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  • 51.
    Singh, Susmita K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation.
    HIV Interferes with the Dendritic Cell-T Cell Axis of Macrophage Activation by Shifting Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4 T Cells into a Dysfunctional Phenotype2019In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 202, no 3, p. 816-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HIV coinfection is the greatest risk factor for transition of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection into active tuberculosis (TB). Epidemiological data reveal both the reduction and the impairment of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cells, although the cellular link and actual mechanisms resulting in immune impairment/suppression need further characterization. M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cells play a central role in development of protective immunity against TB, in which they participate in the activation of macrophages through the dendritic cell (DC)-T cell axis. Using an in vitro priming system for generating Ag-specific T cells, we explored if HIV-M. tuberculosis-infected (coinfected) human DCs can dysregulate the M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cell phenotype and functionality and subsequently mediate the failure to control M. tuberculosis infection in macrophages. After coculture with coinfected DCs, M. tuberculosis Ag-specific CD4 T cells lost their ability to enhance control of M. tuberculosis infection in infected macrophages. Coinfection of DCs reduced proliferation of M. tuberculosis Ag-specific CD4 T cells without affecting their viability, led to increased expression of coinhibitory factors CTLA-4, PD-1, and Blimp-1, and decreased expression of costimulatory molecules CD40L, CD28, and ICOS on the T cells. Expression of the regulatory T cell markers FOXP3 and CD25, together with the immunosuppressive cytokines TGF-beta and IL-10, was also significantly increased by coinfection compared with M. tuberculosis single infection. Our data suggest a pattern in which HIV, through its effect on DCs, impairs the ability of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cells to maintain a latent TB within human macrophages, which could play an early role in the subsequent development of TB.

  • 52.
    Skoberne, M
    et al.
    NYU School of Medicine.
    Beignon, AS
    NYU School of Medicine.
    Larsson, Marie
    NYU School of Medicine.
    Bhardwaj, N
    NYU School of Medicine.
    Apoptotic cells at the crossroads of tolerance and immunity.2005In: Role of Apoptosis in Infection / [ed] R.W. Compans, M.D. Cooper, T. Honjo, H. Koprowski, F. Melchers, M.B.A. Oldstone, S. Olsnes, M. Potter, P.K. Vogt, H. Wagner and Diane E. Griffin, Springer Berlin Heidelberg , 2005, Vol. 289, p. 259-292Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes can result in either anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects or prostimulatory consequences through presentation of cell-associated antigens to T cells. The differences in outcome are due to the conditions under which apoptosis is induced, the type of phagocytic cell, the nature of the receptors involved in apoptotic cell capture, and the milieu in which phagocytosis of apoptotic cells takes place. Preferential ligation of specific receptors on professional antigen-presenting cells dendriticc cells) has been proposed to induce potentially tolerogenic signals. On the other hand, dendritic cells can efficiently process and present antigens from pathogen-infected apoptotic cells to T cells. In this review, we discuss how apoptotic cells manipulate immunity through interactions with dendritic cells.

  • 53.
    Sundén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkeborn, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lindh, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ydrenius, Liselotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Serrander, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Real-time PCR detection of Human Herpesvirus 1-5 in patients lacking clinical signs of a viral CNS infection2011In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 11, no 220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) with herpes- or enterovirus can be self-limiting and benign, but occasionally result in severe and fatal disease. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized the diagnostics of viral pathogens, and by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) prior to real-time PCR the sensitivity might be further enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate if herpes- or enterovirus can be detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients without symptoms.

    METHODS:

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 373 patients lacking typical symptoms of viral CNS infection were analysed by real-time PCR targeting herpesviruses or enteroviruses with or without prior MDA.

    RESULTS:

    In total, virus was detected in 17 patients (4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was most commonly detected, in general from patients with other conditions (e.g. infections, cerebral hemorrhage). MDA satisfactorily amplified viral DNA in the absence of human nucleic acids, but showed poor amplification capacity for viral DNA in CSF samples, and did not increase the sensitivity for herpes virus-detection with our methodology.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Viral pathogens are rarely detected in CSF from patients without signs of CNS infection, supporting the view that real-time PCR is a highly specific method to detect symptomatic CNS-infection caused by these viruses. However, EBV may be subclinically reactivated due to other pathological conditions in the CNS.

