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  • 51.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relocating Swedish whiteness: Review of White migrations: gender, whiteness and privilege by Stine H. Bang Svendsen2015In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 140-143Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Review: Mediated Kinship: Gender, Race and Sexuality in Donor Families.2020In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 131-133Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Sexualised commodification:: Gender, Ethnicity and Sexuality in the Latin Music Boom in Sweden2006In: From Orientalism to Postcoloniality, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 54.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    She's a Kind of Swedish Wannabe: Deconstructing Swedishness in Latin American Diaspora2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Southern Theory: The Global Dynamics of Knowledge in Social Science2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 85-87Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Suburban femininities and the racialization of space in the Latina diaspora in Stockholm2006In: NYRIS 9 Landscapes of Youth, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Suburban Girls: Racialized formations of gender and space in Swedish Latina Diaspora2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Svenska latinas: Ras, klass och kön i svenskhetens geografi2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines diasporic narratives of Swedish national belonging among a group of young women of Latin American descent, born and/or raised in Sweden, and adoptees. Based on individual interviews, pair interviews, and focus group discussions with twenty-nine high school girls in the Stockholm region, the study aims to understand how mechanisms of exclusion and inclusion operate through intersecting power structures of race, class, gender, sexuality, and age, in the increasingly multi-ethnic Sweden. The analysis suggests that the imagined community of Sweden was constructed mainly around boundaries of whiteness, with non-whiteness becoming the main marker for non-Swedishness, meaning "foreign". The borders of whiteness appeared most salient for the adopted girls who identified themselves as culturally Swedish, yet experienced exclusion from national belonging on racial grounds. Swedishness and the sense of national belonging further operated through notions of space and place. In multi-ethnic contexts, the young women could identify themselves as Swedes in relation to other ethnicities, while they encountered scrutinity and a sense of being "out of place" in Swedish-dominated settings. The girls raised in middle-class environments in the "white" inner-city area, however, could use this background and transform it into an ethnic symbolic marker of Swedishness. Thus, race, class, and place were for them intimately intertwined as markers of difference and social stratification in the Swedish society. Another arena for identification was found in the emerging popularity of Latina artists in Sweden. While the Latin music boom had the ability to evolve transnational diasporic links, it was nonetheless fused with projections of exoticism and contrasted to Swedish white subjectivity in ways that contributed to a sense of otherness. Appearing Swedish thus required distancing themselves from Latin American cultural arenas, pointing to the need to critically approach the role of stereotyping discourses in the process of subject formation.

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  • 59.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Svenska Latinas: Rasifierade diskurser om femininitet och representationer av latinidad i Sverige2006In: Feministiska interventioner: Berättelser om och från en annan värld / [ed] Kerstin Sandell & Diana Mulinari, Stockholm: Atlas Akademi , 2006, p. 239-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Svenskhetens informella gränser2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svenskhetens utsida2014In: Bryt upp!: Om etik och rasism / [ed] Nick Jones, Lund: BTJ Förlag , 2014, p. 157-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Svenskhetens utsida.: Invandrare och Minoriteter, Nyckeln till integration?2009In: Specialnummer om kulturmöten i det svenska samhället. ReprintArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish Whiteness and White Melancholia: A case study of a white nation in crisis, its history and future2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last election in Sweden in 2010, the racist party the Sweden Democrats entered the national parliament, something that disturbs the image and the privileged position of progressive Sweden and ‘Nordic exceptionalism’ in the postcolonial world. This paper offers an historicized account of what we consider are the three principal phases, stages and moments of Swedish nation-building and Swedish whiteness, namely the white purity period between 1905-1968, the white solidarity period between 1968-2001 and the white melancholy period from 2001 and onwards. The analysis takes into account how these three nation-building projects and hegemonic whiteness and racial grammar regimes are interrelated and intersecting with the different gender and class relations, racial formations and minority discourses, political ideologies and affective structures that characterised these three time periods. It is argued that Sweden today is subjected to the double-binding power of Swedish whiteness in the sense that the disappearance of white Sweden, that is Sweden as a racially homogeneous nation, and the passing of good Sweden, that is Sweden as a politically progressive nation, are both perceived to be threatened and even under siege by the presence of people of colour within the Swedish body politic and state territory.

