liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Hagblad, Jimmie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kaisdotter Andersson, Annika
    Mälardalen University.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Folke, Mia
    Mälardalen University.
    Lindén, Maria
    Mälardalen University.
    Simultan registrering av blodflöde på flera djup2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Hallberg, I
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, A-C
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjortswang, H
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bachrach-Lindström, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health-related Quality of Life after Vertebral or Hip Fracture in Women - Short Health Scale Useful for Clinical Practice?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammerby, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Health-related quality of life after vertebral or hip fracture: a seven-year follow-up study2009In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 10, no 135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The negative impact of vertebral and hip low-energy fractures on health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) has been demonstrated previously, but few prospective long-term follow-up studies have been conducted. This study aims to (i) investigate the changes and long-term impact of vertebral or hip fracture and between fracture groups on HRQOL in postmenopausal women prospectively between two and seven years after the inclusion fracture, (ii) compare HRQOL results between fracture and reference groups and (iii) study the relationship between HRQOL and physical performance, spinal deformity index and bone mineral density at seven-year follow-up.

    Methods

    Ninety-one women examined two years after a low-energy vertebral or hip fracture were invited to a new examination seven years after the diagnosis. HRQOL was examined using the SF-36 questionnaire and was compared with an age and sex-matched reference group. Physical function was assessed using tests and questionnaires. Bone mineral density was measured. Radiographs of the spine were evaluated using the visual semiquantitative technique. A longitudinal and cross-sectional design was used in this study. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, Student’s t-tests, ANCOVA, and partial correlation.

    Results

    Sixty-seven women participated. In the 42 women (mean age 75.8, SD 4.7) with vertebral fracture as inclusion fracture, bodily pain had deteriorated between two and seven years and might be explained by new fracture. Remaining pronounced reduction of HRQOL was seen in all domains except general health and mental health at seven-year follow-up in women with vertebral fractures compared to the reference group (p<0.05). All 25 women (mean age 75.0, SD 4.7) with hip fracture as inclusion fracture had no significant changes in HRQOL between two and seven years and did not differ from the reference group regarding HRQOL after seven years. The vertebral group had significantly lower values for bodily pain, vitality, role-emotional function and mental health compared to the hip group. HRQOL showed a positive relationship between physical activity, static balance and handgrip strength.

    Conclusions

    The long-term reduction of HRQOL in women with vertebral fracture emerged clearly in this study. The relationships between HRQOL and physical performance in women with vertebral and hip fracture raise questions for more research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 54.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Health-Related Quality of Life 7 Years After Hip or Vertebral fractures2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A striving for independence: a qualitative study of women living with vertebral fractureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quantitative studies using generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires have shown that osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures have a significant negative effect on HRQOL, but there are only few studies that address what it means to live with vertebral fracture from a deeper experiential perspective. How HRQOL and daily life are affected several years after vertebral fracture and how women cope with this are more unclear. This study aimed to describe how HRQOL and daily life had been affected in women with vertebral fracture several years after diagnosis.

    Methods: The study design was qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Swedish women during 2008. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive content analysis.

    Results: The findings of this study revealed three themes related to the influence on HRQOL and daily life: A threatened independence, i.e. back pain, anxiety, negative impact on self-image and consequences in daily life; Strategies for maintaining independence, i.e. coping, self-care and support; and The importance of maintaining independence, i.e. the ability to perform everyday activities, social interaction and having something meaningful to do. As a result of how their HRQOL and daily life have been affected by their vertebral fractures, the women in this study are striving for independence or maintaining their independence by trying to manage the different types of symptoms and consequences in different ways.

    Conclusion: HRQOL and daily life were strongly affected in a negative way by the impact of the vertebral fracture. One possible effective intervention for the future may be to support women in using self-management strategies so that they can be in charge of their situation and positively influence their HRQOL and daily life to achieve independence, but further evaluation is still needed. Information from this study may provide a foundation for guidelines for health care professionals to offer empathic and supportive care to women living with prevalent vertebral fracture.

  • 56.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A striving for independence: a qualitative study of women living with vertebral fracture2010In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 9, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quantitative studies using generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires have shown that osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures have a significant negative effect on HRQOL, but there are only few studies that address what it means to live with vertebral fracture from a deeper experiential perspective. How HRQOL and daily life are affected several years after vertebral fracture and how women cope with this are more unclear. This study aimed to describe how HRQOL and daily life had been affected in women with vertebral fracture several years after diagnosis.

    Methods

    The study design was qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Swedish women during 2008. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive content analysis.

