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  • 51.
    Blennow, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University.
    Fritz, Tomas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Ake Holmgren, Per
    Umeå University.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Obstetrik och gynekologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lindberg, Eva
    University of Örebro.
    Lundqvist, Anita
    Lund University.
    Norden Lindeberg, Solveig
    Uppsala University.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Ostlund, Ingrid
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Simic, Marija
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sjoers, Gunnar
    Uppsala University.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Lund University.
    Hellstrom-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University.
    Norman, Mikael
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Holmstrom, Gerd
    Uppsala University.
    Laurini, Ricardo
    Nordland Hospital.
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Lund University.
    Kallen, Karin
    Lund University.
    Lagercrantz, Hugo
    Karolinska Institute.
    Marsal, Karel
    Lund University.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Umeå University.
    Wennergren, Margareta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Nilstun, Tore
    Lund University.
    Otterblad Olausson, Petra
    National Board of Health & Welfare.
    Stromberg, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    One-Year Survival of Extremely Preterm Infants After Active Perinatal Care in Sweden2009Ingår i: JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, ISSN 0098-7484, Vol. 301, nr 21, s. 2225-2233Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Up-to-date information on infant survival after extremely preterm birth is needed for assessing perinatal care services, clinical guidelines, and parental counseling. Objective To determine the 1-year survival in all infants born before 27 gestational weeks in Sweden during 2004-2007. Design, Setting, and Patients Population-based prospective observational study of extremely preterm infants (707 live-born and 304 stillbirths) born to 887 mothers in 904 deliveries (102 multiple births) in all obstetric and neonatal units in Sweden from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2007. Main Outcome Measures Infant survival to 365 days and survival without major neonatal morbidity (intraventricular hemorrhage grade andgt; 2, retinopathy of prematurity stage andgt; 2, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Associations between perinatal interventions and survival. Results The incidence of extreme prematurity was 3.3 per 1000 infants. Overall perinatal mortality was 45% (from 93% at 22 weeks to 24% at 26 weeks), with 30% stillbirths, including 6.5% intrapartum deaths. Of live-born infants, 91% were admitted to neonatal intensive care and 70% survived to 1 year of age (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-73%). The Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26 weeks were 9.8% (95% CI, 4%-23%), 53% ( 95% CI, 44%-63%), 67% (95% CI, 59%-75%), 82% (95% CI, 76%-87%), and 85% ( 95% CI, 81%-90%), respectively. Lower risk of infant death was associated with tocolytic treatment (adjusted for gestational age odds ratio [ OR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.36-0.52), antenatal corticosteroids (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.24-0.81), surfactant treatment within 2 hours after birth ( OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.32-0.71), and birth at a level III hospital (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32-0.75). Among 1-year survivors, 45% had no major neonatal morbidity. Conclusion During 2004 to 2007, 1-year survival of infants born alive at 22 to 26 weeks of gestation in Sweden was 70% and ranged from 9.8% at 22 weeks to 85% at 26 weeks.

  • 52.
    Boman, Krister
    et al.
    Barncancerforskningsenheten Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Viksten, Jonas
    Avd för Psykologi Stockholms Universitet.
    Kogner, Per
    Barncancerforskningsenheten Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Serious illness in childhood: the different threats of cancer and diabetes from a parent perspective.2004Ingår i: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 145, s. 373-379Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare the incidence of disease-related distress symptoms in parents of children with cancer and diabetes. Study design A total of 675 parents of patients with cancer, patients with diabetes, and control subjects were assessed for 11 distress symptom clusters. Patient and control parent mean differences were tested by 2-tailed t tests, illness groups were compared by means of analysis of variance. Distress variations as a function of time since diagnosis were examined by regression analysis. Results The distress levels of patient parents exceeded those of control parents for global distress (P < .0001) and for most symptom subcategories. Distress levels of parents of patients with cancer (CP) significantly exceeded those of parents of patients with diabetes (DP) in anxiety (P < .0001), physical and psychologic distress (P < .0001), depression (P < .005), and loneliness (P < .05). Levels in DP matched those of CP in uncertainty, loss of control/the patient, self-esteem, disease-related fear, and sleep disturbances. Distress levels were lower in CP most distant hi time from diagnosis, whereas DP showed a reversed trend. Conclusions Parental distress patterns in childhood illness depend on illness type and time passed since diagnosis. Symptom profiles verify the need for psyehosocial attention at the initial shock after the cancer diagnosis and indicate long-term consequences for many parents. In pediatric diabetes, the persistence or intensification of distress over time is of specific clinical relevance.

  • 53.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy of Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden/Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Irander, Kristina
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Nasal metachromatic cells in infancy in relation to the appearance of atopic disease during the first 6 years of life1997Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 52, nr 7, s. 770-774Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between the appearance of nasal metachromatic cells (basophils and mast cells) during the first 18 months of life and the development of respiratory and other allergic diseases up to 6 years of age was studied prospectively in 67 children. Follow-up was done at 3, 6, 9, and 18 months and 6 years. Of the 31 children who had detectable metachromatic cells in the nasal mucosa during infancy, 18 had atopic manifestations at 6 years (58%), two were probably atopic (6%), and 11 (36%) were nonatopic. The corresponding numbers for the 33 children without detectable metachromatic cells during infancy were 10 atopic (30%), two probably atopic (6%), and 21 nonatopic (64%) at 6 years (P<0.05). Children having detectable nasal metachromatic cells at every examination were more often allergic than children with no detectable cells at any time during the 6-year follow-up period (P<0.05). In contrast, nasal metachromatic cells were equally commonly demonstrated at 6 years in children with and without current atopic manifestations. We conclude that metachromatic cells appear at an earlier age in the nasal mucosa of atopic than nonatopic infants. The observation further supports the existence of a primary immunologic abnormality in atopic patients as related to allergic inflammatory responses. The diagnostic efficacy of this marker was too low, however, to be clinically useful as a predictor of allergy.

