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  • 51.
    Halvarsson Lundkvist, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Conditions for Employee Learning and Innovation: Interweaving Competence Development Activities Provided by a Workplace Development Programme with Everyday Work Activities in SMEs2018In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate how the formal competence development activities provided by the Production Leap, a workplace development programme (WPDP), were interwoven with everyday work activities and to identify the conditions that enabled learning and employee-driven innovation that contributed to production improvement, in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Sweden. The study adopts a qualitative case approach and draws on evidence from research conducted in four manufacturing SMEs that participated in this Swedish WPDP. Funded by EU authorities, WPDPs provide competence development activities to SMEs in order to boost their production capabilities and/or promote innovation. The findings reveal that the competence development activities provided by the programme triggered learning in everyday work activities and fostered the development of different approaches to employee-driven innovation in the enterprises. The conclusion is that it is essential to consider that employee-driven innovations may take different forms and involve functions that can support innovative learning that goes beyond minor adjustments to the existing standards of production. Moreover, employee-driven innovation may impose new demands on management leadership skills. The findings provide important guidance for future WPDPs, for vocational education and training or university activities that are customised to SME contexts to promote production capabilities, and for SMEs that aim to strengthen employee-driven innovation.

  • 52.
    Halvarsson Lundkvist, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Learning conditions for continuous improvement in a public service organization2018In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study focuses on a transformation effort in a social welfare department of a Swedish municipality where continuous improvement, which is a Lean principle, was introduced in employees’everyday work via a workplace development programme (WPDP). The aim of this paper is to explore the conditions (internal and external) that enabled or constrained employee learning during the introduction of continuous improvement into employees’ everyday work in a WPDP-supported social welfare department.

    Design/methodology/approach – This case study is based mainly on 22 semi-structured interviews with individuals holding different positions in the department and overarching municipality.

    Findings – The findings show that multiple and emerging conditions, both internal and external, shaped a predominantly restrictive learning environment during the introduction of continuous improvement into the social welfare department. The major conditions identified were related to the initial implementation and top management’s steering and monitoring of the “Lean investment”, activities and support provided by the WPDP, activities and support provided by the internal Lean support team and first-line managers’ abilities to facilitate employee learning.

    Originality/value – Apart from unique empirical material depicting an effort towards change under conditions far from favourable for employee learning, the value of this study lies in the attention given to the external dynamics that drive change in line with the concept of new public management in public service organizations, including a WPDP that supported the social welfare department.

  • 53.
    Halvarsson Lundkvist, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kock, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enabling learning environments in national competence development programmes2016In: 2016 Triennial Conference European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), Imaging Diverse Futures for Adult Education: Questions of Power and Resources of Creativity: Book of Abstracts, 2016, p. 46-46Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education and training for adults is sometimes developed and provided by temporary, publicly funded workplace development programmes (WPDPs). A WPDP is a complex programme, with various stakeholders, often including providers of adult education that, through the programme, act jointly as change agents in local workplaces. The aim of the paper is to identify conditions that enabled stakeholders’ learning and supported programme development processes in two studied WPDPs. A total of 73 interviews were conducted and 20 meetings were documented in this qualitative case study. The findings showed that WPDPs are dependent on rich learning environments with enabling conditions for stakeholders if development processes are to move forward. Among important enabling conditions, were the involvement of appropriate stakeholders in a sufficient number of learning activities and distinct steering of the programmes.

  • 54.
    Halvarsson Lundqvist, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    The role of brokers in a workplace development programme targeting SMEs2018In: European Journal of Training and Development, ISSN 2046-9012, E-ISSN 2046-9020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of a workplace development programme (WPDP) targeting small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises (SMEs) by focussing on the people who acted as brokers providing cross-boundary connections between its collaborating partners.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The material, from interviews with 32 individuals and 11 meetings, was analysed in a boundary-crossing framework, which provided tools to reveal how the roles of brokers at different levels (operative, strategic and national) of the WPDP affected its development.

    Findings

    The findings indicate that cross-boundary connections were made by persons who acted as brokers within and between different levels of the WPDP. The brokers who provided cross-boundary connections between different levels of the WPDP were found to play the most important role for the prompt development of the WPDP.

    Originality/value

    Apart from unique empirical material depicting the development of a collaborative venture between national and regional stakeholders of the manufacturing industry, the value of this study is the attention given to the people behind the policymaking of publicly funded national WPDPs, revealing the complex business of developing policy-driven competence development activities to employees in SMEs.

  • 55.
    Kettis, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wallman, Andy
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Placements: an underused vehicle for quality enhancement in higher education?2013In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Placements have the potential to contribute more effectively to the quality of higher education. The aim of this article is to discuss how placements can be made more worthwhile for individual students, while also contributing to the overall quality of teaching and learning at HEIs as well as to the development of workplace cultures that are conducive to learning. Work experience opportunities help students to build substantive relationships and apply what they are learning. Students’ overall view of their learning experience becomes more positive, their identification with their intended profession strengthens and academic performance improves, as do graduate employment rates. Introducing placements in the curriculum does not, however, guarantee these positive effects. Learning is likely to be greater if the experience is ‘intentional and recognised’ and tightly knit into the curriculum. Using evidence from research on workplace learning is one way to improve the quality of placements, as exemplified by a scholarly approach to the development of placements for pharmacy students at Uppsala University. HEIs’ interaction with employers through placements enriches both parties. Academics gain insights into practice which may inspire teaching on campus, e.g. by generating real life examples that trigger students’ motivation and by informing curriculum design. Practitioners supervising students on placements are often excellent educational development partners. Placements may also contribute to organisational development. Developing a reflective, deliberate approach to learning in the workplace may be as useful for the employees as for the students. Also, students may carry out projects of value to the employer, while also keeping the university informed of current practice. An increased engagement in students' work experience opportunities may improve the student experience, and contribute to bridging the academy-practice divide in a way that is as much about influencing the rest of society as being influenced by it.

  • 56.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Yrkesutbildning - avslutande ord2018In: Yrkesutbildning - mellan skola och arbetsliv / [ed] Maria Gustavsson och Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 195-204Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I inledningskapitlet skisserades en modell som använts i denna bok, för att rama in ett helhetsperspektiv på yrkesutbildning som befinner sig mellan skola och arbetsliv. Bokens kapitel ger exempel på hur målsättningar formulerade på politisk nivå kommer till uttryck i yrkesutbildningens vardagspraktik, det vill säga hur yrkeslärare, yrkeselever och handledare dagligen hanterar yrkesutbildningens mångsidiga utbildningsuppdrag. Detta avslutande kapitel sammanfattar några av bokens huvudpoänger utifrån resonemang och slutsatser som presenterats i de olika kapitlen.

  • 57.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    First line managers` work conditions and health.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Investigating Work Conditions and Burnout at Three Hierarchical Levels2013In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 1157-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the differences in work conditions and symptoms of burnout, and the association between work conditions and symptoms of burnout at the three hierarchical levels: subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Methods: Analyses were based on questionnaire data from 4096 employees in nine organizations, containing three hierarchical levels: subordinates (n=3659), first-line managers (n=345), and middle managers (n=92).

    Results: Work conditions were found to differ between the three hierarchical levels, mostly between subordinates and managers. Managers experienced fewer symptoms of burnout than subordinates. Furthermore, the association between work conditions and burnout differed for subordinates, first-line managers and middle managers.

    Conclusions: Occupational health research needs to focus more on differences between hierarchical levels regarding work conditions and burnout.

  • 59.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of job stress models for predicting health at work2011In: WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Few workplace health promotion (WHP) interventions are designed to improve work conditions. Methods for measurement of work conditions are often developed from a risk factor perspective rather than a WHP perspective. More knowledge is needed on the work conditions that promote health in order to develop a good work environment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the Demand Control Support model, the Effort Reward Imbalance model and the Job Characteristic Inventory are correlated, if the subscales predict health and to analyze which combination of subscales is the most useful predictor of health longitudinally. <br> <br>Participants: The study used questionnaire data from 662 civil servants at baseline and at follow-up 2 years later. <br> <br>Method: The data were analysed by multiple regressions. <br> <br>Results: A new model; effort, reward, and variety, was found having a higher predictive power to predict health than the original models. <br> <br>Conclusions: To promote health at work, social relations and health-mediating work conditions are important because these conditions may buffer health. Health can be assumed to be a resource that is created in everyday activities and interactions in workplaces, and there is a need to develop health measure instruments based on holistic health theories.

  • 60.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of Job Stress Models for Predicting Health at Work. Oral presentation.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Work ability and performance: associations with clarity of work and work conditions: A multilevel studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s flexible working life has resulted in loose structures, less predictability and increased uncertainty for employees. Uncertainty regarding what work tasks to carry out may result in low job satisfaction and high tension, but also in reduced performance and effectiveness. Conversely, organizations with clear goals and strategies provide better opportunities for employees to understand what is expected and how to perform the work. This paper explores associations with clarity of work, work conditions and work ability, and secondly if work ability affects performance, given the organizational and work conditions. The study was based on questionnaire data from 4442 subordinates in 10 organizations in different sectors. The data were analysed by multilevel logistic regressions. High clarity of work, high control and high social capital were associated with higher work ability and better performance. High demands were associated with lower work ability and lower performance. High work ability was associated with better performance. The results imply that good work ability is an important factor for employees’ performance, affected by socio-demographic factors, but mostly with organizational and work conditions. Organizations with clear goals creates more favorable work conditions that support employees’ control, their ability to cope with working life and their performance.

  • 62.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Liljegren, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of work conditions and health for voluntary job mobility: a two-year follow-up2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Changing jobs is part of modern working life. Within occupational health, job mobility   has mainly been studied in terms of employees' intentions to leave their jobs. In contrast to actual turnover, turnover intentions are not definite and only reflect the probability that an individual will change job. The aim of this study was to determine what work conditions predict voluntary job mobility and to examine if good health or burnout predicts voluntary job mobility.

    Methods

    The study was based on questionnaire data from 792 civil servants. The data were analysed   using logistic regressions.

    Results

    Low variety and high autonomy were associated with increased voluntary job mobility.   However, the associations between health and voluntary job mobility did not reach   significance. Possible explanations for the null results may be that the population   was homogeneous, and that the instruments for measuring global health are too coarse   for a healthy, working population.

    Conclusions

    Voluntary job mobility may be predicted by high autonomy and low variety. The former may reflect that individuals with high autonomy have stronger career development motives; the latter may reflect the fact that low variety leads to job dissatisfaction. In contrast to our results on job content, global health measurements are not strong   predictors of voluntary job mobility. This may be because good health affects job mobility through several offsetting channels, involving the resources and ability to seek a new job. Future work should use more detailed measurements of health or   examine other work settings so that we may learn more about which of the offsetting effects of health dominate in different contexts.

  • 63.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liljegren, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hälsans betydelse för rörlighet. Posterpresentation.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Ståhl, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Introducing motivational interviewing in a sickness insurance context: Translation and implementation challenges2018In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a conversational method to support clients in need of behavioral change. In an organizational reform, most Swedish sickness insurance officials were trained in MI to promote clients’ return to work (RTW) after sick leave. The aim of this article is to investigate experiences of introducing MI as a tool to promote clients’ RTW within a sickness insurance context, with a special focus on the translation and implementation of the method. Methods A qualitative approach, comprising 69 interviews with officials, managers, and regional coordinators on two occasions. The material was analyzed through qualitative content analysis. Results Officials were positive about MI, but the application was limited to using certain tools with extensive individual variation. Officials struggled with translating MI into a sickness insurance context, where the implementation strategy largely failed to o er adequate support, due to low managerial priority, competing initiatives, and a high workload. Results of the educational intervention could therefore be seen on an individual but not an organizational level. Conclusions In order to translate MI into a sickness insurance context, training needs to be supported by organizational approaches that promote collective learning and sharing of experiences among officials. The results also illustrate how a method cannot be assumed to be implemented simply because training has been provided. Consequently, the application of the method needs to be carefully monitored in studies of interventions where MI is claimed to be used, in order to measure its effectiveness. 

  • 65.
    Ståhl, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Böhm, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Förutsättningar för implementering och användning av motiverande samtal (MI) inom Försäkringskassan: Slutrapport2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final report from an evaluation project that has studied implementation and use of Motivational Interviewing (MI) within the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA). MI was introduced in order to develop and improve methods within social insurance, aiming to promote insurance officials to intervene earlier in the sick leave process. During 2012, dedicated funds were targeted towards developing insurance officials’ competencies, where an education in MI was included.

    An earlier report has been published in the project (Social Insurance Report 2014:16), focusing on the implementation process. It was concluded that both insurance officials and managers were concerned about not being able to sustain and integrate the use of MI into regular practice. In this report, the conditions for use of MI in regular practice are in focus, along with perceived effects of the intervention on the individual and organizational level.

    Specific research questions are:

    • What individual and organizational/practical conditions has facilitated or prevented officials’ continuous use of MI in regular practice?
    • What effects of the intervention can be identified on an individual and an organizational level?

    The report is based on a survey to the insurance officials (n=880), and interviews with 5 managers and 16 insurance officials in four offices. The interviews are follow-ups from a larger data collection that was reported in the first report from the project.

    The results of the study show that many of the officials, some time after the educational intervention, are still committed to the method, and that many claim to use it in meetings with their clients. However, there is a large variation with regard to what parts of the method that are utilized. Most officials have participated in the educational intervention and perceived it as purposeful and interesting. Many officials claim that using the method has improved their meetings with clients.

    Much criticism is directed towards how the SSIA has managed the investment in MI, where officials do not think that the educational intervention has been followed up in any organized way, and that there has been a lack of the necessary training in order to develop and sustain competence in using the method. It is generally perceived that MI has not been a priority in the organization and that managers have not expressed interested in whether the method is used or not. Officials are also critical to their possibilities to use the method related to their current work situation, where heavy caseloads imply little or no time for reflection and learning.

  • 66.
    Ståhl, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Böhm, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Implementering och användning av motiverande samtal (MI) inom Försäkringskassan2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012, the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) launched an educational intervention where all officials were to be trained in Motivational Interviewing (MI). The purpose of the intervention was to improve the quality of meetings with sickness benefit claimants, and in a long term to strengthen the legitimacy of the SSIA. The intervention comprised off-site education (2+2 days), and workplace coaches to support training and use of MI, through individual and group consultations.

    MI is a client-centered method aimed at facilitating behavior change through focus on motivation and management of ambivalence. The method has been evaluated with convincing results in several areas, e.g. smoking cessation and drug rehabilitation. While it has also been adapted to social work, its effects in such areas are less documented.

    The aim of the study was to elicit how officials, managers and other groups within the SSIA perceived the conditions for using MI, and the implementation process. The study comprises two comprehensive data collections in four insurance offices, comprising interviews with officials, managers, claimants and coaches, and observations at meetings; interviews with managers and coordinators; and a survey to all officials. In this report, data is presented from the first data collection, consisting of observations, and individual interviews with officials, managers, and claimants. A full report will be presented in 2015.

  • 67.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    department of Industrial Engineering and Management Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Berglund, Martina
    School of Engineering and Health Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    Learning and competence driven product introduction2008In: Swedish Production Symposium,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competence and the ability to learn are argued to be the only true sustainable advantages, and at the same time waste of knowledge is one of the major wastes during product introduction. There are several aspects of learning that are relevant to discuss in relation to product introduction. In this paper we elaborate on different types of learning that occur, and possibilities for work place learning during product introduction based on experiences from three research projects. Learning that occurs in relation to product introduction involves elements of both adaptive learning and expansive learning. Our results indicate that adaptive learning often is often associated with the work procedures, how activities and tasks are performed, whereas expansive learning is often associated with the tasks solved, the developed technology, etc. Learning occurs in situations were people meet and work together around a task. Product introduction can not be handled by single individuals; co-operation within, and between, various functions during product introduction is essential. Furthermore it is essential that work procedures are identified that support learning and utilization of competence and experiences. Learning has to be a natural and integrated part of the activities associated with product introduction. Keywords: product introduction, transfer of experiences, adaptive learning, expansive learning

  • 68.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    Preparatory production activities and learning during product introduction2009In: Proceedings of The International 3'rd Swedish Production Symposium, SPS '09, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Tillmar, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Högberg, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rosell, Erik
    Institutet för entreprenörskaps- och småföretagsforskning, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Svensson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sektorsöverskridande samverkan: En studie av organisering för välfärd mellan olika samhällssektorer2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande rapport fokuserar på organisering och samverkan över sektorsgränser mellan det offentliga, det privata och civilsamhället. Den samverkan som studeras sker för att hantera välfärdsutmaningar. Sektorerna fyller olika funktioner i vårt samhälle, men samhällskontraktet är statt i förändring. Allt fler tjänster inom välfärdsområdet har under de senaste decennierna utförts av privata företag. Nu vänder sig allt fler till civilsamhället för att hitta lösningar för att hantera välfärdsutmaningarna. Samverkan över sektorsgränser för att lösa utmaningarna kan ses om en del i en större förändringsprocess som rör samhällskontraktet.

    I den här rapporten diskuteras processer och förutsättningar som främjar respektive hindrar sådan samverkan i praktiken. Vi fokuserar på följande frågeställningar:

    • Hur beskriver och uppfattar de involverade aktörerna organisering och samverkan mellan de tre sektorerna?
    • Vilka förutsättningar främjar respektive hindrar samverkan mellan sektorerna?
    • Vilka organisatoriska utmaningar finns vid samverkan mellan sektorer; och hur hanteras utmaningar?

    Frågorna belyses och diskuteras med hjälp av tre fallstudier, kallade Kooperativet, Projektet och Partnerskapet. Forskningen har en så kallad explorativ fallstudiedesign, och vi har genomfört individuella intervjuer och dialoger med aktörer från de tre sektorerna – det offentliga, företagen och civilsamhällets organisationer i de tre fallen. Totalt har cirka 30 intervjuer och ett antal informella dialoger genomförts. Vi har också studerat dokument, och genomfört återföringsdialoger med representanter för de tre samverkansinitiativen.

    De studerade fallen speglar en tid då den offentliga sektorn i landet är i omvandling. Den här rapporten har dokumenterat välfärdsorganisering där nätverkande och marknadslika relationer snarare än byråkratiska principer är avgörande för den verksamhet som sker. Samtliga fall illustrerar betydelsen av nyckelpersoner med förankring i flera sektorer, så kallade gränsgångare. Dessa personer behöver också besitta det vi kallar intersektoriell kompetens, det vill säga kunskaper om och erfarenheter av andra sektorer, samt nätverkskompetens. Sådan kompetens kräver tid och resurser att bygga och utveckla – tidshorisonten för samverkan behöver därför vara lång. Själva samverkan är också tids- och resurskrävande samt förknippad med en hög grad av komplexitet. Våra studier ger genom framförallt i två av fallen visst stöd till de varnande röster som lyfter fram risken att privat sektorslogik tenderar att bli alltmer styrande på samhällets alla områden. Samtidigt ser vi att fruktbar sektorsöverskridande samverkan är möjlig under vissa förutsättningar, vilka vi sammanfattar i termer av fem K:

    • Kompetens – Det krävs drivande gränsgångare som har det vi vill kalla för ”intersektoriell kompetens” och ett starkt engagemang för målgruppen (gränsobjektet).
    • Kontakt – Gränsgångarna måste ha kontakt med andra gränsgångare, med politiker, (andra) tjänstemän samt med gränsobjektet (målgruppen och den samhällsfråga de är en del av).
    • Kapital – Det krävs finansiellt kapital, även från det offentliga. Privat kapital och ideellt arbete kan bidra, men förslår inte i de studerade fallen.
    • Kontinuitet – När förändringar inom organisationerna eller i de externa förutsättningarna blir omfattande, tappar samverkan fart eller blir en omöjlig uppgift. Det behövs en lång tidshorisont.
    • Kontext – Olika organisatoriska lösningar för samverkan fungerar olika bra i olika sammanhang och under olika finansiella förutsättningar. Valet beror av sammanhanget.

    Från de tre studerade fallen kan också lärdomar dras för samverkande aktörer från samtliga tre sektorer. Ett framgångskoncept för alla förefaller vara – att hitta personer i en annan sektor som har samma eller liknande inställning till den aktuella samhällsfrågan och/eller målgruppen – att vara öppen för att lära sig mer om hur de andra sektorerna fungerar – att i möjligaste mån försöka anpassa tempo och rytm till andra samverkande organisationer.

  • 70.
    Wallman, A.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindblad, A.K.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ring, L.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Factors associated with reflection among students after an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden2009In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 107-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To identify individual and social factors associated with pharmacy students level of reflection in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods. A postal questionnaire, including a reflective assignment, was sent to all pharmacy interns (n=262) at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 4 semesters in 2005-2007. Results. In a univariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be associated with students level of reflection. After controlling for covariates, 3 social factors were found to be independently associated with reflection: having a formal preceptor (OR=5.3), being at a small pharmacy (OR=19.8), and students perception of the importance of discussing critical thinking with the preceptor (OR=1.2). No correlation could be observed between level of reflection and critical thinking, nor learning style. Conclusion. Social components seem to be of higher importance than individual components in students reflective levels after pharmacy internship experience. Trained preceptors are important to foster reflection skills.

  • 71.
    Wallman, Andy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kettis Lindblad, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet.
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala universitet.
    An exploration of how students learn in pharmacy internship2011In: Pharmacy Education, ISSN 1560-2214, E-ISSN 1477-2701, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - The pharmacy internship introduces students to pharmacy practice. An understanding of learning processes in the internship is vital for educators in order to develop activities that support learning.

    Aim - The aim was to analyse students‟ learning activities in a Swedish pharmacy internship from both students‟ and tutors‟ perspectives.

    Method - Interviews with pharmacy internship students (n=17) and pharmacist tutors (n=18) were performed, followed by a qualitative analysis.

    Results – The results showed that learning activities ranged from formal, organized activities to informal learning by participating in the professional community. There was a perceived lack of integration between formal and informal activities. Tutors and students acknowledged the influence of the context for learning and the importance of tutors for supporting learning.

    Conclusion - Both formal and informal learning activities have to be accepted and made explicit. Integrating formal and informal learning activities, using the full continuum of possible learning activities, can enhance learning.

  • 72.
    Wallman, Andy
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia
    Uppsala University.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kettis Lindblad, Åsa
    Uppsala University.
    Johansson, Markus
    Uppsala University.
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala University.
    Swedish Students and Preceptors Perceptions of What Students Learn in a Six-Month Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience2011In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 75, no 10, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To identify what pharmacy students learn during the 6-month advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 pharmacy APPE students and 17 pharmacist preceptors and analyzed in a qualitative directed content analysis using a defined workplace learning typology for categories. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. The Swedish APPE provides students with task performance skills for work at pharmacies and social and professional knowledge, such as teamwork, how to learn while in a work setting, self-evaluation, understanding of the pharmacist role, and decision making and problem solving skills. Many of these skills and knowledge are not accounted for in the curricula in Sweden. Using a workplace learning typology to identify learning outcomes, as in this study, could be useful for curricula development. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Exploring the learning that takes place during the APPE in a pharmacy revealed a broad range of skills and knowledge that students acquire.

  • 73.
    Wreder, Åsa
    et al.
    Quality and Environmental Management Luleå University of Technology.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings.
    Klefsjö, Bengt
    Quality and Environmental Management Luleå University of Technology.
    Management for sustainable health: A TQM-inspired model based on experiences taken from successful Swedish organizations2008In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 561-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is threefold: to describe how a large organization has successfully worked to achieve sustainable health, compare the work of the large organization with methodologies used by smaller successful organizations, and then to create a model for how managers of larger organizations can work to create sustainable health. Design/methodology/approach - The empirical data were gathered through interviews with managers at different organizational levels and workshops with employees, within a case study in a large bank which received the award "Sweden's best workplace". The data were also compared to results from earlier case studies of three smaller organizations that have received the same award. Findings - The results of the studies show coinciding results as to the importance of management commitment and methodologies, such as employee involvement, delegation, goal deployment and coaching, to create a health-promoting work environment. This indicates that larger organizations do not need any specific methodologies. Practical implications - Based on the experiences from four successful organizations, managers should mainly consider doing the following: start measuring and evaluating the consequences of sickness absence in their organization, and adopt a management strategy based on humanistic core values that are supported by methodologies and tools. Originality/value - The paper adds understanding about how managers of large organizations could work practically to overcome management problems in today's working life and support the work and organizational factors earlier described in the literature to create a health-promoting work environment that stimulates the development of sustainable health. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

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