    Results

    The findings of this study revealed three themes related to the influence on HRQOL and daily life: A threatened independence, i.e. back pain, anxiety, negative impact on self-image and consequences in daily life; Strategies for maintaining independence, i.e. coping, self-care and support; and The importance of maintaining independence, i.e. the ability to perform everyday activities, social interaction and having something meaningful to do. The women were striving for independence or maintaining their independence by trying to manage different types of symptoms and consequences in different ways.

    Conclusion

    HRQOL and daily life were strongly affected in a negative way by the impact of the vertebral fracture. Information from this study may provide new knowledge and understanding of the women's experiences of living with vertebral fracture from an insider's point of view in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the women's everyday life. However, further evaluation is still needed in larger study groups.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 57.
    Hollman, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, C
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, A-C
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Livskvalitet vid genetiskt ökad sjukdomsrisk2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Hollman, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, A-C
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, AG
    Achievment of treatment goals2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Hollman, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, A-C
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, AG
    Livskvalitet vid blodfettscreening1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Livskvalitet vid genetiskt ökad sjukdomsrisk2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in familial hypercholesterolaemia families2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in genetic disease: The example of familial hypercholesterolaemia2000In: Atherosclerosis XII, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, AG
    Livskvalitet vid blodfettscreening1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Only one of four patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia reach cholesterol treatment goals in primary prevention2004In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 256, no 2, p. 176-177Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of quality of life among patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Living with a genetic predisposition to disease may influence quality of life. The presence of premature disease can lead to an increased focus on family history and genetic predisposition.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe quality of life in patients with the genetic disease, familial hypercholesterolemia, who are at an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease.

    Methods: Interviews from 12 adult patients with FH were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The findings of this qualitative study revealed that for patients, quality of life was equated with harmony in life, the core category. Attaining harmony in life presumes satisfaction and togetherness. Cognizance of the threat of coronary heart disease and impending mortality is balanced by the support of togetherness and satisfaction that builds harmony in life.

    Conclusion: When caring for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, it is important to meet each patient on his or her own level, and to support balance and their choices for maintaining or regaining harmony in life.

  • 66.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Achievement of treatment goals2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Achievement of treatment goals, adherence and disease knowledge in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Effective treatment is available for patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Nevertheless the treatment goal seems hard to reach in all patients. We investigated to what extent recommended international treatment goals were achieved for total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, adherence to drug treatment and if achievement of treatment goals was influenced by knowledge.

    Design: Cross-sectional design.

    Methods: Patients with FH, above 18 years of age, n=74, were asked to participate. Drug treatment, laboratory results, blood pressure and smoking were documented, a questionnaire on adherence and knowledge about FH was sent to the patients. Response rate for the questionnaire was 92 % (n=68).

    Results: The treatment goals for LDL cholesterol (< 3.0 mmol/L) and total cholesterol (<5.0 mmol/L) were reached in 23% and 22% of the patients, respectively. Patients with LDL cholesterol < 3.0 mmol/L who were on treatment followed the prescription to a significantly higher degree than patients with LDL cholesterol ≥ 3.0 mmol/L, (p=0.001). For patient knowledge, the mean was 6.8±2.2 out of 11 possible. The patients had knowledge about cholesterol, self-care prevention and the reason for drug treatment. Patients were less informed about the chance of getting FH and family history.

    Conclusion: Intensified drug treatment is motivated since 23 % of the patients with FH reached treatment goals. In spite of the absence of relation between LDL cholesterol level and knowledge in the present study, we believe that increased disease lmowledge would facilitate for patients to face the difficulties of the condition.

  • 68.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in family members in families with familial hypercholesterolemia2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Centre for Metabolism Endocrinology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia2002In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 251, no 4, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives.  The primary aim of this study was to analyse quality of life in adult patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a genetic disorder with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Secondary aims were to find explanatory factors for quality of life and anxiety.

    Design. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used.

    Setting.  Outpatients from lipid clinics at two university hospitals in Sweden were included. Patients with heterozygous FH and a randomly selected control group participated by filling out questionnaires.

    Subjects.  Two hundred and eighty patients with heterozygous FH above 18 years of age were asked, and 212 of whom 185 were free of overt CHD, participated. Of a control group of 2980 persons 1485 were included for comparison.

    Methods. We used Likert-type questionnaires: the Quality of Life Index (QLI) consisting of four subscales, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), the Mastery Scale measuring coping and a questionnaire on health and lipids constructed for FH patients.

    Results.  Patients with FH were significantly more satisfied with overall quality of life 21.8 ± 0.3 (SEM) vs. controls 21.1 ± 0.1 and this was also the case in three of four subscales, all differences P < 0.05. Anxiety about getting CHD was expressed amongst 86% of the patients with FH.

    Conclusions. Quality of life amongst patients with FH was at least as good as in controls but they were worried about getting CHD.