  • 64.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish Whiteness and White Melancholia: A white nation in crisis2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After the last election in Sweden in 2010, the racist party the Sweden Democrats entered the national parliament. The post-election reactions and discussions have largely been preoccupied with the issue of how this new presence of a racist party in the Swedish parliament disturbs the exceptionalist image and the privileged position of Sweden both in the West as well as in the non-Western world as being humanity’s avant-garde and beacon for antiracism and everything that is considered to be good and progressive. An explosive eruption of militant antiracism has also taken place since 2010, especially among the country’s elites and within the Swedish establishment. Although Sweden is still topping the international lists as having the most radical anti-discrimination legislation and as harbouring the most solid antiracist population without any competition, at the very same time, Sweden has recently and rapidly also entered the top positions of being one of the most statistically segregated and segmented societies according to racial lines, at least in the Western world and particularly within the residential and labour markets.

    With this background as the point of departure, this article aims at understanding the current situation in Sweden from a critical race and whiteness studies perspective, something that has not yet been heard of in a country which prides itself of having accomplished a post-racial utopia and where colour-blindness is hegemonic and issues of race and whiteness are taboo subjects and almost forbidden to speak about. We regard contemporary Sweden as a white nation in crisis and diagnose Swedish whiteness as suffering from what can be conceptualised as a white melancholia. To be able to disentangle and shed light upon what is perceived to be mourned and what is seen as being lost for the future, the article offers an historicized account of what we consider are the three principal phases, stages and moments of Swedish nation-building and Swedish whiteness, namely the white purity period between 1905-1968, the white solidarity period between 1968-2001 and the white melancholy period from 2001 and onwards. The analysis also takes into account how these three nation-building projects and hegemonic whiteness and racial grammar regimes are interrelated and intersecting with the different gender and class relations, with the different racial formations and minority discourses, and with the different political ideologies and affective structures that characterised these three time periods.

    At the end, we argue that Sweden is at the moment subjected to the double-binding power of Swedish whiteness in the sense that the disappearance of white Sweden, that is Sweden as a racially homogeneous nation, and the passing of good Sweden, that is Sweden as a politically progressive nation, are both perceived to be threatened and even under siege by the presence of people of colour within the Swedish body politic and state territory. Consequently, both the reactionary and racist camp, and the radical and antiracist camp, are mourning the contemporary crisis of the Swedish nation. Finally, we are discussing the possibility of applying our analysis of Swedish whiteness and of white melancholia to other white nations in crisis, and the potential contribution it could make to the field of race and whiteness studies.

  • 65.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swedish whiteness in Southern Spain2013In: Geographies of Privilege / [ed] France Winddance Twine & Bradley Gardener, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 191-203Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How are social inequalities experienced, reproduced and challenged in local, global and transnational spaces? What role does the control of space play in distribution of crucial resources and forms of capital (housing, education, pleasure, leisure, social relationships)? The case studies in Geographies of Privilege demonstrate how power operates and is activated within local, national, and global networks. Twine and Gardener have put together a collection that analyzes how the centrality of spaces (domestic, institutional, leisure, educational) are central to the production, maintenance and transformation of inequalities. The collected readings show how power--in the form of economic, social, symbolic, and cultural capital--is employed and experienced. The volume's contributors take the reader to diverse sites, including brothels, blues clubs, dance clubs, elite schools, detention centers, advocacy organizations, and public sidewalks in Canada, Italy, Spain, United Arab Emirates, Mozambique, South Africa, and the United States.  Geographies of Privilege is the perfect teaching tool for courses on social problems, race, class and gender in Geography, Sociology and Anthropology.

  • 66.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The white side of migration: Reflections on race, citizenship and belonging2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘The migrant’ tends to be imagined as a non-privileged, non-white, non-Westernsubject in search for a better future in Europe or the US, and as such a preconstitutedsubject shaped by notions of marginalization and poverty. What kind ofstories are obscured by this recurrent image of ‘the migrant’, and how does suchcategorization hamper the thinking of privilege, belonging and white normativity?Why are some migrants not regarded as migrants despite their migrant status andwhy are other individuals seen as migrants and thus denied their national belongingin spite of their formal status as national citizens? The presentation aims to developexisting theoretical perspectives on migration and citizenship by combining findingsin current migration studies with critical race and whiteness studies with particularattention to a) autochthony and belonging, b) race and citizenship, and c) whitecapital.

