mechanical exposure in value-added and non-value-added tasks. Further rationalization of dental work would typically involve an increase in the proportion of value-added tasks. Information on mechanical exposure within classes of value-added and non-value-added tasks can be used to predict possible implications of rationalization.

    Twenty-four dentists were investigated. Using a data logger, postures and movements were continuously recorded for each subject during four hours of work, which included 45 minutes of video recording. Time distribution and mechanical exposure for each work activity were calculated from the video recordings, using a loss analysis technique. Value-added tasks, which comprised 57% of the total working time, generally implied significantly more constrained mechanical exposures as compared with non-value-added tasks.

    The results indicate that future rationalization of dental work, involving a reduction of nonvalue-added tasks, may increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders.

  • 68.
    Jonker, Dirk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rolander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balogh, Istvan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dept of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark/Department of Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mechanical exposure levels and duration of value-adding versus non-value-adding tasks among general practice dentists in Sweden.2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Jonker, Dirk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rolander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Balogh, Istvan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dept of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark/Department of Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rationalization in public dental care and impact on biomechanical exposures for dentists - a prospective study. Oral presentation.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Jood, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Medin, Jennie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Helene
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The psychosocial work environment is associated with risk of stroke at working age2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 367-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore the relation between the risk of first-ever stroke at working age and psychological work environmental factors. Methods A consecutive multicenter matched 1:2 case control study of acute stroke cases (N=198, age 30-65 years) who had been working full-time at the time of their stroke and 396 sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke cases and controls answered questionnaires on their psychosocial situation during the previous 12 months. The psychosocial work environment was assessed using three different measures: the job control demand model, the effort reward imbalance (ERI) score, and exposures to conflict at work. Results Among 198 stroke cases and 396 controls, job strain [odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.05-1.62], ERI (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.01-1.62), and conflict at work (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.88) were independent risk factors of stroke in multivariable regression models. Conclusions Adverse psychosocial working conditions during the past 12 months were more frequently observed among stroke cases. Since these factors are presumably modifiable, interventional studies targeting job strain and emotional work environment are warranted.

  • 71.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Department of Neurobiology, Health Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care: prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities2008In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 8, no 201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decade, practitioners in primary health care (PHC) settings in many countries have issued written prescriptions to patients to promote increased physical activity or exercise. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse a comprehensive physical activity referral (PAR) scheme implemented in a routine PHC setting in Östergötland County. The study examines characteristics of the PARs recipients and referral practitioners, identifies reasons why practitioners opted to use PARs with their clients, and discusses prescribed activities and prescriptions in relation to PHC registries.

    Methods: Prospective prescription data were obtained for 90% of the primary health care centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, in 2004 and 2005. The study population consisted of patients who were issued PARs after they were deemed likely to benefit from increased physical activity, as assessed by PHC staff.

    Results: During the two-year period, a total of 6,300 patients received PARs. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 45–64 years. Half of the patients (50.8%) who received PARs were recommended a home-based activity, such as walking. One third (33%) of the patients issued PARs were totally inactive, reporting no days of physical activity that lasted for 30 minutes, and 29% stated that they reached this level 1–2 days per week.

    The number of PARs prescribed per year in relation to the number of unique individuals that visited primary health care during one year was 1.4% in 2004 and 1.2% in 2005. Two-thirds of the combined prescriptions were issued by physicians (38%) and nurses (31%). Physiotherapists and behavioural scientists issued the highest relative number of prescriptions. The most common reasons for issuing PARs were musculoskeletal disorders (39.1%) and overweight (35.4%), followed by high blood pressure (23.3%) and diabetes (23.2%).

    Conclusion: Östergötland County's PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion of physically inactive people visiting local PHC centres for other health reasons. PAR-related statistics, including PAR-rates by individual PHC centres and PAR- rates per health professional category, show differences in prescribing activities, both by patient categories, and by prescribing professionals.

  • 72.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University/Region Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Department of Neurobiology, Health Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care2010In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 11, no 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Written prescriptions of physical activity, so‐called physical activity referral (PAR) schemes, have increased in popularity in recent years. Such schemes have mostly been evaluated in terms of efficacy. This study reports on a Swedish PAR scheme implemented in routine primary health care (PHC) measuring patients’ self‐reported adherence to physical activity prescriptions. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to physical activity prescriptions issued in everyday PHC at 3 and 12 months and to analyse the different characteristics associated with adherence to these prescriptions.