  • 70.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2006In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is one of the most common genetic metabolic disorders and is associated with a high risk of premature coronary heart disease. Primary prevention directed at lifestyle changes, combined with preventive medical treatment, is the most important way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with FH. Knowledge about the condition and adherence to drug treatment may facilitate reaching treatment goals. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with FH. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four patients, more than 18 years of age, with FH were asked to participate. A questionnaire on disease knowledge about FH and adherence to drug treatment was sent to the patients. Response rate was 92% (n = 68). Drug treatment, laboratory results, blood pressure, and smoking were also documented. RESULTS: Most patients knew about cholesterol, prevention, and the reason for drug treatment but were less informed about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. No significant correlation was found between knowledge and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. A significant, negative correlation between adherence and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found (r = -.354, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with FH had scant understanding about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. High adherence to drug prescription has significant correlation to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 71.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Familial hypercholesterolaemia and quality of life in family members2003In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 569-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Awareness of genetic disease in the family may influence quality of life. The purpose of this study was to describe quality of life among nonaffected members of families with familial hypercholesterolaemia. All were aware of the risk for coronary heart disease. Their quality of life was compared with a reference group and with the patients with familial hypercholesterolesterolaemia themselves.

    Methods

    Names of family members (n = 129) were given by the patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia. A randomly selected reference group (n = 1485) and patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (n = 185) were included for comparison. They all completed the questionnaire Quality of Life Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Mastery Scale measuring coping. Family members and patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia also completed a questionnaire on health and lipids.

    Results

    Family members were more satisfied with family life, mean 22.1 ± 3.5 (SD), and psychological/spiritual life, 22.9 ± 4.0, than the reference group, 21.4 ± 4.3 and 21.1 ± 4.8, respectively; this was particularly expressed among partners, P < 0.05. Of family members, 91% were anxious about the patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia developing coronary heart disease.

    Conclusions

    Family members have as good a quality of life as members of the reference group, but they were anxious about the patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia developing coronary heart disease.

  • 72.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, EMK-endokrin.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Quality of life in non affected family members of familial hypercholesterolemia families2002In: Konferens Familjefokuserad omvårdnad, Kalmar,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of quality of life among patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Johansson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Malnutrition in a home-living older population: prevalence, incidence and risk factors. A prospective study2009In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1354-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To prospectively investigate and describe the prevalence and incidence of malnutrition among home-living older people, related to demographic and medical factors, self-perceived health and health-related quality of life. Another aim was to find predictors for developing risk of malnutrition.

    Risk factors for malnutrition have previously been identified as diseases, several medications, low functional status, symptoms of depression and inadequate nutrient intake. Most studies are cross-sectionally performed at hospitals or in nursing care settings.

    A prospective study with a sample of 579 home-living older people, randomly selected from a local national register. Examinations were performed at baseline and yearly follow-ups two to four times.

    Questionnaires validated and tested for reliability, to detect risk of malnutrition (Mini Nutritional Assessment), symptoms of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale-20), cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination), health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile), well-being (Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument) self-perceived health, demographic factors, anthropometry and biochemical examinations. Predictors were searched for through multiple logistic regression analysis with the MNA as dependent factor.

    The prevalence of risk for malnutrition was 14.5%, according to the MNA. Two risk factors for malnutrition were lower handgrip strength and lower self-perceived health. The incidence of risk for malnutrition at follow-ups was between 7.6% and 16.2%. Predictors for developing malnutrition were higher age, lower self-perceived health and more symptoms of depression. Men with symptoms of depression had a higher risk of developing malnutrition.

    Lower self-perceived health had the highest power to predict risk for malnutrition, with increased number of depression symptoms and higher age as second and third predictors.

    A regular and combined assessment using the Mini Nutrition Assessment, Geriatric Depression Scale-20 and self-perceived health as a base for identifying people in need, is one way to prevent the development of malnutrition.

  • 75.
    Johansson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Self-perceived health among older women living in their own residence2007In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim was to characterize women who perceived themselves as healthy and to compare them with women who perceived themselves as less healthy with regard to demographical, social, medical and functional factors. Another aim was to describe changes within the healthy group after one year.

    Background. Self-perceived health is influenced by several factors, of which diseases and illness are only a part.

    Method and participants. Two hundred and seventy-eight women, 75 and 80 years old, of which 50% (n ¼ 139) perceived themselves as healthy and less healthy, respectively. Data were collected by using the Nottingham Health Profile, Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini Nutritional Assessment, Mini Mental State Examination and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument, in two examinations at intervals of one year.

    Results. The women in the healthy group were characterized as having no or low depression symptoms (P ¼ 0.016), better physical mobility (P ¼ 0.029) and better physical health (P < 0.001). Furthermore no or less pain, fewer doctor visits, more energy and fewer negative emotional reactions were predictors for self-perceived health in the healthy group at the one-year follow-up.