  • 67.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The white side of migration: Reflections on race, citizenship and belonging in Sweden2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘The migrant’ tends to be imagined as a non-privileged, non-white, non-western subject in search of a better future in Europe or the United States and as such is a pre-constituted subject shaped by notions of marginalization and poverty. What kinds of stories are obscured by this recurrent image of ‘the migrant’ and how do such categorizations hamper the analysis of privilege, belonging and white normativity within studies of migration? Why are some individuals not regarded as migrants despite their migrant status? Why are other individuals seen as migrants and thus denied their national belonging in spite of their formal status as national citizens? The article develops analytical tools on migration, belonging and citizenship, with particular attention to (a) autochthony and belonging, (b) race and citizenship and (c) white capital.

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  • 68.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Transnationell vithet: Svenska migrantkvinnor i USA och Singapore2010In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 1-2, p. 23-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines different expressions of whiteness in a transnational context through first-generation Swedish migrant women’s narratives of their bodies, when moving and re-installing themselves in the altered social, racial and political landscapes of the United States and Singapore. Their specific migratory experiences are used as a departure to analyze the ways in which gender- and nation-specific forms of capital may be converted through migration. The central inquiries in the article are concerned with how Swedish women experience their bodies, as migrant bodies, and how embodied privilege move and are being re-invested in two racially different contexts. The study, conducted from 2006-2009, is based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions with almost 50 women in United States and Singapore, all of them being members of a support group for Swedish-speaking women, and three of their spouses. In addition, I have conducted participant observations in several Swedish-related arenas in the two countries. By looking at how Swedishness is being re-installed in non-Swedish contexts, the article contextualizes migrating Swedishness and whiteness and contributes with a transnational perspective on whiteness, which carries a potential to destabilize an idea of whiteness as a homogeneous entity. In sum, it is argued that white privileges often remain normalized and invisible for the informants themselves, but while Swedish femininity is highly valued in the United States, it is represented as a non-normative whiteness in the Singaporean context.

  • 69.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utan mätning, ingen rättvisa2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Var kommer du ifrån – egentligen?: Om svenskhet, vithet och passerandets logiker2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Vit exklusivitet?: Svenska latinas som gränsöverskridande kategori2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vit migration: kön, vithet och privilegier i transnationella migrationsprocesser2017Book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Vit respektabilitet: Den svenska nationens könade symbolik och unga kvinnors kulturella praktiker2009In: Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning, ISSN 0809-6341, E-ISSN 1891-1781, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 295-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with social and cultural constructions of Swedishness from a perspective that highlights the intersections of gender, sexuality and race. It argues that racialized discourses around heterosexuality constitute an important aspect of the notion of the nation, and its boundaries of belonging. Empirically, the study is based on interviews with 29 young women of Latin American descent, born and/or raised in Sweden. Looking at ideas around nation, race, gender and sexuality as being intertwined, complex processes of inclusion and exclusion are illuminated. While the young women experience exclusion from the Swedish narrative of whiteness, they constitute themselves as Swedes by culturally associating themselves with sexual liberty: a central part of the idea of “a Swedish sexuality”. In this way, they simultaneously distance themselves from virginity or abstinence, a practice coupled with Muslim young women, and in a broader sense, with the notion of “immigrants”. Since non-white women are not constituted as symbolic to the nation in the same way as white women are, however, it is argued that they, as young Latina women, do not embody Swedishness and the kind of respectability inherited in the construction of whiteness. Thus, by exploring national belonging through intersecting practices, the article argues that the often discussed and by large criticized binary construction of “Swedes” and “immigrants” appears even more complex when gender and sexuality are introduced into the analysis.

  • 74.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vita kroppar migrerar också.2015In: Feministiskt perspektivArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Migranter har blivit ett kodnamn för "icke-vita". Det synliggörs i Catrin Lundströms forskning om transnationell migration där hon studerar svenska kvinnor som av olika anledningar flyttat och bosatt sig i andra länder. Christin Sandberg har intervjuat henne om relationen mellan kön, vithet och globala omsorgs- och migrationskedjor.