    Methods: Prospective prescription data were obtained for 37 of the 42 PHC centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, during 2004. The study population consisted of 3300 patients issued PARs by ordinary PHC staff members. Odds ratios were calculated to identify the factors associated with adherence.

    Results: The average adherence rate was 56% at 3 months and 50% at 12 months. In the descriptive analyses, higher adherence was associated with increased age, higher activity level at baseline, home‐based activities, prescriptions issued by professional groups other than physicians, and among patients issued PARs due to diabetes, high blood pressure and “other PAR reasons”. In the multiple logistic regression models, higher adherence was associated with higher activity level at baseline, and to prescriptions including home‐based activities, both at 3 and 12 months.

    Conclusions: Prescriptions from ordinary staff in routine PHC yielded adherence in 50% of the patients in this routine care PAR scheme follow‐up. Patients’ activity level at baseline (being at least somewhat physically inactive) and being issued homebased activities were associated with higher adherence at both 3 and 12 months.

  • 73.
    Leijon, Matti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Lars
    Landstinget i Östergötland; Centre for Public Health Sciences; Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Department of Neurobiology, Health Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Is there a demand for physical activity interventions from health care providers?: Findings from a population survey2010In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care providers in many countries have delivered interventions to improve physical activity levels among their patients. Thus far, less is known about the population's interest to increase their physical activity levels and their opinion about the health care provider's role in physical activity promotion. The aims of this paper were to investigate the self-reported physical activity levels of the population and intention to increase physical activity levels, self-perceived need for support, and opinions about the responsibilities of both individuals and health care providers to promote physical activity.

    Methods: A regional public health survey was mailed to 13 440 adults (aged 18-84 years) living in Östergötland County (Sweden) in 2006. The survey was part of the regular effort by the regional Health Authorities.

    Results: About 25% of the population was categorised as physically active, 38% as moderately active, 27% as somewhat active, and 11% as low active. More than one-third (37%) had no intentions to increase their physical activity levels, 36% had thought about change, while 27% were determined to change. Lower intention to change was mainly associated with increased age and lower education levels. 28% answered that physical activity was the most important health-related behaviour to change "right now" and 15% of those answered that they wanted or needed support to make this change. Of respondents who might be assumed to be in greatest need of increased activity (i.e. respondents reporting poor general health, BMI>30, and inactivity) more than one-quarter wanted support to make improvements to their health. About half of the respondents who wanted support to increase their physical activity levels listed health care providers as a primary source for support.

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that there is considerable need for physical activity interventions in this population. Adults feel great responsibility for their own physical activity levels, but also attribute responsibility for promoting increased physical activity to health care practitioners.

  • 74.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edvardsson Stiwne, Elinor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Upplevelser av rättvisa och individuella handlingsmönster i samband med organisationsförändringar.2003In: Nordisk Psykologi, ISSN 0029-1463, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 309-322Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between individual perceptions of justice and behavioural actions during an organisational change process. The empirical material consisted of semi-structured interviews with 9 middle managers, working in a Swedish local government organisation. This organisation had recently accomplished a major organisational change. One result showed that individuals that experienced the change as procedural and distributive unfair tended to act in many different ways: they were loyal to the organisation but they also protested or tried to reduce the management's control over their work. The individuals that perceived the organisational change as procedural unfair but distributive fair tended to act either with loyalty or with withdrawal. The individuals that perceived the process as procedural and distributive fair acted more homogeneous: with loyalty to their organisation and management. In organisational change processes it is of particular importance to pay attention to procedural aspects.

  • 75.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    A dual-level intervention process to increase workplace health, decrease sick-leave and implement a structured and effective method for work-related rehabilitation.2006In: Nordic Health Promotion Research Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract ID: 98  

  • 76.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Job mobility as predictor of health and burnout2009In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 0963-1798, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 317-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A few earlier studies have shown that employee's turnover intentions and job mobility simultaneously could affect health and burnout. The present study investigated the cross-sectional, 2-year longitudinal and possible interactional or additive effects of turnover intentions and job mobility (internal and external mobility) on health (SF-36) and burnout (CBI). The study used questionnaire data from 662 Swedish civil servants, 73% remained at the same workplace, 13% were internally mobile, and 14% left the organization (externally mobile) during the 2-year follow-up period. The results showed that high turnover intentions were cross-sectionally associated with worse mental health (MH) and higher degree of burnout. The externally mobile group had, after the change of workplace, less degree of personal and work-related burnout compared to the non-mobile group. The effect of internal mobility on burnout and health was negligible compared to the effects of external mobility. The results also indicated that the relationship between turnover intentions and actual job mobility are additive rather than interactive. One practical implication of the present findings is that external mobility, if it is in concordance with the individual intentions, could be a powerful health promoting factor.

