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  • 51.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Short‐Term Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation on NT‐proBNP, MR‐proANP, Copeptin, and MR‐proADM in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Data From the Observational SMURF Study2016In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 5, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is limited knowledge on the short‐term influence of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF) on 2 cardiac biomarkers; the N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) and the midregional fragment of the N‐terminal of pro‐ANP (MR‐proANP) and 2 extracardiac biomarkers; the c‐terminal provasopressin (copeptin) and the midregional portion of proadrenomedullin (MR‐proADM). There are also limited data concerning cardiac production of the latter two.

    Methods and Results We studied 192 consecutive patients eligible for RFA of AF referred to the University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. NT‐proBNP, MR‐proANP, copeptin, and MR‐proADM levels were measured in peripheral blood, the coronary sinus (CS), and the left atrium before ablation, and in peripheral blood immediately and the day after RFA. The level of NT‐proBNP decreased the day after RFA in participants in AF at the time of RFA, compared to the participants in sinus rhythm who showed a slight increase (P<0.001). Furthermore, regardless of the actual rhythm, the level of MR‐proANP showed an increase immediately after RFA (P<0.001), followed by a decrease the day after ablation (P<0.001). Copeptin level showed a 6‐fold increase immediately after RFA compared to baseline (P<0.001), whereas MR‐proADM level increased the day after RFA (P<0.001). Levels of copeptin and MR‐proADM were not higher in the CS compared to peripheral blood.

    Conclusions RFA of AF is a strong stimulus with a significant and direct impact on different neurohormonal systems. We found no sign of a cardiac release of MR‐proADM or copeptin.

  • 52.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Neurohormonal Activation After Atrial Fibrillation Initiation in Patients Eligible for Catheter Ablation: A Randomized Controlled Study2016In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e003957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Biomarker activation in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been widely studied, but the immediate effect of AF initiation remains unclear. We studied the effect of AF initiation on 2 cardiac biomarkers: the N-terminal fragment of the proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), the midregional fragment of the N-terminal of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and 2 extracardiac biomarkers-the copeptin and the midregional portion of proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM). Methods and Results-This was a randomized controlled study, including 45 patients with AF who had been referred for radiofrequency ablation to the University Hospital, Link_ oping, Sweden, between February 2012 and April 2014. Freedom from AF during the 4 days prior to radiofrequency ablation was confirmed by transtelephonic ECGs. Biomarkers were collected from the femoral vein (fv), coronary sinus (CS), and left atrium (LA) prior to AF initiation (baseline) and 30 minutes later. The MR-proANP and NT-proBNP concentrations increased in the intervention group compared with the control group 30 minutes after the initiation of AF (MR-proANP: P-fvamp;lt;0.001, P-CSamp;lt;0.001, P-LAamp;lt;0.001; NT-proBNP: P-LAamp;lt;0.001). Copeptin levels in patients without ischemic heart disease were decreased after the initiation of AF (P-fv= 0.003, P-CS= 0.015, P-LA= 0.011). Conclusions-AF is a strong stimulus that results in immediate activation of different biomarkers.

  • 53.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation (SMURF): a protocol for an observational study with a randomised interventional component2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e008723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. It is an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke and is estimated to cause about 20-25% of all stroke cases. AF has a great impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL); however, one unresolved issue related to AF is the wide variation in its symptoms.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The symptom burden, metabolic profile, ultrasound findings, rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and HRQoL in patients with AF (Symptom burden, Metabolic profile, Ultrasound findings, Rhythm, neurohormonal activation, haemodynamics and health-related quality of life in patients with atrial Fibrillation, SMURF) study is a prospective observational, cohort study, with a randomised interventional part. The aim of the study is to investigate, in patients with AF, the relationship between symptom burden and metabolic aspects, atrial function and different neurohormones, and the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The interventional part of the study will give an insight into the neurohormonal and intracardiac pressure changes directly after initiation of AF. Consecutive patients with symptomatic AF accepted for treatment with RFA for the first time at Linköping University Hospital are eligible for participation. The enrolment started in January 2012, and a total of 200 patients are to be included into the study, with 45 of them being enrolled into the interventional study with initiation of AF. The sample size of the interventional study is based on a small pilot study with 5 patients induced to AF while 2 served as controls. The results indicated that, in order to find a statistically significant difference, there was a need to include 28 patients; for safety reasons, 45 patients will be included.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The SMURF study is approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. The results will be presented through peer-review journals and conference presentation.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01553045; Pre-results.

  • 54.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Increased IGF1 levels in relation to heart failure and cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population: impact of ACE inhibitors2011In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 165, no 6, p. 891-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are conflicting results regarding the association of circulating IGF1 with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the relationship between IGF1 levels and heart failure (HF), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and CV mortality in an elderly population taking into account the possible impact of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Design and methods: A total of 851 persons aged 66-81 years, in a rural Swedish municipality, were subjected to medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples. They were then followed for 8 years. Results and conclusion: Patients on ACE inhibitors had higher IGF1 levels compared with those without ACE inhibitors. In patients on ACE inhibitors, higher IGF1 values were found in patients with an ejection fraction (EF) less than40% compared with EF greater than= 40%, in patients with higher proBNP levels in quartile 4 vs 1, and in patients with IHD when compared to those without ACE inhibitors (P less than 0.001). In patients without ACE inhibitors, no relationship was found between IGF1 levels and HF or IHD. In multivariate regression, only ACE inhibitors, ECG changes characteristic for IHD, and gender had a significant impact on IGF1. Patients with higher IGF1 levels in quintiles 4 and 5 compared to quintiles 1 and 2 had a 50% higher risk for CV death (P=0.03). This was significant after adjustment for well-known CV risk factors and ACE inhibitors (P=0.03). Conclusions: Our results show that treatment with ACE inhibitors in an elderly population is associated with increased IGF1 levels, especially in patients with impaired cardiac function or IHD. High IGF1 levels tend to be associated with an increased risk for CV mortality.

  • 55.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Proinsulin and IGFBP-1 predicts mortality in an elderly population2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 260-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    High IGFBP-1 in elderly subjects is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We studied the relation of IGFBP-1 to cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, and also the impact of proinsulin and insulin on this association in an unselected elderly primary health care population.

    HYPOTHESIS:

    Our hypothesis was that proinsulin and insulin may have an impact on the association of high IGFBP-1 levels with all-cause and CV-mortality in elderly.

    DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

    A cross-sectional and prospective study was carried out in a rural Swedish population. 851 persons aged 66-81 years were evaluated by medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples, and were followed prospectively for up to 12 years.

    RESULTS:

    At baseline, in a multivariate analysis, IGFBP-1 was associated with gender, N-terminal proBNP (NT pro-BNP), blood glucose, body mass index (BMI), insulin and proinsulin, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and haemoglobin (Hb). During the follow-up period there were 230 deaths (27%), of which 134 (16%) were due to CV mortality. When divided into tertiles there was a significant difference for CV mortality and all-cause mortality between tertiles of IGFBP-1 and proinsulin. For insulin there was a significant difference only for all-cause mortality. After adjustment for well-known risks factors, proinsulin and IGFBP-1 had significant impact on all-cause mortality but only proinsulin on CV mortality.

    CONCLUSION:

    Only proinsulin is an independent predictor for both all-cause mortality and CV mortality when comparing IGFBP-1, insulin, and proinsulin as prognostic biomarkers for CV and all-cause mortality in an elderly population.

  • 56.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Natriuretic peptides as diagnostic tool. The analysis should be a routine in heart failure diagnosis.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 927-929Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 57.
    Eckerdal, O
    et al.
    University of Umeå, Umeå.
    Ahlqvist, J
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Wing, K
    Length dimensions and morphologic variations of the external bony auditory canal. A radiographic and histologic investigation.1978In: Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology, ISSN 0250-832X, E-ISSN 1476-542X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autopsy material comprising a total of 58 specimes of the temporal bone and the proximal part of the mandible was investigated tomographically and by microtome in comparative layers. Microradiographs and histologic sections were used as the main sources of information to determine the length dimensions of the different parts of the external auditory canal. The morphology and its developmental variations are compared and described. The diagnostic implications are discussed. In the authors' opinion, tomography is the method of choice to illustrate the morphologic properties of the external auditory canal. It is suggested that when the tomographic image reveals morphologic developmental or pathologic defects which give rise to problematic diagnosis, a control examination of the contralateral side should be performed.

  • 58.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajac, Jakub
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Left ventricular hemodynamic forces as a marker of mechanical dyssynchrony in heart failure patients with left bundle branch block2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 2971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) causes left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony which is often associated with heart failure. A significant proportion of heart failure patients do not demonstrate clinical improvement despite cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). How LBBB-related effects on LV diastolic function may contribute to those therapeutic failures has not been clarified. We hypothesized that LV hemodynamic forces calculated from 4D flow MRI could serve as a marker of diastolic mechanical dyssynchrony in LBBB hearts. MRI data were acquired in heart failure patients with LBBB or matched patients without LBBB. LV pressure gradients were calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations. Integration of the pressure gradients over the LV volume rendered the hemodynamic forces. The findings demonstrate that the LV filling forces are more orthogonal to the main LV flow direction in heart failure patients with LBBB compared to those without LBBB during early but not late diastole. The greater the conduction abnormality the greater the discordance of LV filling force with the predominant LV flow direction (r(2) = 0.49). Such unique flow-specific measures of mechanical dyssynchrony may serve as an additional tool for considering the risks imposed by conduction abnormalities in heart failure patients and prove to be useful in predicting response to CRT.

  • 59.
    Fredriksson, Alexandru Grigorescu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Örebrö University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svalbring, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    4D flow MRI can detect subtle right ventricular dysfunction in primary left ventricular disease.2016In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect subtle right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in primary left ventricular (LV) disease.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: 4D flow and morphological 3T MRI data were acquired in 22 patients with mild ischemic heart disease who were stratified into two groups based on LV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI): lower-LVEDVI and higher-LVEDVI, as well as in 11 healthy controls. The RV volume was segmented at end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES). Pathlines were emitted from the ED volume and traced forwards and backwards in time to ES. The blood volume was separated into flow components. The Direct Flow (DF) component was defined as RV inflow passing directly to outflow. The kinetic energy (KE) of the DF component was calculated. Echocardiographic conventional RV indices were also assessed.

    RESULTS: The higher-LVEDVI group had larger LVEDVI and lower LV ejection fraction (98 ± 32 ml/m(2) ; 48 ± 13%) compared to the healthy (67 ± 12, P = 0.002; 64 ± 7, P < 0.001) and lower-LVEDI groups (62 ± 10; 68 ± 7, both P < 0.001). The RV 4D flow-specific measures "DF/EDV volume-ratio" and "DF/EDV KE-ratio at ED" were lower in the higher-LVEDVI group (38 ± 5%; 52 ± 6%) compared to the healthy (44 ± 6; 65 ± 7, P = 0.018 and P < 0.001) and lower-LVEDVI groups (44 ± 6; 64 ± 7, P = 0.011 and P < 0.001). There was no difference in any of the conventional MRI and echocardiographic RV indices between the three groups.

    CONCLUSION: We found that in primary LV disease mild impairment of RV function can be detected by 4D flow-specific measures, but not by the conventional MRI and echocardiographic indices. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015.

  • 60.
    Goetze, Jens P.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Flyvbjerg, Allan
    Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Rehfeld, Jens
    Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Comment: Making sense of chromogranin A in heart disease2013In: The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 61.
    Goetze, Jens P
    et al.
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Flyvbjerg, Allan
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rehfeld, Jens F
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Chromogranin A as a biomarker in cardiovascular disease2014In: Biomarkers in Medicine, ISSN 1752-0363, E-ISSN 1752-0371, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 133-140Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromogranin A is known as an important marker of neuroendocrine tumors. In cardiovascular medicine, however, chromogranin A measurement has only recently gained interest, since increased concentrations in the circulation are associated with risk of clinical worsening and death in patients with acute coronary syndromes or chronic heart failure. In this article, we summarize the current clinical data on chromogranin A as a biomarker in cardiovascular disease from high-risk conditions; for example, obesity, hypertension and diabetes, to overt heart failure. Biological activity of the various chromogranin A fragments, including the intact precursor itself, will not be covered in the present review. Instead, we highlight the complexity of chromogranin A as a plasma marker, where the protein is extensively and variably processed to a plethora of peptide fragments. Current immunological methods for clinical measurement differ dramatically with respect to both epitope choice and clinical validation.

  • 62.
    Goetze, Jens P
    et al.
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Hilsted, Linda M
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Rehfeld, Jens F
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Plasma chromogranin A is a marker of death in elderly patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure2014In: Endocrine Connections, ISSN 2049-3614, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular risk assessment remains difficult in elderly patients. We examined whether chromogranin A (CgA) measurement in plasma may be valuable in assessing risk of death in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure in a primary care setting. A total of 470 patients (mean age 73 years) were followed for 10 years. For CgA plasma measurement, we used a two-step method including a screening test and a confirmative test with plasma pre-treatment with trypsin. Cox multivariable proportional regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were used to assess mortality risk. Assessment of cardiovascular mortality during the first 3 years of observation showed that CgA measurement contained useful information with a hazard ratio (HR) of 5.4 (95% CI 1.7–16.4) (CgA confirm). In a multivariate setting, the corresponding HR was 5.9 (95% CI 1.8–19.1). When adding N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) to the model, CgA confirm still possessed prognostic information (HR: 6.1; 95% CI 1.8–20.7). The result for predicting all-cause mortality displayed the same pattern. ROC analyses in comparison to NT-proBNP to identify patients on top of clinical variables at risk of cardiovascular death within 5 years of follow-up showed significant additive value of CgA confirm measurements compared with NT-proBNP and clinical variables. CgA measurement in the plasma of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure can identify those at increased risk of short- and long-term mortality.

  • 63.
    Goetze, Jens P.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Cholecystokinin in plasma predicts cardiovascular mortality in elderly females2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 209, p. 37-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin are related gastrointestinal hormones with documented cardiovascular effects of exogenous administration. It is unknown whether measurement of endogenous CCK or gastrin in plasma contains information regarding cardiovascular mortality. Methods: Mortality risk was evaluated using Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. Elderly patients in a primary care setting with symptoms of cardiac disease, i.e. shortness of breath, peripheral edema, and/or fatigue, were evaluated (n = 470). Primary care patients were followed for 13 years (from 1999); the 5-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality was used as end point. Results: In univariate analysis, patients in the 4th CCK quartile had an increased risk of 5-year cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 3.9, 95% confidence interval: 2.1-7.0, p &lt; 0.0001). In multivariate analysis including established factors associated with cardiovascular mortality, CCK concentrations in the 4th quartile were still associated with increased 5-year cardiovascular mortality risk (HR 3.1, 95% C.I.: 1.7-5.7, p = 0.0004), even when including 4th quartile NT-proBNP concentrations in the same model. We observed a marked difference between the genders, where CCK concentrations in the 4th quartile were associated with a higher 5-year cardiovascular mortality in female patients (HR 8.99, 95% C.I.: 3.49-102.82, p = 0.0007) compared to men (1.47, 95% C.I.: 0.7-3.3, p = 0.35). In contrast, no significant information was obtained from 4th quartile gastrin concentrations on 5-year cardiovascular mortality risk. Conclusions: CCK in plasma is an independent marker of cardiovascular mortality in elderly female patients. The study thus introduces measurement of plasma CCK in gender-specific cardiovascular risk assessment. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 64.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Imaging congestion with a pocket ultrasound device - prognostic implications in patients with chronic heart failure.2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 548-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Venous congestion is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We used a pocket-sized ultrasound imaging device (PID) to assess the patient's congestive status and related our findings to prognosis.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: 104 consecutive outpatients from an HF outpatient clinic were studied. Interstitial lung water (ILW), pleural effusion (PE) and the diameter of the vena cava inferior (VCI) were assessed using a PID. ILW was assessed by demonstration of B-lines (comet tail artefact (CTA). Out of the 104 patients, 28 had CTA, and eight had PE. Median VCI diameter was 18 mm, ±14/22 mm (quartiles). Each of these parameters correlated weakly (r= 0.26-0.37, p< 0.05) with the HF biomarker NT-proBNP. During the median follow-up time of 530 days, 14 hospitalizations deaths and 7 deaths were registered. Findings of CTA, PE or a composite of both, increased the risk of death or hospitalization (hazard ratio 3-4, p< 0.05). After adjustment for age, cardiac systolic function and NT-proBNP, this difference remained significant for CTA alone and CTA + PE combined, but not for PE alone.

    CONCLUSION: By using a handheld ultrasound device, signs of pulmonary congestion could be demonstrated. When found, these had a significant prognostic impact in clinically stable HF.

  • 65.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Pocket-sized ultrasound examination of fluid imbalance in patients with heart failure: A pilot and feasibility study of heart failure nurses without prior experience of ultrasonography.2015In: European journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology, ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 294-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Detecting fluid imbalance in patients with chronic heart failure can be challenging. Use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device (PSUD) in addition to physical examination can be helpful to assess this important information.

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility for nurses without prior experience of ultrasonography to examine fluid imbalance by the use of a PSUD on heart failure patients.

    METHOD: Four heart failure nurses and an expert cardiologist participated. The nurses underwent a four-hour PSUD training programme. One hundred and four heart failure outpatients were included. The examinations obtained information of pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion and the diameter of the vena cava inferior.

    RESULTS: Examinations took nine minutes on average. In 28% and 14% of the patients, pulmonary congestion and pleural effusion respectively were found by the nurses. The sensitivities and specificities for nurses' findings were 79% and 91%, and, 88% and 93% respectively. The inter-operator agreement between the nurses and the cardiologist reached a substantial level (kappa values: 0.71 and 0.66). The inter-operator agreement for vena cava inferior reached a fair level (kappa value=0.39). Bland-Altman plots of the level of agreement revealed a mean difference of vena cava inferior diameter of 0.11 cm, while the 95% lower and upper limits ranged from -0.78 cm to 1.00 cm.

    CONCLUSION: After brief training, heart failure nurses can reliably identify pulmonary congestion and pleural effusion with a PSUD. Assessment of vena cava inferior was less valid. PSUD readings, when added to the history and a physical examination, can improve nurse assessment of fluid status in patients with heart failure.

  • 66.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Copeptin Release in Cardiac Surgery: A New Biomarker to Identify Risk Patients?2018In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, E-ISSN 1532-8422, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 245-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the dynamics of copeptin in open cardiac surgery during the perioperative course.

    DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

    SETTING: Single tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty patients scheduled for open cardiac surgery procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    INTERVENTIONS: No intervention.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Copeptin concentrations were measured pre-, peri-, and postoperatively until day 6 after surgery. Patients were analyzed as a whole cohort (n = 20) and in a restricted "normal cohort" consisting of patients with normal preoperative copeptin concentration (<10 pmol/L) and perioperative uneventful course (n = 11). In the whole cohort, preoperative copeptin concentration was 7.0 pmol/L (interquartile range: 3.1-11 pmol/L). All patients had an early rise of copeptin, with 80% having peak copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Patients in the "normal cohort" had copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB of 194 pmol/L (98-275), postoperative day 1, 27 pmol/L (18-31); and day 3, 8.9 pmol/L (6.3-12).

    CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of cardiac surgical procedure and perioperative course, all patients had an early significant rise of copeptin concentrations, generally peaking at weaning from CBP or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Among patients with normal copeptin concentration preoperatively and uneventful course, the postoperative copeptin concentrations decreased to normal values within 3-to-4 days after cardiac surgery. Furthermore, the restricted "normal cohort" generally tended to display lower levels of copeptin concentration postoperatively. Further studies may evaluate whether copeptin can be a tool in identifying risk patients in cardiac surgery.

  • 67.
    Hunter, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Crimmins, Dan L.
    Washington University.
    Goetze, Jens P.
    University of Copenhagen.
    N-Terminal Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in Plasma Suggests Covalent Modification2011In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 57, no 9, p. 1327-1330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The N-terminal fragment of cardiac-derived pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a glycosylated polypeptide. It is unknown whether N-terminal proatrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) fragments are also covalently modified. We therefore evaluated the clinical performance of 2 distinctly different proANP assays on clinical outcome. METHODS: We examined 474 elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure presenting in a primary healthcare setting. Samples were analyzed with an automated immunoluminometric midregion proANP (MR-proANP) assay and a new processing-independent assay (PIA) developed in our laboratory. The results were compared with Bland-Altman plots, and clinical performance was assessed by generating ROC curves for different clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Despite linear regression results indicating a good correlation (r = 0.85; P less than 0.0001), the PIA measured considerably more proANP than the MR-proANP assay (mean difference, 663 pmol/L; SD, 478 pmol/L). In contrast, the clinical performances of the 2 assays [as assessed by the area under the ROC curve (AUC)] in detecting left ventricular dysfunction were similar [proANP PIA, 0.71 (95% CI, 0.63-0.79); MR-proANP assay, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66-0.81); P = 0.32]. The prognostic ability to report cardiovascular mortality during a 10-year follow-up revealed AUC values of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.60-0.71) for the proANP PIA and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63-0.74) for the MR-proANP assay (P = 0.08, for comparing the 2 assays). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that N-terminal proANP fragments in patient plasma differ from the calibrator peptides used but that the difference does not affect ROC curves in an elderly cohort of patients with mild to moderate heart failure. We suggest that human N-terminal proANP fragments can be covalently modified.

  • 68. Jekell, Andreas
    et al.
    Hossain, Akter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elevated circulating levels of thioredoxin and stress in chronic heart failure2004In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 883-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a complex syndrome, in which reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines are important stressors that contribute to the pathogenesis.

    Aim: We have studied physiological stress response parameters in CHF, in particular the redox-active regulator thioredoxin.

    Subjects: A case–control study was conducted including a consecutive sample of CHF patients (n=27) of NYHA class II and III; comparison control subjects (n=29) were recruited from an association for retired people.

    Method: Baseline levels of Trx, lipid peroxides (oxidative stress), TNF and IL-6 cytokines, platelet-activation marker P-selectin, cortisol (as peripheral effector of HPA axis), and the potent antioxidant selenoprotein Trx-reductase were assessed.

    Results: Mean (±S.E.M.) plasma levels of Trx were significantly higher in patients with CHF (32±3 ng/ml), than in the healthy subjects (12±3 ng/ml, P<0.0001). Trx levels increased in proportion to severity of disease (NYHA class III>NYHA class II) and degree of stress. Trx elevation correlated well with increased oxidative stress (lipid peroxides, P<0.0001), circulatory P-selectin (P<0.0001), morning level of free salivary cortisol (P=0.0002), and serum creatinine (P=0.0417), but not with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6.

    Conclusion: Trx was strikingly elevated in heart failure cases compared with controls, signifying an adaptive stress response that is higher the more severe the disease.

  • 69. Johansson, P
    et al.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    SLEEP DISORDERED BREATHING IN AN ELDERLY COMMUNITY-LIVING POPULATION - RELATIONSHIP TO CARDIAC FUNCTION, INSOMNIA SYMPTOMS AND DAYTIME SLEEPINESS2009In: In Sleep Vol 32, 2009, Vol. 32, p. A213-A214Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Prevalence of sleep disordered breathing, insomnia and daytime sleepiness in an elderly population - reports from the corokind study2006In: 18th Congress of the European Sleep research society,2006, 2006, p. 114-114Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Profile of elderly persons with sleep disordered breathing with and without insomnia2006In: 8th World Congress on Sleep Apnea 27-30 September, 2006,2006, 2006, p. 115-116Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up2012In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 468-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods: a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years. Results: a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50% (LVEF less than 50%) ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA)/stroke. There was no difference in the rate of IHD and TIA/stroke between OSA and no SDB, but more LVEF less than 50% was found in those with OSA. CSA significantly increased the risk for all-cause (P = 0.002) and CV mortality (P = 0.018) by more than two times. After adjustments for CV disease, diabetes and the biomarker NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide CSA associations to all-cause mortality and CV mortality lost significance. Conclusion: OSA, in persons greater than 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.

  • 73.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep disordered breathing in an elderly community-living population - relationship to cardiac function, insomnia symptoms and daytime sleepiness2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep disordered breathing in an elderly community-living population: Relationship to cardiac function, insomnia symptoms and daytime sleepiness2009In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 1005-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The relationship between sleep disordered breathing (SDB), systolic function/heart failure in elderly people living in community has not been investigated, nor has insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS).

    Aim: To describe the prevalence of SDB and its relationship to systolic function, the different insomnia symptoms as well as EDS.

    Method: 331 subjects (71-87 years) underwent echocardiographic examinations and sleep respiratory recordings. Questionnaires were used to evaluate insomnia symptoms and EDS.

    Results: Mild SDB (AHI 5-15), was found in 32%. Moderate SDB (AHI 15-30) occurred in 16%, and 7% had severe SDB (AHI >30). Median AHI was significantly higher (p<0.001) in those with mild impaired systolic function (AHI 11.7) and moderate impaired systolic function (AHI 10.9) compared to those with normal systolic function (AHI 5.0). Mild and moderate impaired systolic function was also independently associated to SDB as indicated by an AHI≥10. Concerning insomnia symptoms and EDS, only difficulties in initiating sleep correlated significantly (p<0.05) with AHI.

    Conclusion: SDB is common among the elderly and may be related to impaired systolic function/heart failure. However, detection of SDB in such population may be problematic since insomnia symptoms and EDS correlated poorly with SDB.

  • 75.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Svensson, Erland
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Determinants of global preceived health in community-dwelling elderly screened for heart failure and sleep-disordered breathing.2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationships between heart failure (HF), sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), insomnia, depressive symptoms, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), as well as their relationship to Global Perceived Health (GPH) in an elderly community-dwelling population, have not been explored. Data from 331 community-dwelling elderly (71-87 years old) were collected by echocardiography, polygraphy, and specific questionnaires. Factor analyses and structural equation modeling were used to explore the relationships between HF, SDB, sleep, psychosocial factors, and GPH. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses derived a 5-factor model representing SDB, insomnia, systolic function, breathlessness/physical function, and psychosocial function. Structural equation modeling analyses were used to explore the relationships between the 5 factors and to GPH. Sleep-disordered breathing had a weak effect on systolic function, but no effects on any of the other factors or GPH were found. Psychosocial function and breathlessness/physical function directly affected GPH. Indirect effects on GPH, mediated by psychosocial function, were found for breathlessness/physical function and insomnia. Systolic function also had an indirect effect on GPH. The fact that SDB in the elderly has no obvious negative associations to sleep complaints or GPH does not exclude them from being adequately treated for SDB. However, the present study has shown that SDB, by means of self-rated sleep complaints and health-related quality of life, can be problematic to detect. Psychosocial function was the most important factor for perceived GPH as it had a direct effect, as well as mediated the factors breathlessness/physical function and insomnia effects, on GPH. This study indicates that interventions in clinical practice targeting psychosocial dysfunction, such as depressive symptoms, could help to improve GPH in the elderly with or without HF.

  • 76.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep disordered breathing in community dwelling elderly: Associations with cardiovascular disease, impaired systolic function, and mortality after a six-year follow-up2011In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 748-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and impaired cardiac function are common in elderly people. We investigated the association of SDB and mortality in a community dwelling elderly population, considering CVD and objectively measured impaired cardiac function have been poorly studied thus far. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim: To investigate whether SDB is a factor that affects mortality in elderly people, with a focus on those with CVD and/or signs of impaired cardiac function. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A prospective cohort design was used and 331 community dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent one-night polygraphic recordings in the subjects homes. CVD and systolic function were objectively established. Mortality data were collected after 6 years. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: in the total population there were no significant associations between mortality and SOB. In those with CVD and impaired systolic function, as measured by NT-proBNP, oxygen desaturation index (ODI) andgt;= 10 was associated with mortality. The hazard ratio of 3.0 (Cl 95% 1.1-8.6, p = 0.03) remained statistically significant after adjustments for age, gender, diabetes and plasma values of NT-proBNP. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: SOB in community dwelling elderly has no overall association to mortality irrespective of degree of SDB. However, hypoxic events (i.e., ODI andgt;= 10) were associated with mortality in the group who had CVD in combination with impaired systolic function.

  • 77.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Research Agency, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vitamin D levels and depressive symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 207, p. 185-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vitamin D (Vit D) is suggested to play a role in the regulation of physical function as well as in depression. Since, Vit D deficiency is common in patients with heart failure (HF), this study aims to explore if Vit D levels are associated with depressive symptoms and if this association is mediated by the patients physical function. Method: 506 HF patients (mean age 71, 38% women) were investigated. Depressive symptoms and physical function were measured with the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and the physical function scale from the RAND-36. Vit D was measured in blood samples Results: At baseline there was no relationship between depressive symptoms and Vit D levels. However, at 18 months follow-up 29% of patients with Vit D &lt; 50 nmol/l at baseline had depressive symptoms compared 19% of those with Vit D levels &gt;50 nmol/l (p &lt; 0.05). Only in patients with Vit D &lt; 50 nmol/l, Vit D correlated significantly to physical function and depressive symptoms (r = .29, p &lt; 0.001 and r = .20, p &lt; 0.01). In structural equation modelling an indirect association between Vit D and depressive symptoms was found, mediated by physical function (B = 0.20). This association was only found in patients with Vit D levels &lt;50 nmol/l. Conclusion: In HF patients with Vit D &lt; 50 nmol/l, Vit D is associated to depressive symptoms during follow-up and this association is mediated by physical function. This relationship is not found in patients with Vitamin D level &gt;50 nmol/l. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 78.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University,.
    Difficulties in Identification of Sleep Disordered Breathing in an Outpatient Clinic for Heart Failure– A Case Study2014In: Annals of Nursing and Practice, ISSN 2379-9501, Vol. 1, no 3, article id 1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF). The clinical signs of newly diagnosed HF and untreated SDB may overlap and patients in need of SDB treatment can therefore be difficult to identify in patients participating in disease management programmes (DMP). The aim was to describe the care process of two patients with HF involved in a DMP, focusing on the difficulties to identify and initiate treatment of SDB.A prospective case study design was used to follow one male (70 yrs) and one female (74 yrs) patient during 18 months at a Swedish University hospital. It took 5 to 10 months from diagnosis of HF until optimal treatment was reached for their heart conditions and 12 to 17 months until SDB was treated. None of the patients complained of poor sleep, but suffered from fatigue. In the male SDB was detected by the wife’s complaints of her husband’s snoring, apnoeas and restless sleep. In the female, SDB was detected after a detailed assessment of fatigue which was shown to be sleepiness. After optimal treatment of HF but before imitation of SDB treatment both cases cardiac function improved. For the female case improvements also were found in the blood pressure. SDB treatment improved fatigue in both patients. Initiation of HF treatment and self-care routines, as well as identification of SDB is complex and time consuming. Treatment of HF and SDB can improve sleep, cardiac function as well as disturbing associated symptoms.

  • 79.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Arestedt, Kristoffer
    University of Kalmar.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, and health related quality of life - A comparison between age and gender matched elderly with heart failure or without cardiovascular disease2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this study are (I) to compare the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and insomnia between elderly with heart failure (HF) and age and gender matched elderly without cardiovascular disease (CVD), and (II) to examine the association between HF, SDB and insomnia, as well as their impact on health related quality of life (Hr-QoL). Methods: Three hundred and thirty-one elderly (71-87 years) community-living individuals underwent sleep recordings and echocardiography. Questionnaires assessed insomnia and Hr-QoL. Comparisons were made between age and gender matched individuals with HF (n=36) and without CVD (n=36). Results: The HF group had higher mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (17.6 vs. 6.3, pless than0.001). Moderate/severe SDB was found in 42% of those with HF vs. 8% in those without CVD (p=0.001). Those with HF had more difficulties maintaining sleep (DMS) (72% vs. 50%, p=0.05) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (25% vs. 8%, p=0.05) and scored worse Hr-QoL in five of eight SF-36 domains. In regression analysis SDB had no association to Hr-QoL. DMS associated to the physical-, and non restorative sleep to the mental domain of Hr-QoL. SDB had no correlations to insomnia or EDS. Conclusions: SDB, DMS and EDS are more common in elderly with HF. SDB is not an obvious cause for sleep complaints or poor Hr-QoL in elderly.

  • 80.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness and depressive symptomatology in elderly. The corokind study2006In: 18th Congress of the European Sleep Research Society,2006, 2006, p. 114-114Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Global perceived health and health-related quality of life in elderly primary care patients with symptoms of heart failure2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 269-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to examine whether a single question about global perceived health (GPH) is associated with the domains of health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) as assessed by the SF-36, and whether the scores in these domains differ from the different scores of the GPH in relation to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).

    Method: The study included 412 elderly outpatients with symptoms of heart failure (HF). Echocardiography was used to determine their LVEF, and GPH was assessed by the first question on the SF-36.

    Results: The correlations between GPH and the different domains in SF-36 ranged from 0.33 to 0.64 in patients with LVEF ≥ 50% and was between 0.29 and 0.59 in patients with LVEF < 40%. Regression analyses revealed GPH to be the strongest predictor of HR-QoL. Patients with LVEF < 40% rating poor GPH differed significantly (p < 0.05) from those with good or moderate GPH in six of the eight HR-QoL domains.

    Conclusion: One question about GPH gives a good general description of HR-QoL and may therefore be used as a simple tool to assess HR-QoL in elderly outpatients with clinical symptoms of HF.

  • 82.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Global perceived health and ten-year cardiovascular mortality in elderly primary care patients with possible heart failure2008In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 1040-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Although multi-item health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments provide prognostic information, they are rarely used in routine clinical practice.

    Aim: To examine whether a single question about global perceived health (GPH) was a prognostic indicator of cardiovascular (CV) mortality over 10 years of follow-up in elderly patients with possible heart failure (HF) in primary care.

    Method: GPH was measured using the first question on the Short-Form-36 concerning current health status. Of the 510 patients who underwent baseline evaluation, 448 patients were included.

    Results: Cox proportional regression hazard analysis controlled for age, sex, NYHA class, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, left ventricular ejection fraction and B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentrations, showed that patients with GPH rated as “poor” or “good” were at four (HR 4.1 CI 95% 1.8–9.4) and three times (HR 3.4 CI 95% 1.4–7.8) the risk of CV mortality, respectively.

    Conclusion: GPH is an independent predictor of CV mortality in elderly patients with possible HF. As a complement to clinical factors when evaluating severity of HF, GPH could be an important tool for identifying patients at risk of adverse CV events and in need of improved treatment.

  • 83.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Depressive symptoms and six-year cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients with and without heart failure2007In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 299-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate whether depressive symptoms (DS) in elderly patients with heart failure (HF) in the community is associated with increased mortality.

    Design: A cohort of 510 elderly patients (65-82 years) in a primary healthcare setting with symptoms associated with HF underwent a clinical and echocardiographic examination. A left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <40% indicated HF. The mental health index scale was used to screen for DS. Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality was registered over 6 years.

    Results: After adjustments those with DS had an increased risk (HR) of 3.0 (CI 95% 1.6-5.5, p=0.0001) and 2.2 (CI 95% 1.3-3.7, p=0.0004) of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, respectively. Patients with HF and DS had the highest risk of cardiovascular mortality, HR 15.7 (CI 95% 4.8-52.2) compared to patients with HF without DS and those with LVEF ≥50% and normal left ventricular diastolic function with and without DS.

    Conclusion: DS in elderly patients with HF is independently associated with increased mortality. Screening for DS is recommended as part of the clinical routine in managing patients with HF.

  • 84.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Effect of selenium and Q10 on the cardiac biomarker NT-proBNP2013In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate whether the effect of 48-month usage of coenzyme Q10 and selenium on cardiac function was different for participants with different levels of cardiac wall tension as measured by plasma levels of N-terminal natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at baseline. Methods. A 48-month randomized double-blind controlled trial in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly (mean age 78 years) was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given coenzyme Q10 combined with selenium, or a placebo. NT-proBNP measured at baseline and 48 months was used to evaluate the cardiac wall tension. Results. After 48 months, supplementation of coenzyme Q10 and selenium had varying impacts depending on the severity of impairment of cardiac function. Analyses of the responses in the different quintiles of baseline NT-proBNP showed that those with active supplementation, and a plasma level of NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles demonstrated significantly reduced NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.022) as well as cardiovascular mortality after 48 months (p = 0.006). Conclusion. Long-term supplementation of coenzyme Q10/selenium reduces NT-proBNP levels and cardiovascular mortality in those with baseline NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles indicating those who gain from supplementation are patients with mild to moderate impaired cardiac function.

  • 85.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Improved health-related quality of life, and more days out of hospital with supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. Results from a double blind, placebo-controlled prospective study2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 870-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on health-care usage and health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) in community-dwelling elderly people has, to our knowledge, not previously been investigated. To investigate the effect of 48 months supplementation with CoQ10 and selenium on community-dwelling elderly as regards: (I) the number of days out of hospital, and (II) the effect on Hr-QoL. A 48-month double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given CoQ10 and organic selenium yeast combined, or a placebo. All admissions to the Department of Internal Medicine or Cardiology were evaluated. Hr-QoL were measured with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Cardiac Health Profile (CHP) and one item overall-quality of life (overall-QoL). A total of 206 participants were evaluated after 48 months. No changes were found in the number of days out of hospital or Hr-QoL. A sub-analysis of participants matched for age, gender and baseline cardiac wall tension as measured by NT-proBNP was performed. The mean number of days out of hospital was 1779 for those taking the active substance compared to 1533 for those taking the placebo (p=0.03). Those with active substance declined significantly less in the HR-QoL domains of physical role performance (p=0.001), vitality (p=0.001), physical component score (p=0.001), overall QoL (p=0.001), somatic dimension (p=0.001), conative dimension (p=0.001) and global function (p=0.001). In a match-group analysis selenium and CoQ10 increased the number of days out of hospital and slowed the deterioration in Hr-QoL.

  • 86.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Riegel, Barbara
    University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sickness behavior in community-dwelling elderly associations with impaired cardiac function and inflammation2014In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 105-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sickness behavior is a cluster of symptoms that occur as a response to an infection and alterations in the inflammatory response. Under normal circumstances, sickness behavior is fully reversible once the pathogen has been cleared. Aging and chronic illness such as heart failure are associated with enhanced inflammatory activity that lasts for a long duration and no longer represents an adaptive response. The aim of this study was to explore whether inflammation mediates the relationship between impaired cardiac function and a symptom cluster including anhedonia, fatigue, and sleepiness, which might represent sickness behavior in community-dwelling elders. Structural equation modeling (SEM) showed that the factor impaired cardiac function (i.e., N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide, left ventricular ejection fraction, and the heart failure medications angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blockade, β-blocker, and diuretics) was associated with both inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein; β = .26) and the symptom cluster (β = .31). Inflammation had a significant direct, but smaller, association with the symptom cluster (β = .21). By this pathway, inflammation also mediated an indirect association between impaired cardiac function and the symptom cluster (β = .05). Including creatinine, blood glucose, ischemic heart disease, previous and current tumor, respiratory disease, age, and body mass index in the SEM model did not change these associations. Our results imply that some aspects of the symptom panorama in elderly individuals with impaired cardiac function or heart failure could represent sickness behavior.

  • 87.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA .
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden .
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Contribution of Heart Failure to Sleep Disturbances and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults2012In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, ISSN 0891-9887, E-ISSN 1552-5708, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 179-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the associations between physical symptoms, sleep disturbances, and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elderly individuals, comparing persons with and without heart failure (HF). Methods: A total of 613 older adults (mean age 78 years) underwent clinical and echocardiographic examinations. Questionnaires were used to evaluate sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms. A model was developed in those with HF (n = 107) and compared with those without HF (n = 506). Results: Cardiopulmonary symptoms (ie, dyspnea and nighttime palpitations) and pain had significant direct associations with sleep disturbances, which indirectly affected depressive symptoms. The model was essentially the same in those with and without HF except that the effect of sleep disturbances on depressive symptoms was stronger in those with HF (beta = 0.64 vs beta = 0.45, P = .006). Conclusion: In community-dwelling older adults, regardless of their diagnosis, physical symptoms had a direct effect on sleep disturbances and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms.

  • 88.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Sleep disordered breathing, hypoxia and inflammation: associations with sickness behaviour in community dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease2015In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation can induce a cluster of symptoms, referred to as sickness behaviour (e.g., depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances, pain and fatigue). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are common in older adults. CVD is associated with an increased inflammatory activity and in SDB, hypoxia can also increase inflammation. The purpose of this study is to explore if SDB-related hypoxia is associated differently with inflammation and the presence of sickness behaviour in older adults with and without CVD.

    METHODS: Three hundred and thirty-one older adults, whose mean age is 78 years, underwent one-night polygraphic recording to measure SDB and hypoxia. CVD was established by a clinical investigation. Questionnaires were used to measure sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was used as a marker of inflammation.

    RESULTS: Structural Equation Modelling showed that SDB-related hypoxia was associated with inflammation (β > 0.40) which mediated indirect associations with sickness behaviour (β = 0.19) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.11), but only in those with CVD (n = 119). In this model, inflammation had a direct effect on sickness behaviour (β = 0.43) and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms (β = 0.24). Hypoxia had the strongest effect (i.e., β = 0.41; significant) on inflammation, whereas the AHI or ODI had weak and non-significant effects (β = 0.03 and β = 0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with CVD and SDB are at a particular risk of developing sickness behaviour and depressive symptoms. The effect of SDB was mainly caused by hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia is an important marker of SDB severity in older adults with CVD.

  • 89.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Department of Nursing Science, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    The contribution of hypoxia to the association between sleep apnoea, insomnia, and cardiovascular mortality in community-dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease2015In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 222-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims:

    This study explores if nightly hypoxia (i.e. percentage of sleep time with oxygen saturation lower than 90% (SaO2<90%)) contributed to the association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and insomnia in community-dwelling elderly with and without cardiovascular disease (CVD). A second aim was to explore a potential cut-off score for hypoxia to predict insomnia and the association of the cut-off with clinical characteristics and cardiovascular mortality.

    Method:

    A total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71–87 years underwent one-night polygraphic recordings. The presence of insomnia was recorded by a self-report questionnaire. The presence of CVD was objectively established and mortality data were collected after three and six years.

    Results:

    In both patients with CVD (n=119) or without CVD (n=212) SDB was associated with hypoxia (p<0.005). Only in the patients with CVD was hypoxia associated with insomnia (p<0.001) which mediated an indirect effect (p<0.05) between SDB and insomnia. Hypoxia of more than 1.5% of sleep time with SaO2<90% was found to be a critical level for causing insomnia. According to this criterion 32% (n=39) and 26% (n=55) of those with and without CVD had hypoxia, respectively. These groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, respiratory disease or levels of SDB. However, in the CVD group, hypoxia was associated with cardiovascular mortality at the three-year follow-up (p=0.008) and higher levels of insomnia (p=0.002).

    Conclusion:

    In the elderly with CVD, SDB mediated by hypoxia can be associated with more insomnia and a worse prognosis.

  • 90.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep disordered breathing in community dwelling elderly-associations to cardiovascular disease, impaired systolic function and mortality. A six year follow-up in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 234-2342010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 234-234Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 91.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Westas, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Program Adapted to Patients With Cardiovascular Disease and Depression: Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: JMIR mental health, ISSN 2368-7959, Vol. 6, no 10, article id e14648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common cause of reduced well-being and prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is a lack of effective intervention strategies targeting depression.

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to evaluate the effects of a nurse-delivered and adapted internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program aimed at reducing depression in patients with CVD.

    METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted. A total of 144 patients with CVD with at least mild depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] score ≥5) were randomized 1:1 to a 9-week program of iCBT (n=72) or an active control participating in a Web-based discussion forum (online discussion forum [ODF], n=72). The iCBT program, which included 7 modules, was adapted to fit patients with CVD. Nurses with an experience of CVD care provided feedback and a short introduction to cognitive behavioral therapy. The primary outcome, depression, was measured using PHQ-9. Secondary outcomes were depression measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-self-rating version (MADRS-S), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measured using Short Form 12 (SF-12) survey and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS), and the level of adherence. An intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputations was used. Between-group differences in the primary and secondary outcomes were determined by the analysis of covariance, and a sensitivity analysis was performed using mixed models.

    RESULTS: Compared with ODF, iCBT had a significant and moderate treatment effect on the primary outcome depression (ie, PHQ-9; mean group difference=-2.34 [95% CI -3.58 to -1.10], P<.001, Cohen d=0.62). In the secondary outcomes, compared with ODF, iCBT had a significant and large effect on depression (ie, MADRS-S; P<.001, Cohen d=0.86) and a significant and moderate effect on the mental component scale of the SF-12 (P<.001, Cohen d=0.66) and the EQ-VAS (P<.001, Cohen d=0.62). Overall, 60% (n=43) of the iCBT group completed all 7 modules, whereas 82% (n=59) completed at least half of the modules. No patients were discontinued from the study owing to a high risk of suicide or deterioration in depression.

    CONCLUSIONS: Nurse-delivered iCBT can reduce depression and improve HRQoL in patients with CVD, enabling treatment for depression in their own homes and at their preferred time.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02778074; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02778074.

  • 92.
    Jonsson, Asa
    et al.
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Heart failure registry: a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with heart failure2010In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guidelines on how to diagnose and treat patients with heart failure (HF) are published regularly. However, many patients do not fulfil the diagnostic criteria and are not treated with recommended drugs. The Swedish Heart Failure Registry (S-HFR) is an instrument which may help to optimize the handling of HF patients. The S-HFR is an Internet-based registry in which participating centres (units) can record details of their HF patients directly online and transfer data from standardized forms or from computerized patient documentation. Up to December 2007, 16 117 patients from 78 units had been included in the S-HFR. Of these, 10 229 patients had been followed for at least 1 year, and 2133 deaths were recorded. Online reports from the registry showed that electrocardiograms were available for 97% of the patients. Sinus rhythm was found in 51% of patients and atrial fibrillation in 38%. Echocardiography was performed in 83% of the patients. Overall, 77% of patients were treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, 80% were on beta-blockers, 34% on aldosterone antagonists, and 83% on diuretics. The S-HFR is a valuable tool for improving the management of patients with HF, since it enables participating centres to focus on their own potential for improving diagnoses and medical treatment, through the online reports provided.

  • 93.
    Karlstrom, Patric
    et al.
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boman, Kurt
    Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brain natriuretic peptide-guided treatment does not improve morbidity and mortality in extensively treated patients with chronic heart failure: responders to treatment have a significantly better outcome2011In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 1096-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To determine whether brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)-guided heart failure (HF) treatment improves morbidity and/or mortality when compared with conventional treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results UPSTEP was an investigator-initiated, randomized, parallel group, multicentre study with a PROBE design. Symptomatic patients with worsening HF, New York Heart Association class II-IV, ejection fraction andlt;40% and elevated BNP levels, were included. All patients (n = 279) were treated according to recommended guidelines and randomized to BNP-guided (BNP) or to conventional (CTR) HF treatment. The goal was to reduce BNP levels to andlt;150 ng/L in younger patients and andlt;300 ng/L in elderly patients, respectively. The primary outcome was a composite of death due to any cause, need for hospitalization and worsening HF. The study groups were well matched, including for BNP concentration at entry (mean: 808 vs. 899 ng/L; P = 0.34). There were no significant differences between the groups regarding either the primary outcome (P = 0.18) or any of the secondary endpoints. There were no differences for the pre-specified analyses; days out of hospital, and younger vs. elderly. A subgroup analysis comparing treatment responders (andgt;30% decrease in baseline BNP value) vs. non-responders found improved survival among responders (P andlt; 0.0001 for the primary outcome), and all of the secondary endpoints were also improved. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Morbidity and mortality were not improved by HF treatment guided by BNP levels. However, BNP responders had a significantly better clinical outcome than non-responders. Future research is needed to elucidate the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms in this sub-population.

  • 94.
    Karlstrom, Patric
    et al.
    Institute for Medicine and Care, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Boman, Kurt
    Institute for Medicine, Skellefteå, Sweden .
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Upstep: A Randomized Study of BNP Guided Management of Systolic Heart Failure in Elderly Patients in CIRCULATION, vol 120, issue 18, pp S729-S7302009In: CIRCULATION, 2009, Vol. 120, no 18, p. S729-S730Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 95.
    Karlström, Patric
    et al.
    Department of Medicine , Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boman, Kurt
    Research unit Skellefteå Department of Medicine , Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Responder to BNP-guided treatment in heart failure. The process of defining a responder.2015In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 316-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels predict prognosis and outcome in heart failure (HF) patients. To evaluate the optimal cut-off level of BNP to predict death, need for hospitalization, and worsening HF, and also to determine the optimal time to apply the chosen cut-off value.

    DESIGN: In a sub-study from the Use of PeptideS in Tailoring hEart failure Project or UPSTEP study where tailoring treatment of HF by BNP level was evaluated, we assessed the change in percentage between levels of BNP at study start versus a specific week (2, 6, 10, 16, 24, 36, or 48) during the follow-up period.

    RESULTS: The optimum cut-off percentage levels were obtained using a Cox proportional regression analysis of death, hospitalization, and worsening HF. A decrease in BNP by less than 40% in week 16 compared with study start and/or a BNP > 300 ng/L presented the highest hazard ratio (HR) for a non-responder to reach a combined endpoint (HR: 2.43; 95% confidence interval or CI: 1.61-3.65; p < 0.00003). This definition gave a 78% risk reduction of cardiovascular (CV) mortality (p > 0.0005) and an 89% risk reduction of HF mortality (p > 0.004), and reduced risk of CV and HF hospitalization for the responders.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a decrease in BNP of more than 40% compared with that at study start and/or a BNP level below 300 ng/L at week 16 had a significantly reduced risk of CV and HF mortality and hospitalization.

  • 96.
    Karlström, Patric
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boman, Kurt
    Research unit Skellefteå Department of Medicine, Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Can BNP-guided therapy improve health-related quality of life, and do responders to BNP-guided heart failure treatment have improved health-related quality of life? Results from the UPSTEP study.2016In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To investigate whether B-type natriuretic peptide (NP)-guided treatment of heart failure (HF) patients improved their health related quality of life (Hr-QoL) compared to routine HF treatment, and whether changes in Hr-QoL differed depending on whether the patient was a responder to NP-guided therapy or not.

    Methods: A secondary analysis of the UPSTEP-study, a Scandinavian multicentre study using a prospective, randomized, open, blinded evaluation design on patients with HF with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV. NP-guiding was aimed to reduce BNP <150 ng/L if<75 years or BNP<300 ng/L if>75 years. A responder was defined as a patient with a BNP<300 ng/L and/or a decrease in BNP of at least 40 % in week 16 compared to study start. Short form-36 (SF-36) was used to measure Hr-QoL. At the study start, 258 patients presented evaluable SF-36 questionnaires, 131 in the BNP group and 127 in the control group. At the study end 100 patients in the NP-guided group and 98 in the control group, presenting data from both the study start and the study end.

    Results: There were no significant differences in Hr-QoL between NP-guided HF treatment and control group; however significant improvements could be seen in four of the eight domains in the NP-guided group, whereas in the control group improvements could be seen in six of the domains.

    Among the responders improvements could be noted in four domains whereas in the non-responders improvements could be seen in only one domain evaluating within group changes.

    Conclusions: Improved Hr-QoL could be demonstrated in several of the domains in both the NP-guided and the control group. In the responder group within group analyses showed more increased Hr-QoL compared to the non-responder group. However, all groups demonstrated increase in Hr-QoL.

  • 97.
    Karlström, Patric
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The impact of time to heart failure diagnosis on outcomes in patients tailored for heart failure treatment by use of natriuretic peptides. Results from the UPSTEP study2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 236, p. 315-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a life-threatening condition and optimal handling is necessary to reduce risk of therapy failure. The impact of the duration of HF diagnosis on HF outcome has not previously been examined. The objectives of this study were (I) to evaluate the impact of patient age on clinical outcomes, (II) to evaluate the impact of duration of the HF disease on outcomes, and (III) to evaluate the impact of age and HF duration on B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) concentration in a population of HF patients. Methods and results: In the UPSTEP (Use of PeptideS in Tailoring hEart failure Project) study we retrospectively evaluated how age and HF duration affected HF outcome. HF duration was divided into amp;lt; 1 year, 1-5 years and amp;gt; 5 years. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that HF duration influenced outcome more than age, even when adjusted for comorbidities(amp;lt; 1 year versus amp;gt; 5 years: HR 1.65; 95% CI 1.28-2.14; P amp;lt; 0.0002) on HF mortality and hospitalisations. The influence of age on BNP showed increased BNP as age increased. However, there was a significant effect on BNP concentration when comparing HF duration of less than one year to HF duration to more than five years, even when adjusted for age. Conclusions: Patients with longer HF duration had significantly worse outcome compared to those with short HF duration, even when adjusted for patient age and comorbidities. Age did not influence outcome but had an impact on BNP concentration; however, BNP concentration increased as HF duration increased. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 98.
    Karlström, Patric
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boman, Kurt
    Research unit Skellefteå Department of Medicine, Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Time since heart failure diagnosis influences outcomes more than age when handling heart failure patients: Results from the UPSTEP study2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a life-threatening condition and optimal handling is necessary to reduce risk of therapy failure.

    Objectives: The aims of this study were (I) to evaluate the impact of patient age on clinical outcomes, (II) to evaluate the impact of duration of the HF disease on outcomes, and (III) to evaluate the impact of age and HF duration on B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) concentration.

    Methods and Results: With data from the UPSTEP (Use of PeptideS in Tailoring hEart failure Project) study we retrospectively evaluated how age and HF duration affected HF outcome. HF duration was divided into <1 year (group 1), 1-5 years (group 2) and >5 years (group 3). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that HF duration influenced outcome more than age, even when adjusted for comorbidities(<1 year versus >5 years: HR 1.65; 95 % CI 1.28-2.14; p <0.0002) on HF mortality and hospitalizations. The influence of age on BNP showed increased BNP as age increased. However, there was a significant effect on BNP concentration comparing HF duration of < one year to HF duration >five years even when adjusted for age.

    Conclusions: Patients with longer HF duration had significantly worse outcome compared to those with short duration, even when adjusted for patient age and comorbidities. Age itself did not influence outcome in this evaluation. Age had impact on BNP concentration; however BNP concentration increased as HF duration increased even when adjusted for age.

  • 99.
    Landberg, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Serum prolactin and macroprolactin in heart failure: no relation to established laboratory or clinical parameters2011In: ANNALS OF CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY, ISSN 0004-5632, Vol. 48, p. 51-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A few smaller studies have reported that the prolactin concentration is elevated in connection with heart failure. As heart failure is combined with disturbances of several biological systems any or all of which may also influence prolactin concentrations, we wanted to evaluate the relation of prolactin to prognosis in elderly patients. Methods: A total of 462 elderly patients from a primary health-care centre, all with symptoms of heart failure, were included. In addition to clinical examination including echocardiography, concentrations of prolactin, macroprolactin, C-reactive protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretric peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured. Patients were then followed for 10 y, and all incidents of cardiovascular mortality were registered. Results: After excluding patients with macroprolactin, hyperprolactinaemia was found in 3.7% of the patients. There were no differences in prolactin concentrations or in the frequency of macroprolactin between patients with heart failure and those with normal cardiac function, defined as left ventricular ejection fraction of at least 50%. No significant correlation could be found between NT-proBNP and prolactin. Neither could any association be found between cardiovascular mortality and prolactin concentration during 10 y of follow-up. Conclusions: Prolactin concentrations were not associated with cardiovascular mortality or any clinical or biochemical marker of heart failure. Macroprolactin was found in similar frequency among patients with and without heart failure, and showed no correlation with mortality risk.

  • 100.
    Linde, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Ståhlberg, Marcus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Braunschweig, Frieder
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, N205, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm .
    Gender, underutilization of cardiac resynchronization therapy, and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation and left bundle branch block in heart failure.2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: It has been suggested that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is less utilized, dyssynchrony occurs at narrower QRS, and CRT is more beneficial in women compared with men. We tested the hypotheses that (i) CRT is more underutilized and (ii) QRS prolongation and left bundle branch block (LBBB) are more harmful in women.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 14 713 patients (28% women) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <40% in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. In women vs. men, CRT was present in 4 vs. 7% (P < 0.001) and was absent but with indication in 30 vs. 31% (P = 0.826). Next, among 13 782 patients (28% women) without CRT, 9% of women and 17% of men had non-specific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD) and 27% of women and 24% of men had LBBB. One-year survival with narrow QRS was 85% in women and 88% in men, with IVCD 74 and 78%, and with LBBB 84 and 82%, respectively. Compared with narrow QRS, IVCD had a multivariable hazard ratio of 1.24 (95% CI 1.05-1.46, P = 0.011) in women and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19-1.42, P < 0.001) in men, and LBBB 1.03 (95% CI 0.91-1.16, P = 0.651) in women and 1.16 (95% CI 1.07-1.26, P < 0.001) in men, P for interaction between gender and QRS morphology, 0.241.

    CONCLUSIONS: While the proportion with CRT was lower in women, CRT was equally underutilized in both genders. QRS prolongation with or without LBBB was not more harmful in women than in men. Efforts to improve CRT implementation should be directed equally towards women and men.

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