  • 75.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    “We are the world”: Swedish migrant women and white cosmopolitanism2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Race and whiteness fundamentally structures mobility and migration by the means of border controls and visa policies or by the lack thereof. These principles in contemporary globalization make up the foundation for our different approaches to the world around us. This paper emerges from the concept of white cosmopolitanism to capture the interrelation between white upper-middle-class migrant women’s sense of being ‘citizens of the world’ and the production of Swedish national modernity. Empirically, the paper is based on nearly ten years of ethnographic work including in-depth interviews with Swedish women living abroad and returning migrants to Sweden. For the women abroad, it is of utmost importance to preserve their Swedish national identity yet transcending the national to become ‘citizens of the world’. For returning Swedes, the undertaking is to bring this world back ‘home’ to Sweden. This process reflects how the reproduction of Swedish modernity acts upon the women’s bodies as representatives of the Swedish nation abroad simultaneously re-inscribing the nation into the global. It is here argued that the very language of cosmopolitanism is structured by whiteness, white capital and class, which grant uninterrupted mobility and the authority to bring pieces and parts of the world ‘back’ into the national. Such expressions and subject positions of white upper-middle-class women are further re-constructed through other women’s work as they care for the domestic and the family while the white women acquire cosmopolitan capital by traveling around the world. Apart from obscuring global inequalities, white cosmopolitanism is here seen as imbricated in national politics. As Sweden searches for a post-Social Democrat identity domestically and globally, white cosmopolitan femininity may well be the place where global intimacies reconnect with a renewed white nationalism that re-inscribes Sweden into the contemporary neoliberal global soul, even with closed borders.

  • 76.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Where are you from?: Swedishness, Whiteness and the Politics of Passing2007In: Cultural Studies Association, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a long history of migration, the notion of a white and homogeneous Swedish nation subsists, and the boundaries of the imagined community are being constructed by both internal racialized, divisions and by external frontiers. This paper is concerned with the discourses of Swedish national identity by theoretically exploring the themes origin, homogeneity and whiteness, and their performative aspects. The discussion is based on individual interviews and focus group discussions with young Latina women in Sweden who represent different positions in relation to the idea(l)s of the nation. Most of them are born in Sweden with parents of Chilean descent, others have migrated only recently from other Latin American countries. Still others have been adopted as children by Swedish families.

    The paper highlights their experiences of being alternately excluded or included in the national imaginary. The analysis acknowledges the importance of looking into the normative nature of the nation, while simultaneously viewing into its border work. Questions asked are: What are the mechanisms in reproducing the ideas of national belonging? How may practices of passing elucidate the processes of redefinition of a national identity? How are racialized power relations to be construed through the politics of passing? How may the position of the ‘outsider’ open for possible critical stances towards the norms of whiteness and (white) femininity?

    Hence, the paper deals with questions of how the frontiers of Swedish national identity are related to gender, race, sexuality and class, and further how alternative spaces are created, and mediated through i.e. the global commodity culture. Here, the recent Latin music boom in Sweden plays a pivotal role as an arena for creating new hybrid identities among young Latina women. Through what practices then is (fictive) homogeneity performed and how may the heterogeneity of the population, as manifested by the group of Latina girls, be articulated? Of particular interest are the experiences of the adopted girls, since they both constitute models of Swedish (middle-class) cultural performance while simultaneously articulating presumptions of biological boundaries to the nation. Despite cultural knowledge, racial boundaries hinder them from easily passing as Swedes, in case they attempt to do that. The notion of the white nation can then be viewed as an embodied act, in which passing as white equates with passing as Swede, perfomative aspects that furthermore insist for a constant redefinition of the nation space.

  • 77.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    White ethnography: (un)comfortable conveniences and shared privileges in fieldwork with swedish migrant women2010In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 70-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses methodological dilemmas in ethnographic research with first-generation Swedish migrant women living in the United States. From a (white) Swedish researcher perspective, it seeks to disentangle aspects of shared privileges between researcher and participants and constructions of white spaces in a non-Swedish context. What does it mean to pass as a white, middle-class Swede in research and how are white privileges being upheld in such acting? How are class differences equalized when ethnography is conducted outside the national class system where internal hierarchies may be re-negotiated? The article argues that the use of “methodological capital” (Gallagher 2000), such as embodied capital and passing strategies that might be necessary to reach specific groups of examination, may also reproduce structural privileges by not intervening into normative assumptions of race, class, gender and sexuality. In these circumstances, the article inquires into what can be learned from studying privileged groups and, thereby, what may we fail to see.

  • 78.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White migrations: Exploring Whiteness and Transnationalism2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of ‘white migration’ could be read as an oxymoron. A migrant is rarely thought of as white and white people tend not to be seen as migrants. Rather, white people’s presence ‘out of place’ is more probably conflicted with the position of a tourist, an expatriate, a mobile professional or, just ‘passing’ as European or North American. This paper provides a theoretical discussion linking transnational migration studies and critical whiteness studies, suggesting that there is a discursive gap between privileged white migrant subjects – experiencing a lack of discrimination (or a positive one) – and non-white (im)migrants – who are defined by discrimination. In this gap, I ask what ‘white capital’ can do for migration and how migration impact on the value of such capital. The theoretical arguments stem from 66 in-depth interviews with Swedish migrant women in the US, Singapore and Spain, showing how the focus on gendered white migration calls for a need to study both oppression and domination – and the intersection between them. In sum, the paper argues that a transnational approach to white migrations could pose new questions and add new knowledge to both (i) transnational migration studies, which have mainly focused on the disadvantages of migration rather than the possible opportunities embedded in white migrations, and to (ii) critical studies of whiteness, which have mainly cantered on single national racial hierarchies, particularly so in the US and the UK.

  • 79.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White migrations: Gender, Whitenss and Privilege in Transnational Migration2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The migrant is often thought of as a non-westerner in search for a better future in Europe or the United States. From a multi-sited ethnography with Swedish migrant women in the US, Singapore and Spain, this book explores the intersections of racial and class privilege and gender vulnerabilities in contemporary feminized migration from or within ‘the West’. Through an analysis of ‘white migration’, it develops theoretical tools to understand the dynamics that shape the women’s lives as wealthy housewives, expatriate wives and lifestyle migrants. By shifting the gaze towards privileged migrants, The book illustrates how race shapes contemporary transnational migration and how white privilege is reproduced through family formation, expatriate geographies or ‘international communities’ in response to the shifting boundaries of whiteness in different national and regional settings. Looking at how whiteness migrates through a transnational lens the book fills a gap in literature on race and migration, presenting some of the complexities of the current global power relations and the contextual variations that surround these.

  • 80.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White Women. White Nation. White Cosmopolitanism: Swedish Migration between the National and the Global2019In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging from the concepts of white cosmopolitanism and white cosmopolitan femininity, this article analyses "cosmopolitan narratives" of Swedish migrant women who lived abroad for an extended period and eventually returned to Sweden. Based on eight months' ethnographic work, including 46 in-depth interviews with migrants who had returned in Sweden, the article explores how national boundaries are both maintained and traversed in the construction of a "world citizen". It is argued that the women?s self-identification with a cosmopolitan ethos is structured by whiteness, nationality, and class that grants uninterrupted mobility and "worldliness". As symbolic bearers of the Swedish nation, national ideals act on the white women?s bodies internationally, in ways that both uphold and re-inscribe the nation into the global. Thus, apart from obscuring global inequalities, white cosmopolitan femininity is imbricated in both national and global politics as a place where global structures reconnect with the white nation, thereby enabling Swedish migrants to re-install themselves into contemporary global settings as self-defined cosmopolitan subjects

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  • 81.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White women. White nation. White cosmopolitanism.: Swedish return migration between the national and the global.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism is intrinsically associated with the transgression of narrowing national boundaries, performing the function of a ‘globalization from within’. This paper emerges from the concept of white cosmopolitanism, providing a critique of the inherent racial aspects of cosmopolitanism and the ‘cosmopolitan class’, based on the argument that the very language of cosmopolitanism is structured by whiteness and class, granting uninterrupted mobility and a sense of becoming ‘worldly’. The concept captures Swedish white upper-middle-class returning migrant women’s’ sense of being ‘citizens of the world’ including ideas of certain ethics such as ‘tolerance’ and a cultured approach to ‘otherness’. The paper analyses how national boundaries are confined, yet transgressed in the narratives of the ‘Swedish world citizen’. Such process reflects how the reproduction of Swedish nationality acts upon the women’s bodies as representatives of the nation abroad and simultaneously re-inscribing the (white) nation into the global.

  • 82.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Women with class: Swedish migrant women re-enacting class privileges in the United States2009In: American Sociological Association: The new politics of community., American Sociological Association , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Umeå Centre for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Women With Class: Swedish Migrant Women's Class Positions in the USA2010In: Journal of Intercultural Studies, ISSN 0725-6868, E-ISSN 1469-9540, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines gender- and nation-specific forms of capital through migration. It focuses on first-generation Swedish women moving to a new social and political landscape in the United States (US), typically from upper- and middle-class environments in Sweden. Their migratory experiences are used as a departure to analyse how former class positions are being re-enacted (or not) in the neo-liberal US. The study, conducted from 2006-2008, is based on in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 33 women and three of their spouses and participant observations in a support group for Swedish-speaking women in the Western region of the US. Using an intersectional analysis, it is suggested that Swedish women are located in contradictory class positions in the US in terms of the loss of social and cultural capital, access to the social democratic welfare state and a dependence on racialised labour in a different social geography. It is argued that the women’s class privileges are shaped, transformed and reproduced through their capacities to re-invest their cultural and embodied forms of capital in marriage and by marking a distance to subordinated groups, often other migrant women, thereby mirroring the unequal relations between (migrating) women in a global arena.

  • 84.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Sociologiska institutionen, Högskolan Halmstad.
    The Politics of Belonging: Intersectional Contestations2013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Den vita maskulinitetens kris är nu2017In: Feministiskt perspektiv, ISSN 2002-1542Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 86.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    La mélancolie blanche ou comment pleurer la ’bonne vieille Suède2012In: La Revue Nouvelle, ISSN 0035-3809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre, Botkyrka.
    Sweden after the recent election: The double-binding power of Swedish Whiteness through the mourning of the loss of "old Sweden" and the passing of "good Sweden".2011In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre.
    Swedish whiteness and white melancholia: A case study of a white nation in crisis and its history and future.2014In: Unveiling whiteness in the 21st century: Global manifestations, transdisciplinary interventions / [ed] Deirdre Howard-Wagner, Veronica Watson & Lisa Spanierman., Lanham: Lexington Books, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre, Botkyrka, Sweden.
    Swedish Whiteness and White Melancholia: A Diagnosis of a White Nation in Crisis2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Multicultural Centre.
    Three phases of hegemonic whiteness: Understanding racial temporalities in Sweden2014In: Social Identities, ISSN 1350-4630, E-ISSN 1363-0296, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 423-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After the election in Sweden in 2010, the racist Sweden Democrats party entered parliament. Post-election reactions and discussions were largely preoccupied with the issue of how the presence of a racist party in the Swedish parliament disturbs the country's exceptionalist image and privileged position – both in the West and in the non-Western world – as humanity's avant-garde and beacon for antiracism. This article aims to understand the current situation in Sweden from a critical race and whiteness studies perspective. We regard contemporary Sweden as a ‘white nation in crisis’, and diagnose Swedish society as suffering from a ‘white melancholia’. In order to disentangle and shed light upon what is perceived to be mourned and what is seen as being lost for the future, the article offers an historicised account of three principal phases, stages and moments of Swedish nation-building and whiteness; ‘white purity’ (1905–1968); ‘white solidarity’ (1968–2001); and ‘white melancholy’, from 2001 onwards. The analysis also takes into account how these three nation-building projects and hegemonic whiteness and racial grammar regimes are interrelated, and intersect with the different gender and class relations; racial formations; minority discourses; and various political ideologies and affective structures characterising these three periods.

  • 91.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Vit melankoli i krisande nation.2020In: Dagens ArenaArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Mattsson, Katarina
    Studying Privilege.2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Sohl, Lena
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Hemmafrun är det nya gamla2011In: Tidskriften Arena, ISSN 1652-0556, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 94.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Umeå Centrum för Genusstudier, Sweden.
    Sohl, Lena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen, Sweden.
    Hemmafrun är det nya gamla2011In: Arena, ISSN 1652-0556, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 95.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Teitelbaum, Benjamin R.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Nordic Whiteness: An Introduction2017In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Tornhill, Sofie
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Om mikrolånen2008In: Arena, ISSN 1652-0556, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97.
    Lundström, Catrin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Twine, France Winddance
    Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara.
    White migrations: Swedish women, gender vulnerabilities and racial privileges2011In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Swedish migrant women to the United States. It asks how racially privileged European migrants adapt to US racial and gender hierarchies that require them to relinquish their economic security and gender autonomy in a neoliberal state? Drawing upon interviews and focus group discussions with 33 Swedish women and three of their spouses, and participant observation between 2006 and 2008 in a network for Swedish speaking women living in the US, the article discusses how a group of ‘white’ migrant women who arrive in the US with an ideology of gender egalitarianism negotiate a more socially conservative and economically vulnerable lifestyle, as the wives (and potential ex-wives) of upper-middle-class men. The article argues that while Swedish women benefit from their racial and social privileges in the US they lose their sense of economic security, acquiring new anxieties that make them reluctant to renounce their Swedish citizenship which they conceive of as a ‘flexible’ resource.

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