  • 77.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Associations between Perceived Distributive, Procedural, and Interactional Organizational Justice, Self-rated Health and Burnout2009In: Work - Journal of Prevention Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the cross-sectional and 2-year longitudinal associations between perceived organizational justice, self-rated health and burnout. Metods: The study used questionnaire data from 428 Swedish employment officers and the data was analyzed with Structural Equation Modeling, SEM. Two different models were tested: a global organizational justice model (with and without correlated measurement errors) and a differentiated (distributive, procedural and interactional organizational justice) justice model (with and without correlated measurement errors). Results: The global justice model with autocorrelations had the most satisfactory goodness-of-fit indices. Global justice showed statistically significant (p andlt; 0.01) cross-sectional (0.80 andlt;= mle andlt;= 0.84) and longitudinal positive associations (0.76 andlt;= mle andlt;= 0.82) between organizational justice and self-rated health, and significant (p andlt; 0.01) negative associations between organizational justice and burnout (cross-sectional: mle = -0.85, longitudinal -0.83 andgt;= mle andgt;= -0.84). Conclusion: The global justice construct showed better goodness-of-fit indices than the threefold justice construct but a differentiated organizational justice concept could give valuable information about health related risk factors: if they are structural (distributive justice), procedural (procedural justice) or inter-personal (interactional justice). The two approaches to study organizational justice should therefore be regarded as complementary rather than exclusive.

  • 78.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The longitudinal relationship between job mobility, perceived organizational justice, and health2008In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 8, no 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The main purpose of the present study was to examine the 2-year longitudinal and reciprocal relationship between job mobility and health and burnout. A second aim was to elucidate the effects of perceived organizational justice and turnover intentions on the relationship between job mobility (non-, internally and externally mobile), and health (SF-36) and burnout (CBI). METHODS: The study used questionnaire data from 662 Swedish civil servants and the data were analysed with Structural Equation Modeling statistical methods. RESULTS: The results showed that job mobility was a better predictor of health and burnout, than health and burnout were as predictors of job mobility. The predictive effects were most obvious for psychosocial health and burnout, but negligible as far as physical health was concerned. Organizational justice was found to have a direct impact on health, but not on job mobility; whereas turnover intentions had a direct effect on job mobility. CONCLUSION: The predictive relationship between job mobility and health has practical implications for health promotive actions in different organizations.

  • 79.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The relationship between self-rated health and employee behavioural responses: a two-year follow-up study2008Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Personality and Social Sciences: Psychometric evaluation and further validation of the Hagedoorn et al. modified EVLN measure2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 169-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and further validate a modified Exit, Voice, Loyalty and Neglect (EVLN) instrument (Hagedoorn, Van Yperen, Van de Vliert & Buunk, 1999), in a Swedish sample (n= 792). To test the underlying scaling assumptions, the convergent and divergent validity, a multitrait/multi-item analysis was conducted and factor analyses were used to evaluate the factor structure. The concurrent validity was tested by using the modified EVLN instrument as predictor and three different forms of justice as criteria in the analysis. The criterion-related validity was tested and an association between exit behavioral response and actual exit behavior was found (predictive validity). The results showed that the instrument may be considered to be a valid measure with the exception of the aggressive voice scale.

  • 81.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    The Associations between Perceived Organizational Justice and Self-Rated Health and Burnout.2005In: International Conference on Psychosocial Factors at Work,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Det sociala stöd chefer får både stärker och försvagar deras legitimitet: Posterpresentation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Exploring the relationship between managers’ leadership and their health.2012In: WORK: A journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 419-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the relationship between managers' leadership and their health, by investigating what psychosocial conditions in the workplace managers experience as being important to their health, and how their health influences their leadership.

    Participants and methods: Semi-structured interviews with forty-two managers at different managerial levels in a large Swedish industrial production company.