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  • 54.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Messmer, Davorka
    University of Calif San Diego, CA USA.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IL-1α Expression in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Affects the Tumor Cell Migration and Is Regulated by the p38MAPK Signaling Pathway2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interplay between the tumor cells and the surrounding stroma creates inflammation, which promotes tumor growth and spread. The inflammation is a hallmark for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is to high extent driven by IL-1α. IL-1α is expressed and secreted by the tumor cells and exerting its effect on the stroma, i.e. cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF), which in turn produce massive amount of inflammatory and immune regulatory factors. IL-1 induces activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κβ (NF-κβ), but also activator protein 1 (AP-1) via the small G-protein Ras. Dysregulation of Ras pathways are common in cancer as this oncogene is the most frequently mutated in many cancers. In contrast, the signaling events leading up to the expression of IL-1α by tumor cells are not well elucidated. Our aim was to examine the signaling cascade involved in the induction of IL-1α expression in PDAC. We found p38MAPK, activated by the K-Ras signaling pathway, to be involved in the expression of IL-1α by PDAC as blocking this pathway decreased both the gene and protein expression of IL-1α. Blockage of the P38MAPK signaling in PDAC also dampened the ability of the tumor cell to induce inflammation in CAFs. In addition, the IL-1α autocrine signaling regulated the migratory capacity of PDAC cells. Taken together, the blockage of signaling pathways leading to IL-1α expression and/or neutralization of IL-1α in the PDAC microenvironment should be taken into consideration as possible treatment or complement to existing treatment of this cancer.

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  • 55.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Niklasson, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Druid, Henrik
    Department of Oncology-pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Division of Oncology, Kalmar hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Messmer, Davorka
    Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pancreatic cancer microenvironment has a high degree of inflammation and infiltrating immune cells in its stroma2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and infiltrating immune cells, and other cellular components, which work together and create an inflammatory environment favoring tumor progression. The present study aimed to characterize the expression and location of immune cells and investigate inflammatory factors that influence pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

    Methods: qPCRs and immunohistological stainings were performed for inflammatory factors and immune cells localized in tumor tissues from patients with PDAC (N=30).

    Results: All PDAC tissues had significant increased levels of inflammatory and chemotactic factors such as IL-1α, COX-2, CXCL8, CCL2, and CCL20 as compared to controls. The PDAC stroma, i.e. the fibrosis surrounding the tumor, was the main producer of these factors with the exception of IL-1α, which was expressed by tumor cells and some infiltrating immune cells. The gene expression for immune cell specific markers CD163, CD1c, CD303, and CD8, corresponding to macrophages, myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), plasmacytoid DCs, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), respectively, were all significantly increased in PDAC tissues. Immunostaining of the tumor tissue confirmed the elevated levels of infiltrating macrophages, DCs, mature DCs, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The different immune cells were in nearly all cases localized in the fibrotic tissue adjacent to tumor nests. Production of CXCL8 mRNA and protein by the stroma was dependent on the tumor expression of IL-1α. Of importance, we found a correlation in expression of the proinflammatory factor IL-1α and the PDAC patients’ survival time.

    Conclusion: PDAC cells seem to take advantage of IL-1α to create an inflammatory microenvironment with high degree of fibrosis and the ability to both recruit and activate immune cells and the level of inflammation in this environment influenced the clinical outcome for the patients. Therapies targeting the inflammation might be beneficial for the survival of patients with PDAC.

  • 56.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Niklasson, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Druid, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Kalmar Hospital.
    Messmer, Davorka
    University of Calif San Diego.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Desmoplastic Stroma Plays an Essential Role in the Accumulation and Modulation of Infiltrated Immune Cells in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma2011In: Clinical & Developmental Immunology, ISSN 1740-2522, E-ISSN 1740-2530, Vol. 2011, no 212810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and infiltrating immune cells, which all work together and create an inflammatory environment favoring tumor progression. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the desmoplastic stroma in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) regarding expression of inflammatory factors and infiltration of immune cells and their impact on the clinical outcome. The PDAC tissues examined expressed significantly increased levels of immunomodulatory and chemotactic factors (IL-6, TGF beta, IDO, COX-2, CCL2, and CCL20) and immune cell-specific markers corresponding to macrophages, myeloid, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) as compared to controls. Furthermore, short-time survivors had the lowest levels of DC markers. Immunostainings indicated that the different immune cells and inflammatory factors are mainly localized to the desmoplastic stroma. Therapies modulating the inflammatory tumor microenvironment to promote the attraction of DCs and differentiation of monocytes into functional DCs might improve the survival of PDAC patients.

