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  • 51.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Novel whole brain segmentation and volume estimation using quantitative MRI2012In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 998-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Brain segmentation and volume estimation of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) are important for many neurological applications. Volumetric changes are observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and in normal aging. A novel method is presented to segment brain tissue based on quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R(1), the transverse relaxation rate R(2) and the proton density, PD.

    METHODS:

    Previously reported qMRI values for WM, GM and CSF were used to define tissues and a Bloch simulation performed to investigate R(1), R(2) and PD for tissue mixtures in the presence of noise. Based on the simulations a lookup grid was constructed to relate tissue partial volume to the R(1)-R(2)-PD space. The method was validated in 10 healthy subjects. MRI data were acquired using six resolutions and three geometries.

    RESULTS:

    Repeatability for different resolutions was 3.2% for WM, 3.2% for GM, 1.0% for CSF and 2.2% for total brain volume. Repeatability for different geometries was 8.5% for WM, 9.4% for GM, 2.4% for CSF and 2.4% for total brain volume.

    CONCLUSION:

    We propose a new robust qMRI-based approach which we demonstrate in a patient with MS. KEY POINTS : • A method for segmenting the brain and estimating tissue volume is presented • This method measures white matter, grey matter, cerebrospinal fluid and remaining tissue • The method calculates tissue fractions in voxel, thus accounting for partial volume • Repeatability was 2.2% for total brain volume with imaging resolution <2.0 mm.

  • 52.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Segmentation and Volume Estimation on a Sub-voxel Basis using Quantitative MR: A Validation Study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Using Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Generate Disease Images of Multiple Sclerosis2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Accurate Estimation of Tissue Volumes by means of Quantitative MR on patients with Multiple Sclerosis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Accurate Estimation of Tissue Volumes by means of Quantitative MR on patients with Multiple Sclerosis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hottinger, Anna-Lena
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Post-mortem 1.5T MR quantification of regular anatomical brain structures2016In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 1071-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, post-mortem MR quantification has been introduced to the field of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. By usage of a particular MR quantification sequence, T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissues and organs can be quantified simultaneously. The aim of the present basic research study was to assess the quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of regular anatomical brain structures for a 1.5T application and to correlate the assessed values with corpse temperatures. In a prospective study, 30 forensic cases were MR-scanned with a quantification sequence prior to autopsy. Body temperature was assessed during MR scans. In synthetically calculated T1, T2, and PD-weighted images, quantitative T1, T2 (both in ms) and PD (in %) values of anatomical structures of cerebrum (Group 1: frontal gray matter, frontal white matter, thalamus, internal capsule, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) and brainstem/cerebellum (Group 2: cerebral crus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, pons, cerebellar hemisphere, and superior cerebellar peduncle) were assessed. The investigated brain structures of cerebrum and brainstem/cerebellum could be characterized and differentiated based on a combination of their quantitative T1, T2, and PD values. MANOVA testing verified significant differences between the investigated anatomical brain structures among each other in Group 1 and Group 2 based on their quantitative values. Temperature dependence was observed mainly for T1 values, which were slightly increasing with rising temperature in the investigated brain structures in both groups. The results provide a base for future computer-aided diagnosis of brain pathologies and lesions in post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging.

  • 57.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Bertus Warntjes, Marcel, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2381-2389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Material and methods Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. Results In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 °C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Conclusion Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoracoabdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided.

  • 58.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem MR quantification of the heart for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2067-2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, an MRI quantification sequence has been developed which can be used to acquire T1- and T2-relaxation times as well as proton density (PD) values. Those three quantitative values can be used to describe soft tissue in an objective manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of quantitative cardiac MRI for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions of different age. Fifty post-mortem short axis cardiac 3 T MR examinations have been quantified using a quantification sequence. Myocardial lesions were identified according to histology and appearance in MRI images. Ischaemic lesions were assessed for mean T1-, T2- and proton density values. Quantitative values were plotted in a 3D-coordinate system to investigate the clustering of ischaemic myocardial lesions. A total of 16 myocardial lesions detected in MRI images were histologically characterized as acute lesions (n = 8) with perifocal oedema (n = 8), subacute lesions (n = 6) and chronic lesions (n = 2). In a 3D plot comprising the combined quantitative values of T1, T2 and PD, the clusters of all investigated lesions could be well differentiated from each other. Post-mortem quantitative cardiac MRI is feasible for characterization and discrimination of different age stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent MR quantification is feasible for characterization of different stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent The results provide the base for computer-aided MRI cardiac infarction diagnosis. aEuro cent Diagnostic criteria may also be applied for living patients.

  • 59.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Riva, Fabiano
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    University of Bern, Switzerland; Hospital and University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem quantitative 1.5-T MRI for the differentiation and characterization of serous fluids, blood, CSF, and putrefied CSF2015In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 129, no 5, p. 1127-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether serous fluids, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and putrefied CSF can be characterized and differentiated in synthetically calculated magnetic resonance (MR) images based on their quantitative T (1), T (2), and proton density (PD) values. Images from 55 postmortem short axis cardiac and 31 axial brain 1.5-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF were analyzed for their mean T (1), T (2), and PD values. Body core temperature was measured during the MRI scans. The fluid-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot as well as in statistical analysis, the quantitative T (1), T (2) and PD values of serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative T (1) and T (2) values were temperature-dependent. Correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 A degrees C resulted in significantly better discrimination between all investigated fluid mediums. We conclude that postmortem 1.5-T MR quantification is feasible to discriminate between blood, serous fluids, CSF, and putrefied CSF. This finding provides a basis for the computer-aided diagnosis and detection of fluids and hemorrhages.

12 51 - 59 of 59
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