    Results: Most managers felt their health was good, but many perceived their work as stressful. They said it was important to their health that they did a good job and achieved results as expected, that conditions in the workplace enabled this achievement, and that their performance was acknowledged. In comparison to the other managerial levels, the first-line managers' work and health were especially dependent on such enabling conditions. The results also showed that the managers' health influenced their leadership, the quality of their work and the quality of their relationship with subordinates.

    Conclusion: Managers' leadership, health and their work conditions are reciprocally related to each other. A productive and healthy workplace is facilitated by focusing on managers' conditions for leadership, their health and their work conditions.

  • 84.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Exploring the Relationship between Managers’ Leadership and their Health. Oral presentation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    First-line managers’ work conditions as antecedents of transformational leadership2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transformational leadership is one of the most researched leadership styles of today; nevertheless, surprisingly little attention has been paid to its antecedents. In this study, questionnaire data from 322 first-line managers and 3001 of their subordinates were used to investigate the association between first-line managers’ self-rated work conditions and their displayed transformational leadership, as rated by their subordinates; also, whether superiors’ leadership is associated with first-line managers’ displayed transformational leadership. The results showed that performance feedback, skill discretion, and social capital were positively associated with first-line managers’ transformational leadership, whereas role conflict and span of control were negatively associated with transformational leadership. No  association was found between superiors’ leadership and transformational leadership. These results suggest that changes in leaders’ work situation might facilitate an increased display of transformational leadership behaviours.

  • 86.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Managers social support: Facilitators and hindrances for seeking support at work2018In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 351-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that social support is important for health and performance at work, but there is a lack of research regarding managers social support at work, and if it needs to be improved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate managers perception of work-related social support, and facilitators and hindrances that influence their seeking of social support at work. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with sixty-two managers in two Swedish organizations. RESULTS: Work-related support, which strengthened their managerial image of being competent, was sought from sources within the workplace. Sensitive and personal support, where there was a risk of jeopardizing their image of being competent, was sought from sources outside the workplace. Access to arenas for support (location of the workplace, meetings, and vocational courses) and the managerial role could facilitate their support-seeking, but could also act as hindrances. Because attending different arenas for support were demanding, they refrained from seeking support if the demands were perceived as too high. CONCLUSIONS: Different supportive sources are distinguished based on what supportive function they have and in which arenas they are found, in order to preserve the confidence of the closest organization and to maintain the image of being a competent and performing manager.

  • 87.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Managers’ Social Support may both Reinforce and Undermine their Legitimacy2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates managers’ social support, and whether managers perceive that receiving social support affects their managerial legitimacy. The material consists of 62 interviews with managers in two organizations. The results show that in order to preserve their legitimacy, managers seek support from different people, and in various distinct arenas, based on the types of support these sources provide. Work-related support, which strengthens the managers’ legitimacy, was sought from sources within the workplace. Sensitive and personal support, where there is a risk of jeopardizing their legitimacy, was sought from sources outside the workplace. The results also show that participation in various arenas in order to receive support meant that demands were placed on the managers, and this could increase their stress and strain. Social support has the potential to both reinforce and undermine managers’ perceived legitimacy.

  • 88.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    First line managers` work conditions and health.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Investigating Work Conditions and Burnout at Three Hierarchical Levels2013In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 1157-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the differences in work conditions and symptoms of burnout, and the association between work conditions and symptoms of burnout at the three hierarchical levels: subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Methods: Analyses were based on questionnaire data from 4096 employees in nine organizations, containing three hierarchical levels: subordinates (n=3659), first-line managers (n=345), and middle managers (n=92).

    Results: Work conditions were found to differ between the three hierarchical levels, mostly between subordinates and managers. Managers experienced fewer symptoms of burnout than subordinates. Furthermore, the association between work conditions and burnout differed for subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Conclusions: Occupational health research needs to focus more on differences between hierarchical levels regarding work conditions and burnout.