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  • 57.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Spangeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Messmer, Davorka
    University of California.
    Emilsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Jonköping Hospital.
    Falkmer, Sture
    Jonköping Hospital.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?2010In: BMC CANCER, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 10, no 87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. Methods: We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. Results: All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients similar to 12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Conclusions: Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival.

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  • 58.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Messmer, Davorka
    University of California San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    University of California San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
    Semi Mature Blood Dendritic Cells Exist in Patients with Ductal Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Owing to Inflammatory Factors Released from the Tumor2010In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Much evidence exists regarding the fact that blood DCs, both myeloid DCs (MDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), are negatively affected in different types of cancer, with both reduced numbers and impaired functionality. Functional impairment of DCs in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), may contribute to the poor clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to examine the effects PDAC had on blood DCs and elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the DC impairment. Methodology/Principal Findings: We examined the systemic influence PDAC exerted on blood DCs by ex vivo measuring numerous activation and maturation markers expressed on these cells. Furthermore, the effect patient plasma and the inflammatory factors CXCL8 and PGE(2) had on purified MDCs and PDCs from healthy donors was assessed and compared to the DCs existing in PDAC patients. We found a partial maturation of the blood MDCs and PDCs in PDAC patients with significantly enhanced expression of CD83, CD40, B7H3, PDL-1, CCR6, and CCR7 and decreased expression of ICOSL, and DCIR. These changes lead to impairment in their immunostimulatory function. Furthermore, chronic pancreatitis gave rise to DCs with similar semi-mature phenotype as seen in PDAC. Low expression of ICOSL was associated with poor prognosis. We found that the mechanism underlying this semi-maturation of DCs was inflammatory factors existing in the PDAC patients plasma. Of note, PGE2, which is elevated PDAC patient plasma, was one contributing factor to the changes seen in MDCs and PDCs phenotype. Conclusion/Significance: Our findings point to a role for the systemic inflammation in transforming blood MDCs and PDCs into semi-mature cells in PDAC patients and we show a correlation between maturation status and clinical outcome. Thus, means to preserve a functional blood DC compartment in PDAC patients by diminishing the inflammation could facilitate their ability to control the disease and improve survival.

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  • 59.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Välilä, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Druid, Henrik
    Department of Oncology-pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Sture
    Department of Clinical Pathology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Department of Oncology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Messmer, Davorka
    Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IL-1α Sustains the Inflammation in Human Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment by Targeting Cancer Associated Fibroblasts2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The tumor microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is dynamic with an extensive interaction between the stroma and tumor cells. Our aim for this study was to delineate the cross-talk between PDAC and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) with focus on the mechanism creating the chronic inflammatory tumor milieu. We assessed the effect cross talk between primary PDAC and CAF cell lines propagated from tumors had on the creation and sustenance of an inflammatory environment and what factors that were involved in establishing the inflammation.

    The coculture of PDAC and CAF cell lines, propagated from tumor tissues, enhanced the levels of inflammatory factors including IL-1α, IL-6, CXCL8, VEGFA, CCL20, and COX-2. The production of these factors correlated with the expression detected in vivo in PDAC tissues. The key producers of nearly all inflammatory factors were the CAFs and not the tumor cells.

    IL-1α was produced by the tumor cell lines, whereas almost all IL-1RI was expressed by CAFs thus corresponding to their in vivo expression profile in PDAC tissues, indicating a role for the IL-1 signaling cascade in a tumor favorable microenvironment. Neutralization of the IL-1α pathway efficiently diminished the cross talk induced production of inflammatory factors, both in stroma and tumor cells. These data suggest that the cross-talk between PDAC cells and the main stroma cell type, i.e. CAFs, is one contributing factor in the formation of the inflammatory tumor environment and we propose that the neutralization of IL-1α pathway might be a potential therapy for this cancer.