  • 54.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Addis, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Italy .
    Adcock, I.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England Royal Brompton and Harefield NIHR Biomed Research Unit, England .
    Agache, I.
    ARIA, France Romanian Alliance Chron Resp Disease, Romania Transylvania University, Romania .
    Agusti, A.
    University of Barcelona, Spain CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Spain .
    Alonso, A.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain .
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    ARIA, France .
    M. Anto, J.
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain .
    Bachert, C.
    ARIA, France Ghent University Hospital, Belgium Ghent University Hospital, Belgium .
    E. Baena-Cagnani, C.
    ARIA, France Catholic University, Argentina .
    Bai, C.
    Chinese Medical Assoc, Peoples R China .
    Baigenzhin, A.
    EuroAsian Resp Soc, Kazakhstan .
    Barbara, C.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal .
    Barnes, P.J.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England Royal Brompton and Harefield NIHR Biomed Research Unit, England .
    Bateman, E.D.
    ARIA, France University of Cape Town, South Africa .
    Beck, L.
    Health Innovat Centre Southern Denmark, Denmark .
    Bedbrook, A.
    MACVIA LR, France ARIA, France .
    Bel, E.H.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Benezet, O.
    MACVIA LR, France .
    Bennoor, K.S.
    ARIA, France Bangladesh Lung Fdn, Bangladesh National Institute Disease Chest and Hospital, Bangladesh .
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Allergicentrum US. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Bernabeu-Wittel, M.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Hlthy Ageing, Spain Andalusian Healthcare Serv, Spain .
    Bewick, M.
    NHS England, England .
    Bindslev-Jensen, C.
    ARIA, France Odense University Hospital, Denmark Odense University Hospital, Denmark .
    Blain, H.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Blasi, F.
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Bonini, M.
    ARIA, France University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy .
    Bonini, S.
    ARIA, France University of Naples 2, Italy Italian National Research Council, Italy .
    Boulet, L.P.
    ARIA, France University of Laval, Canada .
    Bourdin, A.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France INSERM, France .
    Bourret, R.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France .
    Bousquet, P.J.
    ARIA, France .
    Brightling, C.E.
    Glenfield Hospital, England .
    Briggs, A.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Brozek, J.
    ARIA, France McMaster University, Canada McMaster University, Canada .
    Buh, R.
    Mainz University Hospital, Germany .
    Bush, A.
    ARIA, France University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England .
    Caimmi, D.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France .
    Calderon, M.
    University of Costa Rica, Costa Rica University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England .
    Calverley, P.
    University of Liverpool, England Aintree University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Camargos, P.A.
    ARIA, France University of Federal Minas Gerais, Brazil .
    Camuzat, T.
    MACVIA LR, France .
    Canonica, G.W.
    ARIA, France University of Genoa, Italy .
    Carlsen, K.H.
    ARIA, France University of Oslo, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Casale, T.B.
    ARIA, France .
    Cazzola, M.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Cepeda Sarabia, A.M.
    ARIA, France University of Simon Bolivar, Colombia Soc Latinoamer Allergia Asma and Immunol, Italy .
    Cesario, A.
    IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Italy .
    Chen, Y.Z.
    Peking and Centre Asthma Research and Educ, Peoples R China .
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia .
    Chavannes, N.
    ARIA, France Int Primary Care Resp Grp, Netherlands Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Chiron, R.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France .
    Chuchalin, A.
    ARIA, France WHO, Russia Pulmonol Research Institute, Russia Russian Resp Soc, Russia .
    Chung, K.F.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England Royal Brompton and Harefield NIHR Biomed Research Unit, England .
    Cox, L.
    ARIA, France Nova SE University, FL USA .
    Crooks, G.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland .
    G. Crooks, M.
    Hull York Medical Sch, England .
    A. Cruz, A.
    ARIA, France WHO, Russia University of Federal Bahia, Brazil CNPq, Brazil .
    Custovic, A.
    ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France University of Manchester, England .
    Dahl, R.
    ARIA, France Odense University Hospital, Denmark Odense University Hospital, Denmark .
    E. Dahlen, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    De Blay, F.
    ARIA, France Soc Francaise Allergol, France Strasbourg University, France .
    Dedeu, T.
    European Regional and Health Author, Belgium .
    Deleanu, D.
    ARIA, France University of Medical and Pharm Iuliu Hatieganu, Romania .
    Demoly, P.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Devillier, P.
    ARIA, France University of Versailles St Quentin, France .
    Didier, A.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France University of Toulouse, France .
    T. Dinh-Xuan, A.
    Paris Descartes University, France .
    Djukanovic, R.
    University of Southampton, England NIHR, England .
    Dokic, D.
    ARIA, France University of Ss Cyril and Methodius, Macedonia .
    Douagui, H.
    ARIA, France Centre Hospital University of Beni Messous, Algeria .
    Dubakiene, R.
    ARIA, France Lithuanian Soc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Lithuania Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    Eglin, S.
    University of Liverpool, England .
    Elliot, F.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland .
    Emuzyte, R.
    ARIA, France Lithuanian Soc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Lithuania Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    Fabbri, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Fink Wagner, A.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Patient Platform, Austria .
    Fletcher, M.
    WHO, Russia Educ Heatlh, England .
    Fokkens, W.J.
    ARIA, France University of Amsterdam, Netherlands European Rhinol Soc, Portugal .
    Fonseca, J.
    ARIA, France Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal Porto Age Up Consortium, Portugal University of Porto, Portugal University of Porto, Portugal Institute and Hospital CUF Porto, Portugal .
    Franco, A.
    University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, France .
    Frith, P.
    Repatriat Gen Hospital, Australia .
    Furber, A.
    Wakefield Council, England .
    Gaga, M.
    Athens Chest Hospital, Greece Athens Chest Hospital, Greece .
    Garces, J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Spain University of Valencia, Spain .
    Garcia-Aymerich, J.
    University of Pompeu Fabra, Spain .
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    ARIA, France National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia .
    Gonzales-Diaz, S.
    ARIA, France Soc Latinoamer Allergia Asma and Immunol, Italy .
    Gouzi, F.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France INSERM, France .
    A. Guzman, M.
    ARIA, France University of Chile, Chile .
    Haahtela, T.
    ARIA, France Helsinki University Hospital, Finland .
    Harrison, D.
    Public Health Blackburn Darwen, England .
    Hayot, M.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    G. Heaney, L.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland .
    Heinrich, J.
    MeDALL, Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy.
    Hellings, P. W.
    ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France University Hospital Leuven, Belgium .
    Hooper, J.
    Public Health Kirklees, England .
    Humbert, M.
    Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France .
    Hyland, M.
    University of Plymouth, England .
    Iaccarino, G.
    University of Salerno, Italy IRCCS Multimed, Italy .
    Jakovenko, D.
    MACVIA LR, France .
    R. Jardim, J.
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil .
    Jeandel, C.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Jenkins, C.
    George Institute Global Heatlh, Australia University of Sydney, Australia .
    L. Johnston, S.
    ARIA, France University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England .
    Jonquet, O.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Joos, G.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium .
    S. Jung, K.
    Hallym University, South Korea .
    Kalayci, O.
    ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France Hacettepe University, Turkey .
    Karunanithi, S.
    Director of Public Health, Lancashire, UK.
    Keil, T.
    Charite, Germany University of Wurzburg, Germany .
    Khaltaev, N.
    ARIA, France WHO, Russia .
    Kolek, V.
    Czech Alliance Against Chron Resp Disease, Poland .
    L. Kowalski, M.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland .
    Kull, I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Kuna, P.
    ARIA, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France WHO, Russia Medical University of Lodz, Poland .
    Kvedariene, V.
    ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France Lithuanian Soc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Lithuania Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    T. Le, L.
    ARIA, France WHO, Russia University of Medical and Pharm, Vietnam .
    C. Lodrup Carlsen, K.
    ARIA, France University of Oslo, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Louis, R.
    University of Liege, Belgium .
    MacNee, W.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland .
    Mair, A.
    Scottish Govt, Scotland .
    Majer, I.
    University of Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Manning, P.
    Bon Secours Hospital, Ireland .
    de Manuel Keenoy, E.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France Kronikgune, Spain .
    R. Masjedi, M.
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Iran .
    Meten, E.
    ARIA, France Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Melo-Gomes, E.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal .
    Menzies-Gow, A.
    Royal Brompton Hospital, England .
    Mercier, G.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Mercier, J.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    P. Michel, J.
    Geneva School Med, Switzerland University Hospital Geneva, Switzerland .
    Miculinic, N.
    University Hospital Pulm Disease, Croatia .
    Mihaltan, F.
    ARIA, France Institute Pneumol Marius Nasta, Romania .
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia COPD Serbia, Serbia .
    Molimard, M.
    Bordeaux University, France .
    Mamas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France Paris Municipal, France .
    Montilla-Santana, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Hlthy Ageing, Spain .
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Hospital CUF Descobertas, Portugal .
    Morgan, M.
    NHS England, England .
    NDiaye, M.
    Hop Polyclin Dakar IHS, Senegal .
    Nafti, S.
    ARIA, France Mustapha Hospital, Algeria .
    Nekam, K.
    ARIA, France Hospital Hospital Bros Buda, Hungary .
    Neou, A.
    Charite, Germany .
    Nicod, L.
    CHUV Lausanne, Switzerland .
    OHehir, R.
    ARIA, France Alfred Hospital, Australia Monash University, Australia .
    Ohta, K.
    ARIA, France Tokyo National Hospital, Japan Teikyo University, Japan .
    Paggiaro, P.
    University Hospital Pisa, Italy .
    Palkonen, S.
    ARIA, France .
    Palmer, S.
    University of York, England .
    Papadopoulos, N. G.
    ARIA, France European Academic Allergy and Clin Immunol, France University of Manchester, England University of Athens, Greece .
    Papi, A.
    University of Ferrara, Italy .
    Passalacqua, G.
    ARIA, France University of Genoa, Italy .
    Pavord, I.
    University of Oxford, England .
    Pigearias, B.
    SPLF, Espace francophone de Pneumologie.
    Plavec, D.
    University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia .
    Postma, D. S.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    Price, D.
    ARIA, France Int Primary Care Resp Grp, Netherlands University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Rabe, K. F.
    University of Kiel, Germany .
    Radier Pontal, F.
    MACVIA LR, France .
    Redon, J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France University of Valencia, Spain .
    Rennard, S.
    University of Nebraska Medical Centre, NE USA .
    Roberts, J.
    Salford Royal NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Robine, J. M.
    MACVIA LR, France INSERM, France .
    Roca, J.
    University of Barcelona, Spain CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Spain .
    Roche, N.
    University of Paris 05, France Soc Pneumol Langue Francaise, France .
    Rodenas, F.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Spain University of Valencia, Spain .
    Roggeri, A.
    Arcispedale S Maria Nuova Hospital, Italy .
    Rolland, C.
    Assoc Asthme and Allergies, France .
    Rosado-Pinto, J.
    ARIA, France European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal WHO, Russia .
    Ryan, D.
    ARIA, France Int Primary Care Resp Grp, Netherlands Woodbrook Medical Centre, England University of Edinburgh, Scotland .
    Samolinski, B.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, France Medical University of Lodz, Poland Medical University of Warsaw, Poland .
    Sanchez-Borges, M.
    Centre Medical Docente La Trinidad, Venezuela .
    Schunemann, H. J.
    McMaster University, Canada McMaster University, Canada .
    Sheikh, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland Harvard University, MA 02115 USA .
    Shields, M.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland Royal Belfast Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland .
    Siafakas, N.
    University Hospital Heraklion, Greece .
    Sibille, Y.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium .
    Similowski, T.
    University of Paris 06, France INSERM, France Grp Hospital Pitie Salpetriere Charles Foix, France Fonds Dotat Rech Sante Resp Fdn Souffle, France .
    Small, I.
    National Advisory Group, Respiratory Managed Clinical Networks in Scotland.
    Sola-Morales, O.
    Health Institute Technology Transfer, Spain .
    Sooronbaev, T.
    ARIA, France WHO, Russia EuroAsian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan National Centre Cardiol and Internal Med, Kyrgyzstan .
    Stelmach, R.
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil .
    Sterk, P. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Stiris, T.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Sud, P.
    Regional Medical Manager (North), NHS England, UK.
    Tellier, V.
    Observatoire wallon de la santé, Direction générale opérationnelle Pouvoirs locaux, action sociale et Santé, Service public de Wallonie, Belgium .
    To, T.
    WHO, Russia .
    Todo-Bom, A.
    Coimbra University Hospital, Portugal .
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Salerno, Italy .
    Valenta, R.
    ARIA, France Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Valero, A. L.
    University of Barcelona, Spain CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Spain .
    Valiulis, A.
    ARIA, France Lithuanian Soc Allergol and Clin Immunol, Lithuania Vilnius State University, Lithuania .
    Valovirta, E.
    University of Turku, Finland .
    Van Ganse, E.
    CHU Lyon, France CHU Lyon, France University of Lyon 1, France .
    Vandenplas, O.
    ARIA, France INSERM, France .
    Vasankari, T.
    FILHA, Finnish Lung Association.
    Vestbo, J.
    University of Manchester, England Odense University Hospital, Denmark .
    Vezzani, G.
    Arcispedale S Maria Nuova IRCCS, Italy .
    Viegi, G.
    CNR, Italy CNR, Italy Clin Physiol IFC, Italy .
    Visier, L.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France MACVIA LR, France University of Montpellier I, France .
    Vogelmeier, C.
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Vontetsianos, T.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece .
    Wagstaff, R.
    Cumbria County Council, PA USA .
    Wahn, U.
    Charite, Germany .
    Wallaert, B.
    Soc Francaise Allergol, France CHRU, France .
    Whalley, B.
    University of Plymouth, England .
    Wickman, M.
    ARIA, France Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    M. Williams, D.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA .
    Wilson, N.
    North England EU Health Partnership, Belgium .
    Yawn, B. P.
    ARIA, France Olmsted Medical Centre, MN USA University of Minnesota, MN USA .
    Yiallouros, P.K.
    ARIA, France Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus .
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    ARIA, France .
    Yusuf, O. M.
    WHO, Russia Allergy and Asthma Institute, Pakistan .
    Zar, H. J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa .
    Zhong, N.
    Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China Guangzhou Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Zidarn, M.
    ARIA, France University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia .
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany .
    Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)2014Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 44, nr 2, s. 304-323Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYS-ICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  • 55.
    Braback, Lennart
    et al.
    Sundsvall Hospital.
    Vogt, Hartmut
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Hjern, A.
    National Board for Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Migration and asthma medication in international adoptees and immigrant families in Sweden2011Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 41, nr 8, s. 1108-1115Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies of asthma in migrant populations illustrate the effects of environmental changes. Objective In this register study we investigated the importance of exposure to a western lifestyle in different phases of development in Swedish residents with an origin in regions in the world where asthma usually is less prevalent. Methods The study population comprised 24 252 international adoptees, 47 986 foreign-born and 40 971 Swedish-born with foreign-born parents and 1 770 092 Swedish-born residents with Swedish-born parents (age 6-25 years). Purchased prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) during 2006 were used as an indicator of asthma. Results International adoptees and children born in Sweden by foreign-born parents had three-to fourfold higher rates of asthma medication compared with foreign-born children. The odds ratios (ORs) of asthma medication declined persistently with age at immigration. For adoptees the ORs compared with infant adoptees were 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71-0.85] for those adopted at 1-2 years, 0.51 (0.42-0.61) at 3-4 years and 0.35 (0.27-0.44) after 5 or more years of age. Corresponding ORs for foreign-born children with foreign-born parents immigrating at 0-4 years, at 5-9 years, at 10-14 years and at 15 years or more were 0.73 (0.63-0.86), 0.56 (CI 0.46-0.68) and 0.35 (CI 0.28-0.43), respectively. The ORs were only marginally affected by adjustment for region of birth and socio-economic indicators. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Age at immigration is a more important determinant of purchased ICS than population of origin. This indicates the importance of environmental factors for asthma in schoolchildren and young adults.

  • 56.
    Brekke, Hilde K
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Daily vegetable intake during pregnancy negatively associated to islet autoimmunity in the offspring-The ABIS study2010Ingår i: PEDIATRIC DIABETES, ISSN 1399-543X, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 244-250Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate if maternal diet during pregnancy is associated with occurrence of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: Of 21 700 infants invited to the All Babies in South-east Sweden (ABIS) study, 16 004 screening questionnaires, including a 22-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) regarding the mothers diet during pregnancy, were completed after delivery. Follow-up of the children (questionnaires and blood sampling) was performed at 1, 2.5 and 5 yr of age. IA was defined as being positive (above the 95th percentile for healthy children) in two or more measurements of autoantibodies [glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA); tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A), insulin autoantibodies (IAA)] analysed at the three time points or being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during the 5-yr follow-up period. The 5 724 children in whom we carried out two to three possible blood samplings were included in the study. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables predicting IA. Results: Of 5 724 children,191 (3.3%) were considered positive for IA. In a univariate analysis, less than daily consumption of vegetables (3-5 times/week) in the mothers diet was associated with increased risk of IA (OR 1.71, 95% CI:1.24-2.35, p = 0.001) compared to daily consumption (p for trend = 0.004). The association was strengthened when adjusting for known IA-risk factors (p for trend andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: Daily consumption of vegetables in the mothers diet during pregnancy was associated with a decreased risk of IA in the offspring.

  • 57. Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Vitamin D supplementation and diabetes-related autoimmunity in the ABIS study2007Ingår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 11-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Supplementation with vitamin D during infancy, as well as intake of vitamin D during pregnancy, has been associated with decreased risk of type 1 diabetes or diabetes-related autoantibodies in children. The primary aim of this report was to investigate whether vitamin D supplementation during infancy is associated with diabetes-related autoimmunity at 1 and 2.5 yr in the children. Second, we examined whether consumption of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy is related to risk of autoimmunity in the offspring. Screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery, including a food-frequency questionnaire regarding the mother's use of dietary supplements during pregnancy. Parents of 11 081 and 8805 infants completed a follow-up questionnaire regarding the use of vitamin supplementation at 1 and 2.5 yr, respectively. Autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen-2 (IA-2) were analyzed in whole blood from 8694 children at 1 yr and 7766 children at 2.5 yr. Supplementation with AD-drops was not associated with autoantibodies at 1 or 2.5 yr. Use of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy was associated with reduced diabetes-related autoimmunity at 1 yr (adjusted odds ratio: 0.707, confidence interval: 0.520-0.962, p = 0.028) but not at 2.5 yr. In conclusion, no association was found between an intermediate dose of vitamin D supplementation during infancy and development of diabetes-related autoantibodies at 1 and 2.5 yr. Use of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy was associated with reduced development.

  • 58.
    Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Avd för klin nutrition, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Barnkliniken, Örebro.
    van Odijk, J
    Avd för klin nutrition Sahlgrenska sjukhuset.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Breastfeeding and introduction of solid foods in Swedish infants; the All Babies in Southeast Sweden study2005Ingår i: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 94, nr 3, s. 377-382Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this report is to describe breastfeeding duration and introduction of foods in Swedish infants born 1997-9, in relation to current recommendations. A secondary aim is to examine breastfeeding duration and introduction of certain allergenic foods in allergy-risk families (for whom allergy-preventive advice has been issued). Out of 21 700 invited infants, screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery. Parents to 11 081 infants completed a follow-up questionnaire regarding breastfeeding and introduction of foods and 9849 handed in detailed food diaries at 1 year of age. The percentages of infants who were exclusively breast-fed at 3, 6 and =9 months of age were 78.4, 10.1 and 3.9, respectively. The corresponding percentages for partial breastfeeding were 87.8, 68.9 and 43.6. Gluten-containing foods were introduced to 66 % of infants between 4 and 6 months, as recommended at the time of the study, and one-quarter had stopped breastfeeding when gluten was introduced. More than 90 % of parents introduced the first sample of solid food during months 4-6, as recommended. Fish and eggs had been introduced during the first year in 43 % and 29 %, respectively, of infants with atopic heredity. Exclusive breastfeeding duration and time of introduction of solid foods, including gluten, seemed to have been in line with Swedish recommendations at the time, although gluten was often introduced late, and not during ongoing breastfeeding as recommended. The adherence to allergy-preventive advice was less than optimal in infants with atopic heredity.

  • 59.
    Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    van Odijk, Jenny
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Predictors and dietary consequences of frequent intake of high-sugar, low-nutrient foods in 1-year-old children participating in the ABIS study2007Ingår i: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 97, nr 1, s. 176-181Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Foods rich in sugar have been suggested to contribute to the increasing prevalence of obesity in children. The aim of this report is to investigate the dietary pattern in 1-year-old children who frequently receive foods rich in sugar but low in nutrients and to study associated demographic and parental factors. During 1977-9, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in this prospective, population-based, longitudinal cohort study. Screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery. Follow-up questionnaires from 10 762 children at 1 year of age are included in the analysis. It was found that 24% of the children received sweets/pastries more often than one or two times per week. They had a higher intake of French fries, potato crisps and cream as well as a lower intake of fruit and vegetables. A frequent intake of sugar-rich, low-nutrient foods was significantly associated with several maternal factors (high intake of sweets/pastries during pregnancy, young age, mother living alone) as well as presence of older siblings. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and maternal overweight were of borderline significance. Parental education level was inversely associated with the frequency of intake of sweets/pastries in the child. Children who frequently receive sweets/pastries also have an otherwise unfavourable dietary pattern. Several parental and demographic factors were associated with this feeding pattern, especially high intake of sweets/pastries during pregnancy. Screening of pregnant women for risk predictors like consumption of sweets/pastries, young age and smoking could be possible ways of identifying children at future risk for low dietary quality.

  • 60.
    Bruhn, Sören
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Fang, Yu
    Guiyang Medical Coll, Peoples R China University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Barrenäs, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Kronke, Andrea
    Cenix BioScience GmbH, Germany .
    Sonnichsen, Birte
    Cenix BioScience GmbH, Germany .
    Bresnick, Anne
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10461 USA .
    Dulyaninova, Natalya
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10461 USA .
    Wang, Hui
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Zhao, Yelin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Klingelhofer, Jorg
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Ambartsumian, Noona
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Beck, Mette K.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark .
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bona, Elsa
    Boras Hospital, Sweden .
    Xiang, Zou
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärt- och Medicincentrum, Allergicentrum US. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    A Generally Applicable Translational Strategy Identifies S100A4 as a Candidate Gene in Allergy2014Ingår i: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 6, nr 218Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The identification of diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidate genes in common diseases is complicated by the involvement of thousands of genes. We hypothesized that genes co-regulated with a key gene in allergy, IL13, would form a module that could help to identify candidate genes. We identified a T helper 2 (T(H)2) cell module by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of 25 putative IL13-regulating transcription factors followed by expression profiling. The module contained candidate genes whose diagnostic potential was supported by clinical studies. Functional studies of human TH2 cells as well as mouse models of allergy showed that deletion of one of the genes, S100A4, resulted in decreased signs of allergy including TH2 cell activation, humoral immunity, and infiltration of effector cells. Specifically, dendritic cells required S100A4 for activating T cells. Treatment with an anti-S100A4 antibody resulted in decreased signs of allergy in the mouse model as well as in allergen-challenged T cells from allergic patients. This strategy, which may be generally applicable to complex diseases, identified and validated an important diagnostic and therapeutic candidate gene in allergy.

  • 61.
    Bruun, C.F.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Langbakk, B.
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Norway.
    Steigen, S.E.
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Norway.
    Purpura fulminans as a sequel to erythema nodosum in a child with homozygous Leiden mutation and acquired protein S deficiency2005Ingår i: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 94, nr 8, s. 1155-1158Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A 6-y-old boy presented with generalized, bruise-like swelling of both legs. Three weeks later, he developed purpura fulminans in one of the affected feet. Histology of the leg swelling was in accordance with erythema nodosum. The boy proved to be homozygous for the Factor V Leiden mutation and to have acquired protein S deficiency. He recovered, with partial loss of two toes. Conclusion: In contrast to what is often stated, erythema nodosum is not always a benign condition. On the basis of this report, we suggest that if extensive erythema nodosum develops in an individual without any known thrombophilic disorder, investigations with respect to the latter should be performed. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.

  • 62.
    Byström, IngMarie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Medicinsk mikrobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease: From the Perspectives of Children and Parents2012Ingår i: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2012Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To examine how celiac children and adolescents on gluten-free diet valued their health-related quality of life, and if age and severity of the disease at onset affected the childrens self-valuation later in life. We also assessed the parents valuation of their childs quality of life. Methods. The DISABKIDS Chronic generic measure, short versions for both children and parents, was used on 160 families with celiac disease. A paediatric gastroenterologist classified manifestations of the disease at onset retrospectively. Results. Age or sex did not influence the outcome. Children diagnosed before the age of five scored higher than children diagnosed later. Children diagnosed more than eight years ago scored higher than more recently diagnosed children, and children who had the classical symptoms of the disease at onset scored higher than those who had atypical symptoms or were asymptomatic. The parents valuated their childrens quality of life as lower than the children did. Conclusion. Health-related quality of life in treated celiac children and adolescents was influenced by age at diagnosis, disease severity at onset, and years on gluten-free diet. The disagreement between child-parent valuations highlights the importance of letting the children themselves be heard about their perceived quality of life.

  • 63.
    Böttcher (Fagerås), Malin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Gustafson, Sofia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Voor, T.
    Children's Clinic of Tartu University Clinics, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Endotoxin levels in Estonian and Swedish house dust and atopy in infancy2003Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 33, nr 3, s. 295-300Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Immune responses, including those to allergens, may be T helper (Th)2 skewed in newborns. In order to redress the fetal Th1/Th2 imbalance, Th1-stimulating factors, such as bacterial endotoxin, may be required. The increasing prevalence and severity of atopic diseases in industrialized countries, which are in marked contrast with the low prevalence of allergy among children in the formerly socialist countries of Europe, have been suggested to be caused by a reduced microbial stimulation.

    Aim To relate the endotoxin levels in house dust from two countries with a low (Estonia) and a high (Sweden) prevalence of allergy to the development of atopic disease and sensitization in the children during the first 2 years of life.

    Methods The study included 108 children from Tartu, Estonia and 111 children from Linköping, Sweden. Skin prick tests were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of age, and questionnaires were distributed to the families. At 24 months, a paediatrician examined the children. Dust samples were collected from mattresses and carpets and the endotoxin concentration was determined by a chromogenic Limulus assay.

    Results The endotoxin levels were higher in Estonian than in Swedish house dust (median levels 29 (range 0.25–280) and 14 (range 0.25–99) EU/mg dust, respectively, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the levels were inversely related to the development of atopic disease and sensitization in the Swedish, but not in the Estonian, children.

    Conclusions The low prevalence of atopic disease in Estonia may, at least in part, be related to the high endotoxin levels in this country. The findings support that high levels of endotoxin, or other bacterial products with Th1-stimulating properties, might protect children from developing atopic disease.

  • 64.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Immune responses to birch in young children during their first 7 years of life2002Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 57, s. 43-43Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 65.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Nordin, EK
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Hlth & Environm, Div Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Div Microbial Ecol, Dept Cellular & Microbial Biol, Stockholm, Sweden Ostersund Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Ostersund, Sweden.
    Sandin, A
    Midtvedt, T
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Hlth & Environm, Div Paediat, Linkoping, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Div Microbial Ecol, Dept Cellular & Microbial Biol, Stockholm, Sweden Ostersund Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Ostersund, Sweden.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Microflora-associated characteristics in faeces from allergic and nonallergic infants2000Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 30, nr 11, s. 1590-1596Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased particularly over the past 30-40 years. A reduced microbial stimulation during infancy may result in a development of a disturbed balance between Th1- and Th2-like immunity. The gut flora is, quantitatively, the most important source for such stimulation. Objective The aim of the study was to compare the gut microbial flora in 25 allergic and 47 nonallergic 13-month-old infants (range 11-18), through analysing microflora-associated biochemical markers in faeces. Methods Microflora associated characteristics (MACs) were assessed by determining the concentrations of eight different short chain fatty acids and the conversion of cholesterol to coprostanol by gas chromatography. Faecal tryptic activity was analysed spectrophotometrically. Results The allergic infants had lower levels of propionic, i-butyric, butyric, i-valeric and valeric acid. In contrast, they had higher levels of the rarely detected i-caproic acid, which has been associated with the presence of Clostridium difficile. Furthermore, the allergic infants had higher relative distribution of acetic and i-caproic acid. None of the other parameters differed between the groups. Conclusion The results demonstrate differences in the MACs between allergic and nonallergic infants, indicating differences in the composition of the gut flora. that may disturb the development of a normal Th1-/Th2-balance in allergic children.

  • 66.
    Cardwell, C R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, L C
    Norwegian Institute Public Health.
    Joner, G
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Davis, E A
    University Western Australia.
    Cinek, O
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, J
    University Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Castell, C
    Advisory Comm Diabet Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain .
    Svensson, J
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, M J
    University of Oxford.
    Waldhoer, T
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Polanska, J
    Silesian Technical University.
    Gimeno, S G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, L-M
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Parslow, R C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, E J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, A
    University Lancaster.
    Pozzilli, P
    University Campus Biomed, Rome, Italy .
    Brigis, G
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, B
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Sipetic, S
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, E
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, C
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Nutr and Metab Disease Clin, Bucharest, Romania .
    de Beaufort, C E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, D
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Buschard, K
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen.
    Patterson, C C
    Queens University Belfast.
    Birthweight and the risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes: a meta-analysis of observational studies using individual patient data2010Ingår i: DIABETOLOGIA, ISSN 0012-186X, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 641-651Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether children who are heavier at birth have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. Relevant studies published before February 2009 were identified from literature searches using MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of all studies containing relevant data were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct pre-specified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by category of birthweight were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were then used to derive combined ORs and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Data were available for 29 predominantly European studies (five cohort, 24 case-control studies), including 12,807 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, studies consistently demonstrated that children with birthweight from 3.5 to 4 kg had an increased risk of diabetes of 6% (OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.11]; p = 0.02) and children with birthweight over 4 kg had an increased risk of 10% (OR 1.10 [95% CI 1.04-1.19]; p = 0.003), compared with children weighing 3.0 to 3.5 kg at birth. This corresponded to a linear increase in diabetes risk of 3% per 500 g increase in birthweight (OR 1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]; p = 0.03). Adjustments for potential confounders such as gestational age, maternal age, birth order, Caesarean section, breastfeeding and maternal diabetes had little effect on these findings. Children who are heavier at birth have a significant and consistent, but relatively small increase in risk of type 1 diabetes.

  • 67.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute for Public Health .
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo.
    Bulsara, Max K
    University of Notre Dame.
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Jane, Mireia
    Department of Health, Public Health Div, Barcelona, Spain .
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University Oxford.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa
    Medical University of Silesia.
    Gimeno, Suely G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster.
    Pozzilli, Paolo
    University Campus Biomed, Rome, Italy .
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, Denka
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Buschard, Karsten
    Rigshosp, Bartholin Institute, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Patterson, Chris C
    Queens University Belfast.
    Maternal Age at Birth and Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis of 30 Observational Studies2010Ingår i: DIABETES, ISSN 0012-1797, Vol. 59, nr 2, s. 486-494Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-The aim if the study was to investigate whether children born to older mothers have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies using individual patient data to adjust for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Relevant studies published before June 2009 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of studies were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct prespecified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by maternal age were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios and to investigate heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS-Data were available for 5 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 14,724 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was, on average, a 5% (95% CI 2-9) increase in childhood type 1 diabetes odds per 5-year increase in maternal age (P = 0.006), but there was heterogeneity among studies (heterogeneity I-2 = 70%). In studies with a low risk of bias, there was a more marked increase in diabetes odds of 10% per 5-year increase in maternal age. Adjustments for potential confounders little altered these estimates. CONCLUSIONS-There was evidence of a weak but significant linear increase in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes across the range of maternal ages, but the magnitude of association varied between studies. A very small percentage of the increase in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes in recent years could be explained by increases in maternal age.

  • 68.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute Public Health.
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo.
    Bulsara, Max K
    University of Western Australia.
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University of Oxford.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa
    Medical University of Silesia.
    Gimeno, Suely G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Roberts, Christine L
    University of Sydney.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster.
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University Medical.
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Nutr and Metab Disease Clin.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, Denka
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia.
    Buschard, Karsten
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen.
    Radon, Katja
    Hospital LMU Munich.
    Glatthaar, Christopher
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital.
    Patterson, Chris C
    Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies2011Ingår i: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, ISSN 0300-5771, Vol. 40, nr 2, s. 363-374Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies. Methods Relevant studies published before January 2010 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of studies provided individual patient data or conducted pre-specified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios (ORs), before and after adjustment for confounders, and investigate heterogeneity. Results Data were available for 6 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 11 955 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was no evidence of an association prior to adjustment for confounders. After adjustment for maternal age at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second- or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR = 0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P = 0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I-2 = 67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed that the association was stronger and more consistent in children andlt; 5 years of age (n = 25 studies, maternal age adjusted OR = 0.84 95% CI 0.75, 0.93; I-2 = 23%). Conclusion Although the association varied between studies, there was some evidence of a lower risk of childhood onset type 1 diabetes with increasing birth order, particularly in children aged andlt; 5 years. This finding could reflect increased exposure to infections in early life in later born children.

  • 69.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland .
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic .
    Svensson, Jannet
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark .
    Perez-Bravo, Francisco
    University of Chile, Chile .
    Memon, Anjum
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School and NHS Brighton and Hove, England .
    Gimeno, Suely G
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil .
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University, Wales .
    Strotmeyer, Elsa S
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA .
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University of Oxford, England .
    Radon, Katja
    Hospital Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany .
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan .
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds, England .
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster, England .
    Karavanaki, Kyriaki
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University, Latvia .
    Pozzilli, Paolo
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy .
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania .
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Salento, Italy .
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade, Serbia .
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Romania .
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Clin Pediat Luxembourg, Luxembourg .
    Harrild, Kirsten
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Benson, Victoria
    University of Oxford, England .
    Savilahti, Erkki
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
    Royal Childrens Hospital, Australia .
    Salem, Mona
    Ain Shams University, Egypt .
    Rabiei, Samira
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science and Health Serv, Iran .
    C Patterson, Chris
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland .
    Breast-Feeding and Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes A pooled analysis of individual participant data from 43 observational studies2012Ingår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 35, nr 11, s. 2215-2225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Relevant studies were identified from literature searches using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of relevant studies were asked to provide individual participant data or conduct prespecified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to combine odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS-Data were available from 43 studies including 9,874 patients with type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was a reduction in the risk of diabetes after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks (20 studies; OR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.64-0.88), the association after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;3 months was weaker (30 studies; OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.00), and no association was observed after (nonexclusive) breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks (28 studies; OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.81-1.07) or andgt;3 months (29 studies; OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.00). These associations were all subject to marked heterogeneity (I-2 = 58, 76, 54, and 68%, respectively). In studies with lower risk of bias, the reduced risk after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks remained (12 studies; OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.99), and heterogeneity was reduced (I-2 = 0%). Adjustments for potential confounders altered these estimates very little. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS-The pooled analysis suggests weak protective associations between exclusive breast-feeding and type 1 diabetes risk. However, these findings are difficult to interpret because of the marked variation in effect and possible biases (particularly recall bias) inherent in the included studies.

  • 70.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University of Belfast.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Sadauskaite-Kuehne, Vaiva
    Lithuanian University of Health Science.
    Roberts, Christine L
    University of Sydney.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Clin Pediat Luxembourg.
    Soltesz, Gyula
    University of Pecs.
    C Patterson, Chris
    Queens University of Belfast.
    Interbirth Interval Is Associated With Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Risk2012Ingår i: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 61, nr 3, s. 702-707Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Short interbirth interval has been associated with maternal complications and childhood autism and leukemia, possibly due to deficiencies in maternal micronutrients at conception or increased exposure to sibling infections. A possible association between interbirth interval and subsequent risk of childhood type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. A secondary analysis of 14 published observational studies of perinatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes was conducted. Risk estimates of diabetes by category of interbirth interval were calculated for each study. Random effects models were used to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Overall, 2,787 children with type 1 diabetes were included. There was a reduction in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals andlt;3 years compared with longer interbirth intervals (OR 0.82 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). Adjustments for various potential confounders little altered this estimate. In conclusion, there was evidence of a 20% reduction in the risk of childhood diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals andlt;3 years.

  • 71.
    Carlsson, A
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital SUS.
    Kockum, I
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindblad, B
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Engleson, L
    Skåne University Hospital SUS.
    Nilsson, A
    Lund University.
    Forsander, G
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Karlsson, A-K
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Kernell, A
    Sachs Childrens Hospital.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska Institute.
    Zachrisson, I
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ivarsson, S-A
    Lund University.
    Lernmak, A
    Lund University.
    Low risk HLA-DQ and increased body mass index in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children in the Better Diabetes Diagnosis study in Sweden2012Ingår i: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 718-724Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes and obesity has increased in childhood. We therefore tested the hypothesis that type 1 diabetes human leukocyte antigen DQ (HLA-DQ) risk genotypes may be associated with increased body mass index (BMI). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: The type 1 diabetes high-risk HLA-DQ A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*03:01-B1*03:02 genotype along with lower risk DQ genotypes were determined at the time of clinical onset by PCR and hybridization with allele-specific probes. BMI was determined after diabetes was stabilized. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSubjects: A total of 2403 incident type 1 diabetes children below 18 years of age were ascertained in the Swedish national Better Diabetes Diagnosis (BDD) study between May 2005 to September 2009. All children classified with type 1 diabetes, including positivity for at least one islet autoantibody, were investigated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Overall, type 1 diabetes HLA-DQ risk was negatively associated with BMI (Pandlt;0.0008). The proportion of the highest risk A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*03:01-B1*03:02 genotype decreased with increasing BMI (Pandlt;0.0004). However, lower risk type 1 diabetes DQ genotypes were associated with an increased proportion of patients who were overweight or obese (Pandlt;0.0001). Indeed, the proportion of patients with the low-risk A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype increased with increasing BMI (Pandlt;0.003). The magnitude of association on the multiplicative scale between the A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype and increased BMI was significant (Pandlt;0.006). The odds ratio in patients with this genotype of being obese was 1.80 (95% confidence interval 1.21-2.61; Pandlt;0.006). The increased proportion of overweight type 1 diabetes children with the A1*05:01-B1*02:01 haplotype was most pronounced in children diagnosed between 5 and 9 years of age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Susceptibility for childhood type 1 diabetes was unexpectedly found to be associated with the A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype and an increased BMI. These results support the hypothesis that overweight may contribute to the risk of type 1 diabetes in children positive for HLA-DQ A1*05:01-B1*02:01.

  • 72.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Forsander, Gun
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Larsen, Sara
    Novo Nordisk Scandinavia AB, Sweden .
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    A multicenter observational safety study in Swedish children and adolescents using insulin detemir for the treatment of type 1 diabetes2013Ingår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 358-365Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This 26-wk observational study in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Sweden investigated the safety and efficacy of insulin detemir (IDet) in newly diagnosed (ND) patients and those with established diabetes (ED) switching to IDet. A total of 159 patients initiated IDet as part of basal-bolus therapy, 59 in the ND stratum (mean age 9.7yr) and 97 in the ED stratum (mean age 12.5 yr). The primary outcome measure was the incidence of severe adverse drug reactions; just one major hypoglycemic event occurred in a patient in the ND stratum during the study and one patient was withdrawn due to injection-site reactions. All other events were classified as mild. In the ED stratum, there was a reduction in hypoglycemic events in the 4wk prior to study end from baseline (mean reduction of 2.46 events, not significant) and a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia (mean reduction of 2.24 events, p=0.0078). Glycemic control improved in the ND stratum as expected and, in the ED stratum, there was no significant change in HbA1c from baseline (mean reduction of -0.45%). At study end, mean daily IDet doses were 0.39U/kg (ND) and 0.54U/kg (ED). Weight increased by 5.7 and 2.0kg in the ND and ED strata, respectively, and was within the normal limits for growing children. IDet provided good glycemic control and was well tolerated, with a reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia in a heterogeneous cohort of children and adolescents with T1D.

  • 73.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Faresjo, Maria
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jonköping, Sweden.
    Psychological stress in children may alter the immune response2014Ingår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, nr 5, s. 2071-2081Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and b-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, b-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-g, TNF-A, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p less than 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing b cells.Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists.

  • 74.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tillämpad Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tillämpad Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tillämpad Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Detection of global glycosylation changes of serum proteins in type 1 diabetes using a lectin panel and multivariate data analysis2008Ingår i: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 76, nr 2, s. 333-337Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Global glycosylation changes of serum proteins in type 1 diabetic patients have in this paper been investigated based on the interaction of the saccharide moiety of serum proteins with different lectins. Lectins are proteins, which bind carbohydrates specifically and reversibly. Panels with lectins of various carbohydrate specificities were immobilized on gold surfaces. Sera from healthy individuals, newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients and type 1 diabetes patients having had the disease for 4–6 years, respectively, were applied to the lectin panel. The biorecognition was evaluated with null ellipsometry. Data obtained were related to an internal standard of lactoferrin. Multivariate data analysis (MVDA) techniques were used to analyze data.

    Principal component analysis showed that the lectin panel enabled discrimination between sera from the three different above-mentioned groups. Using an artificial neuronal net (ANN), it was possible to correctly categorize unknown serum samples into one of the three groups.

     

  • 75.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tillämpad Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    An indirect competitive immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies based on surface plasmon resonance2008Ingår i: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 24, nr 4, s. 876-881Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a sensitive and specific method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detection of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in serum samples from individuals at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). When measuring trace molecules in undiluted sera with label-free techniques like SPR, non-specific adsorption of matrix proteins to the sensor surface is often a problem, since it causes a signal that masks the analyte response. The developed method is an indirect competitive immunoassay designed to overcome these problems. Today, IAA is mainly measured in radio immunoassays (RIAs), which are time consuming and require radioactively labeled antigen. With our SPR-based immunoassay the overall assay time is reduced by a factor of >100 (4 days to 50 min), while sensitivity is maintained at a level comparable to that offered by RIA.

  • 76.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Tillämpad Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Sensorvetenskap och Molekylfysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Determination of insulin autoantibodies using surface plasmon resonance: A screening study of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients2008Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the screening potential of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based indirectcompetitive immunoassay for quantification of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in sera from childrennewly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) as reference technique.The two methods agreed well with respect to sample classification of 54 sera from newly diagnosedT1D children and 32 reference sera from non-diabetic children. Interestingly, five samples from newlydiagnosed T1D patients classified as IAA-negative according to RIA were IAA-positive with the SPRbasedassay, suggesting that the SPR-based assay might provide a higher sensitivity than the referenceRIA. However, 14 percent of the analyzed samples (five samples from non-diabetics and seven fromnewly diagnosed T1D patients) gave rise to anomalously high and easily distinguishable responses withthe SPR-based method, precluding IAA-quantification. A considerable part of the paper is devoted to adiscussion of possible causes of these anomalous responses. They were not due to temporary changesin the status of the patients, such as infections at the time of sampling, and also not related tocomplement activation. It is speculated whether a plausible explanation should instead be sought in theexistence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to IAA.

  • 77.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Andersson-Gare, Boel
    Jonkoping County Council.
    Child health nurses' roles and attitudes in reducing children's tobacco smoke exposure2010Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, nr 3-4, s. 507-516Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To investigate and analyse the attitudes to tobacco prevention among child healthcare nurses, to study how tobacco preventive work is carried out at child healthcare centres today. To evaluate how the tobacco preventive work had changed in child health care since the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfares national evaluation in 1997. Background. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke has adverse health effects. Interventions aiming at minimising environmental tobacco smoke have been developed and implemented at child healthcare centres in Sweden but the long-term effects of the interventions have not been studied. Design. Survey. Methods. In 2004, a postal questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n = 196) working at 92 child healthcare centres in two counties in south-eastern Sweden. The questionnaire was based on questions used by the National Board of Health and Welfare in their national evaluation in 1997 and individual semi-structured interviews performed for this study. Results. Almost all the nurses considered it very important to ask parents about their smoking habits (median 9.5, range 5.1-10.0). Collaboration with antenatal care had decreased since 1997. Nearly all the nurses mentioned difficulties in reaching fathers (70%), groups such as immigrant families (87%) and socially vulnerable families (94%) with the tobacco preventive programme. No nurses reported having special strategies to reach these groups. Conclusions. Improvement of methods for tobacco prevention at child healthcare centres is called for, especially for vulnerable groups in society. However, the positive attitude among nurses found in this study forms a promising basis for successful interventions. Relevance to clinical practice. This study shows that launching national programmes for tobacco prevention is not sufficient to achieve sustainable work. Nurses working in child healthcare centres have an overall positive attitude to tobacco prevention but need continuous education and training in communication skills especially to reach social vulnerable groups. Regular feedback from systematic follow-ups might increase motivation for this work.

  • 78.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Parents' attitudes to smoking and passive smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in child health care2011Ingår i: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 272-286Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe parents' attitudes to smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in antenatal care and in Child Health Care (CHC) in Sweden. A population based survey in which 62 percent of 3000 randomly selected parents with 1- and 3-year-old children answered a questionnaire. Fifty-six percent stated that smoking was registered in the health record of the child yet no further discussion regarding passive smoking took place. The parents' educational level and smoking status was related to the attitudes and experiences of the tobacco preventive work. The results indicated that the dialogue with parents regarding children and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure has to be redesigned and intensified in order to meet the needs of parents with different backgrounds.

  • 79.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Detection of IgA antibodies to cat, Der p 1 and Bet v 1 inhalant allergens in human milk2001Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 107, nr 2, s. 97-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 80.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Cat allergen induced cytokine secretion and Fel d 1-IgG immune complexes in cord blood2002Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 109, nr 1, s. 529-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 81.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Axelsson, Stina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Specific immunomodulatory effect of GAD(65) in type 1 diabetics2009Ingår i: in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 52, 2009, Vol. 52, s. S194-S194Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 82.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Cat allergen induced cytokine secretion in relation with the detection of Fel d 1-IgG immune complexes in cord blood2002Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 57, s. 135-135Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 83.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik.
    Lindau, C
    Division of Paediatrics Linköping University.
    Zetterström, Olle
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Allergicentrum. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Allergicentrum US.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Downregulation of CXCR6 and CXCR3 in lymphocytes from birch-allergic patients2008Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 68, nr 3, s. 351-361Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Preferential expression of chemokine receptors on Th1 or Th2 T-helper cells has mostly been studied in cell lines generated in vitro or in animal models, however, results are less well characterized in humans. We determined T-cell responses through chemokine receptor expression on lymphocytes, and cytokine secretion in plasma from birch-allergic and healthy subjects. The expression of CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR6, IL-12 and IL-18R receptors was studied on CD4+ and CD8+ cells from birch-allergic (n = 14) and healthy (n = 14) subjects by flow cytometry. The concentration of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokines was measured in plasma from the same individuals using a cytometric bead array human cytokines kit. The similar expression of CCR4 in T cells from atopic and healthy individuals argues against the use of the receptor as an in vivo marker of Th2 immune responses. Reduced percentages of CD4+ cells expressing IL-18R, CXCR6 and CXCR3 were found in the same group of samples. TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-5, IL-4 and IL-12 cytokines were elevated in samples from allergic individuals. Reduced expression of Th1-associated chemokine receptors together with higher levels of Th1, Th2 and anti-inflammatory cytokines in samples from allergic patients indicate that immune responses in peripheral blood in atopic diseases are complex and cannot be simplified to the Th1/Th2 paradigm. Not only the clinical picture of atopic diseases but also the clinical state at different time points of the disease might influence the results of studies including immunological markers associated with Th1- or Th2-type immune responses. © 2008 The Authors.

  • 84.
    Cattaneo, A
    et al.
    Institute Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo.
    Monasta, L
    Institute Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo.
    Stamatakis, E
    UCL.
    Lioret, S
    French Food Safety Agency.
    Castetbon, K
    University of Paris 13.
    Frenken, F
    Stat Netherlands.
    Manios, Y
    Harokopio University.
    Moschonis, G
    Harokopio University.
    Savva, S
    Research and Education Institute for Child Health.
    Zaborskis, A
    University of Medicine, Kaunas.
    Rito, A I
    NIH, Portugal .
    Nanu, M
    Alfred Rusescu Institute Mother and Child Care.
    Vignerova, J
    National Institute for Public Health, Czech Republic .
    Caroli, M
    Azienda Sanit Locale, Italy .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Koch, Felix-Sebastian
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Serra-Majem, L
    University Las Palmas Gran Canaria.
    Szponar, L
    National Food and Nutrion Institute, Poland .
    van Lenthe, F
    Erasmus MC.
    Brug, J
    Vrije University Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Overweight and obesity in infants and pre-school children in the European Union a review of existing data2010Ingår i: OBESITY REVIEWS, ISSN 1467-7881, Vol. 11, nr 5, s. 389-398Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;The objective of this study was to synthesize available information on prevalence and time trends of overweight and obesity in pre-school children in the European Union. Retrieval and analysis or re-analysis of existing data were carried out. Data sources include WHO databases, Medline and Google, contact with authors of published and unpublished documents. Data were analysed using the International Obesity Task Force reference and cut-offs, and the WHO standard. Data were available from 18/27 countries. Comparisons were problematic because of different definitions and methods of data collection and analysis. The reported prevalence of overweight plus obesity at 4 years ranges from 11.8% in Romania (2004) to 32.3% in Spain (1998-2000). Countries in the Mediterranean region and the British islands report higher rates than those in middle, northern and eastern Europe. Rates are generally higher in girls than in boys. With the possible exception of England, there was no obvious trend towards increasing prevalence in the past 20-30 years in the five countries with data. The use of the WHO standard with cut-offs at 1, 2 and 3 standard deviations yields lower rates and removes gender differences. Data on overweight and obesity in pre-school children are scarce; their interpretation is difficult. Standard methods of surveillance, and research and policies on prevention and treatment, are urgently needed.

  • 85.
    Cederborg, A-C
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Living with children who have coeliac disease: a parental perspective2012Ingår i: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, nr 4, s. 484-489Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This study explores how a childs coeliac disease (CD) influences the daily life of families because such knowledge can enhance the understanding of how to support family adjustment to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Methods We used an interpretative phenomenological approach, interviewing 20 parents of 14 children diagnosed with CD about their individual thoughts and beliefs. Results Once parents know, especially when their children are young, they seem to have the capacity to rapidly adapt to GFD, mainly because they notice how quickly their children recover. Parents may have problems controlling how staff at daycare and at school complies with their information about a GFD. Conclusions To ensure that children with CD are given a GFD at daycare and school, it is necessary for municipalities to educate staff about the disease and to give them the prerequisites for serving a GFD. There is also a need of early identification of children who may have CD. When parents express their worries, not just at the hospital but also at the well-baby clinic and primary care units, supporting treatment could prevent children from suffering from inappropriate food.

  • 86.
    Ceriello, Antonio
    et al.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Barkai, Laszlo
    University of Miskolc, Hungary .
    Sandahl Christiansen, Jens
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Czupryniak, Leszek
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland .
    Gomis, Ramon
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Harno, Kari
    LKT Dosentti FHIMSS, Finland .
    Kulzer, Bernhard
    Diabet Clin, Germany .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Nemethyova, Zuzana
    Poliklin Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Owens, David
    University Hospital Llandough, Wales .
    Schnell, Oliver
    Helmholtz Centre, Germany .
    Tankova, Tsvetalina
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland .
    Verges, Bruno
    Hop Bocage, France .
    Weitgasser, Raimund
    Diakonissen Hospital Salzburg, Austria .
    Wens, Johan
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Diabetes as a case study of chronic disease management with a personalized approach: The role of a structured feedback loop2012Ingår i: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 98, nr 1, s. 5-10Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As non-communicable or chronic diseases are a growing threat to human health and economic growth, political stakeholders are aiming to identify options for improved response to the challenges of prevention and management of non-communicable diseases. This paper is intended to contribute ideas on personalized chronic disease management which are based on experience with one major chronic disease, namely diabetes mellitus. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiabetes provides a pertinent case of chronic disease management with a particular focus on patient self-management. Despite advances in diabetes therapy, many people with diabetes still fail to achieve treatment targets thus remaining at risk of complications. Personalizing the management of diabetes according to the patients individual profile can help in improving therapy adherence and treatment outcomes. This paper suggests using a six-step cycle for personalized diabetes (self-)management and collaborative use of structured blood glucose data. E-health solutions can be used to improve process efficiencies and allow remote access. Decision support tools and algorithms can help doctors in making therapeutic decisions based on individual patient profiles. Available evidence about the effectiveness of the cycles constituting elements justifies expectations that the diabetes management cycle as a whole can generate medical and economic benefit.

  • 87.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Axelsson, Stina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    GAD65 autoantibody (GADA) responses in Type 1 diabetes patients participating in a phase III GAD-alum intervention trialManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa isoform (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although aluminum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) induced preservation of residual insulin secretion in a previous clinical phase II trial, recent phase II and III trials failed to reach their primary end-points. The European phase III trial was therefore closed after 15 months, and the entire study period was completed only for a minority of the patients. This study aimed to characterize GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and Tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 autoantibody (IA-2A) levels, GADA IgG1-4 subclass distribution, B-cell frequencies/phenotypes and cytokine secretion. We also assessed whether GAD-alum preserved β-cell function in the small subgroup of Swedish patients who completed the 30 months visit. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected at baseline and after 1, 3, 9, 15 and 21 months from the 148 Swedish subjects included in the trial, and also at 30 months from the 45 patients who reached the final visit. Patients were randomly assigned to; i) 4 doses of GAD-alum (4D), ii) 2 doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo (2D), or iii) 4 doses of placebo.

    GADA titers were induced both in the 4D and 2D group compared to placebo, and 4D patients also displayed a higher GADA fold-change after receiving the  two additional injections compared to the 2D group. The 4D group switched to a higher frequency of GADA IgG4, associated to a Th2 type response at 9 months, whereas an association between GADA fold-change and GAD65-induced in vitro cytokine secretion was observed in the 2D group. These findings suggest that the humoral response, induced by the 2D treatment,  seems to be associated with a GAD65-specific cellular response, while 4D induces a distinct humoral response. Even though GADA titers were elevated, no changes in B-cell frequencies or phenotype were observed in any group. IA-2A levels declined at a similar rate in all groups during the trial.The subgroup of patients who completed the 30 month visit receiving 2 doses of GAD-alum had less decline of both fasting and stimulated C-peptide after 30 months compared to placebo. These results support the concept of GAD-alum treatment, but no specific immune markers have been identified.

  • 88.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hampe, Christiane S.
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Characteristics of in-vitro phenotypes of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies in high-titre individuals2013Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 171, nr 3, s. 247-254Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have indicated phenotypical differences in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA) found in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients, individuals at risk of developing T1D and stiff-person syndrome (SPS) patients. In a Phase II trial using aluminium-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) as an immunomodulator in T1D, several patients responded with high GADA titres after treatment, raising concerns as to whether GAD-alum could induce GADA with SPS-associated phenotypes. This study aimed to analyse GADA levels, immunoglobulin (Ig)G1–4 subclass frequencies, b78- and b96·11-defined epitope distribution and GAD65 enzyme activity in sera from four cohorts with very high GADA titres: T1D patients (n = 7), GAD-alum-treated T1D patients (n = 9), T1D high-risk individuals (n = 6) and SPS patients (n = 12). SPS patients showed significantly higher GADA levels and inhibited the in-vitro GAD65 enzyme activity more strongly compared to the other groups. A higher binding frequency to the b78-defined epitope was found in the SPS group compared to T1D and GAD-alum individuals, whereas no differences were detected for the b96·11-defined epitope. GADA IgG1–4 subclass levels did not differ between the groups, but SPS patients had higher IgG2 and lower IgG4 distribution more frequently. In conclusion, the in-vitro GADA phenotypes from SPS patients differed from the T1D- and high-risk groups, and GAD-alum treatment did not induce SPS-associated phenotypes. However, occasional overlap between the groups exists, and caution is indicated when drawing conclusions to health or disease status.

  • 89.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Skoglund, Camilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Kardiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Hampe, Christiane S
    University of Washington.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    GAD-alum treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes and the subsequent effect on GADA IgG subclass distribution, GAD(65) enzyme activity and humoral response2010Ingår i: Clinical Immunology, ISSN 1521-6616, E-ISSN 1521-7035, Vol. 137, nr 1, s. 31-40Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g GAD-alum to recent onset type 1 diabetic children induced GADA levels in parallel to preservation of insulin secretion. Here we investigated if boosted GADA induced changes in IgG1, 2, 3 and 4 subclass distributions or affected GAD(65) enzyme activity. We further studied the specific effect of GAD-alum through analyses of IA-2A, tetanus toxoid and total IgE antibodies. Serum from children receiving GAD alum or placebo was collected pre-treatment and after 3, 9, 15 and 21 months. At 3 months a reduced percentage of IgG1 and increased IgG3/IgG4 were detected in GAD-alum treated. Further, IA-2A, IgE and tetanus toxoid antibodies, as well as GAD(65) enzyme activity, were unaffected confirming the specific effect of treatment. In the GAD-alum group, higher pretreatment GADA were associated to more pronounced C-peptide preservation. The induced IgG3/IgG4 and reduced IgG1 suggest a Th2 deviation of the immune response.

  • 90.
    Connolly, Eamonn
    et al.
    Dept of Research, BioGaia, Stockholm.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Centrum för Allergiforskning KI, Stockholm.
    Safety of D(-)-lactic acid producing bacteria in the human infant2005Ingår i: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 41, nr 4, s. 489-492Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 91.
    Couper, Jennifer J.
    et al.
    Womens and Childrens Hospital, Australia; University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Haller, Michael J.
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Ziegler, Annette-G
    Technical University of Munich, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Knip, Mikael
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Craig, Maria E.
    Childrens Hospital Westmead, Australia; University of Sydney, Australia; University of New S Wales, Australia .
    Phases of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents2014Ingår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 15, s. 18-25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 92.
    Dahlquist, G
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala, Childrens Hosp, Dept Women & Chil Hlth, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Paediat, Umea, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Ctr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Koster, M
    Univ Uppsala, Childrens Hosp, Dept Women & Chil Hlth, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Paediat, Umea, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Ctr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stromberg, B
    Univ Uppsala, Childrens Hosp, Dept Women & Chil Hlth, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Paediat, Umea, Sweden Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Ctr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Neurological sequelae in in-vitro fertilisation babies - Reply2002Ingår i: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 360, nr 9334, s. 719-719Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 93. Danne, Thomas
    et al.
    Battelino, T
    Jarosz-Chobot, P
    Kordonouri, O
    Pankowska, E
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    al, et
    Establishing glycaemic control with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Experience of the PedPump Study in 17 countries2008Ingår i: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 51, nr 9, s. 1594-1601Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: To assess the use of paediatric continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSII) under real-life conditions by analysing data recorded for up to 90 days and relating them to outcome. Methods: Pump programming data from patients aged 0-18 years treated with CSII in 30 centres from 16 European countries and Israel were recorded during routine clinical visits. HbA 1c was measured centrally. Results: A total of 1,041 patients (age: 11.8±4.2 years, diabetes duration: 6.0±3.6 years, average CSII duration: 2.0±1.3 years, HbA1c: 8.0±1.3% [means±SD]) participated. Glycaemic control was better in preschool (n=142, 7.5±0.9%) and pre-adolescent (6-11 years, n=321, 7.7±1.0%) children than in adolescent patients (12-18 years, n=578, 8.3±1.4%). There was a significant negative correlation between HbA1c and daily bolus number, but not between HbA1c and total daily insulin dose. The use of <6.7 daily boluses was a significant predictor of an HbA1c level >7.5%. The incidence of severe hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis was 6.63 and 6.26 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. Conclusions/ interpretation: This large paediatric survey of CSII shows that glycaemic targets can be frequently achieved, particularly in young children, and the incidence of acute complications is low. Adequate substitution of basal and prandial insulin is associated with a better HbA1c. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  • 94.
    Danne, Thomas
    et al.
    Hannover, Tyskland .
    Battelino, Tadej
    Ljubljana, Slovenien .
    Kordonouri, Olga
    Berlin, Tyskland .
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Barnklin, Uddevalla .
    Klinkert, Christof
    Bad Oeynhausen, Tyskland .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Barrio, Raquel
    Madrid, Spanien.
    Aebi, Christine
    Wildermeth, Schweiz .
    Gschwend, Sylvia
    Biel, Schweiz .
    Mullis, Primus-E
    Zug, Schweiz .
    Schumacher, Urs
    Munsterlingen, Schweiz .
    Zumsteg, Urs
    Basel, Schweiz .
    Morandi, Anita
    Verona, Italy .
    Rabbone, Ivana
    Turin, Italien .
    Cherubini, Valentino
    Marche, Italien .
    Toni, Sonia
    Florence, Italien .
    de Beauforte, Carine
    Luxemburg .
    Hindmarsh, Peter
    London, UK .
    Sumner, Alex
    Peterborough, UK.
    van Waarde, Willie M
    Groningen, Holland .
    van den Berg, Norbert
    Almere, Holland .
    Phillip, Moshe
    Petah Tikva Israel.
    A cross-sectional international survey of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in 377 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 10 countries2005Ingår i: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. 193-198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical data from children and adolescents in different pediatric diabetes centers from Europe and Israel. Methods: Data of patients (1-18 yr) treated with CSII in 23 centers from nine European countries and Israel were recorded with the ENCAPTURE software (PEC International, Frankfurt, Germany). The number of patients who participated was 377 (48% female, mean diabetes duration ± SD: 6.8 ± 3.7 yr, age: 12.9 ± 3.8 yr, preschool n = 33, prepubertal n = 95, adolescent n = 249, CSII duration: 1.6 ± 1.2 yr, local HbA1c: 8.1 ± 1.2%). Results: The total insulin dose was lower than previously reported for injection therapy (0.79 ± 0.20 U/kg/d). Covariance coefficient of daily total insulin was high in all age groups (adolescents 19 ± 9%, prepubertal 18 ± 8 and preschool 17 ± 8). The distribution of basal insulin infusion rates over 24 hr (48 ± 12% of total dose) varied significantly between centers and age groups. The number of boluses per day (7 ± 3) was not significantly different between the age groups (average daily bolus amount: 0.42 ± 0.16 U /kg). The rate of severe hypoglycemia (coma/convulsions) was 12.4 episodes per 100 patient-years and the number of diabetes-related hospital days was 124 per 100 patient-years. Discussion: Pediatric CSII patients show a high variability in their insulin therapy. This relates both to age-dependent differences in the distribution of basal insulin as to the age-independent day-to-day variation in prandial insulin. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2005.

  • 95.
    Dannetun, E.
    et al.
    Department of Communicable Disease Control, Landstinget i Östergötland, SE-581 91 Linköping, Sweden, Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Tegnell, A.
    Communicable Disease Unit, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Giesecke, J.
    Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Parents' reported reasons for avoiding MMR vaccination: A telephone survey2005Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 149-153Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. During the second half of the 1990s and the first years of the 2000s a declining coverage for MMR vaccination in two-year-olds was observed in Sweden. The aim was to assess reasons for postponement or non-vaccination. Design. A telephone survey using a structured questionnaire on parents' attitudes regarding their choice to postpone or abstain from vaccinating their child. Setting. The County of Östergötland in Sweden. Subjects. A total of 203 parents of children who had no registered date for MMR vaccination at a Child Health Centre. Main outcome measures. Parental reasons for non-vaccination. Results. In all, 26 of the 203 children had received MMR vaccination but this had not been registered. Of those not vaccinated, 40% of the parents had decided to abstain and 60% to postpone vaccination. Fear of side effects was the most common reason for non-vaccination in both groups. The main source of information was the media followed by the Child Health Centre. Parents with a single child more often postponed vaccination and those who abstained were more likely to have had a discussion with a doctor or nurse about MMR vaccine. Conclusion. Postponers and abstainers may have different reasons for their decision. The role of well-trained healthcare staff in giving advice and an opportunity to discuss MMR vaccination with concerned parents is very important. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 96.
    Dannetun, Eva
    et al.
    Smittskyddsenheten US.
    Tegnell, Anders
    Dept of Epidemiology Smittskyddsinstitutet, Solna.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, Pediatrik. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Törner, Anna
    Avd för Epidemiologi Smittskyddsinstitutet, Solna.
    Giesecke, Johan
    Avd för Epidemiologi Smittskyddsinstitutet, Solna.
    Timeliness of MMR vaccination - Influence on vaccination coverage2004Ingår i: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 22, nr 31-32, s. 4228-4232Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last seven years, and especially in 2001, a declining coverage for MMR vaccination in 2-year-olds has been noted in Sweden. By recording actual date of vaccination in a cohort of almost 4000 children in a county in central Sweden, we found that parents' decision to postpone vaccination by up to 1.5 years beyond the stipulated age of 18 months accounted for about half the reported drop in 2001. Even if coverage thus improves with time, postponed vaccination adds to the pool of unprotected children in the population. The design of the current national surveillance system overestimates coverage at 2 years and fails to record delayed vaccination. To avoid future outbreaks that can appear around imported cases of measles it is crucial to attain high coverage levels by timely vaccination. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 97.
    Davidsson, Josef
    et al.
    Lund University Hospital.
    Andersson, Anna
    Lund University Hospital.
    Paulsson, Kajsa
    Lund University Hospital.
    Heidenblad, Markus
    Lund University Hospital.
    Isaksson, Margareth
    Lund University Hospital.
    Borg, Ake
    Lund University Hospital.
    Heldrup, Jesper
    Lund University Hospital.
    Behrendtz, Mikael
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Lund University Hospital.
    Fioretos, Thoas
    Lund University Hospital.
    Johansson, Bertil
    Lund University Hospital.
    Tiling resolution array comparative genomic hybridization, expression and methylation analyses of dup(1q) in Burkitt lymphomas and pediatric high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemias reveal clustered near-centromeric breakpoints and overexpression of genes in 1q22-32.32007Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 16, nr 18, s. 2215-2225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although gain of 1q occurs in 25% of Burkitt lymphomas (BLs) and 10% of pediatric high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), little is known about the origin, molecular genetic characteristics and functional outcome of dup(1q) in these disorders. Ten dup(1q)-positive BLs/ALLs were investigated by tiling resolution (32k) array CGH analysis, which revealed that the proximal breakpoints in all cases were near-centromeric, in eight of them clustering within a 1.4 Mb segment in 1q12-21.1. The 1q distal breakpoints were heterogeneous, being more distal in the ALLs than in the BLs. The minimally gained segments in the ALLs and BLs were 57.4 Mb [dup(1)(q22q32.3)] and 35 Mb [dup(1)(q12q25.2)], respectively. Satellite 11 DNA on 1q was not hypomethylated, as ascertained by Southern blot analyses of 15 BLs/ALLs with and without gain of 1q, indicating that aberrant methylation was not involved in the origin of dup(1q), as previously suggested for other neoplasms with 1q rearrangements. Global gene expression analyses revealed that five genes in the minimally 57.4 Mb gained region-B4GALT3, DAP3, RGS16, TMEM183A and UCK2-were significantly overexpressed in dup(1q)-positive ALLs compared with high hyperdiploid ALLs without dup(1q). The DAP3 and UCK2 genes were among the most overexpressed genes in the BL case with gain of 1q investigated. The DAP3 protein has been reported to be highly expressed in invasive glioblastoma multiforme cells, whereas expression of the UCK2 protein has been correlated with sensitivity to anticancer drugs. However, involvement of these genes in dup(1q)-positive ALLs and BLs has previously not been reported.

  • 98.
    Davidsson, Josef
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lilljebjorn, Henrik
    Lund University.
    Andersson, Anna
    Lund University.
    Veerla, Srinivas
    Lund University.
    Heldrup, Jesper
    Lund University.
    Behrendtz, Mikael
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Fioretos, Thoas
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Bertil
    Lund University.
    The DNA methylome of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia2009Ingår i: HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, ISSN 0964-6906, Vol. 18, nr 21, s. 4054-4065Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, with high hyperdiploidy [51-67 chromosomes] and the t(12;21)(p13;q22) [ETV6/RUNX1 fusion] representing the most frequent abnormalities. Although these arise in utero, there is long latency before overt ALL, showing that additional changes are needed. Gene dysregulation through hypermethylation may be such an event; however, this has not previously been investigated in a detailed fashion. We performed genome-wide methylation profiling using bacterial artificial chromosome arrays and promoter-specific analyses of high hyperdiploid and ETV6/RUNX1-positive ALLs. In addition, global gene expression analyses were performed to identify associated expression patterns. Unsupervised cluster and principal component analyses of the chromosome-wide methylome profiles could successfully subgroup the two genetic ALL types. Analysis of all currently known promoter-specific CpG islands demonstrated that several B-cell- and neoplasia-associated genes were hypermethylated and underexpressed, indicating that aberrant methylation plays a significant leukemogenic role. Interestingly, methylation hotspots were associated with chromosome bands predicted to harbor imprinted genes and the tri-/tetrasomic chromosomes in the high hyperdiploid ALLs were less methylated than their disomic counterparts. Decreased methylation of gained chromosomes is a previously unknown phenomenon that may have ramifications not only for the pathogenesis of high hyperdiploid ALL but also for other disorders with acquired or constitutional numerical chromosome anomalies.

  • 99.
    DeKeyser, Nicholas
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Obstetrik och gynekologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken i Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Obstetrik och gynekologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Hälsa och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Obstetrik och gynekologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken i Linköping.
    Premature birth and low birthweight are associated with a lower rate of reproduction in adulthood: a Swedish population-based registry study2012Ingår i: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 1170-1178Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate if individuals born with sub-optimal birth characteristics have reduced probability of reproducing in adulthood. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanUsing population-based registries, the authors included 522 216 males and 494 692 females born between 1973 and 1983 and examined their reproductive status as of 2006. Outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) of reproducing. Adjustments were made for socio-economic factors. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMales and females born very premature displayed a reduced probability of reproducing [HR 0.78, 95 confidence interval (CI): 0.700.86 for males; HR 0.81, CI: 0.750.88 for females]. Likewise for very low birthweight (HR 0.83, CI: 0.710.95 for males; HR 0.80, 95 CI: 0.720.89 for females). Individuals born large for gestational age (LGA) displayed no significant changes. Males born small for gestational age (SGA) had a 9 lower reproductive rate (CI: 0.890.94) and that reduction increased as the individuals aged. Women born SGA tended to start reproducing at an earlier age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe results suggest that being born with low birthweight, premature or SGA (for males) is associated with a reduced probability of reproducing as an adult. LGA shows no statistically significant relationship with future reproduction.

  • 100.
    Delli, A J
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Vaziri-Sani, F
    Lund University.
    Carlsson, A
    Lund University Hospital.
    Forsander, G
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Ivarsson, S A
    Lund University.
    Lindblad, B
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Pediatrik. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lernmark, A
    Lund University.
    Clinical and genetical characterisation of a series of patients with type 1 diabetes induced by interferon therapy in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 53, issue , pp S119-S1202010Ingår i: DIABETOLOGIA, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 53, s. S119-S120Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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