  • 90.
    MacEachen, Ellen
    et al.
    School of Public Health and Health Systems, University Of Waterloo, Canada.
    Du, Bronson
    School of Public Health and Health Systems, University Of Waterloo, Canada.
    Bartel, Emma
    School of Public Health and Health Systems, University Of Waterloo, Canada.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tompa, E.
    Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Canada.
    Kosny, A.
    Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Canada.
    Petricone, I.
    IAVGO Community Legal Clinic, Canada.
    Stapleton, J.
    School of Public Health and Health Systems, University Of Waterloo, Canada.
    Scoping Review of Work Disability Policies and Programs2017In: International Journal of Disability Mangement Research, ISSN 1833-8550, E-ISSN 1834-4887, Vol. 12, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This scoping review identifies the foci of research articles that address government laws, policies and programs designed to foster labour market integration of people who, due to illness or disability, face challenges entering or staying in the workforce. Method: A systematic search of English-language peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2014 yielded 14,474 articles. Title and abstract review identified 723 included articles that addressed government-led programs, policy or legislation on work integration and/or income support after injury, illness or impairment. These were sorted by theme, work disability program or policy, disability type, jurisdiction and year published. Results: The number of articles published that address work disability laws, policies and programs increased steadily. Most articles addressed disability in general. Among articles with a specific health focus, mental health was the most common. Research gaps are identified for mixed method study designs, chronic and episodic conditions, illness and cancer, and for work disability policy studies outside of North America, Northern Europe and Australia. Conclusions: We find a growing number of published articles about work disability and policy and identify specific areas where is a need for further research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 91.
    MacEachen, Ellen
    et al.
    Univ Waterloo, Canada.
    Varatharajan, Sharanya
    Univ Waterloo, Canada.
    Du, Bronson
    Univ Waterloo, Canada.
    Bartel, Emma
    Univ Waterloo, Canada.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Uneven Foci of Work Disability Research Across Cause-based and Comprehensive Social Security Systems2019In: International Journal of Health Services, ISSN 0020-7314, E-ISSN 1541-4469, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 142-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This scoping review identified what kinds of work disability policy issues are critiqued in articles published in countries with cause-based versus comprehensive welfare systems. Drawing on a review of work disability policy research, we identified 74 English-language, peer-reviewed articles that focused on program adequacy and design. Articles on cause-based systems dwelled on system fairness and policies of proof of entitlement, while those on comprehensive systems focused more on system design complexities relating to worker inclusion and scope of medical certificates. Overall, we observed a clear difference in the nature of problems examined in the different systems. Gaps in work disability policy literature are identified, and challenges for comparative policy research are discussed.

  • 92.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Barajas, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stroke patients' experiences of return to work2006In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 1051-1060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of return to work (RTW) after stroke from the patient's perspective.

    Method. Six patients who had their first ever stroke in 2001, were <65 years of age and were working at the time of their stroke were included. Information was obtained via an open-ended interview. The material was transcribed verbatim and analysed using Giorgi's empirical phenomenology.

    Results. Rehabilitation was perceived as primarily aimed at restoring bodily functions and a return to everyday activities, rather than at promoting a return to work. It was not experienced as adapted to the participants' needs or their age. The workplace was experienced as very important in the rehabilitation process. When the informants experienced that the rehabilitation professionals were not taking action, they took control of the situation themselves. The informants expressed pride in their own capacity to take the initiative and in their ability to take action. Both self-employed and employed informants said they had possibilities and opportunities to take action since their work situation was flexible. The informants' adaptation to a new role at work was perceived as facilitated by the understanding and positive attitude of co-workers.

    Conclusion. Among this group of stroke patients, the individual patient's capacity and ability to return to work was enhanced by motivation or “will” and self-efficacy in combination with external support. Self-efficacy was not only a personal trait or internal factor; it was enhanced and encouraged in interaction with contextual conditions. There are similarities between the RTW process and processes of health promotion.

  • 93.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health promotion and rehabilitation: a case study2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 908-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the number of people in Sweden on long-term sick leave has rapidly increased since 1996, new non-biomedical models of occupational rehabilitation are at stake. A group of seven women who had finished medical treatment and rehabilitation but were still on sick leave or temporary disability pension for several years, worked in a problem-based rehabilitation group for 6 months. Focus for the group was on a process of change towards health and work ability.

    Purpose: The aim of this case study was to improve understanding of effects of a problem-based rehabilitation model (PBR) on health promoting processes amongst a group of women on long-term sick leave. Method: Data source was a focus group interview. The analysis follows the guidelines of qualitative analysis that emerges from grounded theory.

    Results: The pedagogical model of PBR enhanced the participant's internal resources such as self-confidence and ability to act in a social setting. External resources such as social support were improved. An individual follow-up was conducted 2 years after the rehabilitation process and four out of seven women had returned to work.

    Conclusion: Among this group of women PBR launched health-promoting processes. When the more medically oriented treatment is finished or is not able to contribute further to the individual's recovery, other aspects of the individuals abilities and health resources will be focused upon.

  • 94.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, A.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Job Strain and First-Ever Stroke in a Community Based Case Control Study in Sweden; Preliminary results2003In: ICPH Intl Congress on Occupational Health,2003, Iguassu Falls, Brasilien: ICPH , 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 95.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Centre for Studies of Humans, Technology and Organization. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Organisational change, job strain and increased risk of stroke?: a pilot study2008In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The objective of this pilot study was to explore whether organisational change and work-related stress, as measured by the Job Content Questionnaire, were associated with first-ever stroke among working people aged 30–65.

    Methods: In a case-control study a total of 65 consecutive cases, aged 30–65 years of age, with first-ever stroke were recruited from four hospitals in Sweden during 2000–2002. During the same period, 103 random population controls in the same age interval were recruited. Data on job-related stress and traditional medical risk factors were collected by a questionnaire.

    Results: In the multivariate analyses, organisational change (OR 3.38) increased the likelihood of stroke, while experiencing an active job (OR 0.37) decreased the likelihood of stroke. Regarding risk factors outside work, age (OR 1.11), low physical activity (OR 5.21), low education (OR 2.48) and family history of stroke (OR 2.59) were associated with increased likelihood of stroke.

    Conclusion: This study suggests an association between organisational change, work-related stress and stroke. The likelihood of stroke was lower for people in active job situations.

  • 96.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Increasing Stroke Incidence in Sweden Between 1989 and 2000 Among Persons Aged 30 to 65 Years: Evidence From the Swedish Hosptial Discharge Register.2003In: 12th Nordic Meeting on Cerebrovascular Diseases,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increasing stroke incidence in Sweden between 1989 and 2000 among persons aged 30 to 65 years: evidence from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register2004In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1047-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose— Stroke mortality is decreasing in Sweden, as is the case in other Western European countries. However, both decreases and increases have been reported in Sweden for persons younger than age 65 years. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of stroke in Sweden between the periods 1989 and 1991 and 1998 and 2000 in persons aged 30 to 65 years.

    Methods— All first-ever stroke patients aged 30 to 65 years in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register between 1989 and 2000 were included.

    Results— The age-standardized, 3-year average incidence increased by 19%, from 98.9 to 118.0 per 100 000 among men, and by 33%, from 48.4 to 64.4 among women, between 1989 and 1991 and 1998 and 2000. The largest increase was seen among those younger than 60 years. On a county level, the change in age-standardized stroke incidence varied from small decreases (−3%) to large increases (82%).

    Conclusion— Stroke incidence increased in Sweden for both men and women between 1989 and 2000. The increase was larger among women. This calls for action when it comes to studying risk factors and planning for prevention and health promotion and indicates the need for gender-specific studies.

  • 98.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sick leave, disability pension and health-care-seeking behaviour prior to stroke, among people aged 30–65: a case–control study2007In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 457-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary objective: To explore sick leave, disability pension and health-care-seeking behaviour among people 30–65 years of age prior to their stroke in 2001 in the county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Research design: A register-based, retrospective case–control study for the period 1 January 1998–31 December 2000. Cases (n = 212): patients aged 30–65 with first-ever stroke in 2001. Controls (n = 4606): people aged 30–65, randomly selected from the same base population.

    Main outcomes and results: More than 91 days of accumulated sick leave among women was associated with increased likelihood of developing stroke (OR = 1.89). Among men, 29–90 days and more than 91 days on sick leave increased the likelihood of stroke (OR = 2.34 and OR = 3.43, respectively).

    Conclusion: Frequent health-care-seeking behaviour is not a tool for identifying women who develop stroke, while it may be an indicator for men. Accumulated sick leave may be a tool for identifying men and women with higher risk of stroke.

    Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699050701317643

  • 99.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Organisational change, job strain, effort reward and increased risk of stroke: a case control study.2005In: Second ICOH International Conference on Psychosocial factors at Work.,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?2013In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout.

    Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions,health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments.

    Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (𝑛 = 33) and nursesworking in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (𝑛 = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once.

    Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient,poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores.

    Conclusion.When comparing these nurses with existing normdata for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

1234 51 - 100 of 164
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf