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  • 51.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Observing of interprofessional collaboration in simulation: A socio-material approach2016In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 710-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation exercises are becoming more common as an educational feature of the undergraduate training of health professionals. Not all students participate in these activities, but are assigned as observers of the actual simulation. This article presents a study that explored how social-material arrangements for observation of interprofessional collaboration in a simulated situation are enacted and how these observations are thematised and made relevant for learning. The empirical data consisted of 18 standardised video recordings of medical and nursing students observing their peer students simulate. Practice theory is used to show how observation is embodied, relational, and situated in social-material relations. The findings show two emerging ways of enacting observation—proximate observation and distant observation. The enactments are characterised by different socio-material arrangements concerning the location where the simulation took place and its material set-up as well as embodied “doings” and “relatings” between the observing students and instructors. The observing students are participating in a passive, normative position as an audience and as judges of what is correct professional behaviour.

  • 52.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The practice architectures for becoming a forensic expert2012In: ProPEL International Conference. Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times: Emergin Practices and Transgressive Knowledge / [ed] Tara Fenwick, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The profession of a forensic expert is a narrow professional area and the professional knowledge is specialized with high quality demands from the judicial system. The common way to become a forensic expert is through higher education. However, to become a professional forensic expert in Sweden the only formal way is the internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL). The aim of this paper is to investigate the professional learning of forensic experts in such conditions, based on the findings from an ethnographical study of five forensic trainees’ and their supervisors’ participations in the program. Specifically, the paper investigates how the internal training program within SKL, i.e. forensic specific introductory courses and learning integrated in everyday work, is arranged in order for forensic expert trainees’ to learn the professional practice and become professional. By drawing on practice theory (Schatzki, 2002; Kemmis, e.g. 2009) we view the internal training program as practice architectures for learning the professional practice in terms of special arrangements of activities and relations within the professional practice of forensics. With this viewpoint it has been possible to explore how the different mediated preconditions, i.e. discursive, economical, material and social arrangements of the specific professional forensic practices prefigure the possibilities and constraints for developing a new professional practitioner, i.e. forensic expert. Thu, a central finding is that despite the institutional intention of common architectures for a training program the culturally and discursive “sayings”, “doings” and “relatings” in the specific professional practices shape different learning practices. This is presented in a model of arrangements for work and social connections for learning.  It is also shown that becoming a forensic expert is fully entangled with a material practice such as technologies, tools and machines.

  • 53.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reid, Anna
    Learning and Teaching Centre, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Beyond Higher ducation: Critical Transformations in Becoming a ProfessionalManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on student and novice professional psychologists’ and political scientists’ critical transformations in their transition from higher education to working life. The empirical evidence is derived from a longitudinal study of students’ understanding of learning and work. The findings indicate that the participants’ critical transformations comprise complex and reflective processes involving both an inner reflection and a more overt reflection on the circumstances in which they find themselves. The first component concerns the transformation the participants experience as a development of themselves and how they see that they have changed. The second are the influences the participants have received from the people and communities of practices in which they participate. However, besides the identification of these two orientations, critical transformation is foremost an interplay between these two as a continuous reflected experience that involves both formal and informal learning opportunities.

  • 54.
    Rooney, Donna
    et al.
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Simulation: A complex pedagogical space2018In: Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 1449-3098, E-ISSN 1449-5554, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation is a pedagogy that has been widely used in a number of educational settings (e.g., aviation, transport, social work, nursing education). While it can take numerous forms, it often involves an assortment of high-tech equipment (e.g., flight simulators, manikins) that seek to replicate real settings. Specifically, this paper provides an empirically driven exploration of how simulation laboratories, used in the professional education of nurses, and medical and other health professionals in higher education settings, are practised. Informed by sociomaterial understandings, the paper problematises and disrupts homogeneous understandings of the simulation space as found in much of the health sciences literature. This is done by providing a number of layers ranging from accounts of simulation in literature and empirically driven accounts of simulation in action through to more abstract discussion. The paper is attentive to both the distinct materiality of the spaces involved and the human activities the spaces engender. This dual focus enables the consideration of spatial injustices as well as new directions for the development of simulation pedagogies.

12 51 - 54 of 54
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