  • 60.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Välilä, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Druid, Henrik
    Department of Oncology – Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Falkmer, Sture
    Department of Clinical Pathology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Department of Oncology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Messmer, Davorka
    Moores Cancer Center, University California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interleukin 1α sustains the expression of inflammatory factors in human pancreatic cancer microenvironment by targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts2011In: Neoplasia, ISSN 1522-8002, E-ISSN 1476-5586, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 664-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tumor microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is dynamic with an extensive interaction between the stroma and tumor cells. The aim for this study was to delineate the cross-talk between PDAC and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) with focus on the mechanism creating the chronic inflammatory tumor milieu. We assessed the effects of the cross-talk between primary PDAC and CAF cell lines on the creation and sustenance of the inflammatory tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. The coculture of primary PDAC and CAF cell lines enhanced the levels of inflammatory factors including IL-1á, IL-6, CXCL8, VEGFA, CCL20, and COX-2. CAFs were superior to tumor cells regarding the production of most inflammatory factors and tumor cell associated IL-1á was established as the initiator of the enhanced production of inflammatory factors through the binding of IL-1á to the active IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1) expressed predominantly by CAFs. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between IL-1á and CXCL8 expression levels in PDAC tissues and correlation between IL-1á expression and the clinical outcome of the patients. This confirmed an important role for the IL-1 signaling cascade in the creation and sustenance of a tumor favorable microenvironment. Neutralization of the IL-1á signaling efficiently diminished the cross-talk induced production of inflammatory factors. These data suggest that the cross-talk between PDAC cells and the main stroma cell type, i.e. CAFs, is one essential factor in the formation of the inflammatory tumor environment and we propose that neutralization of the IL-1á signaling might be a potential therapy for this cancer.

  • 61.
    Tjomsland, Veronica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Burgener, Adam
    National Laboratory for HIV Immunology, Public health Agency of Canada, 1015 Arlington Street Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D
    AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, SAIC Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Complement opsonization of HIV-1 results in a different intracellular processing pattern and efficiency leading to an enhanced MHC I presentation by dendritic cells2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The antigen processing and presentation processes occurring in dendritic cells (DCs) required for induction of HIV-1 specific T cell responses, which are essential for controlling the viral infection in vivo. The initial interactions of DCs with free HIV-1 (FHIV), or complement opsonized HIV-1 (C-HIV) might influence the routing and nature of pathways used for MHC class I and II restricted presentation. We have examined FHIV, C-HIV, and complement and antibody opsonized HIV-1 (C-IgG-HIV) effects on immature DCs (IDCs) and mature DCs (MDCs) antigen proteolysis, MHC class I and II antigen presentation, and the role of endocytic receptors in presentation of antigens derived from HIV-1. We found that opsonized virions promoted MHC class I presentation by both IDCs and MDCs compared to F-HIV. Indicative of that complement opsonization routes more virions towards the MHC class I presentation pathway. We found that blocking macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) rerouted the HIV-1 to a path leading to higher levels of MHC class I and II presentation. Furthermore, the blocking of β7-integrin also gave an enhanced MHC class I and II presentation by both IDCs and MDCs, whereas the block of αMβ2 integrins, i.e. complement receptor 3 (CR3), decreased the MHC class I and II presentation. In addition, we found that IDCs and MDCs proteolytic activities were modulated by the HIV-1 exposure, for example C-HIV induced an increased proteasome activity in IDCs. Taken together, these findings indicated that endocytic receptors, such as MMR, CR3, and β7 integrin, can promote or disfavor antigen presentation by routing HIV-1 into different endosomal compartments with distinct properties and efficiencies for degradation of viral antigens and MHC class I and II presentation and that HIV-1 affects the antigen processing machineries.

  • 62.
    Tjomsland, Veronica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Burgener, Adam
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Mogk, Kenzie
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Fru Che, Karlhans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westmacott, Garrett
    National Microbiol Lab, Canada.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D.
    SAIC Frederick Inc, MD USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Complement opsonization of HIV-1 results in a different intracellular processing pattern and enhanced MHC class I presentation by dendritic cells2013In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1470-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induction of optimal HIV-1-specific T-cell responses, which can contribute to controlling viral infection in vivo, depends on antigen processing and presentation processes occurring in DCs. Opsonization can influence the routing of antigen processing and pathways used for presentation. We studied antigen proteolysis and the role of endocytic receptors in MHC class I (MHCI) and II (MHCII) presentation of antigens derived from HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived immature DCs (IDCs) and mature DCs, comparing free and complement opsonized HIV-1 particles. Opsonization of virions promoted MHCI presentation by DCs, indicating that complement opsonization routes more virions toward the MHCI presentation pathway. Blockade of macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and β7-integrin enhanced MHCI and MHCII presentation by IDCs and mature DCs, whereas the block of complement receptor 3 decreased MHCI and MHCII presentation. In addition, we found that IDC and MDC proteolytic activities were modulated by HIV-1 exposure; complement-opsonized HIV-1 induced an increased proteasome activity in IDCs. Taken together, these findings indicate that endocytic receptors such as MMR, complement receptor 3, and β7-integrin can promote or disfavor antigen presentation probably by routing HIV-1 into different endosomal compartments with distinct efficiencies for degradation of viral antigens and MHCI and MHCII presentation, and that HIV-1 affects the antigen-processing machinery.