    Conclusion. The most important predictors associated with perceiving oneself as healthy were no or few depression symptoms, physical mobility and good physical health.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Attention has to be paid to women’s mood, physical health, mobility, pain and energy to help them stay healthy.

  • 76.
    Johansson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-reported energy and nutrient intake among older people: a two year follow-up studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to investigate older people’s energy intake regarding macro- and micronutrients, related to nutritional status, symptoms of depression, self-perceived health and demographical factors, and describe possible changes of energy intake during a period of two years.

    Method: The study included 115 individuals 80 years-old who performed a yearly 24h recallvof food intake, a total of three times. Energy requirement was estimated using weight, agevand gender and a Physical Activity Level of 1.6, and the Nordic Nutrition Recommendationsvwere used as a reference for nutrients. Nutritional status was assessed using the MinivNutritional Assessment and symptoms of depression using the Geriatric Depression Scale-20.

    Result: Three groups with different self-reported energy intakes appeared in the analysis, onev with <1500 kcal, a second with a fluctuating intake over time (±1500 kcal), and a third with ≥1500 kcal. Intake of vitamins A, D, E, folate and fibre were below the recommended levels in all groups. The same pattern of energy intake and micronutrients was found over time. No correlation between energy intake and MNA and GDS-20 was found.

    Conclusion: Reported energy intake and some micronutrients were low in relation to estimated energy requirement. This might be due to a combination of low energy intake, underreporting and the day on which the 24h recall was performed. Weight loss was found in women and men who reported a fluctuating energy intake and among men who reported an energy intake <1500 kcal. This might indicate an inadequate energy intake and an increased vulnerability to malnutrition.

  • 77.
    Johansson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-perceived health among older men living in their own residence: a four year follow-up studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study characterize older men, who perceived themselves as healthy, with focus on demographical, social, medical and functional factors, and describe changes within the healthy group over time and find predictors of self-perceived health. The study has a prospective design and included 303 men, 75 and 80 years old, living in a municipality in the south of Sweden. Data collection took place 2001-2006 in a total of three – five examinations at an interval of one year. The examinations included questionnaires validated and tested for reliability, assessing the nutritional status, (Mini Nutritional Assessment), symptoms of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale-20), cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination), health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile), wellbeing (Philadelphia Geriatric Centre Multilevel Assessment Instrument), demographic factors, physical- and biochemical assessments. The men were divided into two groups according to their self-perceived health, 58% (n=175) perceived themselves as healthy and 42% n=128) as less healthy. Good physical health, the ability to walk a distance outdoors, an ability to maintain a social network and having energy were factors important to feeling healthy among men at baseline. Analyses at the follow-ups included men whom still perceived themselves as healthy and men who perceived their health as being impaired. Seventy five percent (n=132) of the healthy group at baseline still perceived themselves as healthy at the first follow-up. Important factors for a self perceived good health when growing older were feeling mentally well and being able to walk up and downstairs. These results indicated that areas representing the individuals own perception and ability are important to feel healthy.

  • 78.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Riskfactors for pressure sore among newly operated patients, a prospective study1999In: 8th Annual Meeting of th European Tissue Repair Society,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 79.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Different lying positions and their effects on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To report a study to compare the effects of different lying positions on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients. This article reports the evaluation of study design and procedures. Background. To reduce risk of pressure ulcers, repositioning of immobile patients is a standard nursing practice; however, research into how different lying positions effect tissue microcirculation is limited. Design. Descriptive comparative design. Methods. From MarchOctober 2010, 20 inpatients, aged 65 years or older, were included in the study. Tissue blood flow and skin temperature were measured over bony prominences and in gluteus muscle in four supine and two lateral positions. Results. The blood flow over the bony prominence areas was most influenced in the superficial skin and especially in the 30 degrees lateral position, where the blood flow decreased significantly in comparison with the supine positions. There were significant individual differences in blood flow responses, but no common trend was identified among the patients considered at risk for pressure ulcer development. The study procedure worked well and was feasible to perform in an inpatient population. Conclusion. The lying positions seem to influence the tissue blood flow over the bony prominences in different ways in older adult inpatients, but further study is needed to confirm the results and to make recommendations to clinical practice. The study procedure worked well, although some minor adjustments with regard to heat accumulation will be made in future studies.

  • 80.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nursing staff induced repositionings and immobile patients' spontaneous movements in nursing care.2016In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1168-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate nursing staff induced repositionings and the patients' spontaneous movements during the day and night among older immobile patients in nursing care. Furthermore, the aim was to identify factors associated with the nursing staff induced repositionings and the patients' spontaneous movement frequency. An observational cross-sectional design was used. Spontaneous movements among patients (n = 52) were registered continuously using the MovinSense monitoring system. The nursing staff documented each time they repositioned the patient. Patients spontaneous movements were compared with nursing staff induced repositionings. There were large variations in the patients' spontaneous repositioning frequency during both days and nights, which shows that, although immobilised, some patients frequently reposition themselves. Analgesics were positively related to the movement frequency and psycholeptics were negatively related. The nursing staff more often repositioned the patients who were assessed as high risk than those assessed as low risk, but the patients' spontaneous movement frequency was not correlated to the risk score. This may be important when planning repositioning schedules. A monitoring system may be useful in decision making with regard to planning repositioning and positions used in the prevention of pressure ulcers among elderly immobile patients.

  • 81.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure ulcer prevention: The effect of different lying positions on tissue blood flow, temperature and interface pressure in elderly patients - an ongoing study2010In: Pressure ulcer prevention: The effect of different lying positions on tissue blood flow, temperature and interface pressure in elderly patients, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sacral pressure-induced blood flow responses at different tissue depths during one hour supine bedrest in nursing home residents2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Pressure induced vasodilation (PIV) protects the skin from pressure induced ischemia. PIV responses at individual level during a long-term measurement period have not previously been described in an elderly population in a clinically relevant situation.

    Aim. To describe individual PIV responses in a nursing home resident population for 1-hour periods of bed rest.

    Method. From May 2011 to August 2012, blood flow at three tissue depths was measured for one hour over the sacrum in 0° supine position and 30° supine tilt position in 25 individuals aged 65 years or older while lying on a pressure redistributing mattress. Measurements were made using the non-invasive optical techniques Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) and photoplethysmography. The individuals were divided into a PIV group and a non-PIV group based upon the LDF data.

    Results. In the PIV group, the blood flow in almost all cases increased immediately and remained over baseline for the entire 60 minutes of loading in both positions, while the blood flow decreased immediately and remained below baseline in the non-PIV group. These blood flow patterns were also seen in deeper tissue layers although a PIV response was most common in the underlying tissue in both groups.

    Conclusion. The cutaneous blood flow response among the nursing home residents was distinct, appeared early and remained during the one hour of loading in both the PIV and non-PIV group. The non-PIV group may be more vulnerable to pressure and thus may be at risk for pressure ulcer development. More research is needed in order to verify the results.

  • 83.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Cristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Effects of Different Lying Positions on Interface Pressure, Skin Temperature, and Tissue Blood Flow in Nursing Home Residents2015In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored.

    Aim: To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    Method: From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30 supine tilt and 0 supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30lateral and 90lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry.

    Results: Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0supine and 90lateral positions than in 30supine tilt and 30 lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30 supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions.

    Conclusion: The 30supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial.

  • 84.
    Lidman, Disa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Trycksår - Decubitalsår2005In: Bokkapitel i Svårläkta sår - Vårdprogram för Sydöstra sjukvårdsdistriktet / [ed] Landstinget i Jönköpings län,Landstinget i Kalmar län och Landstinget i Östergötland, Linköping: LiÖ , 2005, p. 50-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Risk factors associated with pressure sore development among hospitalized patients2004In: 12th Biennial Conference of the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Altered skin blood perfusion in areas with non blanchable erythema: an explorative study2006In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 215-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non blanchable erythema, i.e. stage I pressure ulcer, is common in patients in acute and geriatric care and in nursing homes. Research has shown that this type of lesions is prone to develop into more severe pressure ulcers. The peripheral skin blood perfusion is of major importance for the development of pressure ulcers. The aim of this study was to explore the peripheral skin blood perfusion over time, in areas with non blanchable erythema and in corresponding undamaged areas on the opposite side of the body. A total of 19 measurements were performed, over time, using a laser Doppler perfusion imager. The blood flow distribution profiles over areas with non blanchable erythema and undamaged skin were found to be different. As the area of the non blanchable erythema decreased, the blood perfusion distribution profiles gradually became more heterogeneous; an area of high blood perfusion in the centre of the lesions was seen and the perfusion successively decreased closer to the edge. These results indicate that there are differences in blood perfusion between skin areas of non blanchable erythema and undamaged skin. The results also indicate that the visible redness in areas with non blanchable erythema is related to altered blood perfusion. The skin blood perfusion also seems to increase in relation to the size of the non blanchable erythema.

  • 87.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure sore prevalence within a public health services area2000In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 333-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressure sores are a great problem for patients, staff and society. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, treatment and prevention of pressure sores in a public health service area in Sweden. Criteria used for pressure sore assessment were persistent discoloration, epithelial damage and damage to the full thickness of the skin, without or with a cavity. The data were collected during 2 weeks in April 1995 from 1173 inpatients. The pressure-sore prevalence rate was 3.75%; 44 patients had a total of 68 sores. Men were as prone to developing pressure sores as women. The most frequently reported preventive measures were antidecubitus mattresses and turning schedules. Relief from pressure and occlusive dressings were the most common treatment measures. There was no statistical difference in pressure-sore prevalence when compared with a similar study from 1980. Patients were, however, older in 1995.

  • 88.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immobility – a major risk factor for development of pressure ulcers among adult hospitalized patients: a prospective study2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : To identify risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development among adult hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    Design : A prospective comparative study including 530 adult patients from medical and surgical wards. Registered Nurses made the data collection on admission and once a week for up to 12 weeks. The risk assessment scale used was the Risk Assessment Pressure Sore (RAPS) scale, including the following variables; general physical condition, activity, mobility, moisture, food intake, fluid intake, sensory perception, friction and shear, body temperature and serum albumin.

    Results : Sixty-two (11.7%) patients developed 85 pressure ulcers. The most common pressure ulcer was that of nonblanchable erythema. Patients who developed pressure ulcers were significantly older, hospitalized for a longer time, had lower scores on the total RAPS scale, had lower weight and lower diastolic blood pressure than nonpressure ulcer patients did. In the multiple logistic regression analyses using variables included in the RAPS scale immobility emerged as a strong risk factor. When adding remaining significant variables in the analyses, mobility, time of hospitalization, age, surgical treatment and weight were found to be risk factors for pressure ulcer development.

    Conclusion : It is confirmed that immobility is a risk factor of major importance for pressure ulcer development among adult hospitalized patients. The results also indicate that the RAPS scale may be useful for prediction of pressure ulcer development in clinical practice.

  • 89.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A risk assessment scale for the prediction of pressure sore development: reliability and validity2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 190-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The ability to assess the risk of a patient developing pressure sores is a major issue in pressure sore prevention. Risk assessment scales should be valid, reliable and easy to use in clinical practice.

    Aim.  To develop further a risk assessment scale, for predicting pressure sore development and, in addition, to present the validity and reliability of this scale.

    Methods. The risk assessment pressure sore (RAPS) scale, includes 12 variables, five from the re-modified Norton scale, three from the Braden scale and three from other research results. Five hundred and thirty patients without pressure sores on admission were included in the study and assessed over a maximum period of 12 weeks. Internal consistency was examined by item analysis and equivalence by interrater reliability. To estimate equivalence, 10 pairs of nurses assessed a total of 116 patients. The underlying dimensions of the scale were examined by factor analysis. The predictive validity was examined by determination of sensitivity, specificity and predictive value.

    Results.  Two variables were excluded as a result of low item–item and item–total correlations. The average percentage of agreement and the intraclass correlation between raters were 70% and 0·83, respectively. The factor analysis gave three factors, with a total variance explained of 65·1%. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value were high among patients at medical and infection wards.

    Conclusions.  The RAPS scale is a reliable scale for predicting pressure sore development. The validity is especially good for patients undergoing treatment in medical wards and wards for infectious diseases. This indicates that the RAPS scale may be useful in clinical practice for these groups of patients. For patients undergoing surgical treatment, further analysis will be performed.

  • 90.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Pressure ulcer risk factors in patients undergoing surgery2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper reports a study to identify risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development among a mixed group of adult patients undergoing surgery. Background. Few studies have been carried out with patients undergoing surgery to assess the risk of pressure ulcer development, and so there is a little knowledge of the risk factors for this group. However, studies among non-surgical patients have shown that nutritional predictors such as low serum albumin level and low body mass index (BMI) are of great importance. An additional predictive factor may be low blood pressure. It is important to study these predictors further among patients undergoing surgery, using techniques such as multiple regression techniques, designed to identify the most important predictors for pressure ulcer development. Methods. A prospective comparative study was carried out in 1996-1998 with 286 adult patients undergoing surgical treatment. The data were collected from patient records by Registered Nurses preoperatively, for seven days postoperatively and thereafter once a week for up to 12 weeks. Perioperative data were also collected. The Risk Assessment Pressure Sore Scale was used, and data were collected on general physical condition, activity, mobility, moisture, food intake, fluid intake, sensory perception, friction and shear, body temperature and serum albumin. Results. Forty-one (14.3%) patients developed pressure ulcers during the observation period. The most common type was non-blanchable erythema. Those who developed pressure ulcers were significantly older, weighed less, and had a lower BMI and serum albumin. More women than men developed pressure ulcers. Risk factors identified in multiple stepwise regression analyses were female gender, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) status or New York Heart Association (NYHA) status and food-intake. Conclusion. Special attention, with regard to risk of pressure ulcer development, should be paid to patients undergoing surgery who have low ASA or NYHA scores, low food intake and/or are women. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 91.
    Olsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Transition: How a concept has been used in nursing science2002In: Theoria : medlemsblad / Riksföreningen för omverdnadsteorier inom praktik, utbildning och forskning, ISSN 1400-8033, Vol. 11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patients' Perspective of Factors Influencing Quality of Life While Living With Crohn Disease2010In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The chronic, relapsing nature of Crohn disease produces physical, psychological, and social stress. The disease occurs early in life, and the effects of Crohn disease on daily life are associated with symptom burden; thus, managing their disease and coping with its impact is a lifelong process for sufferers. This study was undertaken to identify and describe the meaning of quality of life in patients with Crohn disease. Using a grounded theory methodology, 11 interviews were performed with 6 men and 5 women, 29–83 years of age, all suffering from Crohn disease. The experience of quality of life was associated with limitations in daily activity, the major theme that emerged from the analysis. Quality of life varied depending on how the patient managed limitations related to the symptoms of the disease. The categories of self-image, confirmatory relations, powerlessness, attitude toward life, and sense of well-being were conceptualized as the dominant themes derived from the data. When caring for these patients, it is important to identify limitations and provide support so that patients are able to maintain a daily life that can be perceived as normal and routine.

  • 93.
    Pihl-Lesnovska, K
    et al.
    n/a.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life among individuals with Crohn's disease.2008In: Conference on Transition, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94. Stratton, R
    et al.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Engfer, M
    Moore, Z
    Rigby, P
    Wolfe, R
    Elia, M
    Enteral nutritional support in prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: A systematic review and meta-analysis2005In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 422-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There have been few systematic reviews and no meta-analyses of the clinical benefits of nutritional support in patients with, or at risk of developing, pressure ulcers. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to address the impact of enteral nutritional support on pressure ulcer incidence and healing and a range of other clinically relevant outcome measures in this group. Methods: Fifteen studies (including eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs)) of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) or enteral tube feeding (ETF), identified using electronic databases (including Pub Med and Cochrane) and bibliography searches, were included in the systematic review. Outcomes including pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer healing, quality of life, complications, mortality, anthropometry and dietary intake were recorded, with the aim of comparing nutritional support versus routine care (e.g. usual diet and pressure ulcer care) and nutritional formulas of different composition. Of these 15 studies, 5 RCTs comparing ONS (4 RCTs) and ETF (1 RCT) with routine care could be included in a meta-analysis of pressure ulcer incidence. Results: Meta-analysis showed that ONS (250-500 kcal, 2-26 weeks) were associated with a significantly lower incidence of pressure ulcer development in at-risk patients compared to routine care (odds ratio 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.89, 4 RCTs, n = 1224, elderly, post-surgical, chronically hospitalised patients). Similar results were obtained when a combined meta-analysis of ONS (4 RCT) and ETF (1 RCT) trials was performed (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.62-0.88, 5 RCTs, n = 1325). Individual studies showed a trend towards improved healing of existing pressure ulcers with disease-specific (including high protein) versus standard formulas, although robust RCTs are required to confirm this. Although some studies indicate that total nutritional intake is improved, data on other outcome measures (quality of life) are lacking. Conclusions: This systematic review shows enteral nutritional support, particularly high protein ONS, can significantly reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcers (by 25%). Although studies suggest ONS and ETF may improve healing of PU, further research to confirm this trend is required. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 95.
    Söderhamn, O
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Lindencrona, C
    Vänersborg.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden2000In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75 + years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.

  • 96.
    Söderhamn, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional screening and perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 1997-2006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. (i) To perform a nutritional screening using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly and relate the results to perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients; and (ii) to compare the screening results and nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation.

    Background. Undernutrition is an under-recognized problem among older patients. Using a screening instrument is a way to detect patients at risk for undernutrition.

    Design. A cross-sectional study conducted in Sweden.

    Methods. A sample of 147 geriatric rehabilitation patients was consecutively included and was interviewed with the screening instrument, questions about background variables, perceived health and health-related issues. Higher screening scores indicate higher risk for undernutrition. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were used. When nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation were corresponding to the content in any of the response alternatives for each screening item, the notes were marked as existent.

    Results. The screening results showed that 55% of the patients were at medium risk and 14% at high risk for undernutrition. Patients in perceived ill health had higher screening scores than those in perceived good health. Associations were also found between receiving help, perceiving helplessness, not being active and not feeling satisfied and higher screening scores. The content of nine of 15 items in the instrument was mentioned in a number of nursing records.

    Conclusions. The prevalence of older patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition was high. To be at high risk for undernutrition was associated with perceived ill health. Nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation showed deficiencies, indicating that all patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition were not identified.

    Relevance to clinical practice. The results suggest that nurses need a screening instrument to highlight older nutritional at-risk patients in need of further awareness and investigation.

  • 97.
    Söderhamn, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-care ability and sense of coherence in older nutritional at-risk patients2008In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 62, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate self-care ability and sense of coherence in geriatric rehabilitation patients nutritionally screened using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly and to relate the patients' perceived health to self-care ability and sense of coherence.

    Design: Cross-sectional study.

    Setting: A geriatric rehabilitation ward in a hospital in western Sweden.

    Subjects: A sample of 172 consecutively recruited patients (65+ years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. One hundred forty-four patients were included in the study because 16 patients refused to take part and 12 could not complete the entire data collection procedure.

    Methods: Interviews, using one instrument for nutritional screening and other instruments measuring self-care ability and sense of coherence and one question about perceived health, were performed.

    Results: Patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition had lower self-care ability (P<0.001) and weaker sense of coherence (P=0.007) than patients at low risk for undernutrition. Lower self-care ability, being single and admitted from another hospital ward was found to be predictors for being at medium or high risk for undernutrition. Patients who perceived good health had higher self-care ability (P<0.001) and stronger sense of coherence (P<0.001) than patients who perceived ill health.

    Conclusions: There is an indication that older patients at low risk for undernutrition have a greater capability to care for themselves than patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition. Perceived ill health in older patients is associated with lower self-care ability and weaker sense of coherence.

    Sponsorship: Supported by grants from The Research and Development Council Fyrbodal, Trollhättan; The Lions Research Foundation, Linköping, Sweden.

  • 98.
    Wambui, Theresah
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, School of Medicine, Moi University, Kenya.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognizance of sexually transmitted infections among low-income men in western Kenya2011In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 169-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) pose a worldwide health problem. To improve the efforts of prevention of STIs it is important to gain insight into the awareness of STIs among people in the society.

    Objective: To describe the cognizance of STIs among low-income men in western Kenya.

    Method: Data was collected from eight focus groups consisted of 64 men between15 and 54 years of age. The interviews were audio taped and content analysis was used for the analysis.

    Findings: Three categories were derived: Consciousness of STIs, Risk of and prevention of STIs, and Marital relationship and STIs. The results indicate that men had some limited consciousness of STIs but that there were misunderstandings. The treatments the men mentioned were hospital treatment help, from traditional herbalists and self-administration. Condoms were regarded as an effective prevention method, but there were obstacles to using them as well as to talking about STIs within marriage.

    Conclusion: The study stresses the need to promote cognizance of STIs, including gender aspects, and to reduce the gap between knowing and practising.

  • 99.
    Widar, Marita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Health-related quality of life in persons with long-term pain after a stroke2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 497-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. No study has, to our knowledge, previously been published on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a group suffering from long-term pain after a stroke.

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to describe HRQoL in persons with long-term pain after a stroke, and to compare this with different types of pain conditions, age, gender and household status.

    Design. This study has a design combining qualitative and quantitative methods.

    Methods. Forty three participants suffering from long-term pain after a stroke were included. A qualitative interview was performed and then analysed by means of latent content analysis. In addition, two self-report questionnaires, SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD Scale), were used.

    Results. The qualitative data revealed that physical and cognitive functioning, economic security and good relationships, support and having the ability to be together with family and friends were important factors with regard to experienced HRQoL. No significant differences were found in SF-36 and the HAD Scale with regard to the different types of pain. The older age group had decreased physical functioning in SF-36. The men had more decreased vitality than the women.

    Conclusion. The results show, that the participants in this study have a lower HRQoL due to their long-term pain than those in previous studies on stroke survivors. It is evident that further research is needed with longitudinal studies and larger populations to gain more knowledge and thereby provide better supportive care.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Awareness and understanding of the patients' perceptions and transitions with regard to their life situation and suffering from long-term pain after a stroke is important in order to support a maintained or increased HRQoL. This is also important after the acute stage and rehabilitation, including quality of life of the relatives, especially to older and dependent persons.

  • 100.
    Widar, Marita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caring and uncaring experiences as narrated by persons with long-term pain after a stroke2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how persons with long-term pain after a stroke experience their care. The study is part of a larger research project concerning a group persons suffering from long-term pain after a stroke. Qualitative interviews were performed with 43 persons suffering from central poststroke pain, nociceptive pain or tension-type headache after their stroke incident. Content congruence emerged among the narratives (n = 43), and therefore the most information-rich ones (n = 23) were selected for deeper investigation by means of qualitative content analysis. The results reveal the patients' need for being respected, understood and supported, also for being given adequate time and information. Accessibility and continuity in the professional contacts and with regard to medical and physical treatment was emphasized. The participants' narratives highlight the importance of the professionals having knowledge of pain and pain management.

123 51 - 100 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf