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  • 51.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Brain and Mind Institute, National Centre for Audiology, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Semantic coherence and prior knowledge enhance perceptual clarity of degraded speech. Recent study by our team has shown that these two effects interact such that the perceptual clarity of noise-vocoded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when prior knowledge is available from text cues and prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS even when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. We predicted 1) an effect of matching cues for both sentences with high and low semantic coherence in left-lateralized perisylvian areas (Zekveld et al., 2012) and right superior temporal gyrus (Wild et al., 2012), but stronger for low than for high coherent sentences since more resources are required to process sentences with low semantic coherence in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010) and 2) an effect of semantic coherence in temporal and inferior frontal cortex (Lau et al., 2008). The additive effect of semantic coherence when matching cues were provided should be observed in the angular gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010). Twenty participants (age; M=25.14, SD=5.01) listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of Cue (F(1,228) = 21.26; p < .05 FWE) in the left precentral gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus confirming the results of Zekveld et al (2012), but neither the main effect of Coherence nor the interaction between Cue and Coherence survived FWE correction. In accordance with our predictions, contrasts revealed a greater effect of matching cues for low than for high coherent sentences (t(19) = 6.25; p < .05 FWE) in the left superior temporal gyrus as well as left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44 and 45), suggesting greater involvement of both top-down and bottom-up processing mechanisms during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when sentence coherence is lower. There was a marginally greater effect of semantic coherence (t(19) = 3.58; p < .001unc) even when matching cues were provided in the left angular gyrus, the left middle frontal gyrus and the right superior frontal gyrus, suggesting greater involvement of top-down activation of semantic concepts, executive processes and the phonological store during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when the semantic content of the speech is more readily available.

  • 52.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The interplay between prior knowledge and semantic coherence during processing of degraded speech: an fMRI study2015In: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2015, p. 181-181Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Degraded speech is rendered more intelligible both by semantic coherence and preceding text cues. Recently, we showed that the perceptual clarity of noise-vo-coded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when cues are provided and that prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. Twenty participants listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of both Coherence and Cue in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally and a significant interaction between Coherence and Cue when speech was degraded, in superior and middle temporal gyri bilaterally and left precentral gyrus. Investigation of this interaction revealed greater activation for high compared to low coherent sentences when cues were provided in the left-lateralized regions and greater activation without than with cues when semantic coherence was low in bilateral regions. The opposite contrasts elicited no significant activation. This pattern of results indicates that the increases in perceptual clarity of NVS attributable to semantic coherence and prior knowledge are supported by similar neural mechanisms organized in bilateral temporal regions, but that when perceptual clarity is optimized by both factors, it is supported by left-lateralized mechanisms.

12 51 - 52 of 52
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