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  • 63.
    Tjomsland, Veronica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology.
    Fru Che, Karlhans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D
    AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, SAIC Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Complement Opsonization of HIV-1 Enhances the Uptake by Dendritic Cells and Involves the Endocytic Lectin and Integrin Receptor Families2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction with the complement system is an underappreciated aspect of HIV-1 infection; even in primary infection, complement fragments are found on virions with potential to affect the interplay between the virus and dendritic cells (DC). Since opsonization may affect the efficiency of uptake and the type of receptors utilized, we compared the interactions of DC with free HIV-1 (F-HIV) and complement opsonized HIV-1 (C-HIV). We demonstrate that C-HIV significantly enhanced the uptake by immature DC (IDC) and mature DC (MDC) and that the internalization rate was dependent on both opsonization of the virus and DC maturation state. Increased DC uptake of C-HIV was not due to opsonization related increased binding of virus to the surface of DC but rather increased internalization of C-HIV despite utilizing a similar repertoire of receptors as F-HIV. Both F-HIV and C-HIV interacted with C-type lectins, integrins, and CD4 and blocking these receptor families prevented HIV-1 from binding to DC at 4 degrees C. Blocking integrins significantly reduced the binding and uptake of F-HIV and C-HIV implicating the involvement of several integrins such as beta 1-integrin, CR3, LFA-1, and alpha 4 beta 7. Distinctive for C-HIV was usage of beta 1-integrin and for F-HIV, usage of beta 7-integrin, whereas both F-HIV and C-HIV utilized both integrin chains of CR3. We have in this study identified the receptor types used by both F-HIV and C-HIV to bind to DC. Noteworthy, C-HIV was internalized more efficiently by DC than F-HIV, probably via receptor mediated endocytosis, which may entail different intracellular processing of the virus leading to both elevated infection and altered activation of HIV specific immune responses.

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  • 64.
    Tjomsland, Veronica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninni
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey
    SAIC/Fredrick, National Cancer Institute at Fredrick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blocking of integrins inhibits HIV-1 infection of human cervical mucosa immune cells with free and complement-opsonized virions2013In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 2361-2372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial interaction between HIV-1 and the host occurs at the mucosa during sexual intercourse. In cervical mucosa, HIV-1 exists both as free and opsonized virions and this might influence initial infection. We used cervical explants to study HIV-1 transmission, the effects of opsonization on infectivity, and how infection can be prevented. Complement opsonization enhanced HIV-1 infection of dendritic cells (DCs) compared with that by free HIV-1, but this increased infection was not observed with CD4+ T cells. Blockage of the α4-, β7-, and β1-integrins significantly inhibited HIV-1 infection of both DCs and CD4+ T cells. We found a greater impairment of HIV-1 infection in DCs for complement-opsonized virions compared with that of free virions when αM/β2- and α4-integrins were blocked. Blocking the C-type lectin receptor macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) inhibited infection of emigrating DCs but had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. We show that blocking of integrins decreases the HIV-1 infection of both mucosal DCs and CD4+ T cells emigrating from the cervical tissues. These findings may provide the basis of novel microbicidal strategies that may help limit or prevent initial infection of the cervical mucosa, thereby reducing or averting systemic HIV-1 infection.

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  • 65.
    Tjomsland, Veronica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D
    AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, SAIC Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blocking of integrins significantly inhibits HIV-1 infection of human cervical mucosa immune cells and development of founder populations2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Slightly more than half of the HIV-1 infected individuals in the world are women and almost all acquire the infection through sexual intercourse. The initial interaction between HIV-1 and the host occurs at the mucosa site and the most common mode to access the submucosa is through dendritic cells (DCs). In the cervical mucosa, HIV-1 exist both as free and opsonized virions and this might influence initial infection. We used a cervical tissue explant model and both free and opsonized virions to study HIV-1 transmission and how it can be prevented.

    We found that complement opsonization significantly enhanced HIV-1 infection of DCs compared to free HIV-1, but this increased infection was not seen for CD4+ T cells. Blocking of α4, β7, and β1 integrins demonstrated significant inhibition of infection of both DCs and CD4+ T cells emigrating from mucosa, independent of the use of free or complement opsonized HIV-1. We found a higher impairment of HIV-1 infection in emigrating DCs for complement opsonized virions compared to free virions when the use of αM/β2 and α4 integrins was blocked.

    This study showed that block of integrins decreased the HIV-1 infection of both DCs and CD4+ T cells emigrating from the cervical explant tissues and, remarkably, the establishment of founder populations in these tissues. This indicates that preventing or severely lowering initial infection of the cervical mucosa could avert systemic HIV-1 infection and should be considered for development of microbicides to prevent HIV infection and transmission.

  • 66.
    Velu, Vijayakumar
    et al.
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA; Yerkes National Primate Research Centre, GA 30329 USA.
    Dyavar Shetty, Ravi
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA; Yerkes National Primate Research Centre, GA 30329 USA; University of Nebraska Medical Centre, NE USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Role of PD-1 co-inhibitory pathway in HIV infection and potential therapeutic options2015In: Retrovirology, ISSN 1742-4690, E-ISSN 1742-4690, Vol. 12, no 14Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virus-specific CD8(+) T cells play an important role in controlling viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, during chronic HIV infection, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells undergo functional exhaustion, lose effector functions and fail to control viral infection. HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells expressing high levels of co-inhibitory molecule programmed death-1 (PD-1) during the chronic infection and are characterized by lower proliferation, cytokine production, and cytotoxic abilities. Although, antiretroviral therapy has resulted in dramatic decline in HIV replication, there is no effective treatment currently available to eradicate viral reservoirs or restore virus-specific T or B-cell functions thatmay complement ART in order to eliminate the virus. In recent years, studies in mice and non-human primate models of HIV infection demonstrated the functional exhaustion of virus-specific T and B cells could be reversed by blockade of interaction between PD-1 and its cognate ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2). In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PD-1 pathway in HIV/ SIV infection and discuss the beneficial effects of PD-1 blockade during chronic HIV/SIV infection and its potential role as immunotherapy for HIV/AIDS.

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  • 67.
    Yien Tan, Hong
    et al.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Kong Yong, Yean
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Paukovics, Geza
    Macfarlane Burnet Institute Medical Research and Public Heatlh, Australia.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    French, Martyn A.
    University of Western Australia, Australia; Royal Perth Hospital, Australia.
    Crowe, Suzanne M.
    Macfarlane Burnet Institute Medical Research and Public Heatlh, Australia; Alfred Hospital, Australia; Monash University, Australia.
    Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome2016In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 196, no 10, p. 4052-4063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1 beta, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18R alpha on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS.

  • 68.
    Yong, Yean K.
    et al.
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia; Univ Malaya, Malaysia; Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Saeidi, Alireza
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Tan, Hong Y.
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia; Univ Malaya, Malaysia; Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia; Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Rosmawati, Mohamed
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Enström, Philip F.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Al Batran, Rami
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Vasuki, V.
    Govt Thiruvarur Med Coll and Hosp, India.
    Chattopadhyay, Indranil
    Cent Univ Tamil Nadu, India.
    Murugesan, Amudhan
    Govt Theni Med Coll and Hosp, India.
    Vignesh, Ramachandran
    Univ Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia; Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Rajarajeswaran, Jayakumar
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ansari, Abdul W.
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Vadivelu, Jamuna
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ussher, James E.
    Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Velu, Vijayakumar
    Emory Vaccine Ctr, GA USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia; Cent Univ Tamil Nadu, India; Cent Univ Tamil Nadu, India.
    Hyper-Expression of PD-1 Is Associated with the Levels of Exhausted and Dysfunctional Phenotypes of Circulating CD161(++)TCR iV alpha 7.2(+) Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, defined as CD161(++) TCR iV alpha 7.2(+) T cells, play an important role in the innate defense against bacterial infections, and their functionality is impaired in chronic viral infections. Here, we investigated the frequency and functional role of MAIT cells in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The peripheral CD3(+)CD161(++)TCR iV alpha 7.2(+) MAIT cells in chronic HBV-infected patients and healthy controls were phenotypically characterized based on CD57, PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 expression. The frequency of MAIT cells was significantly decreased among chronic HBV-infected individuals as compared to controls. Expression of CD57, PD-1, CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 on MAIT cells was significantly elevated in chronic HBV-infected individuals relative to controls. The percentage of T cell receptor (TCR) iVa7.2+ CD161(+) MAIT cells did not correlate with HBV viral load but inversely with HLA-DR on CD4(+) T cells and MAIT cells and with CD57 on CD8(+) T cells suggesting that decrease of MAIT cells may not be attributed to direct infection by HBV but driven by HBV-induced chronic immune activation. The percentage and expression levels of PD-1 as well as CTLA-4 on MAIT cells inversely correlated with plasma HBV-DNA levels, which may suggest either a role for MAIT cells in the control of HBV infection or the effect of HBV replication in the liver on MAIT cell phenotype. We report that decrease of TCR iV alpha 7.2(+) MAIT cells in the peripheral blood and their functions were seemingly impaired in chronic HBV-infected patients likely because of the increased expression of PD-1.

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  • 69.
    Yong, Yean K.
    et al.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Tan, Hong Y.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Saeidi, Alireza
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Rosmawati, Mohamed
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Atiya, Nadia
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ansari, Abdul W.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Rajarajeswaran, Jayakumar
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Vadivelu, Jamuna
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Velu, Vijayakumar
    Emory Vaccine Centre, GA USA.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; CUTN, India.
    Decrease of CD69 levels on TCR V7.2(+)CD4(+) innate-like lymphocytes is associated with impaired cytotoxic functions in chronic hepatitis B virus-infected patients2017In: Innate Immunity, ISSN 1753-4259, E-ISSN 1753-4267, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease that may progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Host immune responses represent the key determinants of HBV clearance or persistence. Here, we investigated the role of the early activation marker, CD69 and effector cytokines, granzyme B (GrB) and IFN- in the exhaustion of innate-like TCR V7.2(+)CD4(+)T cells, in 15 individuals with chronic HBV (CHB) infection where six were HBV DNA(+) and nine were HBV DNA(-). The percentage of cytokine-producing T cells and MAIT cells were significantly perturbed in HBV patients relative to healthy controls (HCs). The intracellular expression of GrB and IFN- was significantly reduced in MAIT cells derived from HBV-infected patients as compared to HCs, and the levels correlated with the percentage and levels [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI)] of CD69 expression. The total expression of CD69 (iMFI) was lower in CHB patients as compared to HCs. The frequency of CD69(+) cells correlated with the levels of cytokine expression (MFI), particularly in CHB patients as compared to HCs. In summary, the polyfunctionality of peripheral T cells was significantly reduced among CHB patients, especially in the TCR V7.2(+)CD4(+)T cells, and the levels of cytokine expression correlated with functional cytokine levels.

  • 70.
    Yong, Yean K.
    et al.
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Tan, Hong Y.
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia; Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Saeidi, Alireza
    Emory Vaccine Ctr, GA USA.
    Wong, Won F.
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia.
    Vignesh, Ramachandran
    Xiamen Univ Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Velu, Vijayakumar
    Emory Vaccine Ctr, GA USA.
    Eri, Rajaraman
    Univ Tasmania, Australia.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    CUTN, India.
    Immune Biomarkers for Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring of Tuberculosis: Current Developments and Future Prospects2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 2789Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment monitoring is paramount to clinical decision-making and the host biomarkers appears to play a significant role. The currently available diagnostic technology for TB detection is inadequate. Although GeneXpert detects total DNA present in the sample regardless live or dead bacilli present in clinical samples, all the commercial tests available thus far have low sensitivity. Humoral responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens are generally low, which precludes the use of serological tests for TB diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. Mtb-specific CD4(+) T cells correlate with Mtb antigen/bacilli burden and hence might serve as good biomarkers for monitoring treatment progress. Omics-based techniques are capable of providing a more holistic picture for disease mechanisms and are more accurate in predicting TB disease outcomes. The current review aims to discuss some of the recent advances on TB biomarkers, particularly host biomarkers that have the potential to diagnose and differentiate active TB and LTBI as well as their use in disease prognosis and treatment monitoring.

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